Surnames Starting with S

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z
Filter Results       more options...
ŠIMONCzech, Slovak
Derived from the given name ŠIMON.
SIMONEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Jewish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONEITGerman
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONISDutch
Means "son of SIMON (1)".
SIMONSEnglish, German
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONSONEnglish
Means "son of SIMON (1)".
SIMONSSONSwedish
Swedish form of SIMONSON.
SIMPKINEnglish
From a diminutive of the given name SIMON (1).
SIMPSONEnglish
Means "son of Sim", Sim being a medieval short form of SIMON (1).
SIMSEnglish
Variant of SIMMS.
SINAGRA (1)Italian
Originally denoted a person from Sinagra on Sicily, possibly derived from Latin sinus "inlet" and ager "field".
SINAGRA (2)Italian
Derived from the given name Senagora, an Italian form of XENAGORAS.
SINCLAIREnglish
Derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR".
SINGHHindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion". In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh gave all his Sikh male followers the surname Singh and all females Kaur.
SIPOSHungarian
Occupational name for a fife player or piper, from Hungarian síp "whistle, pipe".
SITKOPolish
Means "a fine sieve" in Polish, a diminutive of the Polish word sito "sieve".
SITZ (1)German
Derived from a given name beginning with the Germanic element sigu meaning "victory".
SITZ (2)German
Means "house owner", derived from Old High German siz "seat, domicile".
SKÁLACzech
Means "rock" in Czech, indicating that the original bearer lived near a prominent rock.
SKAŁAPolish
Polish cognate of SKÁLA.
SKALICKÝCzech, Slovak
Indicated the original bearer came from a place named Skalice, Skalica or Skalička in the Czech Republic or Slovakia, derived from the Slavic root skala meaning "rock".
SKEATESEnglish
From the Old Norse nickname or byname skjótr meaning "swift".
SKINNEREnglish
Occupational name for a person who skinned animals, from Old Norse skinn.
SKJEGGESTADNorwegian
From a place name, derived from Norwegian skjegg "beard" and stad "town, place".
SKOVGAARDDanish
From a place name, derived from Danish skov "wood, forest" and gård "farm, yard".
SLANEIrish
Originally indicated a person from Slane, County Meath, Ireland, which is derived from the given name SLÁINE.
ŚLĄSKIPolish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
SLATEREnglish
Occupational name indicating that an early member worked covering roofs with slate, from Old French esclat "shard", of Germanic origin.
SLÁVIKSlovak
Slovak cognate of SLAVÍK.
SLAVÍKCzech
Means "nightingale" in Czech.
SLAVKOVBulgarian
Means "son of SLAVKO".
ŚLĄZAKPolish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
SLEZÁKCzech
Originally a name for a person from SILESIA, a historical region that is nowadays split between Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic.
SLOANIrish
Patronymic name derived from the early Irish given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SLOANEIrish
Variant of SLOAN.
SLOOTMAEKERSDutch, Flemish
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Dutch slot "lock" and maker "maker".
SLOVÁKCzech, Slovak
Originally described one who was from Slovakia.
ŚLUSARCZYKPolish
Diminutive form of ŚLUSARSKI.
ŚLUSARSKIPolish
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Polish ślusarz, of Germanic origin.
SMALLEnglish
From a nickname for a small person, from Middle English smal.
SMALLSEnglish
Variant of SMALL.
SMEDLEYEnglish
From an unidentified place name probably meaning "smooth clearing" in Old English.
SMEETSDutch
Variant of SMIT.
SMETSDutch
Variant of SMIT.
SMITDutch
From Middle Dutch smit "metalworker, blacksmith", a cognate of SMITH.
SMITHEnglish
Means "metalworker, blacksmith" from Old English smiþ, related to smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world. A famous bearer was the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).
SMITSDutch
Variant of SMIT.
SMOLACzech
Variant of SMOLAK.
SMOLAKPolish, Czech
Occupational name for a distiller of pitch, derived from the Slavic word smola meaning "pitch, resin".
SMYTHEEnglish
Variant of SMITH.
SNAAIJERDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNAIJERDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIDERSDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJDERDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJDERSDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJERDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJERSDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNELDutch
Dutch cognate of SNELL.
SNELLEnglish
From Old English snel meaning "fast, quick, nimble".
ŚNIEGOWSKIPolish
Habitational name for a person from Sniegow, Sniegowo or other places with a name derived from Polish śnieg "snow".
SNIJDERDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNIJDERSDutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNYDEREnglish
Means "tailor" from Middle English snithen "to cut", an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.
SOARESPortuguese
Means "son of SUERO".
SOBELJewish
Variant of SOBOL.
SOBÓLPolish
Polish cognate of SOBOL.
SOBOLRussian, Ukrainian, Jewish
Occupational name for a fur trader, from the Slavic word soboli meaning "sable, marten". As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKALPolish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKÓŁPolish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKOLCzech, Jewish
From Czech sokol meaning "falcon", a nickname or an occupational name for a falconer. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKOLLJewish
Variant of SOKOL.
SOKOLOFJewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOLOFFJewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOLOVSKYRussian
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOŁOWSKIPolish
Usually refers to the city of Sokołów Podlaski in Poland. It may sometimes be derived from Polish sokół meaning "falcon".
SOKOLSKYJewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOLAKTurkish
From the nickname solak meaning "left-handed".
SOLBERGNorwegian, Swedish
From a place name, derived from Old Norse sól "sun" and berg "mountain". As a Swedish name it may be ornamental.
SOLDATIItalian
From Italian soldato meaning "soldier", ultimately from Latin solidus, a type of Roman coin.
SOLEROccitan, Catalan
Denoted a person from any of the numerous places in the area whose names derive from Occitan or Catalan soler meaning "ground, floor".
SOLOBasque
Means "rural estate" in Basque.
SOLOMONEnglish, Jewish
Derived from the given name SOLOMON.
SOLOSBasque
Possibly a variant of SOLO.
SÓLYOMHungarian
Means "hawk, falcon" in Hungarian.
SOMMAItalian
From the names of Italian places like Somma Lombardo or Somma Vesuviana, derived from Latin summa meaning "summit".
SOMMER (1)German, English
Means "summer", from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor meaning "summer". This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone wgo lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
SOMMER (2)German
From Middle High German sumber or sommer meaning "basket, wickerwork, drum".
SOMOGYIHungarian
Originally indicated a person from Somogy, a region within Hungary. It may be derived from Hungarian som meaning "cornel tree".
SONGChinese, Korean
From Chinese (sòng) referring to the Song dynasty, which ruled China from 960 to 1279.
SONNENGerman
Means "sun" from Middle High German sunne. It probably denoted someone of cheerful temperament or a person who lived in a sunny area.
SORDIItalian
From Italian sordo meaning "deaf", from Latin surdus.
SÖRENSENSwedish
Swedish form of SØRENSEN.
SORGGerman
Variant of SORGE.
SORGEGerman
Means "worry, care, anxiety" in German, from Old High German sorga.
SORIANOItalian
From place names such as Soriano Calabro and Soriano nel Cimino. It is typical of southern Italy.
SÖRÖSHungarian
From Hungarian sör meaning "beer". Originally the name was given to beer brewers.
SORRENTINOItalian
Derived from the town of Sorrento near Naples, called Surrentum in Latin, of unknown meaning.
SOSASpanish
Spanish form of SOUSA.
SOTOSpanish
Means "grove of trees, small forest" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin saltus.
SOUČEKCzech
From Czech suk meaning "tree knot". This could either be a topgraphic name or a nickname for a stubborn person.
SOUCYFrench
Originally denoted someone from French towns by this name in Aisne or Yonne, both derived from the Latin name Suciacum.
SOUNKhmer
Means "garden" in Khmer.
SOURDFrench
French cognate of SORDI.
SOUSAPortuguese
Originally indicated someone who lived near the River Sousa in Portugal, possibly derived from Latin salsus "salty" or saxa "rocks".
SOUTHERSGerman
Possibly an Americanized form of SAUTER.
SOUTHGATEEnglish
Name for a person who lived near the southern gate of a town or in a town named Southgate, from Old English suþ and gæt.
SOVÁNYHungarian
Means "thin, lean" in Hungarian.
SOWARDSEnglish, Irish
Possibly a variant of SEWARD (1) or SEWARD (3).
SÓWKAPolish
From a diminutive of Polish sowa meaning "owl".
SPADAItalian
Occupational name for an armorer or swordsman, from Italian spada "sword", Latin spatha.
SPALDINGEnglish
From the name of the town of Spalding in Lincolnshire, derived from the Anglo-Saxon tribe of the Spaldingas.
SPANNAGELGerman
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Middle High German span nagel "connecting bolt".
SPANÒSicilian
From Sicilian spanu meaning "sparse, thin hair", ultimately from Greek σπανιος (spanios) meaning "scarce, rare".
SPARACELLOItalian
From Sicilian sparaciu meaning "asparagus", an occupational name for an asparagus seller or grower.
SPARKSEnglish
From an Old Norse nickname or byname derived from sparkr meaning "sprightly".
SPEAREnglish
From Old English spere "spear", an occupational name for a hunter or a maker of spears, or a nickname for a thin person.
SPEARINGEnglish
Patronymic form of SPEAR.
SPEARSEnglish
Patronymic form of SPEAR.
SPECHTGerman
Means "woodpecker" in German.
SPEIGHTEnglish
English form of SPECHT, probably a loanword from German or Dutch.
SPELLMEYERGerman
Possibly from German spielen meaning "to play, to jest" combined with meyer meaning "village headman". Perhaps it referred to someone who was played or acted as the village headman.
SPENCEREnglish
Occupational name for a person who dispensed provisions to those who worked at a manor, derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry".
SPEZIALEItalian
Means "grocer" in Italian, derived from Latin speciarius "spice seller".
SPIJKER (1)Dutch
Denoted a dweller by or worker at a granary, from Dutch spijker "granary".
SPIJKER (2)Dutch
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Dutch spijker "nail".
SPIKERDutch
Americanized form of SPIJKER (1) or SPIJKER (2).
SPILLUMNorwegian
Originally denoted a person from Spillum, Norway.
SPINIItalian
Denoted a person who lived near thorn bushes, from Italian spina "thorn, spine", from Latin.
SPIROSGreek
From the given name SPIRO.
SPITZGerman
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
SPITZNAGELGerman
Means "sharp nail" in German, an occupational name for a nailsmith.
SPITZNOGLEGerman
Americanized form of SPITZNAGEL.
SPONAUGLEGerman
Americanized form of SPANNAGEL.
SPOONEREnglish
Occupational name for a maker of spoons or a maker of shingles, derived from Middle English spone meaning "chip of wood, spoon".
SPURLINGEnglish
From Middle English sparewe "sparrow" and the diminutive suffix -ling.
STABILEItalian
From the medieval Italian given name Stabile which meant "stable, firm".
STABLUMItalian
Northern Italian name derived from Latin stabulum meaning "stable".
STACEYEnglish
Variant of STACY.
STACKEnglish
From a nickname for a big person, derived from Middle English stack "haystack", of Old Norse origin.
STACKSEnglish
Variant of STACK.
STACYEnglish
Derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE.
STAFFORDEnglish
From the name of the English city of Stafford, Staffordshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ford meaning "ford, river crossing".
STAINTHORPEEnglish
Originally indicated a person from Staindrop, County Durham, England, derived from Old English stæner meaning "stony ground" and hop meaning "valley".
STAMPEnglish
Originally denoted a person from Étampes near Paris. It was called Stampae in Latin, but the ultimate origin is uncertain.
STANEK (1)Polish
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name STANISŁAW.
STANEK (2)Czech
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name STANISLAV.
STANEVBulgarian
Means "son of Stane", Stane being a diminutive of STANISLAV.
STANFORDEnglish
Derived from various English place names meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
STANLEYEnglish
From various place names meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904).
STANTONEnglish
From one of the many places named Stanton or Staunton in England, derived from Old English stan meaning "stone" and tun meaning "enclosure, town".
STÁREKCzech
Czech cognate of STAREK.
STAREKPolish
From a nickname derived from Polish stary "old".
STARKEnglish, German
From a nickname meaning "strong, rigid", from Old English stearc or Old High German stark.
STAROSTAPolish
Means "mayor, leader, elder" in Polish.
STARREnglish
From Middle English sterre meaning "star". This was usually a nickname, but it could also occasionally be a sign name from the name of an inn called the Star.
STARRETTScottish
Originally indicated a person from Stairaird, an estate in Scotland.
STASIUKUkrainian, Polish
From a diminutive of the given name STANISLAV.
STATHAMEnglish
From the name of a village in the English county of Cheshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place".
STAUSSGerman
Means "buttocks" from Middle High German stuz.
STAVROSGreek
From the given name STAVROS.
STAWSKIPolish
Derived from Polish staw meaning "pond".
STEEDEnglish
Occupational name for one who tended horses, derived from Middle English steed, in turn derived from Old English steda meaning "stallion".
STEELEEnglish
Occupational name for a steelworker, from Old English stele meaning "steel".
STEENLow German
Low German variant of STEIN.
STEENSENDanish
Means "son of STEEN".
STEFANIDISGreek
Means "son of STEFANOS" in Greek.
STEFANOVBulgarian
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFANOVIĆSerbian
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFANSENDanish
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFANSSONSwedish
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFFENLow German, English
Derived from the given name STEPHEN.
STEFFENSENDanish
Means "son of STEFFEN".
STEINGerman, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
STEINMANNGerman
Means "stone man" in German, used as a habitational name for a person who lived near a promineent stone or an occupational name for a stone worker.
STEINSSONIcelandic
Means "son of STEINN".
STENBERGSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Scandinavian sten "stone" and berg "mountain". As a Swedish name it is ornamental.
STENDAHLSwedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish sten "stone" and dahl "valley" (modern spelling dal).
STENGERGerman
Occupational name for a post maker, from Old High German stanga "pole".
ŠTĚPÁNEKCzech
Derived from a diminutive of the given name ŠTĚPÁN.
STEPHANIDISGreek
Variant transcription of STEFANIDIS.
STEPHENSEnglish
Derived from the given name STEPHEN.
STEPHENSONEnglish
Means "son of STEPHEN".
STERLINGScottish
Derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning.
STERN (1)English
From Old English styrne meaning "stern, severe". This was used as a nickname for someone who was stern, harsh, or severe in manner or character.
STERN (2)German, Jewish
German cognate of STARR.
STERNBERGJewish
Ornamental name derived from old German stern "star" and berg "mountain".
STEUBENGerman
Name for a dweller by a stump of a large tree, from Middle Low German stubbe "stub".
STEWARTScottish
Occupational name for an administrative official of an estate or steward, from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". The Stewart family (sometimes spelled Stuart) held the Scottish crown for several centuries. One of the most famous members of the Stewart family was Mary, Queen of Scots.
STIDOLPHEnglish
From the Old English given name STITHULF.
STIEBERGerman
Derived from Middle High German stiuben meaning "to run away". It may have been given as a nickname to a cowardly person or a thief.
STIGSSONSwedish
Means "son of STIG".
STILOItalian
Derived from the name of the town of Stilo in southern Italy. It is possibly derived from Greek στυλος (stylos) meaning "column, pillar".
ST JOHNEnglish
From a place named for Saint JOHN.
ST MARTINFrench
From a place named for Saint MARTIN.
STODDARDEnglish
Occupational name for a horse keeper, from Old English stod "stallion, stud" and hierde "herder".
STOJANOVMacedonian
Means "son of STOJAN".
STOLARZPolish
Occupational name from Polish stolarz meaning "joiner, maker of furniture".
STONEEnglish
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
STOPPELBEINGerman
Means "stump leg" from Middle Low German stoppel "stump" and bein "leg".
STORSTRANDNorwegian
Originally denoted someone from Storstrand farm in Norway, derived from stor meaning "big" and strand meaning "beach".
STOYANOVBulgarian
Means "son of STOYAN".
ST PIERREFrench
From a French place named for Saint PETER.
STRANDNorwegian, Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse strǫnd meaning "beach, sea shore". It was originally given to someone who lived on or near the sea.
STRANGEEnglish
Derived from Middle English strange meaning "foreign", ultimately from Latin extraneus.
STRAUBGerman
From Old High German strub meaning "rough, unkempt".
STREETEnglish
Habitational name for a person who lived in a place called Street, for example in Somerset. It is derived from Old English stræt meaning "Roman road", from Latin strata.
STRICKLANDEnglish
From the name of a town in Cumbria, derived from Old English stirc "calf, young bullock" and land "cultivated land".
STRINGEREnglish
Occupational name for a maker of string or bow strings, from Old English streng "string".
STRNADCzech, Slovene
Means "bunting" in Czech and Slovene.
STROBELGerman
Diminutive form of STRAUB.
STROHKIRCHGerman
Means "straw church" in German.
STROMANGerman
Means "straw man" in German, an occupational name for a seller of straw.
STROUDEnglish
From Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood".
STRUDWICKEnglish
From an English place name derived from Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood" and wíc meaning "village, town".
STRUNASlovene, Czech
From Slavic struna meaning "string, cord", possibly denoting a maker of rope.
STUBERGerman
Occupational name for the owner of an inn, derived from Old High German stuba "room".
STÜCKGerman, Jewish
From Old High German stucki meaning "piece, part".
STUMPFGerman
Nickname for a short person or a topographic name someone who lived near a prominent stump, from Middle High German stumpf.
STURMGerman
Means "storm" in German, originally a nickname for an volatile person.
STYLESEnglish
Locational name for one who lived near a steep hill, from Old English stigol "stile, set of steps".
SUÁREZSpanish
Means "son of SUERO".
SUCHÝCzech
Means "dry" in Czech. This was a nickname for a thin person.
SUDWORTHEnglish
From an English place name composed of Old English suþ "south" and worþ "enclosure".
SUEROSpanish
Derived from the given name SUERO.
SUESSGerman
Variant of SÜß. A famous bearer was the American children's author Dr. Seuss (1904-1991), who was born Theodor Seuss Geisel.
SULLIVANIrish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ó Súileabháin which means "descendant of Súileabhán". The name Súileabhán means "little dark eye".
SULTANArabic
From a nickname meaning "sultan, ruler" in Arabic.
SULTANABengali, Urdu, Maltese
Bengali, Urdu and Maltese form of SULTAN.
SULZBACHGerman
Toponymic name from German places named Sulzbach meaning "salty stream", derived from Old High German sulza "salty water" and bah "stream".
SUMMERFIELDEnglish
Originally indicated the bearer was from a town of this name, derived from Old English sumor "summer" and feld "field".
SUMNEREnglish
Occupational name for a summoner, an official who was responsible for ensuring the appearance of witnesses in court, from Middle English sumner, ultimately from Latin submonere "to advise".
SUNChinese
From Chinese (sūn) meaning "grandchild, descendant". A famous bearer of the surname was Sun Tzu, the 6th-century BC author of 'The Art of War'.
SUNDÉNSwedish
From Swedish sund meaning "sound, strait".
SUNGChinese
Variant transcription of SONG.
SÜSSGerman
Variant of SÜß.
SÜßGerman
From Old High German suozi meaning "sweet".
SUTHERLANDScottish
Regional name for a person who came from the former county by this name in Scotland. It is derived from Old Norse suðr "south" and land "land", because it was south of the Norse colony of Orkney.
SUTTONEnglish
From various English place names meaning "south town".
SUZUKIJapanese
From Japanese (suzu) meaning "bell" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood". This is the second most common surname in Japan.
SVÉDHungarian
Means "Swedish" in Hungarian.
SVENSSONSwedish
Means "son of SVEN".
SVOBODACzech
Means "freedom" in Czech. This was a medieval name for a freeman, someone who was not a serf.
SWANGOGerman
Americanized form of SCHWANGAU.
SWEETEnglish
From a nickname meaning "sweet, pleasant", from Old English swete.
SWINDLEHURSTEnglish
From the place name Swinglehurst in the Forest of Bowland in central Lancashire, derived from Old English swin "swine, pig", hyll "hill" and hyrst "wood, grove".
SWITZERGerman
Americanized form of SCHWEITZER.
SÝKORACzech, Slovak
Means "tit (bird)" in Czech and Slovak.
SYMONDSEnglish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SYMONSEnglish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SZABÓHungarian
Means "tailor" in Hungarian.
SZABOLCSIHungarian
From the name of the Szabolcs region in Hungary, derived from the given name SZABOLCS.
SZÁNTÓHungarian
Occupational name for a ploughman or tiller, derived from Hungarian szánt meaning "to plow".
SZARKAHungarian
From Hungarian szarka meaning "magpie", often used as a euphemistic term for a thief.
SZARVASHungarian
Means "deer" in Hungarian.
SZCZEPAŃSKIPolish
Derived from the given name SZCZEPAN.
SZÉKELYHungarian
Denoted a person of Székely ancestry. The Székelys are a population of Hungarians who live in central Romania.
SZEKERESHungarian
Occupational name for a cartman, derived from Hungarian szekér meaning "cart, wagon".
SZÉPHungarian
Means "beautiful, lovely" in Hungarian.
SZEWCPolish
Means "shoemaker" in Polish.
SZILÁGYIHungarian
Denoted one from the region of Szilágy in Hungary, derived from Hungarian szil meaning "elm" and ágy meaning "bed".
SZŐKEHungarian
Means "blond, fair haired" in Hungarian.
SZOMBATHYHungarian
From Hungarian szombat meaning "Saturday".
SZŰCSHungarian
Occupational name meaning "furrier" in Hungarian.
SZWARCPolish
Polish phonetic spelling of German SCHWARZ.
SZWEDPolish
Variant of SZWEDA.
SZWEDAPolish
Derived from Polish Szwed meaning "Swede, person from Sweden".
Previous Page      1  2  3      Next Page         601 results (this is page 2 of 3)