American Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
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COOKSONEnglish
Patronymic form of COOK.
COOMBSEnglish
From Old English cumb meaning "valley", the name of several places in England.
COOPEREnglish
Means "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
COREYEnglish
Derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning.
CORNELLEnglish
Derived from the given name CORNELIUS.
CORNETTEnglish
Derived from Old French cornet meaning "horn", referring to one who worked as a horn blower.
CORWINEnglish
Derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.
CORYEnglish
Variant of COREY.
COTTERILLEnglish
Derived from Middle English cotter meaning "cottager", referring to a small tenant farmer.
COUPEEnglish
From Middle English coupe meaning "barrel", a name for a barrel maker or cooper.
COURTENAY (1)English
From the name of towns in France which were originally derivatives of the Gallo-Roman personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short".
COURTENAY (2)English
From the Old French nickname court nes meaning "short nose".
COWDENEnglish
From various English place names, which meaning either "coal valley", "coal hill" or "cow pasture" in Old English.
COXEnglish
Patronymic form of COCK.
COYEnglish
Means "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
CRAWFORDEnglish
From a place name derived from Old English crawa "crow" and ford "river crossing".
CREWEEnglish
Originally denoted someone from Crewe in Cheshire, which is from Welsh criu "weir, dam, fish trap".
CRISPEnglish
English cognate of CRESPO.
CROFTEnglish
From Old English croft meaning "enclosed field".
CROPPEREnglish
Occupational name derived from Middle English croppe "crop", referring to a fruit picker or a crop reaper.
CROSSEnglish
Locative name meaning "cross", ultimately from Latin crux. It denoted one who lived near a cross symbol or near a crossroads.
CROUCHEnglish
Variant of CROSS.
CULLEN (1)English
From the name of the German city of Cologne, which was derived from Latin colonia "colony".
CUMMINSEnglish, Scottish, Irish
From an Old Breton given name, a cognate of CUIMÍN, introduced to Britain at the time of the Norman Conquest.
CURTISEnglish
Nickname for a courteous person from Old French curteis meaning "refined".
DALEEnglish
From Old English dæl meaning "valley", originally indicating a person who lived there.
DALTONEnglish
Derived from a place name which meant "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the English chemist and physicist John Dalton (1766-1844).
DANE (2)English
Originally denoted a Dane, that is a person from Denmark.
DANELLEnglish
Derived from the given name DANIEL.
DANIELEnglish, French, German, Portuguese
Derived from the given name DANIEL.
DANIELLEnglish
Derived from the given name DANIEL.
DANIELSONEnglish
Means "son of DANIEL".
DARBYEnglish
From the name of the town Derby meaning "deer farm" in Old Norse.
DARRELLEnglish
Originally denoted one who came from the town of Airel in Normandy, derived from Late Latin arealis meaning "open space".
DARWINEnglish
From the given name DEORWINE.
DAUBNEYEnglish
From any of the various towns in France called Aubigny, derived from the Gallo-Roman personal name ALBINUS.
DAVIDSEnglish
Means "son of DAVID".
DAVIDSONEnglish
Means "son of DAVID".
DAVISEnglish, Scottish
Means "son of DAVID". This was the surname of the revolutionary jazz trumpet player Miles Davis (1926-1991).
DAVISONEnglish
Means "son of DAVID".
DAWSONEnglish
Means "son of DAW".
DAYEnglish
From a diminutive form of DAVID.
DEAN (1)English
Derived from Middle English dene meaning "valley".
DEAN (2)English
Occupational surname meaning "dean", referring to a person who either was a dean or worked for one. It is from Middle English deen (ultimately from Latin decanus meaning "chief of ten").
DEBENHAMEnglish
Originally denoted a person from the town of Debenham in Suffolk, derived from the name of the River Deben (meaning "deep" in Old English) combined with ham meaning "home,homestead".
DEDRICKEnglish
Derived from the given name Dederick, an older form of DEREK.
DEERINGEnglish
From the Old English given name Deora meaning "dear, beloved".
DELANEY (1)English
Derived from Norman French de l'aunaie meaning "from the alder grove".
DENMANEnglish
From Middle English dene "valley" combined with man.
DENNISEnglish
From the given name DENNIS.
DENZILEnglish
From the place name Denzell, a manor in Cornwall, which is of unknown meaning.
DERBYEnglish
Variant of DARBY.
DERRICKEnglish
Derived from the given name Derrick (see DEREK). A famous bearer of this surname is the character Stephan Derrick from the German television series 'Derrick' (1974-1998).
DERRICKSEnglish
Derived from the given name DERRICK.
DERRICKSONEnglish
Means "son of DERRICK".
DEVEREUXEnglish
Indicated a person from Evreux in France, itself named after the Gaulish tribe of the Eburovices, which was probably derived from a Celtic word meaning "yew".
DEVIN (2)English
Nickname for a person who acted divinely, from Old French devin "divine", ultimately from Latin.
DEXTEREnglish
Occupational name meaning "dyer" in Old English (orginally this was a feminine word, but it was later applied to men as well).
DICKEnglish
From the given name DICK (1).
DICKENSEnglish
From the medieval given name Dicun, a medieval diminutive of DICK (1). A famous bearer of this surname was the English writer Charles Dickens (1812-1870).
DICKINSONEnglish
Means "son of Dicun", Dicun being a medieval diminutive of DICK (1). American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) was a famous bearer.
DICKMANEnglish
From Old English dic "ditch" combined with man "man". It was originally a name for a ditch digger or someone who lived near a ditch.
DICKSONEnglish
Means "son of DICK (1)".
DISNEYEnglish
Means "from Isigny", referring to the town of Isigny in Normandy.
DIXONEnglish
Means "DICK (1)'s son".
DOCTOREnglish
Originally denoted someone who was a doctor, ultimately from Latin doctor meaning "teacher".
DODGEEnglish
From Dogge, a medieval diminutive of ROGER.
DONALDSEnglish
Derived from the given name DONALD.
DONALDSONEnglish
Means "son of DONALD".
DORSEYEnglish
Means "from Orsay", referring to the town of Orsay near Paris, its name deriving from the Latin personal name Orcius.
DOWNEREnglish
Name for someone who lived on or near a down, which an English word meaning "hill".
DRAKEEnglish
Derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent".
DRAPEREnglish
Occupational name for a maker or seller of woolen cloth, from Anglo-Norman French draper (Old French drapier, an agent derivative of drap "cloth").
DUDLEYEnglish
From a place name meaning "DUDDA's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUKEEnglish
From the noble title, which was originally from Latin dux "leader". It was an occupational surname for a person who behaved like a duke, or who worked in a duke's household.
DUKESEnglish
Patronymic form of DUKE.
DUNNEnglish, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Old English dunn "dark" or Gaelic donn "brown", referring to hair colour or complexion.
DURANDFrench, English
From Old French durant meaning "enduring", ultimately from Latin durans. This was a nickname for a stubborn person.
DUSTINEnglish
From the Old Norse given name ÞÓRSTEINN.
DWERRYHOUSEEnglish
Indicated a person who worked or lived at a dye-house, which is a place where dyeing was done.
DWIGHTEnglish
From the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of DIONYSIUS.
DYEREnglish
Occupational name for a cloth dyer, from Old English deah "dye".
DYSONEnglish
Means "son of DYE".
EADSEnglish
Means "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM".
EARLEnglish
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
EARLSEnglish
Patronymic form of EARL.
EASOMEnglish
Variant of EADS.
EASONEnglish
Variant of EADS.
EASTONEnglish
From the name of various places meaning "east town" in Old English.
EATONEnglish
From any of the various English towns with this name, derived from Old English ea "river" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
ECCLESTONEnglish
Denoted a person from any of the various places named Eccleston in England, derived from Latin ecclesia "church" (via Briton) and Old English tun "enclosure, yard, town".
EDGAREnglish
Derived from the given name EDGAR.
EDISONEnglish
Means "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM". The surname was borne by American inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
EDWARDSEnglish
Means "son of EDWARD".
EDWARDSONEnglish
Means "son of EDWARD".
ELDEREnglish
Derived from Old English ealdra meaning "older", used to distinguish two people who had the same name.
ELDREDEnglish
From the given name EALDRÆD.
ELDRIDGEEnglish
Derived from the given name ALDRIC.
ELLERYEnglish
From the medieval masculine name HILARY.
ELLIOTTEnglish
Derived from a diminutive of the given name ELIAS.
ELLISEnglish, Welsh
Derived from the given name ELIJAH, or sometimes ELISEDD.
ELLISONEnglish
Patronymic form of the English name Ellis, from the medieval given name Elis, a vernacular form of ELIJAH.
ELLSWORTHEnglish
Habitational name for a person from the town of Elsworth in Cambridgeshire. The town's name is derived from the masculine given name Ella (a short form of Old English names beginning with the elements ælf meaning "elf" or eald meaning "old") combined with worþ meaning "enclosure".
ELMEREnglish
Derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR.
ELVISEnglish
Variant of ELWES.
ELWESEnglish
Derived from the given name ELOISE.
ELWINEnglish
Variant of ELWYN.
ELWYNEnglish
Derived from the given names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE.
ELYEnglish
From the name of a town in eastern England meaning "eel district".
EMERSONEnglish
Means "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
EMMETEnglish
Variant of EMMETT. This name was borne by the Irish nationalist Robert Emmet (1778-1803).
EMMETTEnglish
Derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.
ENDICOTTEnglish
Topographic name derived from Old English meaning "from the end cottage".
ENGLISHEnglish
Denoted a person who was of English heritage. It was used to distinguish people who lived in border areas (for example, near Wales or Scotland). It was also used to distinguish an Anglo-Saxon from a Norman.
ERICKSONEnglish
Means "son of ERIC".
ERICSONEnglish, Swedish
Means "son of ERIC".
EUSTISEnglish
Derived from the given name EUSTACE.
EVANSONEnglish
Means "son of EVAN".
EVELYNEnglish
Derived from the given name AVELINE.
EVEREDEnglish
From the given name EVERARD.
EVERETTEnglish
From the given name EVERARD.
EVERILLEnglish
Derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
EVERLYEnglish
From place names meaning derived from Old English eofor "boar" and leah "woodland, clearing"..
EWART (1)English
From a Norman form of EDWARD.
EWART (2)English
From the name of an English town, derived from Old English ea "river" and worþ "enclosure".
FABIANGerman, English, Polish
Derived from the given name FABIAN.
FAIRBAIRNScottish, English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English and Scots.
FAIRBURNEnglish
From a place name which meant "fern stream", from Old English fearn "fern" and burna "stream".
FAIRCHILDEnglish
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English.
FAIRCLOUGHEnglish
From a place name meaning "fair ravine, fair cliff" in Old English.
FARMEREnglish
Occupational name for a tax collector, from Middle English ferme "rent, revenue, provision", from Medieval Latin firma, ultimately from Old English feorm. This word did not acquire its modern meaning until the 17th century.
FARNHAMEnglish
Indicated a person from any of the various towns named Farnham in England, notably in Surrey. Their names are from Old English fearn "fern" and ham "home, settlement" or ham "water meadow, enclosure".
FAULKNEREnglish, Scottish
Occupational name for a keeper of falcons, from Middle English and Scots faulcon, from Late Latin falco, of Germanic origin.
FAYFrench, English
Referred to a person who came from various places named Fay or Faye in northern France, derived from Old French fau "beech tree", from Latin fagus.
FEAREnglish
Derived from Middle English feare meaning "friend, comrade".
FENNEnglish
From a name for someone who dwelt near a marsh, from Old English fenn meaning "fen, swamp, bog".
FIDDLEREnglish
English form of FIEDLER.
FIELDSEnglish
Name for a person who lived on or near a field or pasture, from Old English feld.
FIRMINEnglish, French
From the given name FIRMIN.
FISHMANEnglish
Occupational name for a fisherman.
FITZROYEnglish
Means "son of the king" in Anglo-Norman French, from French roi meaning "king". This name has been bestowed upon illegitimate children of kings.
FLEMINGEnglish
Given to a person who was a Fleming, that is a person who was from FLANDERS in the Netherlands.
FLETCHEREnglish
Occupational name for a fletcher, someone who attached feathers to the shaft of an arrow. It is derived from Old French fleche meaning "arrow".
FORDEnglish
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it.
FORESTEnglish, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
FORESTEREnglish
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see FOREST).
FORTUNEEnglish
From Middle English, ultimately from Latin fortuna meaning "fortune, luck, chance". This was possibly a nickname for a gambler.
FOSSEnglish
Variant of FOSSE.
FOSSEEnglish, French
Derived from Old French fosse "ditch".
FOSTER (2)English
Occupational name for a scissor maker, derived from Old French forcetier.
FOSTER (3)English
Occupational name for a maker of saddle trees, derived from Old French fustier.
FOSTER (4)English
Nickname given to a person who was a foster-child or foster-parent.
FOWLEREnglish
Occupational name for a fowler or bird-catcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
FOXEnglish
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
FRANCISEnglish
Derived from the given name FRANCIS.
FRANK (1)English
Derived from the given name FRANK (1).
FRANK (2)English
From Old English franc meaning "free".
FRANKLINEnglish
Derived from Middle English frankelin meaning "freeman". It denoted a landowner of free but not noble birth, from Old French franc meaning "free".
FREEMANEnglish
Referred to a person who was born free, or in other words was not a serf.
FROSTEnglish, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning "frost", a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
FRYEnglish
From Old English frig (a variant of freo) meaning "free".
FRYEEnglish
Variant of FRY.
FULLEREnglish
Occupational name for a fuller, a person who softened and cleaned coarse cloth by pounding it. It is derived via Middle English from Latin fullo.
FULTONEnglish
From the name of the English town of Foulden, Norfolk, meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
GABRIELSEnglish
Derived from the given name GABRIEL.
GABRIELSONEnglish
Means "son of GABRIEL".
GAGEFrench, English
Occupational name derived either from Old French jauge "measure" (a name for an assayer) or gage "pledge, payment" (a name for a moneylender). Both words were ultimately of Frankish origin.
GARBUTTEnglish
From the given name GERBOLD.
GARDENEREnglish
Occupational surname for one who was a gardener, from Old French jardin meaning "garden" (of Frankish origin).
GAREYEnglish
Variant of GEARY.
GARFIELDEnglish
Means "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881).
GARLANDEnglish
Means "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. It originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GARNER (1)English
From Old French gernier meaning "granary", a derivative of Latin granum meaning "grain". This name could refer to a person who worked at a garnary or lived near one.
GARNETT (1)English
Occupational name referring to a person who made hinges, from Old French carne "hinge".
GARNETT (2)English
From a diminutive of the given name GUARIN.
GARRARDEnglish
From the given name GERARD.
GARRETTEnglish
Derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD.
GARRODEnglish
Derived from the given name GERALD.
GARRYEnglish
Variant of GEARY.
GARYEnglish
Variant of GEARY.
GEARYEnglish
Derived from a Norman given name which was a short form of Germanic names starting with the element ger "spear".
GEORGEEnglish
Derived from the given name GEORGE.
GEORGESONEnglish
Means "son of GEORGE".
GIBBEnglish
Derived from the given name GIB.
GIBBSEnglish, Scottish
Means "son of GIB".
GIBSONEnglish, Scottish
Means "son of GIB".
GIFFARDEnglish
Derived from the Germanic given name GEBHARD.
GILBERTEnglish
Derived from the given name GILBERT.
GILESEnglish
From the given name GILES.
GILLIAMEnglish
Variant of WILLIAM. A famous bearer of the name is cartoonist and filmmaker Terry Gilliam (1940-).
GLADWINEnglish
Derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLASSEnglish, German
From Old English glæs or Old High German glas meaning "glass". This was an occupational name for a glass blower or glazier.
GLAZIEREnglish
Means "glass worker, glazier", from Old English glæs meaning "glass".
GLOVEREnglish
Occupational name for a person who made or sold gloves, from Middle English glovere.
GODDARDEnglish
Derived from the Germanic given name GODEHARD.
GODFREYEnglish
From the Norman given name GODFREY.
GOFFEEnglish
Derived from Breton or Cornish goff meaning "smith", and referred to a metalworker.
GOODEnglish
From a nickname meaning "good", referring to a kindly person.
GOODEEnglish
Variant of GOOD.
GOODMANEnglish
Variant of GOOD.
GOODWINEnglish
Derived from the given name GODWINE.
GORBOLDEnglish
From the given name GERBOLD.
GOREEnglish
From the Old English word gara meaning "a triangular plot of land".
GRANGEREnglish, French
Means "farm bailiff" from Old French grangier, ultimately from Latin granum meaning "grain". It is borne in the Harry Potter novels by Harry's friend Hermione Granger.
GRANTEnglish, Scottish
Derived from Norman French meaning "grand, tall, large, great".
GRANVILLEEnglish
Derived from a Norman place name GRAINVILLE.
GRAVESEnglish
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
GRAYEnglish
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
GREENEnglish
Descriptive name for someone who often wore the colour green or someone who lived near the village green.
GREENEEnglish
Variant of GREEN.
GREGORYEnglish
From the given name GREGORY.
GREYEnglish
Variant of GRAY.
GRIFFIN (2)English
Nickname from the mythological beast with body of a lion with head and wings of an eagle. It is ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
GROVESEnglish
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
GULLYEnglish
Nickname for a big person, from Middle English golias meaning "giant" (ultimately from GOLIATH, the Philistine warrior who was slain by David in the Old Testament).
HACKETTEnglish
From a diminutive of the medieval byname Hake, which was of Old Norse origin and meant "hook".
HADENEnglish
From a place name derived from Old English hæþ "heath" and dun "hill".
HAGGARDEnglish
From a nickname meaning "wild, untamed, worn", from Old French, ultimately from a Germanic root.
HAIGEnglish, Scottish
From Old English haga or Old Norse hagi meaning "enclosure, pasture".
HAIGHTEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived at the top of a hill, derived from Old English heahþu "height, summit".
HAILEYEnglish
Variant of HALEY.
HALEEnglish
Derived from Old English halh meaning "nook, recess, hollow".
HALEYEnglish
From the name of an English town meaning "hay clearing", from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing".
HALLEnglish, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means simply "hall", given to one who either lived in or worked in a hall (the house of a medieval noble).
HAMBLETONEnglish
From various English place names, derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
HAMILTONEnglish, Scottish
From an English place name, derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". This was the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists).
HAMMEnglish
Means "river meadow" in Old English.
HAMMONDEnglish
From the Norman given name HAMO.
HAMPSONEnglish
Means "son of HAMO".
HAMPTONEnglish
From the name of multiple towns in England, derived from Old English ham "home" or ham "water meadow, enclosure" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
HANCOCKEnglish
From a diminutive of the medieval name HANN.
HANLEYEnglish
From various English place names meaning "high meadow" in Old English.
HANSONEnglish
Means "son of HANN".
HARDENEnglish
From a place name meaning "hare valley" in Old English.
HARDINGEnglish
Derived from the given name HEARD. A famous bearer was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARDWICKEnglish
From Old English heord "herd" and wíc "village, town".
HARDYEnglish, French
From Old French and Middle English hardi meaning "bold, daring", of Germanic origin.
HARFORDEnglish
Habitational name from places called Harford in Gloucestershire and Devon, meaning "hart ford" or "army ford".
HARGRAVEEnglish
Derived from Old English har meaning "grey" and graf "grove".
HARLANDEnglish
From various place names meaning "hare land" in Old English.
HARLEYEnglish
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOWEnglish
Habitational name derived from a number of locations named Harlow, from Old English hær "rock, heap of stones" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARMANEnglish
From the given name HERMAN.
HARMONEnglish
From the given name HERMAN.
HARPEREnglish
Originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps.
HARRELLEnglish
From the given name HAROLD.
HARRELSONEnglish
Means "son of HAROLD". A famous bearer of this surname is the American actor Woody Harrelson (1961-).
HARRISEnglish
Means "son of HARRY".
HARRISONEnglish
Means "son of HARRY".
HARTEnglish
Means "male deer". It was originally acquired by a person who lived in a place frequented by harts, or bore some resemblance to a hart.
HARTELLEnglish
From various place names derived from Old English heort "hart, male deer" and hyll "hill".
HARVEYEnglish
From the Breton given name Haerviu (see HARVEY).
HATHAWAYEnglish
Habitational name for someone who lived near a path across a heath, from Old English hæþ "heath" and weg "way".
HAWKEnglish
Originally a nickname for a person who had a hawk-like appearance or who acted in a fierce manner, derived from Old English heafoc "hawk".
HAWKINGEnglish
From a diminutive of HAWK. A famous bearer was the British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018).
HAWKINSEnglish
From a diminutive of HAWK.
HAYDEN (1)English
From place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYES (1)English
From various English place names which were derived from Old English hæg meaning "enclosure, fence". A famous bearer was American President Rutherford B. Hayes (1822-1893).
HAYLEYEnglish
Variant of HALEY.
HAYNESEnglish
Patronymic derived from the Norman name HAGANO.
HAYTEREnglish
Name for a person who lived on a hill, from Middle English heyt meaning "height".