Surnames via Occupations

Given Name   Occupation   Location   Nickname   Ornamental   Other
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LEFÈVRE French
Occupational name meaning "blacksmith" in Old French, derived from Latin faber.
LEHMANN German
From Middle High German lehenman meaning "vassal, liege man".
LEHRER Jewish
Means "teacher" in German (Yiddish לערער (lerer)).
LEMAIRE French
Means "the mayor" in French. It was a title given to a town official, or else a nickname for someone who was pompous and officious.
LÉVESQUE French
Derived from French évêque, a cognate of BISHOP.
LISTER Scottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac an Fleisdeir meaning "son of the arrow maker".
LONČAR Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Means "potter", from Serbo-Croatian lonac, Slovene lonec meaning "pot".
LOVÁSZ Hungarian
Means "groom, stableman, ostler" in Hungarian.
MAC AN ABA Irish, Scottish
Gaelic form of MCNAB.
MAC AN BAIRD Scottish
Scottish form of Mac an Bhaird (see WARD (2)).
MAC AN BHAIRD Irish
Irish Gaelic form of WARD (2).
MAC AN FLEISDEIR Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of LISTER.
MAC CLÉIRICH Irish
Means "son of the clerk" in Irish.
MACCLERY Irish
Anglicized form of MAC CLÉIRICH.
MAC GHABHANN Irish
Means "son of the smith" in Irish.
MAC GILLEAIN Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of MCLAIN.
MAC GILLE FHAOLAIN Scottish
Scottish Gaelic form of MCCLELLAND.
MAC GIOLLA BHRIGHDE Irish
Means "son of the servant of BRIGHID" in Irish.
MAC GIOLLA EOIN Irish
Irish Gaelic form of MCLAIN.
MACGOWAN Irish
Anglicized form of MAC GHABHANN.
MACHADO Portuguese, Spanish
Denoted a person who made or used hatchets, derived from Spanish and Portuguese machado "hatchet", both from Latin marculus "little hammer".
MAÇON French
French cognate of MASON.
MADEIRA Portuguese
Occupational name for a carpenter, from Portuguese madeira "wood".
MAGORIAN Irish
Possibly a variant of MCGOWAN or MCGOVERN.
MAISURADZE Georgian
From Georgian მაისურა (maisura) meaning "shirt", perhaps an occupational name for one who made or sold them.
MAKI (1) Japanese
From Japanese (maki) meaning "shepherd, tend cattle".
MALLEY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó MÁILLE.
MANDEL German, Yiddish
Means "almond" in German, an occupational name for a grower or seller, or a topographic name for a person who lived near an almond tree. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
MARANGOZ Turkish
Occupational name meaning "joiner, carpenter" in Turkish.
MARCHAND English, French
Occupational name meaning "merchant", ultimately from Latin mercari "to trade".
MARCHESI Italian
From the Italian title marchese meaning "marquis". It was probably a nickname for a person who behaved like a marquis or worked in the household of a marquis.
MARMO Italian
Means "marble" in Italian, possibly indicating a person who lived near a quarry or one who worked with marble.
MARQUARDT German
From Old High German marka "border, boundary" and wart "protector". This was an occupational name for a border guard.
MARQUERING Dutch
Possibly a Dutch form of MARQUARDT.
MARSHALL English
Derived from Middle English mareschal "marshal", ultimately from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant". It originally referred to someone who took care of horses.
MARSZAŁEK Polish
Polish cognate of MARSHALL.
MARTEL (2) French, English
Nickname for a smith, derived from Old French martel "hammer", ultimately from Late Latin martellus.
MARTELLI Italian
Italian form of MARTEL (2).
MÁSELNÍK Czech
Referred to one who churned or sold butter or buttermilk, derived from Czech máslo "butter".
MAŚLANKA Polish
Polish cognate of MÁSELNÍK.
MASON English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, ultimately of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
MASTERSON English
Patronymic derived from Middle English maister meaning "master", via Old French from Latin magister.
MATARACI Turkish
Occupational name for a person who made water bottles or flasks, from Turkish matara "flask".
MATHERS English
Occupational name meaning "mower, cutter of hay" in Old English.
MAURER German
Occupational name meaning "wall builder" in German.
MAYER (3) English
Occupational name for a mayor, from Middle English mair, derived via Old French from Latin maior.
MAZZA Italian
From a nickname (perhaps occupational) meaning "maul, mallet" in Italian.
MCBRIDE Irish
Anglicized form of MAC GIOLLA BHRIGHDE.
MCCLEARY Irish
Anglicized form of MAC CLÉIRICH.
MCCLELLAND Irish, Scottish
From Gaelic Mac Giolla Fhaoláin meaning "son of the servant of FAOLÁN".
MCGOWAN Irish
Anglicized form of MAC GHABHANN.
MCINTYRE Scottish
From Scottish Gaelic Mac an tSaoir meaning "son of the carpenter".
MCLAIN Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Eoin meaning "son of the servant of EOIN".
MCNAB Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Aba meaning "son of the abbot".
MENCHER Polish
Possibly an occupational name derived from Polish maczarz meaning "miller".
MERCER English
Occupational name for a trader in textiles, from Old French mercier, derived from Latin merx meaning "merchandise".
MERCIER French
French form of MERCER.
MESSER German
Occupational name for a person who made knives, from Middle High German messer "knife".
MESSERLI German (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive form of MESSER.
MESSNER German
Occupational name for a sexton or churchwarden, from Old High German mesinari.
MÉSZÁROS Hungarian
Means "butcher" in Hungarian.
METAXAS Greek
Derived from Greek μεταξι (metaxi) meaning "silk", most likely referring to a silk merchant or another occupation dealing with silk.
METZ (1) German
Occupational name for maker of knives, from Middle High German metze "knife".
METZGER German
Means "butcher" in German.
MEYER (1) German
From Middle High German meier meaning "bailiff, administrator", derived from Latin maior meaning "greater". Later it also denoted a tenant farmer. The spellings Meier and Meyer are more common in northern Germany while Maier and Mayer are more common in southern Germany.
MILLER English
Occupational surname referring to a person who owned or worked in a grain mill, from Middle English mille "mill".
MILLHOUSE English
Name for someone whose house was in a mill or who worked in a mill.
MILLS English
Originally given to one who lived near a mill or who worked in a mill, from Middle English mille.
MILLWARD English
Means "guardian of the mill" in Old English.
MILNE Scottish
From Scots and Middle English milne (a variant of mille) meaning "mill".
MLYNÁŘ Czech
Means "miller" in Czech.
MOLES Catalan
From Catalan mola meaning "millstone".
MÖLLER Low German, Swedish
Low German and Swedish form of MÜLLER.
MØLLER Danish
Danish form of MÜLLER.
MOLNÁR Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "miller" in Hungarian.
MOLONEY Irish
From Irish Ó Maol Dhomhnaigh meaning "descendant of a church servant".
MONDADORI Italian
From Italian mondatore meaning "weeder". This was an occupational name for someone who kept fields clear of weeds.
MONDAY (3) Irish
Anglicized form of MAC GIOLLA EOIN. The last part of the surname was mistakenly taken as the Gaelic word for "Monday", Luain.
MOŹDZIERZ Polish
Means "mortar" in Polish. It probably referred to someone who worked with or sold mortar.
MULDER Dutch
Dutch equivalent of MILLER.
MÜLLER German
German equivalent of MILLER, derived from Middle High German mülnære or müller.
MURARO Italian
Occupational name for a wall builder, from Italian murare meaning "to wall up".
MURGIA Sardinian
Means "brine" in Sardinian, perhaps a nickname for someone who pickled foods.
MUTTON English
Referred to a shepherd or else someone who in some way resembled a sheep, derived from Norman French mouton "sheep".
MYERS English
Patronymic form of MAYER (3).
NACAR Turkish
Turkish form of NAJJAR.
NAGEL German, Dutch
Means "nail" in German and Dutch, an occupational name for a carpenter or nailsmith.
NAJJAR Arabic
Means "carpenter" in Arabic.
NECCHI Italian
Possibly from Italian neccio, a type of flat bread.
NERVETTI Italian
Possibly a nickname for an innkeeper, from archaic Milanese nervètt, a local meal prepared from a calf.
NICCHI Italian
From the Italian word nicchio meaning "shell", possibly a nickname for people related to the sea.
NORRIS (2) English
Means "wet nurse, foster mother" from Old French norrice, from Latin nutricius.
NOTARO Italian
Occupational name for a clerk, derived from Latin notarius.
NYILAS Hungarian
Means "archer, bowman" in Hungarian.
Ó CLÉIRIGH Irish
Means "descendant of the clerk" in Irish.
O'CLERY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó CLÉIRIGH.
OFFERMANS Dutch
From Dutch offer meaning "offering, donation", referring to a person who collected money in a church.
Ó HEIDIRSCEÓIL Irish
Irish Gaelic form of DRISCOLL.
Ó HÍCIDHE Irish
Irish Gaelic form of HICKEY.
Ó MÁILLE Irish
Means "descendant of a nobleman" from the Irish Gaelic mál.
O'MALLEY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó MÁILLE.
Ó MAOL BHRÉANÁIN Irish
Means "descendant of a follower of Saint BRENDAN" in Irish.
Ó MAOL DHOMHNAIGH Irish
Irish Gaelic form of MOLONEY.
Ó SCOLAIDHE Irish
Means "descendant of the scholar" from Irish scholaidhe.
PAGE English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page". It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PAGET English, French
Diminutive of PAGE.
PAIGE English
Variant of PAGE.
PAJARI Finnish
Means "boyar", the Finnish form of the Russian noble title боярин (boyarin).
PALLADINO Italian
From Italian paladino meaning "knight, defender", from Late Latin palatinus meaning "palace officer".
PALMEIRO Portuguese
Portuguese form of PALMER.
PALMER English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PALOMER Provençal
Means "pigeon keeper" from Latin palumbes "pigeon".
PANDER Dutch
Variant of PENDERS.
PANDERS Dutch
Variant of PENDERS.
PAPADOPOULOS Greek
Means "son of the priest", from Greek παπας (papas) combined with the patronymic suffix πουλος (poulos).
PAQUET (1) French
Occupational name for a firewood gatherer, from Old French pacquet "bundle".
PARK (2) English
From Middle English park, from Latin parricus, of Germanic origin. This was a name for someone who worked in or lived in a park.
PARKER English
Means "keeper of the park" in Middle English. It is an occupational name for a person who was a gamekeeper at a medieval park.
PARSONS English
Originally denoted a son of a parson, a derivative of Latin persona "person".
PASTERNACK Polish, Yiddish
Americanized form of PASTERNAK.
PASTERNAK Polish, Ukrainian, Russian, Yiddish
Means "parsnip" in various Slavic languages, ultimately from Latin pastinaca. A famous bearer was Boris Pasternak (1890-1960), author of 'Doctor Zhivago'.
PASTORE Italian
Means "shepherd" in Italian.
PÁSZTOR Hungarian
Means "shepherd" in Hungarian.
PATEL Indian, Gujarati
Means "landowner" in Gujarati.
PATERNOSTER English, Italian
Occupational name for a maker of rosaries, also called paternosters. They are derived from the Latin phrase pater noster "our Father", the opening words of the Lord's Prayer.
PATIL Indian, Marathi
Means "village chief" in Marathi.
PECK (2) English
Occupational name for a maker of pecks (vessels used as peck measures), derived from Middle English pekke.
PECORA Italian
Means "sheep" in Italian, an occupational name for a shepherd.
PEERENBOOM Dutch
From Dutch meaning "pear tree", referring to someone who lived or worked at a pear orchard.
PÉK Hungarian
Means "baker" in Hungarian.
PELLETIER French
Derived from Old French pelletier "fur trader".
PENDER (1) English
From Middle English pind "to pen up". This was an occupational name for someone who penned animals.
PENDERS Dutch
From Middle Dutch paender meaning "brewer", derived from panne meaning "pan, pot", ultimately from Latin patina.
PENN (2) English
Occupational name for a person who kept penned animals, from Old English penn.
PENNERS Dutch
Variant of PENDERS.
PESCE Italian
Means "fish" in Italian, referring either to a fisherman or to a person who resembled a fish in some way.
PEYNİRCİ Turkish
From Turkish peynir meaning "cheese".
PIPER English
Originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute).
PLANCHE French
French form of PLANK.
PLANCK German
German variant of PLANK.
PLANK German, English
Means "plank", from Old French, itself from Late Latin planca. This could have referred to a person who lived by a plank bridge over a stream, someone who was thin, or a carpenter.
PLANQUE French
French form of PLANK.
PLOURDE French
Possibly derived from French palourde, a type of a shellfish.
PODSEDNÍK Czech
Means "one who sits behind" in Czech, an equivalent to Zahradník mainly used in the region of Moravia.
POLOLÁNÍK Czech
Derived from Czech polo "one half" and lán, a medieval Czech measure of land (approximately 18 hectares). The name denoted someone who owned this much land.
POPOV Russian, Bulgarian
Means "son of the priest", derived from Russian and Bulgarian поп (pop).
POPOVSKI Macedonian
Means "son of the priest" in Macedonian.
PORCHER English, French
Means "swineherd" from Old French and Middle English porchier, from Latin porcus "pig".
PORTER English
Occupational name meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
PORTNER Low German
Low German cognate of PORTER.
POTTER English
Occupational name for a potter, one who makes earthen vessels.
POTTINGER English
Occupational name, either for an apothecary, from Old French potecaire, or a seller of stew, from Old French potagier.
POULIN French
Derived from Old French poule meaning "chicken". It was most likely used to denote a person who raised or sold poultry.
POUND English
Occupational name for a person who kept animals, from Old English pund "animal enclosure".
PRETORIUS Southern African, Afrikaans
From Latin praetor meaning "leader". This name was adopted in the 17th century by Wesselius Praetorius as a Latin translation of his previous surname Schulte. It is now common in South Africa.
PRIDDY Welsh
From Welsh prydudd meaning "bard".
PRIFTI Albanian
From Albanian prift meaning "priest".
PROCHÁZKA Czech
Means "walk, wander, stroll" in Czech. This was an occupational name for a travelling tradesman.
PROHÁSZKA Hungarian
Hungarian form of PROCHÁZKA.
PRYOR English
Originally belonged to one who was a prior (a religious official), or one who worked for a prior.
PULKRÁBEK Czech
Derived from the medieval status name purkrabí meaning "burgrave". It is derived from German Burggraf meaning "castle count".
PURCELL English
From Old French pourcel "piglet", from Latin porcellus, a derivative of porcus "pig". This was a nickname or an occupational name for a swineherd.
PUSKÁS Hungarian
Occupational name for a gunsmith or cannon maker, from Hungarian puska meaning "gun" (from German, itself from Latin buxis "box").
RADEMACHER Low German
Low German cognate of RADEMAKER.
RADEMAKER Dutch
From the occupation of rademaker meaning "maker of wheels", from Dutch rad meaning "wheel".
RAIS Italian
Occupational name for the fisherman in charge of the boat, from Italian rais "captain", of Arabic origin. It is typical of Sicily and Sardinia.
RAPTIS Greek
Means "tailor" in Greek.
RAUTIO Finnish
Means "smith" in Finnish.
REEVE English
Occupational name derived from Middle English reeve, Old English (ge)refa meaning "sheriff, prefect, local official".
REEVES English
Variant of REEVE.
RETTIG German
Derived from Middle High German retich, Middle Low German redik meaning "radish", an occupational name for a grower or seller of radishes.
REVIE English
Variant of REEVE.
ŘEZNÍČEK Czech
Diminutive of ŘEZNÍK.
ŘEZNÍK Czech, Slovak
Means "butcher" in Czech and Slovak.
RICHTER German
Means "judge" in German, from Middle High German rihtære.
RIDER English
Variant of RYDER.
RIMMER English
Occupational name meaning "poet", from Middle English rime meaning "rhyme".
RITTER German
From Middle High German riter meaning "rider, knight", a cognate of RYDER.
ROTHBAUER German
From Old High German riuten "to clear land" and bur "peasant, farmer".
ROYER French
From French roue meaning "wheel", ultimately from Latin rota, an occupational name for a wheelwright.
RUSKIN (1) Scottish
From Gaelic rusgaire meaning "tanner".
RYBA Czech, Polish
Means "fish" in Czech and Slovak, an occupational name for a fisher.
RYBÁR Slovak
Slovak form of RYBÁŘ.
RYBÁŘ Czech
Means "fisher" in Czech, from ryba meaning "fish".
RYDER English
Occupational name for a mounted warrior, from Old English ridere meaning "rider".
RYE English
Topographic name. It could be a misdivision of the Middle English phrases atter ye meaning "at the island" or atter eye meaning "at the river". In some cases it merely indicated a person who lived where rye was grown or worked with rye (from Old English ryge).
SACCO Italian
Occupational name for a maker of sacks, from Italian sacco, Latin saccus.
SADLER English
Occupational name for a make of saddles, from Old English sadol "saddle".
SALA Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Romanian
Occupational name for a worker at a manor house, from the Romance word sala meaning "hall, large room", of Germanic origin.
SALINAS Spanish
Occupational name for a salt worker or someone who lived bear a salt works, from Spanish salina "salt works, salt mine", ultimately from Latin sal "salt".
SALUCCI Italian
From Italian sale meaning "salt".
SANGSTER English, Scottish
Occupational name or nickname for a singer, from Old English singan "to sing, to chant".
SAQQAF Arabic
From Arabic سقف (saqaf) meaning "roof".
SARTI Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTINI Italian
Diminutive form of SARTO.
SARTO Italian
Occupational name meaning "tailor" in Italian, from Latin sartor, from sarcire meaning "to mend".
SARTOR Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTORE Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTRE French
French cognate of SARTO.
SASTRE Spanish
Spanish cognate of SARTO.
SAUTER German
Occupational name for a cobbler, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
SAVATIER French
From Old French savatier "shoemaker", derived from savate "shoe", of uncertain ultimate origin.
SAWYER English
Occupational name meaning "sawer of wood, woodcutter" in Middle English, ultimately from Old English sagu meaning "saw". Mark Twain used it for the main character in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SAYER Welsh
From Welsh saer meaning "carpenter".
SAYLOR English
Occupational name meaning "acrobat, dancer", derived from Old French sailleor, from Latin sallitor.
SCARLETT English
Denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet, a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat).
SCARPA Italian
Means "shoemaker" from Italian scarpa meaning "shoe".
SCAVO Italian
Means "serf, slave", from Old Sicilian scavu.
SCHÄFER German
From Old High German scaphare meaning "shepherd".
SCHEER German
Variant of SCHERER.
SCHENCK German
Variant of SCHENK.
SCHENK German, Dutch
From Middle High German, Middle Dutch schenke meaning "wine server" (from Old High German scenken "to pour out").
SCHERER German
Occupational name for a cutter of cloth or a sheep-shearer, from Old High German skeran "to cut".
SCHERMER Dutch, Low German
Dutch and Low German form of SCHIRMER.
SCHINDLER German
Occupational name for a roof tiler, from Middle High German schindel "shingle". A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
SCHIRMER German
Means "fencer, fencing master", from Old High German skirmen meaning "to defend".
SCHLOSSER German
Occupational name for a locksmith, derived from Old High German sloz meaning "lock".
SCHMID German
Variant of SCHMIDT.
SCHMIDT German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German smit "smith, metalworker", a cognate of SMITH.
SCHMITZ German
Variant of SCHMIDT, originating in the Rhine area in western Germany.
SCHNEIDER German, Jewish
From German schneider or Yiddish shnayder, making it a cognate of SNYDER.
SCHNOOR German
Variant of SCHNUR.
SCHNUR German, Jewish
From Old High German snuor meaning "rope, cord", an occupational name for a maker of rope.
SCHOOL Dutch
From Dutch school, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school", indicating a person who worked at or lived near a school.
SCHREIBER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SCHREIER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a town crier, from Old High German scrian meaning "to shout, to yell".
SCHRIJNEMAKERS Dutch
Occupational name for a cabinet maker, from Dutch schrijn "box, container" and maker "maker".
SCHRÖDER (1) Low German
Occupational name for a tailor, from Middle Low German schroden meaning "to cut".
SCHRÖTER German
Means "beer-porter, wine-porter" in German, an occupational name for a carrier of wine or beer barrels.
SCHUCHARDT German
From Middle High German schuochwürte meaning "shoemaker, cobbler".
SCHUHMACHER German
From the Middle High German occupational name schuochmacher meaning "shoemaker".
SCHULER German
Means "scholar, student" in German, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school".
SCHULT Low German
Low German variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTE Low German
Low German variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTHEIß German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German schultheiße meaning "mayor, judge".
SCHUSTER German
Means "shoemaker, cobbler", from Middle High German schuoch "shoe" and suter, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
SCHÜTTMANN German
Means "watchman, guard" from Middle High German schützen "to protect".
SCHUYLER Dutch
Dutch form of SCHULER.
SCHWINGHAMMER German
Occupational name for a blacksmith, literally meaning "swing hammer" in German.
SCOLA Italian
From Italian scuola meaning "school".
SCRIVEN English
Occupational name meaning "writer, clerk, scribe" in Old French, derived from Latin scriba.