Surnames Categorized "trees"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include trees.
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AHLBERGSwedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish al "alder" and berg "mountain".
AHLGRENSwedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish al "alder" and gren "branch".
AHLSTRÖMSwedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish al "alder" and ström "stream".
AINSLEYScots
From a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALAMILLASpanish
From Spanish alamillo meaning "poplar, aspen".
ALBEROItalian
From Italian albero meaning "tree", ultimately from Latin arbor, referring to someone who lived in the woods or worked as a woodcutter.
ALBUQUERQUEPortuguese
From the name of the Spanish town of Alburquerque, near the Portuguese border in the province of Badajoz. It is probably derived from Latin alba quercus meaning "white oak".
ALMÁSSYHungarian
Derived from Hungarian alma meaning "apple", perhaps originally referring to a person who harvested or sold apples.
ALMSTEDTSwedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish alm "elm" and stad "town".
APELDOORNDutch
From the name of a city in the Netherlands, meaning "apple tree" in Dutch.
APPELHOFDutch
Indicated a person who lived by or at an apple garden, from Dutch appel "apple" and hof "garden, courtyard".
APPELODutch
Indicated a person who was from a farm called Aperloo, probably a derivative of appel meaning "apple".
APPERLODutch
Variant of APPELO.
APPLEBYEnglish
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English æppel "apple" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
APPLETONEnglish
From the name of several English towns, meaning "orchard" in Old English (a compound of æppel "apple" and tun "enclosure, yard").
ARBOREItalian
From Latin arbor meaning "tree".
ARCESpanish
Means "maple tree" in Spanish.
ARDELEANRomanian
From the Romanian region of Ardeal, also called Transylvania. It is possibly derived from Hungarian erdő meaning "forest".
ARECHAVALETASpanish
Originally indicated a person from the town of Aretxabaleta in Spain. It means "oak trees" in Basque.
ARITZASpanish, Basque
From Basque aritz meaning "oak tree". This was a nickname of Iñigo, the first king of Pamplona, Spain (9th century).
ASHEnglish
From Old English æsc meaning "ash tree", indicating a person who lived near ash trees.
ASHLEYEnglish
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many places in England which bear this name. The place name itself is derived from Old English æsc "ash tree" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ASHWORTHEnglish
From an English place name meaning "ash enclosure" in Old English.
ASSELMANDutch
Denoted a person from Assel, Asselt or Hasselt, the name of communities in the Netherlands and Belgium. They derive from Germanic asc "ash tree" and lauha "woods on sandy soil", or hasal "hazel tree".
ASSENBERGDutch
From Dutch es meaning "ash tree" (plural essen) and berg meaning "mountain".
ASSENDORPDutch
From the name of a place called Assendorp, composed of Dutch essen and dorp, meaning "ash tree village".
ATWOODEnglish
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the wood".
AUDLEYEnglish
From a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AVERESCHDutch
From a place name, possibly from a dialectal variation of Dutch over meaning "over" combined with esch meaning "ash tree".
BADEMTurkish
Derived from a Turkish word meaning "almond".
BAGLEYEnglish
From various English place names, all derived from Old English bagga "bag, badger" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
BARDSLEYEnglish
From the name a village near Manchester, from the Old English given name BEORNRÆD and leah "woodland, clearing".
BASURTOSpanish
From the Basque place name Basurtu, a village (now part of Bilbao) in Biscay. It means "middle of the forest".
BAUMGerman, Jewish
Means "tree" in German.
BAUMBACHGerman
From a place name meaning "tree stream" in German.
BAUMERGerman
Variant of BAUM.
BAUMGARTNERGerman
Occupational name for a person who worked or lived at an orchard, from German Baumgarten "orchard" (derived from Baum "tree" and Garten "garden").
BAUMHAUERGerman
Occupational name meaning "woodcutter", derived from German Baum "tree" and hauen "to chop".
BEASLEYEnglish
From the name of a place in Lancashire, from Old English beos "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BEAUCHÊNEFrench
From French place names derived from beau "beautiful" and chêne "oak".
BENTLEYEnglish
From a place name derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BERGLUNDSwedish
Derived from Swedish berg "mountain" and lund "grove".
BĒRZIŅŠLatvian
From Latvian bērzs meaning "birch tree".
BEZUIDENHOUTDutch
From Dutch zuid "south" and hout "forest". It refers to the south of the forest in The Hague.
BJÖRKSwedish
From Swedish björk "birch tree".
BJÖRKMANSwedish
From Swedish björk "birch tree" and man "man".
BLACKWOODEnglish, Scottish
From an English place name meaning "black wood".
BLOMGRENSwedish
From Swedish blomma meaning "flower" and gren meaning "branch".
BOSCH (1)Dutch, Low German
Derived from Middle Dutch bosch meaning "wood, forest".
BOSCH (2)Catalan
Catalan cognate of BOSCO.
BOSCOItalian
Means "forest" in Italian.
BOSQUESpanish
Spanish form of BOSCO.
BOYCEEnglish
From Old French bois meaning "wood", originally given to someone who lived by or in a wood.
BRADDOCKEnglish
From various locations derived from Old English meaning "broad oak".
BRISBOISFrench
Referred to a person who cleared land, from Old French briser "to cut" and bois "forest".
BRZEZICKIPolish
Derived from Polish brzezina meaning "birch grove".
BUCHHOLZGerman
From Middle High German buoche "beech" and holz "wood".
BUCKLEY (1)English
From an English place name derived from bucc "buck, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BÜKIHungarian
Derived from the name of the Bükk Mountains, which means "beech tree" in Hungarian (probably of Slavic origin).
BUKOWSKIPolish
Originally denoted someone who came from a place called Bukowo or Bukowiec, which derive from Polish buk "beech".
BYQUISTSwedish
Derived from Swedish by "village" and qvist "twig, branch".
CHASTAINFrench
From Old French castan "chestnut tree" (Latin castanea), a name for someone who lived near a particular chestnut tree, or possibly a nickname for someone with chestnut-coloured hair.
COLLINGWOODEnglish
From a place name, itself derived from Old French chalenge meaning "disputed" and Middle English wode meaning "woods".
COLQUHOUNScottish
From a place name meaning "narrow corner" or "narrow wood" in Gaelic.
COUTTSScottish
From the name of the town of Cults in Aberdeenshire, derived from a Gaelic word meaning "woods".
DARROWScottish
Habitational name from Darroch near Falkirk, in Stirlingshire, said to be named from Gaelic darach meaning "oak tree".
DEFORESTFrench
Means "from the forest" in French.
DELANEY (1)English
Derived from Norman French de l'aunaie meaning "from the alder grove".
DEL BOSQUESpanish
Means "of the forest" in Spanish.
DE PALMAItalian
Means "from the palm tree" in Italian.
DEVEREUXEnglish
Indicated a person from Evreux in France, itself named after the Gaulish tribe of the Eburovices, which was probably derived from a Celtic word meaning "yew".
DOUBEKCzech
Means "small oak" in Czech, derived from dub "oak".
DUBOISFrench
Means "from the forest", from French bois "forest".
EGLĪTISLatvian
From Latvian egle meaning "spruce tree".
EICHELGerman
Means "acorn" in German, indicating a person who lived near an oak tree.
EIKENBOOMDutch
Means "oak tree", from Dutch eik "oak" and boom "tree".
EKSwedish
Means "oak" in Swedish.
EKLUNDSwedish
Composed of the elements ek "oak" and lund "grove".
ELZINGADutch
Probably from a place name which was a derivative of Dutch els meaning "alder tree".
ERDŐSHungarian
Occupational name meaning "forester", derived from Hungarian erdő "forest".
ESCÁRCEGASpanish
Derived from the Basque place name Eskarzaga, which itself is derived from Basque hazkar "maple".
EVERLYEnglish
From place names meaning derived from Old English eofor "boar" and leah "woodland, clearing"..
FAYFrench, English
Referred to a person who came from various places named Fay or Faye in northern France, derived from Old French fau "beech tree", from Latin fagus.
FEIGENBAUMGerman, Jewish
Means "fig tree" in German.
FORESTEnglish, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
FORESTEREnglish
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see FOREST).
FORESTIERFrench
French cognate of FORESTER.
FORSTGerman
Derived from Old High German forst "forest". Probably unrelated to the Old French word forest, which was derived from Latin, Old High German forst was derived from foraha meaning "fir tree".
FÖRSTNERGerman
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest (see FORST).
GAJOSPolish
Derived from Polish gaj meaning "grove, thicket".
GROVESEnglish
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
GRÜNEWALDGerman
Means "green forest" from German grün "green" and Wald "forest".
GWÓZDEKPolish
Derived from either archaic Polish gwozd meaning "forest" or gwóźdź meaning "nail".
HÁJEKCzech
Means "thicket" in Czech, a diminutive of háj "woods".
HARGRAVEEnglish
Derived from Old English har meaning "grey" and graf "grove".
HARLEYEnglish
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HAYASHIJapanese
From Japanese (hayashi) meaning "forest".
HAYWARDEnglish
Occupational name for a person who protected an enclosed forest, from Old English hæg "enclosure, fence" and weard "guard".
HAYWOODEnglish
From various place names meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HOLLINSEnglish
Referred to someone living by a group of holly trees, from Old English holegn.
HOLMEEnglish, Scottish
Referred either to someone living by a small island (northern Middle English holm, from Old Norse holmr) or near a holly tree (Middle English holm, from Old English holegn).
HOLMESEnglish, Scottish
Variant of HOLME. A famous fictional bearer was Sherlock Holmes, a detective in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
HOLTEnglish, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
HOLTZGerman
German cognate of HOLT.
HÖLZERGerman
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLZERGerman
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLZKNECHTGerman
Occupational name for a forester's helper, from Old High German holz "wood" and knecht "servant, apprentice".
HOLZMANNGerman
Derived from Old High German holz "wood" and man "man", a name for someone who lived close to a wood or worked with wood.
HOMEWOODEnglish
From various place names derived from Old English ham meaning "home" and wudu meaning "wood".
HOUTMANDutch
Dutch cognate of HOLZMANN.
HUERTASpanish
Means "garden, orchard" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin hortus.
HULTSwedish
Swedish form of HOLT.
HUMEScottish, English
Variant of HOLME. A famous bearer was the philosopher David Hume (1711-1776).
HURSTEnglish
Originally a name for a person who lived near a thicket of trees, from Old English hyrst "thicket".
HUXLEYEnglish
From the name of a town in Cheshire. The final element is Old English leah "woodland, clearing", while the first element might be hux "insult, scorn". A famous bearer was the British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963).
JEDLIČKACzech
Derived from Czech jedle meaning "fir tree", perhaps given to a person who lived near a fir tree.
KEITHScottish
From a place name which is probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles.
KELLY (2)Scottish
From a Scottish place name derived from coille "grove".
KIEFER (1)German
Means "pine tree" in German.
KIMURAJapanese
From Japanese (ki) meaning "tree, wood" and (mura) meaning "town, village".
KINGSLEYEnglish
From a place name meaning "king's clearing" in Old English.
KOBAYASHIJapanese
From Japanese (ko) meaning "small" and (hayashi) meaning "forest".
LAGERSwedish
Means "laurel" in Swedish.
LAMChinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of LIN.
LANGLEY (1)English
From any of the various places with this name, all derived from Old English lang "long" and leah "woodland, clearing".
LEE (1)English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a leah, Old English meaning "woodland, clearing".
LEHTONENFinnish
Derived from Finnish lehto meaning "grove".
LENNOXScottish
From the name of a district in Scotland, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly meaning "place of elms".
LESLIEScottish
From a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly".
LI (1)Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "plum, plum tree". This was the surname of Chinese emperors of the Tang dynasty.
LIEPIŅŠLatvian
From Latvian liepa meaning "linden tree".
LIMTaiwanese
Min Nan romanization of LIN.
LINChinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest".
LINDBERGSwedish
From Swedish lind "linden tree" and berg "mountain".
LINDENGerman
Derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LINDGRENSwedish
Means "branch of a linden tree" from Swedish lind "linden tree" and gren "branch". A famous bearer of this name was Swedish author Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002).
LINDHOLMSwedish
From Swedish lind "linden tree" and holme "islet".
LINDQUISTSwedish
Derived from the Swedish words lind "linden tree" and qvist "twig, branch".
LINDSTRÖMSwedish
Means "linden stream", and is derived from the swedish words lind meaning "linden (lime) tree", and ström which means "stream".
LINTONEnglish
Originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "linden tree town" in Old English.
LINWOODEnglish
Originally derived from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
LOCKWOODEnglish
From an English place name meaning "enclosure forest".
LÖFGRENSwedish
From Swedish löv "leaf" and gren "branch".
LUNDDanish, Swedish, Norwegian, English
Indicated a person who lived near a grove of trees, from Old Norse lundr meaning "grove". There are towns in Sweden and Britain called Lund.
LUNDBERGSwedish
Derived from Swedish lund "grove" and berg "mountain".
LUNDGRENSwedish
Derived from Swedish lund "grove" and gren "branch".
LUNDQUISTSwedish
Derived from Swedish lund "grove" and qvist "twig, branch".
LYNDONEnglish
Originally from a place name meaning "linden tree hill" in Old English.
MAKI (2)Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" and (ki) meaning "tree".
MANDELGerman, Jewish
Means "almond" in German.
MANDELBAUMJewish
Means "almond tree" in German.
MARLEYEnglish
Originally denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in Britain called Marley, ultimately meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. One of the main characters in Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol' (1843) bears this last name.
MATASpanish, Portuguese, Catalan
From the Old Spanish mata meaning "plantation of trees".
MATSUMOTOJapanese
From one of the many places with this name in Japan, derived from Japanese (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
MATSUOKAJapanese
From Japanese (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and (oka) meaning "ridge, hill".
MATSUSHITAJapanese
From Japanese (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and (shita) meaning "under, below".
MIDGLEYEnglish
From a village in England called Midgley which meant "midge (insect) wood" in Old English.
MORALESSpanish
Derived from Spanish moral "mulberry tree".
MORIJapanese
From Japanese (mori) meaning "forest".
MURTASItalian
From the Sardinian word murta meaning "myrtle". This surname has a locative origin.
NASHEnglish
Derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer was the mathematician John Nash (1928-).
NESPOLAItalian
From towns like Nespoli and Nespoledo, from the Italian word nespola meaning "medlar (tree)".
NOGUEIRAPortuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician nogueira meaning "walnut tree", from the Late Latin nucarius, ultimately from Latin nux meaning "nut".
NOGUERASpanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan form of NOGUEIRA.
NORDSKOVDanish
Means "north woods".
NORWOODEnglish
Originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
NOYERFrench
French form of NOGUEIRA.
NUSSBAUMGerman, Jewish
Means "nut tree" from the Germanic words nuß meaning "nut" and baum meaning "tree".
NYKVISTSwedish
From Swedish ny "new" and qvist "twig".
NYLUNDFinnish, Swedish
From the Swedish-speaking south of Finland, directly from Swedish ny "new" and lund "grove".
OAKLEYEnglish
From a place name meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. It was borne by American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
Ó CUILINNIrish
Means "descendant of Cuileann", Cuileann being a nickname meaning "holly".
OGDENEnglish
Means "(dweller in the) oak valley" from Old English âc "oak" and denu "valley".
OLEASTROSpanish
Means "(dweller by the) wild olive tree".
OLMOSpanish
Means "elm tree" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin ulmus. The name originally indicated a person who lived near such a tree.
OLMOSSpanish
Variant of OLMO.
OMDAHLNorwegian
Denoted a person hailing from any one of a number of farms in Norway called either Åmdal or Omdal meaning "elm valley".
OZOLIŅŠLatvian
From Latvian ozols meaning "oak tree".
OZOLINSHLatvian
Anglicized form of OZOLIŅŠ.
OZOLSLatvian
Means "oak tree" in Latvian.
PALMEIROPortuguese
Portuguese form of PALMER.
PALMEREnglish
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PEERENBOOMDutch
From Dutch and means "pear tree", referring to someone who kept a pear orchard.
PENZIGGerman, Yiddish
Denoted a person who came from Penzig, the German name for Pieńsk, a town in southwest Poland. Pieńsk is derived from Polish pień meaning "tree stump" or "tree trunk".
PEREIRAPortuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician pereira meaning "pear tree", ultimately from Latin pirum meaning "pear".
PERRY (1)English
Derived from Middle English perrie, Old English pyrige meaning "pear tree". A famous bearer was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
PILKVISTSwedish
From Swedish pil "arrow, willow" and qvist "twig".
PINHEIROPortuguese
Derived from Portuguese meaning "pine-tree".
PINHOPortuguese
Habitational name derived from any of the many places named Pinho, itself derived from pinho meaning "pine" or "pine wood".
PINIItalian
Name for a person who lived near a pine tree, from Latin pinus.
POIRIERFrench
Means "pear tree" in French. The name was originally a nickname for someone who lived close to a pear tree.
RAMOSSpanish
Originally indicated a person who lived in a thickly wooded area, from Latin ramus meaning "branch".
REISGerman, Jewish
From Middle High German ris meaning "twig, branch, bush", denoting a person who lived in an overgrown area. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
RHEEKorean
North Korean form of LEE (2).
RHODESEnglish
Topographic name derived from Old English rod meaning "cleared land", or a locational name from any of the locations named with this word.
RIDLEYEnglish
Denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places of this name in England. The places are derived from Old English geryd "channel" or hreod "reed" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
ROBLEDOSpanish
Means "oak wood" from Spanish roble "oak", ultimately from Latin robur.
ROBLESSpanish
Originally indicated a person who lived near an oak tree or forest, from Spanish roble "oak", from Latin robur.
ROSCOEEnglish
From the name of a town in Lancashire, derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
ROWANIrish
Anglicized form of Ó RUADHÁIN.
ROWNTREEEnglish
Originally given to a person who lived near a rowan tree or mountain ash.
SADOWSKIPolish
Denoted someone who lived in Sadowo, Sadowice or other places beginning with Polish sad "garden, orchard".
SALCEDOSpanish
Derived from Latin salix meaning "willow tree". The name was originally given to one who lived near a willow tree.
SALLER (2)German
Denoted a person who lived by a prominent sallow tree, from Middle High German salhe "sallow tree".
SANDOVALSpanish
Derived from the name of a town in Spain, ultimately from Latin saltus "forest, glade" and novalis "unploughed land".
SASAKIJapanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "help, aid" (repeated, indicated by the iteration mark ) and (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
SAULTFrench
French cognate of SOTO.
SCHOORLDutch
Originally indicated a person from the town of Schoorl in the province of Noord-Holland in the Netherlands. It means "forest by the shore" in Dutch.
SELBYEnglish
From the name of a village which meant "willow farm" in Old English.
SHAWEnglish
Originally given to a person who lived near a prominent thicket, from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket, copse".
SHELBYEnglish
Variant of SELBY.
SILVAPortuguese, Spanish
From Spanish or Portuguese silva meaning "forest".
SILVEIRAPortuguese
Means "forests" in Portuguese.
SKOVGAARDDanish
From a place name, derived from Danish skov "wood, forest" and gård "farm, yard".
SOMOGYIHungarian
Originally indicated a person from Somogy, a region within Hungary. It may be derived from Hungarian som meaning "cornel tree".
SOTOSpanish
Means "grove of trees, small forest" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin saltus.
SOUČEKCzech
From Czech suk meaning "tree knot". This could either be a topgraphic name or a nickname for a stubborn person.
SUZUKIJapanese
From Japanese (suzu) meaning "bell" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood". This is the second most common surname in Japan.
SWINDLEHURSTEnglish
From the place name Swinglehurst in the Forest of Bowland in central Lancashire, derived from Old English swin "swine, pig", hyll "hill" and hyrst "wood, grove".
SZILÁGYIHungarian
Denoted one from the region of Szilágy in Hungary, derived from Hungarian szil meaning "elm" and ágy meaning "bed".
TASHEnglish
From Middle English at asche meaning "at the ash tree".
THWAITEEnglish
Indicated a dweller in a forest clearing or pasture, from Old Norse þveit "clearing, pasture".
TIMBERLAKEEnglish
From an English place name, derived from Old English timber "timber, wood" and lacu "lake, pool, stream".
TREMBLAYFrench
From French tremble meaning "aspen".
TUFFEnglish
Variant of TUFT.
TUFTEnglish
Denoted one who lived near a clump of trees or bushes, from Middle English tufte "tuft, clump", from Old French.
UNDERWOODEnglish
Means "dweller at the edge of the woods", from Old English under and wudu.
URQUHARTScottish
Derived from Brythonic ar "by" and cardden "thicket". This is the name of several places, the most famous being north of Loch Ness.
VAN ANDELDutch
Means "from Andel", a town in the Netherlands, possibly meaning "upper forest" in Old Dutch.
VAN ASDutch
Means "from Asch", a town in the Netherlands, meaning "ash tree".
VAN ASSENDutch
Means "from Assen", a city in the Netherlands, which is possibly from essen meaning "ash trees".
VAN DE VLIERTDutch
Means "from the elderberry" in Dutch.
VAN HASSELDutch
Means "from Hassel", a town in Lower Saxony, Germany. It may be derived from Germanic hasel meaning "hazel tree".
VAN HOUTENDutch
Means "from forests", derived from Dutch hout "forest".
VAN LAARDutch
Derived from Dutch laar (plural laren), which means "open spot in the forest". These areas were used to graze cattle for example.
VAN ROSSUMDutch
Means "from Rossum", a town in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. It is mentioned as Rotheheim in a 9th-century document, and is derived from Dutch rothe "cleared area in a forest" and heim "home".
VAN WILLIGENDutch
Means "from the willows", from Old Dutch wilga "willow".
VERBOOMDutch
Means "from the tree" in Dutch.
VERNONEnglish
Locational name in the Eure region of Normandy, from the Gaulish element vern "alder (tree)" with the genitive case maker onis.
VON ESSENGerman
Means "from Essen", a city in Germany, possibly a derivative of Old High German asc meaning "ash tree".
WALDVOGELJewish
Ornamental name derived from German Wald meaning "forest" and Vogel meaning "bird".
WALTONEnglish
From the name of any of several villages in England, derived from Old English wealh "foreigner, Celt", weald "forest", weall "wall", or well "well, spring, water hole" combined with tun "enclosure".
WESTLEYEnglish
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English west "west" and leah "woodland, clearing".
WILLOUGHBYEnglish
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English wilig meaning "willow" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
WILTONEnglish
From any of the English towns named WILTON.
WOMACKEnglish
Of uncertain origin. One theory suggests that it indicated a dweller by a hollow oak tree, derived from Old English womb "hollow" and ac "oak".
WOODEnglish, Scottish
Originally denoted one who lived in or worked in a forest, derived from Old English wudu "wood".
WOODHAMEnglish
Indicated a person who had a home near a wood, derived from Old English wudu "wood" and ham "home".
WOODROWEnglish
From a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English.
WOODWARDEnglish
Occupational name for a forester, meaning "ward of the wood" in Old English.
WOOTTONEnglish
Derived from Old English wudu "wood" and tun "enclosure, town".
XYLANDERGerman
From Greek ξυλον (xylon) meaning "wood, forest" and ανδρος (andros) meaning "man". This surname was a Greek translation of German surnames of the same meaning.