Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is XICooper.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ASHMORE     English
English locational name, from either "Aisemare", (from Old English pre 7th Century "aesc" meaning ash plus "mere" a lake; hence "lake where ash-trees grow), or from any of several minor places composed of the Old English elements "aesc" ash plus "mor" a marsh or fen.
BAINBRIDGE     English
from Bainbridge in North Yorkshire, named for the Bain river on which it stands (which is named with Old Norse beinn ‘straight’) + bridge.
BELONGER     French (Quebec)
variant of French Belanger or Boulanger
BLAZER     Dutch
from Middle Dutch blaser ‘blower’, hence an occupational name for a player of the trumpet or other wind instrument, or a nickname for a braggart or boaster
DEALE     English
Originated in Kent
DIETERLIN     German
From "Dieterlein", a diminuative of the given name Dieter
DOBBS     English
English Patronymic from an old nickname for Robert
DOWNING     Anglo-Saxon
from 'Dunning', a patronymic meaning 'Son of Dunn', 'Dunn' being a nickname for someone with brown coloring
DUTTON     English
habitational name from any of the places called Dutton, especially those in Cheshire and Lancashire. The first of these is named from Old English dun ‘hill’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’; the second is from Old English personal name Dudd + Old English tun.
GUDGEON     English
from Middle English gojon, gogen, Old French gougon ‘gudgeon’ (the fish) (Latin gobio, genitive gobionis), applied as a nickname or perhaps as a metonymic occupational name for a seller of these fish... [more]
HERRINGTON     English
habitational name from Herrington in County Durham, England
HILLEARY     English
Variant of Hillary
HUTZEL     German
from a Germanic personal name, Huzo
LAVERS     English
English (chiefly Devon and Cornwall): Medieval English and occupational, from pre-10th century Old French "lavandier". Introduced by the Normans after 1066, originally described a worker in the wool industry, and was a metonymic or nickname for a person employed to wash raw wool or rinse the cloth after fulling... [more]
LOUD     English
from the English word "loud", given to a loud or, in jest, quiet person
MARIGAN     Irish
unknown
MOGASEN     German
meaning unknown
NIEHAUS     German
North German: topographic name from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + hus ‘house’; or a habitational name from a common North German and Westphalian farm name with the same meaning.
PEARSALL     English
a British surname of French origin derived from the pre-9th-century word "pourcel", which described a breeder of animals or a farmer
PICKETT     English
of Norman origin, from the personal name "Pic", here with the diminutive suffixes "et" or "ot", and recorded as "Picot, Pigot" and Piket". The name is ultimately of Germanic derivation, from "pic", meaning "sharp", or "pointed", which was a common element in names meaning for instance, residence near a "pointed hill", use of a particular sharp or pointed tool or weapon, or a nickname for a tall, thin person.
PINKHAM     English
habitational name from a lost or unidentified place in or bordering on Devon
PULSIPHER     Italian (Anglicized)
from the nickname meaning "handsome man" of a member of the Italian Pulci family who settled in England around the time of the Norman conquest
RAISBECK     English
Raisbeck is a hamlet in the civil parish of Orton, in the Eden district, in the county of Cumbria, England. The surname Raisbeck originates from the hamlet. The name of the hamlet derives from Hrridarr, a personal name and beck, a stream or river.
REVELS     American
from the surname Revel, a variant of Revell, a Middle English and Old French name referring to festivity
ROUSE     English
nickname for a person with red hair, from Middle English, Old French rous ‘red(-haired)’
SCHWEINHARDT     German
an occupational or nickname having to do with pigs
SINGER     German
variant of Sänger, in the sense of ‘poet’
STOWELL     English
A locational name from various places in England called Stowell
TERWILIGER     American
a name adopted by a Dutch family in New York
TOOMEY     Irish
from ancient Gaelic personal name 'Tuama', probably derived from 'tuaim', meaning a hill or a small mountain
VETTER     German
from a nickname from Middle High German veter(e) ‘uncle’, ‘nephew’. The word is from Old High German fetiro (a derivative of fater ‘father’), which was used more generally to denote various male relatives; the meaning of modern German Vetter is ‘cousin’.
WINCHEL     English
from Old English wencel ‘child’, perhaps used to distinguish a son from his father with the same forename or perhaps a nickname for a person with a baby face or childlike manner
YOHO     American (Anglicized)
American Anglicized spelling of Swiss surname 'Joho'
33 results