Madyson's Personal Name List

ADLER
Usage: German, Jewish
Pronounced: AD-lu(German)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "eagle" in German.
FIALA
Usage: Czech
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Means "violet" in Czech, referring to the flower. It may have originally referred to a person who lived near a sign bearing violets, or it may have been given to a person who lived in a place where violets grew.
GARVER
Usage: German
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of GERBER.
GLEESON
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: GLEE-sən
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
ADALET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 13% based on 6 votes
Means "justice" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic عَدَلَ ('adala) meaning "to act justly".
ADANNAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "her father's daughter" in Igbo.
AERONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of AERON.
AGRAFENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аграфена(Russian)
Pronounced: u-gru-FYEH-nə
Russian form of AGRIPPINA.
AKOSUA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Akan
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "born on Sunday" in Akan.
ALIZARIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ə-LIZ-ə-rin
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
From alizarin crimson, the English name of a shade of red. The color is named after a red dye originally obtained from the root of the madder plant, ultimately from Arabic al-usara meaning "the juice". This was used for a male character in the romance novel 'Pandora' by Jilly Cooper.
ALUDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from Arabic العذرا (al-'adhra) meaning "the maiden". This is the name of a star in the constellation Canis Major.
AMARJEET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian (Sikh)
Other Scripts: ਅਮਰਜੀਤ(Gurmukhi)
From Sanskrit अमर (amara) meaning "immortal" and जिति (jiti) meaning "victory, conquering".
AMBROSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αμβροσια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 52% based on 21 votes
Feminine form of Ambrosios (see AMBROSE).
ANAHERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Rating: 46% based on 11 votes
Means "angel" in Maori.
ANDRASTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Possibly means "invincible" in Celtic. This was the name of a Briton goddess of victory who was invoked by Boudicca before her revolt.
ANFISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Анфиса(Russian)
Pronounced: un-FYEE-sə
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Russian form of the Greek name Ανθουσα (Anthousa), which was derived from Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This was the name of a 9th-century Byzantine saint.
ANJALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Nepali
Other Scripts: अञ्जली, अंजली(Hindi) अंजली(Marathi, Nepali) அஞ்சலி(Tamil) అంజలి(Telugu) അഞ്ജലി(Malayalam)
Rating: 51% based on 12 votes
Means "salutation" in Sanskrit.
ANTHOUSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ανθουσα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Ancient Greek form of ANFISA.
AÑULI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "joy" in Igbo.
ARACELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THEH-lee(European Spanish) a-ra-SEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 47% based on 29 votes
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
ARAMINTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 57% based on 17 votes
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy The Confederacy (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
ARANTXA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of ARANTZAZU.
ARDATH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Pronounced: AHR-dəth
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From the name of a field mentioned briefly in the Old Testament Apocrypha, the meaning of which is uncertain. It may relate to Akkadian ardatû "maiden". A literary bearer was American author Ardath Mayhar (1930-2012).
ARGIÑE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ARGI.
AROHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Rating: 33% based on 15 votes
Means "love" in Maori.
ARUZHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Аружан(Kazakh)
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Means "beautiful soul" in Kazakh.
ASTERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Ἀστερία
Pronounced: ah-STEH- ree-ah (Greek, Greek Mythology)
Feminine form of Greek Asterios and Italian Asterio. In Greek Mythology, the daughter of Titans Phoebe and Coeus bore this name. In Christian tradition, Saint Asteria and her sister Saint Grata were martyred at Bergamo, in Sicily. They were also associated with the burial of the martyr Alexander.
ASTRAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αστραια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Αστραια (Astraia), derived from Greek αστηρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.
ATALANTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αταλαντη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 45% based on 12 votes
From the Greek Αταλαντη (Atalante) meaning "equal in weight", derived from αταλαντος (atalantos), a word related to ταλαντον (talanton) meaning "a scale, a balance". In Greek legend she was a fast-footed maiden who refused to marry anyone who could not beat her in a race. She was eventually defeated by Hippomenes, who dropped three golden apples during the race causing her to stop to pick them up.
AVANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Marathi, Gujarati
Other Scripts: अवनी(Marathi) અવની(Gujarati)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "earth" in Sanskrit.
AYLİN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Rating: 41% based on 15 votes
Means "of the moon" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon".
BAHAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Turkish
Other Scripts: بهار(Persian)
Pronounced: ba-HAR(Turkish)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Means "spring" in Persian and Turkish.
BAILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: ביילאַ(Yiddish)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of BEYLE.
BASIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: BA-sha
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Polish diminutive of BARBARA.
BENEDETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: beh-neh-DEHT-ta
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Italian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BETSAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Other Scripts: Betsan
Pronounced: BET-san
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Welsh diminutive of Elizabeth.
BIBIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: bee-BYA-na(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 26% based on 10 votes
Possibly an early variant of VIVIANA. Alternatively, it may be a feminine derivative of the earlier Roman cognomen VIBIANUS.
BLUMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: בלומאַ(Yiddish)
Pronounced: BLOO-mah
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
From Yiddish בלום (blum) meaning "flower".
BRAITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Pronounced: BRAYTH
Rating: 32% based on 18 votes
Meaning uncertain, perhaps from Welsh brith, braith meaning "speckled".
BRIALLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: bree-AHSH-ehn
Rating: 42% based on 32 votes
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
BRISEIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Form of BRISEIS used in medieval tales about the Trojan War.
CAMELLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-MEEL-i-ə, kə-MEHL-i-ə
Rating: 50% based on 24 votes
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CATALEYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Popular Culture, Various (Modern)
Pronounced: kah-tah-LEH-yah (Spanish (Latin American))
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Hispanic variant of Cattleya.

Cataleya was the name of the protagonist of the French-American film Colombiana (2011), portrayed by American actress Zoe Saldana, which inspired the name's use in various countries in recent years.

CELANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-ən-deen, SEHL-ən-dien
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
CERIDWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: keh-RID-wehn
Rating: 58% based on 39 votes
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.
CHANNARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Khmer
Rating: 32% based on 14 votes
Means "moon-faced girl" from Khmer ចន្ទ (chan) meaning "moon" and នារី (neari) meaning "woman, girl".
CHANTREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Khmer
Other Scripts: ចន្ទ្រា(Khmer)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "moonlight" in Khmer.
CHRYSANTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kri-SAN-tə
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Shortened form of the word chrysanthemum, the name of a flowering plant, which means "golden flower" in Greek.
CIRCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κιρκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SUR-see(English)
Rating: 44% based on 25 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κιρκη (Kirke), which possibly meant "bird". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs but was forced by him to change them back.
CITLALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Nahuatl
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Means "star" in Nahuatl.
CLARETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of CLARA.
CYBELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Near Eastern Mythology (Latinized)
Pronounced: SIB-ə-lee(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly from Phrygian roots meaning either "stone" or "hair". This was the name of the Phrygian mother goddess associated with fertility and nature. She was later worshipped by the Greeks and Romans.
DESIDERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: deh-see-DHEH-rya(Spanish)
Feminine form of DESIDERIO. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.
DESTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Amharic
Other Scripts: ደስታ(Amharic)
Rating: 26% based on 13 votes
Means "joy" in Amharic.
DRUSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of DRUSUS.
EBBA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHB-ə
Rating: 25% based on 8 votes
From the Old English name Æbbe, meaning unknown, perhaps a contracted form of a longer name. Saint Ebba was a 7th-century daughter of King Æthelfrith of Bernicia and the founder of monasteries in Scotland. Another saint named Ebba was a 9th-century abbess and martyr who mutilated her own face so that she would not be raped by the invading Danes.
EIRWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed".
ENDZELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ენძელა(Georgian)
Rating: 27% based on 12 votes
Means "snowdrop flower" in Georgian (genus Galanthus).
ENOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-NO-lə
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. This name first appeared in the late 19th century. It is the name of the main character in the novel Enola; or, her Fatal Mistake (1886) by Mary Young Ridenbaugh. The aircraft that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima was named Enola Gay after the mother of the pilot, who was herself named for the book character.
EPONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology
Rating: 31% based on 10 votes
Derived from Gaulish epos meaning "horse". This was the name of the Celtic goddess of horses.
ESELD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 54% based on 8 votes
Cornish form of ISOLDE.
EVADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ευαδνη(Ancient Greek)
Personal note: "Eve"
Rating: 47% based on 24 votes
From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), from ευ (eu) meaning "good" possibly combined with Cretan Greek αδνος (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
EVANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Theatre
Pronounced: ee-VAN-thee, ə-VAN-thee, i-VAN-thee
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of Euanthe. Characters named Evanthe appear in John Fletcher's 17th-century tragicomedy A Wife for a Month and Thomas Godfrey's 18th-century romantic tragedy The Prince of Parthia (which was the first play written by an American to be presented in the United States by a professional cast of actors).
EVELIEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: ay-və-LEEN
Rating: 59% based on 8 votes
Dutch form of EVELINA.
EVERILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of EOFORHILD. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
FERAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 30% based on 9 votes
Means "radiance of the moon" in Turkish.
FIDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of FIDEL.
HAIZEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ie-SEH-a
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "wind" in Basque.
HANNELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: HAHN-neh-leh
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Finnish diminutive of JOHANNA or HANNAH.
HERSILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
Meaning unknown. In Roman legend this was the name of a Sabine woman who became the wife of Romulus.
HOTARU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: (Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: HO-TA-ROO
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (hotaru) meaning "firefly".
HULDA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: HUWL-da(German)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "gracious, sweet, lovable".
HÜLYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 26% based on 8 votes
Means "daydream" in Turkish.
HYDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὑδρα
Pronounced: HIE-drə
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "water-serpent" in Greek (from hydor "water"). In Greek myth this was the name of a many-headed Lernaean water serpent slain by Hercules. It is also a northern constellation that is said to resemble a serpent, as well as a moon of Pluto.
HYPATIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: ‘Υπατια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Derived from Greek ‘υπατος (hypatos) meaning "highest, supreme". Hypatia of Alexandria was a 5th-century philosopher and mathematician, daughter of the mathematician Theon.
INANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sumerian Mythology
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒈹(Sumerian Cuneiform)
Pronounced: i-NAH-nə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Sumerian nin-an-a(k) meaning "lady of the heavens", from 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and the genitive form of 𒀭 (an) meaning "heaven, sky". Inanna was the Sumerian goddess of love, fertility and war. She descended into the underworld where the ruler of that place, her sister Ereshkigal, had her killed. The god Enki interceded, and Inanna was allowed to leave the underworld as long as her husband Dumuzi took her place.

Inanna was later conflated with the Semitic (Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian) deity Ishtar.

IOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Probably a variant of IOLE.
IRATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-ṘA-tee
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Means "fern field" in Basque.
ISABELLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
A shade of white and also a combination of Isabell and with the added suffix line
ISCAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִסְכָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name יִסְכָּה (Yiskah) meaning "to behold". In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's niece, mentioned only briefly. This is the basis of the English name Jessica.
ISMENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ισμηνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EEZ-MEH-NEH(Classical Greek) is-MEE-nee(English)
Rating: 50% based on 31 votes
Possibly from Greek ισμη (isme) meaning "knowledge". This was the name of the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta in Greek legend.
ISRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: إسراء(Arabic)
Pronounced: ees-RA
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) meaning "to travel at night".
JULY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: juw-LIE
Rating: 33% based on 19 votes
From the name of the month, which was originally named for Julius Caesar.
KATRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Estonian
Pronounced: ka-TREEN(German) kah-TREEN(Swedish)
Rating: 42% based on 16 votes
German, Swedish and Estonian short form of KATHERINE.
KESHET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: קֶשֶׁת(Hebrew)
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
Means "rainbow" in Hebrew.
KIRKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Κιρκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KEER-KEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Greek form of CIRCE.
KIRSIKKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KEER-seek-kah
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "cherry" in Finnish.
KISTIÑE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 31% based on 10 votes
Basque form of CHRISTINA.
KYVELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Κυβελη(Greek)
Pronounced: kee-VEHL-ee
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Modern Greek form of CYBELE.
LAELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: LIE-lee-a
Rating: 64% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Laelius, a Roman family name of unknown meaning. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America.
LALITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: ललिता(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi)
Personal note: "Lolly"
Rating: 30% based on 17 votes
Means "playful, charming, desirable" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of one of the playmates of the young Krishna. It is also another name of the goddess Parvati.
LEONIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: LEH-o-nee(German) lay-o-NEE(Dutch)
Rating: 61% based on 33 votes
German and Dutch feminine form of LEONIUS.
LERATO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Sotho
Rating: 33% based on 14 votes
Means "love" in Sotho.
LIBITINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown. Libitina was the Roman goddess of funerals, corpses and death.
LINDITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 25% based on 10 votes
Means "the day is born" in Albanian, from lind "to give birth" and ditë "day".
LINNET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: li-NEHT, LIN-it
Rating: 57% based on 18 votes
Either a variant of LYNETTE or else from the name of the small bird, a type of finch.
LIORIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
Strictly feminine form of LIOR.
LUCASTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called Lucasta (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".
LUCETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 46% based on 11 votes
Diminutive of LUCIE.
LUCITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: l(u)-ci-ta
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Lucía.
LUJAYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: لجين(Arabic)
Pronounced: loo-JIEN
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
Means "silver" in Arabic.
MACARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-KA-rya
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of MACARIO.
MAGALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Occitan
Pronounced: MA-GA-LEE(French)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Occitan form of MAGDALENE.
MAGALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-GA-LEE
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of MAGALI.
MAIALEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Basque form of MAGDALENE.
MAIARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Tupi
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "great grandmother, wise" in Tupi.
MALINI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: मालिनी(Hindi)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "fragrant" in Sanskrit.
MANYARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Shona
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "you have been humbled" in Shona.
MARAĴA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ma-RA-zha
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "made of the sea" in Esperanto.
MARAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Azerbaijani, Armenian
Other Scripts: Մարալ(Armenian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "deer" in Azerbaijani and Armenian, referring to the Caspian Red Deer, derived from Persian مرال (maral).
MARGALIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מַרְגָלִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "pearl" in Hebrew, ultimately from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites).
MARIFÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Filipino
Contraction of María and Fe (or other names that begin with Fe, such as Felisa).
MARJANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Rating: 43% based on 10 votes
Means "coral" in Swahili, originally a borrowing from Arabic.
MARSAILI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: MAR-si-li
Rating: 37% based on 15 votes
Scottish form of both MARJORIE and MARCELLA.
MARZENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ma-ZHEH-na
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Probably originally a Polish diminutive of MARIA or MAŁGORZATA.
MASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Маша(Russian)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Russian diminutive of MARIYA.
MATLEENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MAHT-leh-nah
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Finnish form of MAGDALENE.
MAVOURNEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 42% based on 9 votes
Derived from the Irish phrase mo mhúirnín meaning "my darling".
MBALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Zulu
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "flower" in Zulu.
MELANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mə-LAN-thə
Rating: 38% based on 21 votes
Probably a combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the suffix antha (from Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). John Dryden used this name in his play Marriage a la Mode (1672).
MELIORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Derived from Latin melior meaning "better".
MERETE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Danish form of MARGARET.
MERITXELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: mə-ree-CHEHL
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
From the name of a village in Andorra where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The name of the village may derive from Latin meridies meaning "midday".
METOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Μετώπη
Pronounced: MEH-te-pee
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
the name of various characters in Greek mythology. Also, an architectural term
MIEP
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: MEEP
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Dutch diminutive of MARIA.
MINALI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: मीनाली(Hindi)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Means "fish catcher" in Sanskrit.
MINODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian form of MENODORA.
MIREMBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Ganda
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "peace" in Luganda.
MIRJAMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: MEER-yah-mee
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Finnish form of MIRIAM.
MOA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: MOO-ah
Rating: 29% based on 14 votes
Possibly derived from Swedish moder meaning "mother". This was the pen name of the Swedish author Moa Martinson (real name Helga Maria Martinson).
MODESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAW-DEHS-TEEN
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
French diminutive of MODESTUS.
MOEMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "lies" in Tupí. This name appears in the poem Caramuru (1781) by the Brazilian poet Santa Rita Durão.
MYLÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-LEHN
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
Combination of MARIE and HÉLÈNE. It can also be used as a French form of MILENA.
NASRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Bengali
Other Scripts: نسرین(Persian) নাসরীন(Bengali)
Rating: 47% based on 14 votes
Means "wild rose" in Persian.
NAYELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Zapotec
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
Possibly from Zapotec nadxiie lii meaning "I love you" or nayele' meaning "open".
NENSI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
Croatian form of NANCY.
NERIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous Australian
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Possibly means "water lily" in an Australian Aboriginal language.
NESKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Limburgish
Pronounced: NEHS-kə
Rating: 28% based on 8 votes
Dutch and Limburgish diminutive of AGNES.
NIZHONI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Navajo
Rating: 21% based on 7 votes
Means "beautiful" from Navajo nizhóní.
NNENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
Means "mother's mother" in Igbo. This name is sometimes given to a child when it is believed that she is a reincarnation of her maternal grandmother.
NURAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Means "bright moon" in Turkish, ultimately from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" and Turkic ay meaning "moon".
NÚRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan, Portuguese
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From a Catalan title of the Virgin Mary, Nostra Senyora de Núria, meaning "Our Lady of Nuria". Nuria is a sanctuary in Spain in which there is a shrine containing a famous statue of Mary.
ODILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Germanic element odal meaning "fatherland" or aud meaning "wealth, fortune". Saint Odilia (or Odila) was an 8th-century nun who is considered the patron saint of Alsace. She was apparently born blind but gained sight when she was baptized.
OENONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Οινωνε(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-NO-nee(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Οινωνε (Oinone), derived from οινος (oinos) meaning "wine". In Greek mythology Oenone was a mountain nymph who was married to Paris before he went after Helen.
OMOLARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "a child is family" in Yoruba.
PERNILLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: peh-NEEL-lə(Danish) peh-NEEL-leh(Norwegian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Danish and Norwegian short form of PETRONILLA.
PERONEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Contracted form of PETRONEL.
PERSINETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
"Persinette" is a 1698 French fairy-tale by novelist Charlotte-Rose de Caumont de La Force which was later adapted by the Grimms brothers to become "Rapunzel"
PHILOMEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FIL-ə-mehl(English)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
POLYMNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πολυμνια, Πολυυμνια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PO-LUYM-NEE-A(Classical Greek)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Means "abounding in song", derived from Greek πολυς (polys) meaning "much" and ‘υμνος (hymnos) meaning "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.
POMELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: POM-ə-leen, pom-ə-LEEN
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Variant form of Pomelline. This name is best known for being one of the middle names of Charlotte Casiraghi (b. 1986), who is the daughter of Princess Caroline of Hanover (formerly of Monaco). She was given this middle name in honour of her ancestor Pomellina Fregoso (c. 1387-1468), a Genovese noblewoman who was the wife of Jean I of Monaco (c. 1382-1454). Her name had been gallicized to Pomelline in Monaco, as it was (and still is) predominantly a French-speaking country.
PRAIRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the English word for a flat treeless grassland, taken from French prairie "meadow". This was used by Thomas Pynchon for a character in his novel 'Vineland' (1990).
PRUNELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: proo-NEHL-ə
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the type of flower, also called self-heal, ultimately a derivative of the Latin word pruna "plum".
RABI'A
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ربيعة(Arabic)
Pronounced: ra-BEE-‘ah, RA-bee-‘ah
Rating: 25% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of RABI (1). This can also be another way of transcribing the name رابعة (see RAABI'A).
RAMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: rah-MEE-rah
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Ramiro.
RAYEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Mapuche, Spanish (Latin American)
Rating: 27% based on 9 votes
Means "flower" in Mapuche.
RAYHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رَيحانة(Arabic)
Pronounced: rie-HA-nah
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Means "basil" in Arabic. This was the name of a wife of the Prophet Muhammad.
RAZIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: רָזִיאֵלָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of RAZIEL.
REMEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: rə-MAY
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "remedy" in Catalan, a Catalan equivalent of REMEDIOS.
REVERIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REV-ə-ree
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
As a noun, it has been used since 1325 and is Middle English meaning "daydream" or, more literally, "fanciful musing", from Old French reverie which was derived from rever meaning "to speak wildly." As a name, there are some instances of usage in the mid to late 1800s, but it is still relatively rare, with 7 babies named Reverie in 2012.
ROCÍO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ro-THEE-o(European Spanish) ro-SEE-o(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Means "dew" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary María del Rocío meaning "Mary of the Dew".
ROSMERTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Celtic Mythology
Pronounced: roz-MER-tə (English)
Probably means "great provider" from Gaulish ro, an intensive prefix (hence "very, most, great"), combined with smert "purveyor, carer" and the feminine name suffix a. This was the name of an obscure Gallo-Roman goddess of fertility, abundance and prosperity. The author J. K. Rowling borrowed the name for a witch in her 'Harry Potter' series.
SABELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: sa-BEHL-a
Rating: 26% based on 16 votes
Galician form of ISABEL.
SABRIYYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: صبريّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: sab-REE-yah
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of SABRI.
SAMUELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of SAMUEL.
SANDRINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAHN-DREEN
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
French diminutive of SANDRA.
SASKIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: SAHS-kee-a:(Dutch) ZAS-kya(German)
Rating: 52% based on 24 votes
From the Germanic element sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SEBLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Amharic
Other Scripts: ሰብለ(Amharic)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "harvest" in Amharic.
SEDNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mythology
Rating: 49% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Inuit goddess of the sea, sea animals and the underworld. According to some legends Sedna was originally a beautiful woman thrown into the ocean by her father.
SELAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: סֶלַה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SEE-lə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
From a Hebrew musical term that occurs many times in the Old Testament Psalms. It was probably meant to indicate a musical pause.
SHOSHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Hebrew)
Rating: 54% based on 7 votes
Modern Hebrew form of SUSANNA.
SIBÉAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Irish form of ISABEL.
SIGRID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
Pronounced: SEE-grid(Swedish) SEEG-reed(Finnish)
Rating: 50% based on 27 votes
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SONATA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare), Lithuanian (Rare)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From Italian sonata, "a musical composition for one or few instruments", ultimately from Latin sonāre "to make sound".
SOVANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Khmer
Other Scripts: សុវណ្ណា(Khmer)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "golden, dream" in Khmer.
SPRITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: SPREE-ta
Rating: 22% based on 9 votes
Means "witty" in Esperanto.
SYBELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: si-BEHL-ə
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Variant of SIBYLLA.
TAISIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Таисия(Russian) Таїсія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: tu-EE-syi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of THAÏS (referring to the saint).
TATIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
French form of TATIANA.
TESNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 39% based on 15 votes
Means "warmth from the sun" in Welsh.
THESSALY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Thessaly is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. This name is borne by Thessaly Lerner, American stage, film and voice actress.
TIÊN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Vietnamese
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
From Sino-Vietnamese (tiên) meaning "immortal, transcendent, celestial being, fairy".
TIZIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: teet-TSYA-na
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of TIZIANO.
TOMASA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: to-MA-sa
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Spanish feminine form of THOMAS.
UMBRIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: UM-bree-el
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Probably derived from Latin umbra meaning "shadow". This name was created by Alexander Pope for a "dusky, melancholy sprite" in his poem 'The Rape of the Lock' (1712). A moon of Uranus bears this name in his honour.
UNDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: UN-deen(English) un-DEEN(English)
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
Derived from Latin unda meaning "wave". The word undine was created by the medieval author Paracelsus, who used it for female water spirits.
VALESKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of VALERIA.
XANTHIPPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθιππη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEEP-PEH(Classical Greek) zan-TIP-ee(English) zan-THIP-ee(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of XANTHIPPOS. This was the name of the wife of Socrates. Because of her supposedly argumentative nature, the name has been adopted (in the modern era) as a word for a scolding, ill-tempered woman.
XENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ZEE-nə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 16 votes
Probably a variant of XENIA. This was the name of the main character in the 1990s television series Xena: Warrior Princess.
YARDENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: יַרְדֵנָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Hebrew feminine form of JORDAN.
CHESED
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: חֶסֶד(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "kindness, goodness" in Hebrew.
CHRISTMAS
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-məs
Personal note: MN only
Rating: 19% based on 9 votes
From the name of the holiday, which means "Christ festival".
DERYA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "sea, ocean" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
IMANI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "faith" in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.
MARAM
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: مرام(Arabic)
Pronounced: ma-RAM
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "wish, desire" in Arabic.
MORAN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מוֹרָן(Hebrew)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Means "viburnum shrub" in Hebrew.
NILAM
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: नीलम(Hindi, Marathi)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "dark blue, sapphire" in Sanskrit.
SOLARA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: so-LAYR-a, so-LAR-a
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
The name Solara comes from the English word solar.

This name means radiance of the sun. This name is a modern invention of Toyota most likely inspired by late Middle English solar from Latin solaris, from sol ‘sun.’ The "Toyota Camry Solara" was a model of car produced between 1998 and 2008.
UDO (2)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "peace" in Igbo.
WINTER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
ZOLA (2)
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Southern African, Xhosa
Rating: 41% based on 9 votes
From the Xhosa root -zola meaning "calm".
ADONIJAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֲדֹנִיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ad-ə-NIE-jə(English)
Rating: 32% based on 18 votes
Means "my lord is YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is the name of one of King David's sons in the Old Testament. Though he was the eldest surviving son of David, he was passed over as heir to the throne in favour of Solomon.
AFRIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "approach" in Albanian.
ALIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Uyghur
Other Scripts: عليم(Arabic) ئالىم(Uyghur)
Pronounced: ‘a-LEEM(Arabic)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "learned, expert, scholar" in Arabic.
ALTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "red dawn" in Turkish.
AMATO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: a-MA-to
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Italian form of AMATUS.
AMRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Hebrew, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עַמְרָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: AM-ram(English) ahm-RAHM(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "exalted nation" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Amram is the father of Moses.
ANSHEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: אַנשיל(Yiddish, Hebrew)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Yiddish form of ANSELM, used as a vernacular form of Asher.
ARRIGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ar-REE-go
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Italian form of HENRY.
ATON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology
Pronounced: AH-tən(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "solar disk" in Egyptian. Aton was an Egyptian god of the sun, depicted as a solar disk with long rays extending downwards. The worship of Aton was especially extensive during the reign of the pharaoh Akhenaton, who proclaimed Aton was the only god.
AZEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אָצֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Means "reserved" in Hebrew. This is both the name of a minor character and a place name in the Old Testament.
BALENDIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Basque form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
BARIŞ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Means "peace" in Turkish.
BASILE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BA-ZEEL
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
French form of BASIL (1).
BAYRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 26% based on 11 votes
Means "festival" in Turkish.
BRANIMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Бранимир(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Rating: 48% based on 13 votes
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
BREIXO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: BRAY-sho
Rating: 27% based on 10 votes
Galician form of VERÍSSIMO.
BROEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Limburgish
Pronounced: BRHOON
Rating: 28% based on 12 votes
Limburgish form of BRUNO.
CHAYIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: חַיִּים(Hebrew)
Pronounced: KHA-yeem
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Hebrew word חַיִּים (chayyim) meaning "life". It has been used since medieval times.
CHAYYIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: חַיִּים(Hebrew)
Pronounced: KHA-yeem
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַיִּים (see CHAYIM).
CLEMENT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHM-ənt
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
CYPRIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: TSI-pryan(Polish) SIP-ree-ən(English)
Rating: 46% based on 26 votes
From the Roman family name Cyprianus, which meant "from Cyprus". Saint Cyprian was a 3rd-century bishop of Carthage and a martyr under the emperor Valerian.
DELANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL-ə-no
Rating: 21% based on 7 votes
From a surname, recorded as de la Noye in French, indicating that the bearer was from a place called La Noue (ultimately Gaulish meaning "wetland, swamp"). It has been used in honour of American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945), whose middle name came from his mother's maiden name.
DEVRİM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 33% based on 10 votes
Means "revolution" in Turkish.
EALHSTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".
EDOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱדוֹם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-dəm(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Hebrew אָדֹם ('adom) meaning "red". According to the Old Testament, Esau, who is described as having red skin, was given this name because he traded his birthright for a helping of red broth. The bible goes on to tell that Esau was the founder of the ancient nation of Edom, located to the south of the kingdom of Judah.
ELISEDD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Celtic
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Derived from Welsh elus meaning "kind". This was the name of two kings of Powys in Wales.
ELSDON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ELZ-dən
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "Elli's valley" in Old English.
EMERENS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Dutch form of EMERENTIUS.
ENDYMION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ενδυμιων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ehn-DIM-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Derived from Greek ενδυειν (endyein) meaning "to dive into, to enter". In Greek mythology he was an Aeolian mortal loved by the moon goddess Selene, who asked Zeus to grant him eternal life. Zeus complied by putting him into an eternal sleep in a cave on Mount Latmos.
ESAU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: עֵשָׂו(Ancient Hebrew) Ησαυ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-saw(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name עֵשָׂו ('Esaw), which possibly meant "hairy". In the Old Testament Esau is the elder of the twin sons of Isaac and Rebecca. Once when he was very hungry he sold his birthright to his twin Jacob for a bowl of stew. Later Jacob disguised himself as Esau and received the elder son's blessing from the blind Isaac. Esau, also called Edom, was the ancestor of the Edomites.
ÉVARISTE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-VA-REEST
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
French form of EVARISTUS.
FEIVEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: פֿייװל(Yiddish) פייבל(Hebrew)
Rating: 49% based on 8 votes
Diminutive of FAIVISH.
FERENC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: FEH-rents
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Hungarian form of FRANCIS.
FINNEGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: FIN-ə-gən(English)
Rating: 26% based on 8 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of a character in James Joyce's novel Finnegans Wake (1939), the title of which was based on a 19th-century Irish ballad called Finnegan's Wake.
GANIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Basque form of JOHN.
GERSHOM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: גֵּרְשֹׁם(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: GUR-shahm(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Probably means "exile" in Hebrew, though the Bible explains that it derives from גֵּר שָׁם (ger sham) meaning "a stranger there" (see Exodus 18:3). This is the name of a son of Moses in the Old Testament.
GORAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Горан(Serbian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: GO-ran(Croatian, Serbian)
Rating: 39% based on 8 votes
Means "mountain man", derived from South Slavic gora meaning "mountain". It was popularized by the Croatian poet Ivan Goran Kovačić (1913-1943), who got his middle name because of the mountain town where he was born.
HANAN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: חָנָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAY-nən(English)
Rating: 29% based on 9 votes
Means "gracious" in Hebrew. This is the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament.
HANKIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of HANN.
HANNIBAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Phoenician (Latinized), History
Pronounced: HAN-i-bəl(English)
Rating: 33% based on 29 votes
Means "grace of Ba'al" from Phoenician hann "grace" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hannibal was the Carthaginian general who threatened Rome during the Second Punic War in the 3rd century BC.
HAWLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAW-lee
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Transferred use of the surname Hawley.
IAGAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 42% based on 9 votes
Possibly a variant of Aodhagán, a diminutive of AODH.
IANTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of IFAN.
IONEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: yo-NEHL
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Romanian diminutive of JOHN.
IRVING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish, Jewish
Pronounced: UR-ving(English)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname that was in turn derived from a Scottish place name meaning "green water". Historically this name has been relatively common among Jews, who have used it as an American-sounding form of Hebrew names beginning with I such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah. A famous bearer was the Russian-American songwriter and lyricist Irving Berlin (1888-1989), whose birth name was Israel Beilin.
JAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Portuguese, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Other Scripts: יָאִיר(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-ər(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "he shines" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a son of Manasseh and one of the ruling judges of the Israelites.
JEANNOT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHA-NO
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of JEAN (1).
JOWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Cornish form of JOHN.
KAOLIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 24% based on 16 votes
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN. This is also the name of a type of clay.
KHALIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: خليل(Arabic)
Pronounced: kha-LEEL
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "friend" in Arabic.
KIPLING
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KIP-ling
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "Cyppel's people". The surname was borne by Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), a British novelist born in India who wrote The Jungle Book and other works.
KORALO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ko-RA-lo
Rating: 22% based on 9 votes
Means "coral" in Esperanto.
KORAY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "ember moon" in Turkish.
LAURENCE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əns
Rating: 58% based on 8 votes
From the Roman cognomen Laurentius, which meant "from Laurentum". Laurentum was a city in ancient Italy, its name probably deriving from Latin laurus "laurel". Saint Laurence was a 3rd-century deacon and martyr from Rome. According to tradition he was roasted alive on a gridiron because, when ordered to hand over the church's treasures, he presented the sick and poor. Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in the Christian world (in various spellings).

In the Middle Ages this name was common in England, partly because of a second saint by this name, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury. Likewise it has been common in Ireland due to the 12th-century Saint Laurence O'Toole (whose real name was Lorcán). Since the 19th century the spelling Lawrence has been more common, especially in America. A famous bearer was the British actor Laurence Olivier (1907-1989).

LENZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LENTS
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of LORENZ. This is also a German poetic word referring to the springtime.
LEOLIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Variant of LLYWELYN influenced by Latin leo "lion".
LORÁND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Hungarian form of ROLAND.
MARNIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: MAHR-niks
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From a Dutch surname of unknown meaning.
MARZELL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
German variant of MARCELLUS.
PÉPIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: PEHP-in(English)
Rating: 26% based on 11 votes
Frankish name of unknown meaning. It possibly means "awe-inspiring" from Frankish bib- "to tremble". This was the name of three majordomos of Austrasia including Pépin III the Short, who became the first Carolingian king of the Franks. He was the father of Charlemagne.
PHERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Rating: 43% based on 8 votes
Manx form of PATRICK.
PHRIXUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φριξος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FRIK-səs(English)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
From the Greek Φριξος (Phrixos) meaning "thrilling, causing shivers", derived from φριξ (phrix) meaning "ripple, shiver". In Greek myth Phrixus was the son of Athamus and Nephele. He was to be sacrificed to Zeus, but he escaped with his sister Helle on the back of the ram with the Golden Fleece.
PREBEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Modern Danish form of the name Pridbjørn, which was a medieval Scandinavian form of the Slavic (Wendish) name Pridbor, which was derived from Slavic prid meaning "first" and borti meaning "battle". It was imported into Danish via the medieval Putbus family, who were Slavic nobles from Rügen in Pomerania.
PTOLEMY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Other Scripts: Πτολεμαιος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAHL-ə-mee(English)
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
From the Greek name Πτολεμαιος (Ptolemaios), derived from Greek πολεμηιος (polemeios) meaning "aggressive, warlike". Ptolemy was the name of several Greco-Egyptian rulers of Egypt, all descendants of Ptolemy I, one of the generals of Alexander the Great. This was also the name of a Greek astronomer.
QUIDEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Native American, Mapuche
Rating: 33% based on 6 votes
Means "burning torch" in Mapuche.
RANDOLF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAN-dawlf
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the Germanic elements rand meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wulf meaning "wolf". The Normans brought this name to England, where there existed already an Old Norse cognate Randúlfr, which had been introduced by Scandinavian settlers. Randolf became rare after the Middle Ages, though it was revived in the 18th century (usually in the spelling Randolph).
RENARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: RU-NAR
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
French form of REYNARD. Because of the medieval character Reynard the Fox, renard became a French word meaning "fox".
REUEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: רְעוּאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROOL(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Means "friend of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is another name for Jethro. The fantasy author John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (1892-1973) was a famous bearer.
SELWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-win
Rating: 54% based on 24 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from an Old English given name, which was formed of the elements sele "manor" and wine "friend".
SIMEON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Bulgarian, Serbian
Other Scripts: שִׁמְעוֹן(Ancient Hebrew) Симеон(Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: SIM-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
From Συμεων (Symeon), the Old Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON (1)). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and Leah and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament the Greek rendering Σιμων (Simon) is more common, though Συμεων occurs belonging to a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. He is recognized as a saint in most Christian traditions.

This name was also borne by a powerful 10th-century ruler of Bulgaria who expanded the empire to its greatest extent.

SINJIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Variant of the name St. John (see JOHN).
SIXTEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the Old Norse name Sigsteinn, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and steinn "stone".
SOLLY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of SOLOMON.
TASGALL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 22% based on 6 votes
Scottish form of ÁSKETILL.
THOTH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Θωθ(Ancient Greek)
Greek form of Egyptian Djhwty (reconstructed as Djehuti), which is of uncertain meaning. In Egyptian mythology Thoth was the god of the moon, science, magic, speech and writing. He was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis.
TIELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval German
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
Earlier form of TILO.
TIRIAQ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Native American, Inuit
Rating: 23% based on 7 votes
Means "ermine" in Inuktitut.
TURAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Azerbaijani
Rating: 36% based on 9 votes
Means "to be alive" in Azerbaijani.
TURLOUGH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 39% based on 7 votes
Anglicized form of TOIRDHEALBHACH.
URIAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אוּרִיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: yuw-RIE-ə(English)
Rating: 38% based on 21 votes
From the Hebrew name אוּרִיָה ('Uriyah) meaning "YAHWEH is my light", from the roots אוּר ('ur) meaning "light, flame" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is the name of a Hittite warrior in King David's army, the first husband of Bathsheba. David desired Bathsheba so he placed Uriah in the forefront of battle so he would be killed.
WAZO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element wad meaning "to go" or warin meaning "guard, protect".
WIELAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: VEE-lant(German)
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
Meaning uncertain, perhaps a derivative of Germanic wela meaning "skilled, artful". In Germanic mythology Wieland (called Völundr in Old Norse) was an unequaled smith and craftsman.
WYSTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman Conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
ZERAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זֵרַח(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "dawning, shining" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of Judah and the twin of Perez in the Old Testament.
ZIMRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זִמְרִי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ZIM-rie(English)
Rating: 43% based on 7 votes
Means "my praise" or "my music" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Israel in the Old Testament. He ruled for only seven days, when he was succeeded by the commander of the army Omri.
ZOTICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ζωτικος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ζωτικος (Zotikos), derived from ζωτικος (zotikos) meaning "full of life". This was the name of several early saints.
ZURIEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: צוּרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 39% based on 9 votes
Means "my rock is God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name is borne by a chief of the Merarite Levites at the time of the Exodus.
BROGAN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from Gaelic bróg "shoe" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
CHISOMO
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Chewa
Pronounced: chee-SO-mo
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Means "grace" in Chewa.
CRIMSON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIM-sən, KRIM-sin
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Derived from English crimson, the name for a strong, bright, deep purplish-red color. The English word is ultimately derived from Arabic qirmiz. It is originally the color of the dye produced from a scale insect, Kermes vermilio, but the name is now also used as a generic term for those slightly bluish-red colors that are between red and rose.

As a given name, Crimson has been in use since the late 1800s.

EFEMENA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Western African, Urhobo
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Means "here is my wealth" in Urhobo.
EKO
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Javanese
Pronounced: EH-ko
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Javanese form of EKA (1).
SATYA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Kannada
Other Scripts: सत्य (Hindi), సత్య (Telugu), ಸತ್ಯ (Kannada)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Derived from Sanskrit सत्य (satya) meaning “true, truthful, pure”.
TENZIN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Tibetan, Bhutanese
Other Scripts: བསྟན་འཛིན(Tibetan)
Rating: 24% based on 7 votes
From Tibetan བསྟན་འཛིན (bstan-'dzin) meaning "upholder of teachings". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).
ZOHAR
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זֹהַר(Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "light, brilliance" in Hebrew.
ZORION
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "happiness" in Basque.
behindthename.com   ·   Copyright © 1996-2019