American Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
There are 1,376 names matching your criteria.

ABBEY     English
Means "dweller by the abbey" or "worker at the abbey" from the Middle English abbeye, abbaye.
ABBOTT     English
English cognate of ABATE
ABEL     English, French, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Spanish, German
Derived from the given name ABEL.
ABNEY     English
Originally the name was D'Aubigne and is found as the name of towns in four locations in France... [more]
ABRAHAM     Jewish, English, Dutch, French
Derived from the given name ABRAHAM.
ABRAHAMS     Jewish, English, Dutch
Derived from the given name ABRAHAM.
ABRAHAMSON     English, Jewish
Means "son of ABRAHAM".
ABRAM     English, Dutch
Derived from the given name ABRAHAM
ABRAMS     Jewish, English, Dutch
Means "son of ABRAHAM".
ABRAMSON     English
Means "son of ABRAHAM".
ACHILLES     English, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Derived from the given name ACHILLES.
ACKER     English, German
Denoted a person who lived near a field, derived from Middle English acker or Old High German ackar meaning "field" (related to the word acre).
ACKERMAN (1)     English
Means "ploughman" from the Middle English word acker "field"... [more]
ACKERMAN (2)     English
Variant of ACKER
ADAIR     English
Derived from the given name EDGAR.
ADAM     English, French, German, Jewish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ADAMS     English, Jewish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ADAMSON     English, Scottish
Means "son of ADAM".
ADCOCK     English
Derived from a diminutive of the given name ADAM.
ADDISON     English
Means "son of ADDY (2)".
ADKINS     English
Variant of the ATKINS.
AIKEN     English, Scottish
Derived from the medieval given name Atkin, a diminutive of ADAM.
AINSWORTH     English
Habitational name for someone who lived in a place named Ainsworth near Manchester, from the Old English given name Ægen and worþ meaning "enclosure".
AITKEN     Scottish, English
Derived from the medieval given name Atkin, a diminutive of ADAM.
AKERMAN (2)     English
Variant of ACKER
AKERS     English
Variant of ACKER
ALBERT     English, French, Catalan, Hungarian, German
Derived from the given name ALBERT.
ALBERTS     English, Dutch
Means "son of ALBERT".
ALBERTSON     English
Means "son of ALBERT".
ALBINSON     English, Swedish
Means "son of ALBIN".
ALDEN     English
Derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALEXANDER     English
Derived from the given name ALEXANDER.
ALFREDSON     English
Means "son of ALFRED".
ALFSON     English
Means "son of ALF (2)".
ALGER     English
From the given name ALGAR.
ALLARD     English, French
Derived from the given name ÆÐELRED.
ALLEN     English, Scottish
Derived from the given name ALAN.
ALLSOPP     English
Derived from the village of Alsop en la Dale in Derbyshire, England... [more]
ALVEY     English
Derived from the Anglo-Saxon given name Ælfwig meaning "elf battle".
ALVIN     English
Variant of ELWYN
ANDERSON     English
Means "son of ANDREW".
ANDREWS     English
Means "son of ANDREW".
ANDREWSON     English
Variant of ANDERSON
ANSEL     English
Derived from the given name ANSELM
ANSON     English
Means "son of AGNES".
ANTHONYSON     English
Means "son of ANTHONY".
APPLEBY     English
Referred to someone who lived by or tended an apple orchard.
APPLETON     English
Means "apple town".
ARCHER     English
Occupational name for one who practiced archery.
ARKWRIGHT     English
Occupational name for a chest maker, from Middle English arc meaning "chest, bin" and wright meaning "maker, craftsman".
ARMISTEAD     English, French
Means "dweller by or at the hermitage" from the Old French ermite and the Old English stede.
ARNOLD     English
Derived from the given name ARNOLD.
ARRINGTON     English
From a town originally called Earningaton, meaning "Earna's settlement"... [more]
ARTERBERRY     English
Anglicization of AUTTENBERG.
ARTERBURY     English
Anglicization of AUTTENBERG.
ARTHUR     English, French
From the given name ARTHUR.
ARTHURSON     English
Means "son of ARTHUR".
ASH     English
Means "dweller by the ash trees" from the Old English æsc.
ASHLEY     English
Denotes a person hailing from one of the many places in England which bear this name... [more]
ASHWORTH     English
From a place name in Lancashire meaning "ash enclosure" in Old English.
ATKINS     English
Derived from the given name Atkin, a medieval diminutive of ADAM.
ATKINSON     English
Means "son of Atkin", Atkin being a medieval diminutive of ADAM.
ATTAWAY     English
Shortening of the words "at the way", denoting someone who lived close to the road.
ATTEBERRY     English
Anglicization of AUTTENBERG.
ATTERBERRY     English
Anglicization of AUTTENBERG.
ATTWATER     English
Means "dweller at the water" from the Middle English at, atte "at" and wæter "water".
AUDLEY     English
From a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AUGUSTINE     English
From the given name AUGUSTINE (1).
AUSTIN     English
Derived from the given name AUSTIN.
AUTEBERRY     English
Anglicization of AUTTENBERG.
AUTENBERRY     English
Anglicized form of AUTTENBERG.
AUTTENBERG     English, German, Polish
Possibly means "dweller at Ealdwine's hill" from the Germanic name Ealdwine meaning "old friend" and berg meaning "hill, mountain".
AVERILL     English
Derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY     English
Derived from a Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AYERS (1)     English
Means "heir" from the Middle English eir.
AYERS (2)     English
Derived from the given name Ealhhere which means "temple army" in Old English.
AYERS (3)     English
Indicated a person from Ayr, Scotland.
AYLMER     English
Derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR
AYTON     English
From the place names Ayton (Berwick) or Ayton (Yorkshire)... [more]
BABCOCK     English
Derived from the medieval name Bab which was possibly a diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW or BARBARA.
BABCOCKE     English
Variant of BABCOCK
BABCOKE     English
Variant of BABCOCK
BACKUS     English
Means "bakery", an occupational name for a baker, from Old English bacan "to bake" and hus "house".
BADCOCK     English
Variant of BABCOCK
BADCOCKE     English
Variant of BABCOCK
BADCOKE     English
Variant of BABCOCK
BAGLEY     English
Name for someone who lived in a field populated by badgers, from Old English bagga "bag-shaped animal, badger" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
BAILEY     English
From Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", which comes via Old French from Latin baiulus "porter".
BAINES (2)     English
From a nickname for a thin person, meaning "bones".
BAKER     English
Occupational name for a baker, derived from Middle English bakere.
BALDWIN     English
Derived from the given name BALDWIN.
BANCROFT     English
Habitational name derived from any of various places called Bancroft, derived from Old English bean meaning "beans" and croft meaning "paddock, smallholding".
BANISTER     English
Meant "basket maker" in Norman French.
BANKS     English
Means "by the bank".
BANNER     English
Occupational name for a flag carrier, derived from Old French baniere meaning "banner", ultimately of Germanic origin.
BANNERMAN     English
Variant of BANNER
BARBER     English, Scottish
Indicated one who cut hair for a living.
BARDSLEY     English
From the name a village lying between Ashton-under-Lyne and Oldham, in the County of Lancashire, England... [more]
BARKER     English
From Middle English bark(en) "to tan", an occupational name for a leather tanner.
BARLOW     English
Derived from a number of English place names which variously mean "barley hill", "barn hill", "boar clearing" or "barley clearing".
BARNES     English
Denoted a person who worked or lived in a barn... [more]
BARNET     English
Variant of BARNETT
BARNETT     English
Derived from place originating from Old English bœrnet "cleared by burning".
BARRET     English
Variant of BARRETT
BARRETT     English
Derived from Middle English meaning "dispute", originally given to a quarrelsome person.
BARTON     English
From a place name meaning "barley town".
BARTRAM     English
From the given name BERTRAM.
BASS     English
English cognate of BASSO
BATES     English
Means "son of Batte"... [more]
BATESON     English, Scottish
Means "son of Batte"... [more]
BATTLE     English
From the name of English places called Battle, so named because they were sites of battles.
BATTS     English
From the medieval name Batte, a diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW.
BAXTER     English
Variant (in origin a feminine form) of BAKER.
BEAKE     English
From a nickname for a person with a big nose, from Middle English beke meaning "beak".
BEASLEY     English
From the name of a place in Lancashire, from Old English beos "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BEATTIE     English, Scottish
From the medieval name Battie, a diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW.
BECK (2)     English
From Middle English bekke meaning "stream, brook".
BECK (3)     English
Variant of BEAKE
BECK (4)     English
From Old English becca "pick-axe", an occupational surname.
BECKET     English
Variant of BECKETT
BECKETT     English
Originally a diminutive of BECK (2) or BECK (3).
BECKHAM     English
From a place name meaning "Becca's homestead".
BELCHER     English
From a Middle English version of Old French bel chiere... [more]
BELL (1)     English
Means "bell" from Middle English belle... [more]
BELL (2)     English
Derived from the given name Bel, a medieval short form of ISABEL.
BELLAMY     French, English
Probably from the Norman French bel ami meaning "beautiful friend".
BENBOW     English
From a nickname given to an archer meaning "bend the bow", later shortened to Benbow.
BENJAMINSON     English
Means "son of BENJAMIN".
BENNET     English
English patronymic surname from the given name Bennet, which comes from BENEDICT... [more]
BENNETT     English
Variant of BENNET
BENSON     English
Means "son of BENEDICT".
BENTLEY     English
From a place name meaning "clearing covered with bent grass" in Old English... [more]
BENTON     English
Denoted someone who came from Benton, England... [more]
BERNARD     French, English, Polish, Czech
From the given name BERNARD.
BERRY     English
Derived from a place name which was derived from Old English burh "fortification".
BEVERLEY     English
Variant of BEVERLY
BEVERLY     English
Derived from a place name meaning "beaver stream" in Old English.
BIRD     English
Occupational name for a person who raised or hunted birds.
BISHOP     English
Means simply "bishop", ultimately from Greek επισκοπος (episkopos) meaning "overseer"... [more]
BLACK     English
Means either "black" (from Old English blœc) or "pale" (from Old English blac)... [more]
BLACKBOURNE     English
Variant of BLACKBURN
BLACKBURN     English
Means "black stream" in Old English.
BLACKMAN     English
From a nickname (see BLACK).
BLACKWOOD     Scottish, English
From an English place name meaning "black wood".
BLAKE     English
Derived from Old English blæc "black" or blāc "pale"... [more]
BLAKESLEE     English
From Blakesley, a town in Northamptonshire... [more]
BLOODWORTH     English
Habitational name from Blidworth in Nottinghamshire, which was named with the Old English given name Blīþa and the Old English worð, which means "enclosure".
BLOXAM     English
Variant of BLOXHAM
BLOXHAM     English
After the Saxon conquest of England, two brothers by the name of Blocc established a town, named Blocc's Hamlet... [more]
BLUE     English
From a nickname for a person with blue eyes or blue clothing.
BLYTHE     English
From Old English meaning "happy" or "joyous".
BOIVIN     English
Nickname for a wine drinker, from Old French boi, a form of the verb boivre "to drink", and vin "wine".
BOLTON     English
From any of the places in England called Bolton, meaning "house settlement".
BOND     English
Occupational name for a peasant farmer, from Middle English bonde.
BONE (1)     English
Means "good" from the Old French bon.
BONE (2)     English
Means "thin, bony" from the Old English ban.
BONHAM     English
Derived from Old French bon homme "good man".
BONHER     English
Variant of BONHEUR
BONNER     English, French
Of Norman French origin with the original Bonners arriving in Britain during the Norman Conquest in the 11th century... [more]
BONNEY     English
Variant of BONNER
BOON (1)     English
Variant of BONE (1) or BONE (2).
BOON (2)     English
Originally indicated a person from Bohon, La Manche.
BOONE     English
Variant of BOON (1) or BOON (2)
BOONER     English
Variant of BONNER
BOOTHMAN     English
Name for a man who was associated with a both, Middle English meaning "hut".
BOTWRIGHT     English
Derived from the English boatwright meaning "maker of boats"... [more]
BOURKE     English
Variant of BURKE
BOWMAN     English
Occupational name for an archer, derived from Middle English bow, Old English boga meaning "bow".
BOYCE     English
From Old French bois meaning "wood", originally given to someone who lived by or in a wood.
BRADDOCK     English
Old English meaning "broad oak"... [more]
BRADFORD     English
Derived from a place name which meant "broad ford" in Old English.
BRADLEY     English
From a common English place name meaning "broad clearing".
BRAMS     Dutch, English
Derived from the given name BRAM.
BRAMSON     English
Means "son of BRAM".
BRAND     German, English
Derived from the Germanic given name BRANDO or its Old Norse cognate BRANDR.
BRANDON     English
From a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English.
BRANT     German, English
Variant of BRAND
BRASHER     English
Means "brass worker", derived from Old English brœs "brass".
BRASSINGTON     English
From a place name, meaning "enclosure by a steep path".
BRAY     English
From a place name derived from Cornish bre "hill".
BRECKENRIDGE     Scottish, Irish, English
Habitational name for someone from Brackenrig in Lanarkshire, named with the northern Middle English braken, meaning "bracken" (from the Old Norse brækni), and rigg, meaning "ridge" (from the Old Norse hryggr), or from a similarly named place located in northern England.
BRENT     English
Originally derived from an English place name derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
BREWER     English
Occupational name for a maker of ale or beer.
BREWSTER     English
Variant of BREWER, originally a feminine form of the occupational term.
BRIGHAM     English
Originally referred to one who came from Brigham (meaning "homestead by the bridge"); the name of places in Cumberland and Yorkshire.
BRISTOL     English
From the name of a city in England meaning "the site of the bridge".
BRISTOW     English
Meaning is believed to be "bright place", from brihs "pleasant, bright" and stow "stead, place"... [more]
BRITTON     English
Originally given to a person who was a Briton (a Celt of England) or a Breton (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROADBENT     English
From an English place name meaning "broad bent grass".
BROCK     English
Derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger", ultimately of Celtic origin.
BROOK     English
Denoted a person who lived near a brook, a word derived from Old English broc.
BROOKE     English
Variant of BROOK
BROOKS     English
Variant of BROOK
BROWN     English
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin.
BROWNLOW     English
Of Anglo-Saxon origin and is of two parts, brown (descriptive) and lowe (topographical)... [more]
BRYAN     English
From the given name BRIAN.
BRYANT     English
From the given name BRIAN.
BRYSON     English
Means "son of BRICE".
BUCKLEY (1)     English, French
Originated from the Norman surname Beauclerc meaning "beautiful or fair clergyman".
BUCKLEY (2)     English
From an English place name derived from bucca "goat" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BULLARD     English
Occupational name for a scribe, derived from Middle English bulle "letter".
BULLE     Dutch, English
Variant of BUL
BULLOCK     English
From a nickname meaning "young bull".
BUNKER     English
Derived from Norman French de Bon Coer meaning "of a good heart".
BURKE     English, Irish
Derived from Middle English burk, meaning "fort or fortified town"... [more]
BURNHAM     English
Derived from Burnham, a town in Norfolk and Essex, England... [more]
BURNS (1)     English, Scottish
Derived from Old English burne "stream"... [more]
BURRELL     English
This was the name of a type of cloth... [more]
BURTON     English
English place name derived from the Old English meaning "fortified town".
BUSH     English
Given to a person who lived in or near bushes.
BUTCHER     English
Occupational name for a butcher, derived from Old French bouchier.
BUTLER     English, Irish
From the Middle English word botte, which means "a vat or large trough used to contain wine"... [more]
BUTTS     English
From a nickname meaning "short, stumpy".
BYRD     English
Variant of BIRD
CANNON     English
From the ecclesiastical usage of canon, referring to a church official.
CANTRELL     English
Habitational name for someone from Cantrell in Devon, from an unknown first element and the Old English hyll, meaning "hill".
CARL     English, Dutch
From the given name CHARLES.
CARLISLE     English
From the name of a city in northern England... [more]
CARLYLE     English
Variant of CARLISLE
CARMAN (1)     English, Dutch
Occupational name for a carter, from Middle English car "cart" and man "man".
CARMAN (2)     English
From the Old Norse given name KARLMANN.
CARPENTER     English
From the occupation, derived from Middle English carpentier (ultimately from Latin carpentarius meaning "carriage maker").
CARTER     English
Occupational name for a person who operated a cart to transport goods, from Norman French cartier.
CARTWRIGHT     English
Occupational name indicating one who made carts.
CARVER (1)     English
Occupational surname for a carver, from Middle English kerve "cut".
CAULFIELD     English
From a place name meaning "cold field".
CAUSER     English
Occupational name for one who made leggings, derived from Old French chausse "leggings".
CAUSEY     English
Indicated a person who lived near a causeway, from Middle English caucey.
CHADWICK     English
Derived from a place name meaning "dairy farm belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHAMBERLAIN     English
Occupational name for one who looked after the master bedroom, from Norman French cambrelain.
CHAMBERS     English
Occupational name for one who looked after the master bedroom, from Norman French cambre "chamber, room".
CHANCE     English
From a nickname for a lucky person or a gambler.
CHANCELLOR     English, Scottish
Occupational name for an administrator, a chancellor, from Norman French chancelier.
CHANDLER     English
Occupational surname meaning "candle seller" or "candle maker" in Middle English, ultimately derived from Old French.
CHAPMAN     English
Occupational name for a merchant, from Old English ceapmann.
CHASE     English
Occupational name for a hunter, from Middle English chase "hunt".
CHESHIRE     English
Originally indicated a person from Cheshire, England.
CHRISTIANS     English
Derived from the given name CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIANSON     English
Means "son of CHRISTIAN".
CHRISTOPHER     English
Derived from the given name CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTOPHERS     English
Derived from the given name CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTOPHERSON     English
Means "son of CHRISTOPHER".
CHURCH     English
From the English word, it probably referred to a person who lived close to a church.
CLARK     English
Means "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec meaning "priest", ultimately from Latin clericus... [more]
CLARKE     English
Variant of CLARK
CLARKSON     English
Patronymic form of CLARK
CLAY     English
Means simply "clay", originally referring to a person who lived near or worked with of clay.
CLAYTON     English
Means "clay settlement", from a place name.
CLEMENS     English
Derived from the given name CLEMENT... [more]
CLIFFORD     English
Derived from a place name which meant "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTON     English
Derived from a place name meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINE     English
Anglicized spelling of KLEIN.
CLINTON     English
Derived from a place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme" in Old English.
CLOSE     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure of some sort, such as (in towns), a courtyard set back from the main street or (in county districts) a farmyard.
COBB     English
From a medieval English byname meaning "lump".
COBURN     Scottish, English
Variant of COCKBURN
COCK     English
Variant of COX
COCKBURN     Scottish, English
Name for someone who came from Cockburn, a place in Berwickshire... [more]
COCKS     English
Variant of COX
COEL     English
Variant of COLE
COKE     English
Variant of COOK
COKES (1)     English
Derived from the Middle English hypocoristic suffix -coke(s) which meant "cockerel" possibly denoting someone who strutted around like a cockerel... [more]
COKES (2)     English
Derived from the Flemish word cok which denoted a cook.
COLBERT     English, French
Derived from the given name COLOBERT.
COLE     English
From the Old English byname COLA.
COLEMAN     Irish, English
From the given name COLMÁN.
COLLINGWOOD     English
Means "coal forest" from the Old English words col and wudu.
COLLINS (2)     English
Means "son of COLIN (2)".
COLTON     English
From a place name meaning "COLA's town".
COMBS     English
Old English from a Celtic root meaning "valley"... [more]
COMSTOCK     English
From the River Culm in Devon, England... [more]
CONNER     English
Occupational name for an examiner or inspector, derived from Middle English connere.
CONSTABLE     English
From the Latin comes stabuli, the "count or officer of the stable"... [more]
COOK     English
Derived from Old English coc meaning "cook"... [more]
COOKE     English
Variant of COOK
COOKSON     English
Patronymic form of COOK
COOMBS     English
Variant of COMBS
COOPER     English
Means "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
COREY     English
Derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning.
CORNELL     English
Derived from the given name CORNELIUS.
CORRA     English
Variant of COIRO
CORY     English
Variant of COREY
COTTERILL     English
Derived from the occupation then known as cotter or cotier, which means "cottager"; that is, a farming small land owner.
COURTENAY (1)     English
From the name of towns in France which were originally derivatives of the Gallo-Roman personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short".
COURTENAY (2)     English
From a nickname for a person with a short nose, from Old French court nes.
COWDEN     English, Scottish
From various place names meaning either "coal valley", "coal hill", or "cow pasture" in Old English.
COX     English
Derived from the medieval nickname cok which meant "rooster"... [more]
CRAWFORD     English
From a place name derived from Old English crawa "crow" and ford "river crossing".
CREWE     English, Welsh
Name for someone from Crewe in Cheshire, which comes from Welsh criu "weir".
CROFT     English, Scottish
From an Old English term that referred to a small pasture near a house.
CROPPER     English
Occupational name referring to a fruit picker or a crop reaper.
CROSS     English
Locative surname meaning "cross"... [more]
CROUCH     English
Variant of CROSS
CUMMINS     English, Scottish, Irish
Means "descendent of Cuimin", a Breton name meaning "little bent one".
CURTIS     English
Nickname for a courteous person from Old French curteis meaning "refined".


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