Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is cutenose.
Filter Results       more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AAKER     Norwegian
Variant of Åker.
ABEGG     German, German (Swiss)
Topographic name for someone who lived near the corner of a mountain, from German ab meaning "off" and Egg, dialect form of Eck(e) meaning "promontory", "corner".
ABRESCH     German, Dutch, Jewish
From a pet form of the Biblical name Abraham.
ADURIZ     Basque
A famous bearer of this surname is Aritz Aduriz, a Spanish professional footballer who plays for Athletic Bilbao as a striker.
AERNI     German (Swiss)
Variant spelling of Ärni.
AGLER     English
From one or more Middle English personal names variously written Alger, Algar, Alcher, Aucher, etc. These represent a falling together of at least three different Continental Germanic and Old English names: Adalgar "noble spear" (Old English Æ{dh}elgār), Albgar "elf spear" (Old English Ælfgār), and Aldgar "old spear" (Old English (E)aldgār)... [more]
AHLBORN     Swedish (Rare)
Ornamental name composed of the elements al "alder" and -born, a Swedish surname suffix derived from German geboren "born".
AHLBORN     German
From the old personal name Albern, from Germanic adal meaning "noble" and boran meaning "born".
AHUJA     Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Sindhi, Indian (Sikh)
Sikh name meaning "descendant of Ahu", based on the name of a clan in these communities (see Arora). Ahu is presumably the name of an ancestor; the suffix -jā is patronymic.
AINARA     Japanese
From Japanese 相 (ai) meaning "mutual, reciprocal, with one another", 奈 (na) meaning "apple tree" and 良 (ra) meaning "good".
AJEMIAN     Armenian
Patronymic from Turkish acem meaning ‘Persian’, ‘foreigner’, from Arabic a’jam meaning ‘one who speaks Arabic incorrectly’.
AKASHITA     Japanese
From Japanese 赤 (aka) or 丹 (aka) both meaning "red" combined with 下 (shita) meaning "below, down, descend, give, low, inferior". Other kanji combinations are possible.
AKBAR     Pakistani, Bengali (Muslim), Indonesian, Indian (Muslim), Afghani, Arabic, Persian
From the given name Akbar, itself derived from the Arabic أَكْبَر (’akbar) "greater, greatest", the elative degree of كَبِير (kabīr) "big, large, great". It is most widely used in the Islamic takbir: الله أكبر (Allāhu Akbar) meaning "God is the greatest".
ÅKER     Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From Swedish and Norwegian åker "plowed field".
AKHTAR     Persian
Meaning "Star." Also a first name.
ALBANY     Scottish, English (American)
From the title of the Dukes of Albany (House of Stuart), hence a name borne by their retainers. It is an infrequent surname in England and Scotland. The city of Albany, NY (formerly the Dutch settlement of Beverwijck or Fort Orange) was named for James Stuart, Duke of York and Albany; he was the brother of King Charles II and later king in his own right as James II... [more]
ALLEMAND     French
Means "Germany" in French.
ALLENBACH     German, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of several places called Allenbach.
ALLENDORF     German
Habitational name from any of ten or more places called Allendorf.
ALTMEYER     German
Status name for an older steward, headman, or tenant farmer, as distinguished from a younger one, from Middle High German alt ‘old’ + meier ‘steward’, ‘headman’, ‘tenant farmer’
ALTRINGER     German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Altringen or Aldingen, of which there are two in Württemberg.
ALWARDT     German
From the personal name Adelward, composed of the Germanic elements adal ‘noble’ + ward ‘keeper’, ‘protector’.
AMREIN     German (Swiss)
Topographic name from am ‘at’ + Rain ‘edge of plowed land’.
AMSPACHER     German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Amsbach
AMSTUTZ     German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
Topographic name for someone living near or at the foot of a steep mountainside, German am Stutz ‘at the escarpment’.
ANDROS     English
Variant of Andrews.
ANDROS     German (Swiss), Hungarian
Derivative of the personal name Andreas. Perhaps a reduced form of Greek Andronikos, Andronidis, or some other similar surname, all patronymics from Andreas.
ANEY     English
Possibly a respelling of French Ané, from a personal name derived from Latin Asinarius.
ANN     English
Habitational name from Abbots Ann in Hampshire, named for the stream that runs through it, which is most probably named with an ancient Welsh word meaning ‘water’.
APPLEWHITE     English
Habitational name from a place named Applethwaite, from Old Norse apaldr ‘apple tree’ and þveit ‘meadow’. There are two or three such places in Cumbria; Applethwaite is also recorded as a surname from the 13th century in Suffolk, England, pointing to a possible lost place name there... [more]
APT     German, Yiddish
German: variant of Abt.... [more]
ARÀBIA     Italian, Spanish
Ethnic name for someone from Arabia or some other Arabic-speaking country or a nickname for someone who had visited or traded with one of these countries.
ARABIA     English (American)
Americanized form of French Arabie.
ARABIAN     Armenian
Patronymic from the ethnic term arab ‘Arab’.
ARABIE     French
Ethnic name denoting someone from Arabia or an Arabic-speaking person.
ARAMBURÚ     Basque
Famous bearers of this surname is Fernando Aramburu, a Spanish writer and Pedro Eugenio Aramburu, he was an Argentine Army general.
ARDIS     Scottish
Reduced form of Allardice.
ARGENTI     Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Argento.
ARGENTO     Italian
From argento "silver", perhaps sometimes applied as a nickname for someone with silvery gray hair, but more often a metonymic occupational name for a silversmith.
ARIZA     Catalan
Castilianized form of Basque Aritza, a topographic name from Basque (h)aritz ‘oak’ + the article suffix -a.
ARIZA     Spanish
Spanish: habitational name from a place so named in Zaragoza province in Aragón.
ARJONA     Spanish
Habitational name from Arjona in Jaén province.
ARLOTTA     Sicilian
From the French personal name Arlot, recorded in the Latinized form Arolottus from the 13th century.
ARMENTEROS     Spanish
Habitational name from either of two places called Armenteros, in the provinces of Ávila and Salamanca, from the plural of armenatero meaning ‘cowherd’, from Latin armenta ‘herd(s)’.
ÄRNI     German (Swiss)
From a much altered pet form of the personal name Arnold.
ASA     Japanese
Variously written, sometimes with characters used phonetically. It can mean ‘morning’, but the most likely meaning is ‘hemp’, making it a topographic or occupational name. Both forms are found mostly in Amami, one of the Ryūkyū Islands.
ASANO     Japanese
Meaning ‘shallow plain’; probably derived from two places of that name, one in Mino (now southern Gifu prefecture), the other in Owari (now Nagoya prefecture). Both families descend from the Minamoto clan through the Toki family.
ASCENCIO     Spanish, Italian
From the personal name (Latin Ascensius), favored by the early Christians, by whom it was bestowed with reference to the ascension of Christ (Late Latin ascensio).
ATSUDA     Japanese
From Japanese 渥 (atsu) meaning "moist" combined with 田 (da) meaning "paddy, field".
AUCLAIR     French
Patronymic from the personal name Clair or the nickname Leclair (‘the cheerful one’): (fils) à Leclair ‘(son) of Leclair’. It has also absorbed cases of Auclerc (from LeClerc).
AUGUSTYN     Polish
From the personal name Augustyn, Polish form of Latin Augustinus
AXELL     Swedish
Creative spelling of Axel.
AZAHARA     Japanese
From Japanese 字 (aza) meaning "a section of a village" and 原 (hara) meaning "field, plain".
AZARIAN     Armenian
Patronymic, apparently from Turkish Azar ‘March’, but more probably from a first name Azaria, from Hebrew ’Azariāh ‘God’s help’.
BAACK     North Frisian, Dutch
Either from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Baldeke (a short form of any of the compound names with the first element bald ‘bold’, for example Baldewin) or from Middle Low German baec, bake ‘pork’, ‘bacon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a butcher or pig farmer.
BABAIAN     Armenian (Rare), Iranian
Variant of Babayan, which is a patronymic from Turkish baba "father".
BADILLA     Spanish
Variant of Badillo.
BADILLO     Spanish
Topographic name from a diminutive of vado ‘ford’ (Latin vadum) or a habitational name from either of two places named with this word: Valillo de la Guarena in Zamora province or Vadillo de al Sierra in Ávila.
BAE     Korean
Korean form of Pei.
BAGDONAS     Lithuanian
Patronymic from the personal name Bagdon, Lithuanian form of Polish Bogdan.
BAJWA     Pakistani, Urdu, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh)
From the Persian باز (bâz) meaning "hawk, falcon". Used by both Pakistani Muslims and Indian Sikhs.
BALDY     Scottish, Northern Irish
From the personal name Baldy or Baldie, a pet form of Archibald.
BALDY     English
Possibly from an Old English female personal name, Bealdḡ{dh}, meaning ‘bold combat’, first recorded c.1170 as Baldith, and in others from the Old Norse personal name Baldi.
BALE     English
Variant of Bail. This is the surname of Welsh footballer Gareth Bale.
BALEN     English
English surname, perhaps of Cornish British origin, from belen, meaning "mill."
BALIAN     Armenian
Patronymic of uncertain origin, perhaps from Turkish bal ‘lord’, ‘master’, a word of Arabic origin.
BALLON     Spanish
Theoretically it could be a variant of vallón, from valle ‘valley’, but neither form is attested as a vocabulary word or as a place name element. Alternatively, it could be a Castilian spelling of Catalan Batlló, Balló, nicknames from diminutives of batlle ‘dancing’.English: variant spelling of Balon.
BALMA     Italian
Perhaps a topographic name from the dialect word balma meaning ‘grotto’, ‘cave’, ‘jutting rock’.
BANEZ     Spanish
Spanish (Báñez): shortened form of Ibáñez
BARCELÓ     Catalan
Apparently from a personal name Barcelonus (feminine Barcelona), originally denoting someone from the city of Barcelona.
BARCELONA     Catalan, Spanish
Habitational name from Barcelona, the principal city of Catalonia. The place name is of uncertain, certainly pre-Roman, origin. The settlement was established by the Carthaginians, and according to tradition it was named for the Carthaginian ruling house of Barca; the Latin form was Barcino or Barcilo.
BARKUS     English
Probably a reduced form of Barkhouse, a topographic name for someone who lived by a tannery, Middle English barkhous, or an occupational name for someone who worked in one.
BARNETTE     English, French (?)
Variant of Bernet and perhaps also a variant of English Barnett, under French influence.
BARREAU     French
Possibly a variant of Barreur, an agent derivative of barrer ‘to bar’, ‘to close or block off’, hence possibly an occupational name for a jailer or doorkeeper.
BARTEK     Polish, Czech, Slovak, German
Polish, Czech, Slovak, and eastern German: from a pet form of a vernacular form of the personal name Bartolomaeus (Czech Bartoloměj, Polish Bartłomiej, German Bartolomäus)
BASISTA     Polish, Czech, Slovak
Occupational name for a double-bass player.
BATEMAN     English, Scottish
Occupational name meaning ‘servant of Bate.’
BAWA     Punjabi
Sikh name based on the name of a Jat clan. It is also a title given to the male descendants of the first three Sikh gurus.
BAZZI     Arabic, Iranian
Probably from Arabic baezii ‘foster brother(s)’, unrelated children breast-fed by the same wet nurse.
BEABER     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Bieber or Biber, from Middle High German biber ‘beaver’, hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal in some way, a topographic name for someone who lived in a place frequented by beavers or by a field named with this word, or a habitational name from any of various place names in Hesse containing this element.
BEACHEM     English
Variant spelling of Beauchamp.
BEARD     English (American)
Nickname for a bearded man (Middle English, Old English beard). To be clean-shaven was the norm in non-Jewish communities in northwestern Europe from the 12th to the 16th century, the crucial period for surname formation... [more]
BEAS     Spanish (Mexican)
Spanish (common in Mexico): habitational name from any of the places in Andalusia named Beas.
BEAS     English
Varient spelling of the surname Bees.
BEAS     German
Possibly also a variant spelling of German Bies.
BEER     English, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
BEGA     Spanish
Variant of Vega.
BĚLÍN     Czech
Either a nickname from Czech bílý ‘white’ or a derivative of the female personal name Běla (which also means ‘white’), denoting the son or husband of a woman so named.
BELIN     Serbian
Variant of Belan.
BELIN     Yiddish
Metronymic from the Yiddish female personal name Beyle meaning ‘beautiful’ (related to French belle).
BÉNA     Hungarian
Nickname from béna ‘lame’, or from a pet form of Benedek.
BENA     Italian
From a reduced form of the medieval personal name Benenato.
BENANTI     Italian
From a derivative of Bene, a short form of the various omen names formed with this element (from Latin bene ‘well’), such as Benedetto, Benvenuto, etc.
BERN     German, Scandinavian, German (Swiss)
German and Scandinavian: from the personal name Berno, a pet form of Bernhard. In South German it comes from the habitational name from Bern, Switzerland, notably in the south; in other parts from the personal name Berno.
BERNET     French
From a pet form of Bernard.
BERNIUS     German (Latinized), Lithuanian
German-Latinized form of Berner.... [more]
BI     Chinese
Probably from the name of a people living to the west of China in ancient times, who integrated with the Han Chinese during the Han dynasty (206 bc–220 ad). The character also means ‘finish’, ‘conclude’.
BIBER     German
Varient of Bieber.
BIEDROŃ     Polish
Nickname, either from dialect biedron ‘spotted bullock’, or for someone with conspicuous or deformed hips, from a derivative of dialect biedro ‘hip’.
BITSUIE     Navajo
From bitsóí meaning "his grandchild", a commonly adopted surname when the BIA required Native Americans to take surnames for the purpose of official records.
BLACH     Polish
Alternatively perhaps a metonymic occupational name from Old Polish blach ‘skeet iron’, ‘metal fittings’.
BLACHER     French
Mainly used in Southern France. Topographic name for someone who lived by an oak grove, originating in the southeastern French dialect word blache ‘oak plantation’ (said to be of Gaulish origin), originally a plantation of young trees of any kind.
BLACKABY     English
Variant of Blackerby.
BŁAŻEJEWSKI     Polish
Habitational name for someone from Błażejewo, Błażejewice, Błażejewko, or another place named with Błażej, a vernacular form of the personal name Blasius.
BLEECKER     Dutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, a launderer, or the owner of a public bleaching ground.
BLEEKER     Dutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, from Middle Dutch ble(e)kere.
BLINOV     Russian
Russian surname, derived from the word "блин" (pancake).
BLINOVA     Russian
Feminine form of Blinov.
BLOOD     English
Evidently from Old English blod ‘blood’, but with what significance is not clear. In Middle English the word was in use as a metonymic occupational term for a physician, i.e. one who lets blood, and also as an affectionate term of address for a blood relative.
BLOOD     Welsh
Anglicized form of Welsh ap Llwyd ‘son of Llwyd’.
BOBOLA     Polish
From a derivative of bób meaning 'bean'.
BOGUSŁAWSKI     Polish, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Boguslaw or Boguslawice, from the personal name Bogusław (composed of Slavic Bog "God" and slav "glory").
BOJE     Dutch
Variant spelling of Boye.
BOLDEN     English
Varient of Bolding.
BOLDING     English, German
Patronymic from Bold as a personal name.
BOLDING     Danish
Habitational name from a place so named in Jutland.
BONANNO     Italian
From the medieval personal name Bonanno, an omen name meaning "good year". Mainly found throughout southern Italy.
BONUS     French, German, Dutch
Humanistic Latinization of vernacular names meaning ‘good’, for example French Lebon or Dutch de Goede
BONUŠ     Czech
From a pet form of the personal name Bonifác, Czech form of Bonifacio.
BOOT     English, Dutch, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of boots, from Middle English, Old French bote (of unknown origin).... [more]
BOSO     Italian
From the medieval personal name Boso, from a Germanic personal name derived from a pejorative nickname meaning ‘leader’, ‘nobleman’, or ‘arrogant person’. Compare Dutch Boos.
BOYDSTON     Scottish
Habitational name from a place called Boydston near Glasgow. This surname is no longer found in the British Isles.
BOYE     English, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From a Germanic personal name, Boio or Bogo, of uncertain origin. It may represent a variant of Bothe, with the regular Low German loss of the dental between vowels, but a cognate name appears to have existed in Old English, where this feature does not occur... [more]
BRAATEN     Norwegian
Habitational name from Bråten, a common farm name in southeastern Norway, derived from Old Norse broti ‘land cleared for cultivation by burning’.
BRAIN     Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized), Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mac an Bhreitheamhan ‘son of the judge’, from breitheamh ‘judge’.
BRATTÉN     Swedish
Ornamental name composed of the personal name Bratt + the surname suffix -én, from Latin -enius ‘descendant of’.
BRATTEN     Scottish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac an Bhreatnaich ‘son of the Briton’, originally denoting a Strathclyde Welsh-speaking Briton. It was applied in Ireland also to people from Brittany.
BRATTIN     Scottish
Variant of Bratten.
BREAN     Irish
Variant of Breen or Brain.
BREVIK     Norwegian
Habitational name from any of several farms named Brevik, from Norwegian bred "broad" and vik "bay".
BRODÉN     Swedish
Ornamental name or topographic name, probably composed of the elements bro ‘bridge’ + the adjectival suffix -én, from Latin -enius.
BROPHY     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bróithe ‘descendant of Bróth’, a personal name or byname of unknown origin. Also Anglicized as Broy.
BRUNETTE     French (Quebec)
Variant of Brunet, reflecting the French Canadian pattern of pronouncing the final -t, which is not pronounced in metropolitan French.
BRUNO     Portuguese
From a Germanic personal name, Brun.
BRZOZA     Polish
Topographic name from brzoza meaning ‘birch tree’.
BUDA     Hungarian (Rare)
Habitational name from the name of the old capital of Hungary.
BUDOU     Japanese
From Japanese 武 (bu) meaning "military, martial" combined with 堂 (dou) meaning "temple, shrine" or from 武道 (budou) meaning "Japanese martial arts".
BÙI     Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Pei.
BUJNOWSKI     Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Bujnowo or Bujnow, named with bujny ‘luxuriant’, ‘bushy’, ‘fertile’.
BUTTA     Italian
Italian: from a short form of a compound name formed with butta- ‘throw’, as for example Buttacavoli.Italian: from an old German feminine personal name Butta.Italian: variant of Botta.
BUTTERFIELD     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pasture for cattle or at a dairy farm, or a habitational name from a place named Butterfield (for example in West Yorkshire), from Old English butere ‘butter’ + feld ‘open country’.
CABA     Spanish, Catalan
Variant of Cava.
CABAÑA     Spanish, Portuguese
Habitational name from a place named with Spanish cabaña ‘hut’, ‘cabin’ (Late Latin capanna, a word of Celtic or Germanic origin).
CABAÑAS     Spanish, Portuguese
Habitational name from a place named with Spanish cabaña or Portuguese cabanha ‘hut’, ‘cabin’.
CABANISS     French
Variant spelling of Cabanis, a habitational name from any of various places in Gard named Cabanis, from Late Latin capannis ‘at the huts’, ablative plural of capanna 'hut'. This name was established in North American in the 18th century, probably by Huguenots.
CAKE     English
From the Middle English cake denoting a flat loaf made from fine flour (Old Norse kaka), hence a metonymic occupational name for a baker who specialized in fancy breads. It was first attested as a surname in the 13th century (Norfolk, Northamptonshire).
CALAWAY     English
Variant spelling of Callaway.
CALERO     Spanish
Metonymic occupational name for a burner or seller of lime, from calero ‘lime’.
CALKIN     Irish
Variant of Culkin.
CANDY     English
Unexplained.There was a family of this name in Roussillon, France, descended from a partisan of James II named Kennedy, who was exiled in France in the 17th century. The family died out in France in 1868, but may have had an American branch.
CARBONERO     Spanish
Famous bearers are Carlos Carbonero, a Colombian footballer who plays as a midfielder for Sampdoria on loan from Fénix and Sara Carbonero, a Spanish sports journalist.
CARLYON     Cornish
Cornish: habitational name from any of three places in Cornwall called Carlyon, in St. Minver and Kea parishes. The first element is Celtic ker ‘fort’; the second could represent the plural of Cornish legh ‘slab’.
CASILLAS     Spanish
From any of various places called Casillas or Las Casillas, from the plural of casilla, a diminutive of Casa. ... [more]
CAVA     Italian, Catalan, Spanish, Portugese
From cava ‘cave’, ‘cellar’ (from Latin cavea), hence a metonymic occupational name for someone employed in the wine cellars of a great house, a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a cave, or a habitational name from any of numerous places named with this word.
CEJA     Spanish
From a common field name or a habitational name from any of various minor places called Ceja Yecla in Aragon.
CHABOT     French
From chabot ‘bull-head’, a species of fish with a large head, hence a nickname for someone with a big head and a small body.
CHAMBON     French
A very popular last name in France.
CHEAH     Chinese
Variant of Xie.
CHERNOFF     Russian, Jewish
Alternative spelling of Chernov, a patronymic from the byname Chernyj meaning ‘black’, denoting a black-haired or dark-skinned person.
CHEW     English
Habitational name from a place in Somerset named Chew Magna, which is named for the river on which it stands, a Celtic name, perhaps cognate with Welsh cyw ‘young animal or bird’, ‘chicken’.
CHICA     Spanish
Apparently from chica, feminine form of chico ‘small’, ‘young’ (see Chico), but a variant of the habitational name Checa, from a place so named in Jaén province is also a possibility.
CHING     Chinese (Cantonese, Latinized)
A Cantonese romanization of the Chinese surname Cheng
CLINKER     English (British, ?)
Possibly a varient of Clinger.
CLORE     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Klor (from a short form of the medieval personal name Hilarius (see Hillary) or Klar).
CLY     Navajo
From Navajo tłʼaaí meaning ‎"lefty, left-handed one", from the verb nishtłʼa ‎"to be left-handed".
COLLINSWORTH     English
Variant spelling of Collingsworth, itself a variant of Collingwood.
CONRADI     German, Danish, Norwegian
Latinization of a patronymic from the personal name Konrad.
CONRADI     Italian
Variant of Corradi.
CORNWELL     English
Habitational name from Cornwell in Oxfordshire, named from Old English corn, a metathesized form of cron, cran ‘crane’ + well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’.variant of Cornwall.
COUTINHO     Portuguese
Diminutive of Couto.
COVA     Catalan, Galician
Topographic name from Catalan and Galician cova ‘cave’, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, in the provinces of Lugo, Ourense, Pontevedra, Catalonia and Valencia.
CRAFT     English (American)
Variant of Croft and Americanized spelling of Kraft.
CRENSHAW     English
The derivation of this surname is from the Old English pre 7th Century "Crawa", a crow, with "sceaga" a grove, thus "Crowswood". The earliest recording of this placename is in the Lancashire Inquests of 1324 and appears as "Croweshagh".
CREUS     Spanish
Variant of Cruz. Famous bearer of this surname is Spanish footballer Xavi Hernández.
CRIADO     Portuguese, Spanish
Occupational name from criado ‘servant’.
CUBA     Portugese, Asturian-Leonese, Galician, Spanish
habitational name from any of the places in Portugal (in the provinces of Alentejo and Beira Baixa) or Spain (in Aragon, Asturies, and Galicia) named Cuba, from cuba ‘barrel’ (from Latin cupa)... [more]
CULLIMORE     English (Rare)
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place. There is a place called Colleymore Farm in Oxfordshire, but it is not clear whether this is the source of the surname, with its many variant spellings
CYGAN     Polish
Ethnic name or nickname from a word meaning ‘gypsy’, ‘Romany’.Altered spelling of eastern German Zigan, from Hungarian cigány ‘gypsy’.
CYPRESS     English
Translation of German Zypress, a topographic name for someone living near a cypress tree or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a cypress, Middle High German zipres(se) (from Italian cipressa, Latin cupressus), or possibly of any of various Greek family names derived from kyparissos ‘cypress’, as for example Kyparissis, Kyparissos, Kyparissiadis, etc.
CYPRIAN     English
Possibly an altered spelling of French Cyprien, from a medieval personal name, from Latin Cyprianus (originally an ethnic name for an inhabitant of Cyprus), or a shortened form of Greek Kyprianos, Kyprianis, Kyprianidis, ethnic names for an inhabitant of Cyprus (Greek Kypros), or patronymics from the personal name Kyprianos (of the same derivation)... [more]
DAANE     Dutch
From a pet form of the personal name Daniel.
DABB     English
Variant of Dobb, a pet form of Robert.
DADY     Irish
Variant of Deady.
DADY     Hungarian
Habitational name for someone from a place called Dad, in Fejér and Komárom counties, or Dada, in Somogy and Szabolcs counties.
DALMAN     Swedish
Variant spelling of Dahlman.
DAMERON     French
Nickname for a foppish or effeminate young man, Old French dameron, a derivative of Latin dominus "lord", "master" plus two diminutive endings suggestive of weakness or childishness.
DANESE     Italian
Ethnic name for a Dane, or from the personal name Danese, which was introduced to and popularized in medieval Italy through French Carolingian literature, notably the epics Chanson de Roland and Ogier de Denemarche.
DANESI     Italian
it may be a patronymic or plural form of Danese.
DANFORTH     English
Probably a habitational name, perhaps from Darnford in Suffolk, Great Durnford in Wiltshire, or Dernford Farm in Sawston, Cambridgeshire, all named from Old English dierne ‘hidden’ + ford ‘ford’.
DANI     Gujarati, Sanskrit
Indian (Gujarat): Hindu Vania name, from the Sanskrit epithet dani ‘liberal in giving’.
DÄNZER     German
Occupational name for a professional acrobat or entertainer; variant of Tanzer.
ĐÀO     Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Tao. This is also the Vietnamese word for peach.
DA SILVA     Portuguese
Topographic name for someone who lived by a wood, from Latin silva meaning "wood". Famous bearers are Brazilian footballers Thiago Silva and Neymar.
DAYS     Welsh
Patronymic from the personal name Dai, a pet form of Dafydd, with the redundant addition of the English patronymic suffix -s.
DEADY     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Déadaigh ‘descendant of Déadach’, a personal name apparently meaning ‘toothy’.
DENVER     English
English surname, composed of the Old English elements Dene "Dane" and fær "passage, crossing," hence "Dane crossing."
DERIAN     Armenian
Patronymic from classical Armenian tēr meaning ‘lord’.
DICKENSHEETS     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Dickenscheid, a habitational name from a place named Dickenschied in the Hunsrück region. The place name is from Middle High German dicke ‘thicket’, ‘woods’ + -scheid (often schied) ‘border area’ (i.e. ridge, watershed), ‘settler’s piece of cleared (wood)land’.
DIỆP     Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Ye.
DINN     English
From a short form of the personal name Dinis, a variant of Dennis.
DOLLAR     Scottish, English (American)
Scottish: habitational name from Dollar in Clackmannanshire.... [more]
DONABEDIAN     Armenian
Patronymic from classical Armenian tōnapet meaning ‘head of a festival’.
DOSCH     German
Topographic name for someone living near bushes or brush, from Middle High German doste, toste ‘leafy branch’, or a habitational name from a house with a sign depicting a bush. Also an altered spelling of Dasch.
DOSHI     Gujarati
Hindu name meaning ‘hawker selling cloth’ in Gujarati, from Persian dush ‘shoulder’ + the agent suffix -i (because the cloth was carried over the hawker’s shoulder).
DRAG     Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from any of several farms named Drag. The place name is related to Old Norse draga "to pull" and originally denoted a place where boats were pulled along a river or across an isthmus.
DRIVER     English
Occupational name for a driver of horses or oxen attached to a cart or plow, or of loose cattle, from a Middle English agent derivative of Old English drīfan ‘to drive’.
DUMMITT     English
Habitational name from Dumart-en-Ponthieu in Somme, France.
DUXBURY     English
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, recorded in the early 13th century as D(e)ukesbiri, from the genitive case of the Old English personal name Deowuc or Duc(c) (both of uncertain origin) + Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke).
DWIGGINS     Irish
Anglicized form (with English genitive -s) of Gaelic Ó Dubhagáin (see Dugan) or, more likely, of Ó Duibhginn (see Deegan).Possibly a variant (by misdivision) of English Wiggins.
EGGLESTON     English
Habitational name from a place in County Durham so called, or from Egglestone in North Yorkshire, both named in Old English as Egleston, probably from the Old English personal name Ecgel (unattested) + tūn ‘settlement’, ‘farmstead’.
EGNER     German
From a Germanic personal name formed with the element agi ‘point (of a sword)’.
EGNER     Norwegian
Habitational name from a farmstead, of unexplained origin.
EKERN     Norwegian
Habitational name from a farm in eastern Norway so named, from Old Norse ekra ‘meadow’, ‘field’.
ELANDER     Swedish
Ornamental name composed of an unexplained first element + -ander, suffix adapted from Greek aner, andros ‘man’, a common element of Swedish surnames.
ELARDO     Italian
Possibly from a variant of the Germanic personal name Ilardo (see Ilardi).
ELENBAAS     Dutch
Reinterpretation of Elenbos or Elebaers, from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements alja ‘other’ or agil ‘point or edge (of a sword)’ + berht ‘bright’.
ELLEFSEN     Norwegian
Means "son of Ellef".
EL SAYED     Arabic (Egyptian)
Means "the master", from Arabic سَيِّد (sayyid) meaning "master, lord, prince" (see Sayyid).
ELSING     German
From a variant of the old personal name Elsung.
ELSINGER     German (Swiss)
Probably a derivative of Elsing.
EMBOABA     Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Variant of Emboava. A famous bearer of this surname is Brazilian footballer Oscar.
ENGLAND     Norwegian
Habitational name from any of various farmsteads, so named from Old Norse eng "meadow" and land "land".
ESPAÑA     Spanish
From the Spanish word for Spain.
FÀBREGAS     Catalan
Deriving from any of the places in Barcelona province named Fàbregues, from the plural of Fàbrega. Famous bearer of this surname is Spanish/Catalan footballer Francesc "Cesc" Fàbregas Soler.
FAILOR     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Failer or Fehler, variants of Feiler.
FALKENROTH     German
Variant of Falkenrath.
FALLEN     Scottish, Northern Irish
Variant spelling of Irish Fallon.
FALOTICO     Italian
From southern Italian falotico ‘eccentric’, ‘strange’, Greek kephalōtikos, a derivative of Greek kephalē ‘head’.
FANTOZZI     Italian
From a derivative of Fante.
FEIDT     German
Variant spelling of Feit.
FIELDHOUSE     English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a house in open pasture land. Reaney draws attention to the form de Felhouse (Staffordshire 1332), and suggests that this may have become Fellows.
FINSTAD     Norwegian
Habitational name from any of several farms so named, especially in southeastern Norway, from the personal name Finnr, meaning ‘Finn’, ‘Lapp’ + stad (from Old Norse staðr ‘farmstead’, ‘dwelling’).
FLOWER     Welsh
Anglicized form of the Welsh personal name Llywarch, of unexplained origin.
FLOWER     English
Nickname from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flower’, ‘blossom’ (Old French flur, from Latin flos, genitive floris). This was a conventional term of endearment in medieval romantic poetry, and as early as the 13th century it is also regularly found as a female personal name.
FLOWER     English
Metonymic occupational name for a miller or flour merchant, or perhaps a nickname for a pasty-faced person, from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flour’. This is in origin the same word as in 1, with the transferred sense ‘flower, pick of the meal’... [more]
FLOWER     English
Occupational name for an arrowsmith, from an agent derivative of Middle English flō ‘arrow’ (Old English flā).
FORREN     Norwegian
Habitational name from a farmstead in Trøndelag, so named from a river name derived from a word meaning ‘hollow’, ‘gorge’.
FORRER     German (Swiss)
Variant of Furrer.
FRANCOIS     French
Last name of the given name Francois
FRANTZEN     Norwegian, Danish
Variant of Franzén.
FRITZ     German
From the given name Fritz.
FUJIMORI     Japanese
Means Wisteria Forest.The name is found mostly in central Japan.
FURRER     German (Swiss)
Topographic name from the regional term furre ‘cleft in the ground’.
GAA     German
Bavarian dialect variant of Gau.
GABRIELE     Italian
From the personal name Gabriele, Italian form of Gabriel.
GAIDA     Latvian
From a personal name Gaida, based on the verb gaidīt meaning ‘to wait for’.
GALKIN     Russian
From Russia galka (галка) meaning "jackdaw".
GAŁKOWSKI     Polish
Habitational name for someone from Gałkowo in Suwałki voivodeship or Gałków in Piotrków voivodeship, both places named from gałka meaning ‘knob’, ‘lump’.
GAMA     Portuguese
Probably from gama ‘fallow deer doe’, feminine form of gamo, possibly as a topographic or habitational name.
GARATE     Basque
Habitational name from a town called Garate in Basque Country, or topographic name, possibly from a derivative of Basque gara ‘height’, ‘peak’.
GAU     German
Habitational name from any of various places named with Middle High German gau, göu ‘area of fertile agricultural land’.
GERMAN     English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
GERTH     German (Swiss)
From a reduced form of Gerhardt. Habitational name for someone from Gerthe near Bochum.
GERTSCH     German (Swiss)
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with gēr meaning ‘spear’, ‘lance’.
GHARAGOZLOU     Persian
Meaning "black eye".
GHEZZI     Italian
Patronymic or plural form of a nickname from Old Italian ghezzo ‘dark’
GIRONDA     Italian
Possibly from a variant of Italian ghironda ‘barrel-organ’.
GOAN     Northern Irish
Northern Irish form of Gowan.
GODA     Hungarian
From the old Hungarian secular personal name Goda, probably from a short form of Godimir, Godislav, or some other Slavic name.
GÖDEL     German
From an Old German personal name, Godilo, Godila.German (Gödel): from a pet form of a compound personal name beginning with the element god ‘good’ or god, got ‘god’.Variant of Godl or Gödl, South German variants of Gote, from Middle High German got(t)e, gö(t)te ‘godfather’.
GOE     Korean
Varient of Ko.
GOEL     Indian
Indian (northern states): Hindu (Bania) and Jain name of unknown origin, based on the name of a clan in the Agarwal Bania community.
GOULDING     English, Anglo-Saxon
From the late Old English personal name Golding.
GOURCUFF     Breton
Variant of Gourkuñv. ... [more]
GOURKUÑV     Breton
Breton combination of gour and kuñv meaning "a charming, affable, gentle or conciliatory man". The digraph -ff was introduced by Middle Ages' authors to indicate a nasalized vowel.
GOWAN     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Gobhann ‘descendant of the smith’.
GOYAL     Indian
Variant of Goel.
GRABAREK     Polish
Occupational name from a diminutive of grabarz ‘grave digger’.
GRABE     German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike or ditch, or habitational name from either of two places in Thuringia named with this word: Grabe and Graba.
GREGORI     Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Gregorio.
GUZMÁN     Spanish
Of uncertain and disputed etymology, probably from a Germanic personal name.
HAHM     German
Metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights and measures, from Middle High German hāme ‘(standard) measure’.
HAIRFIELD     English
Probably a variant of Harefield, a habitational name from a place so named, for example the one Greater London or Harefield in Selling, Kent, which are both apparently named from Old English here ‘army’ + feld ‘open country’.
HAIZLIP     English (American)
American variant spelling of Scottish Hyslop.
HALAMA     Polish, Czech
Unflattering nickname meaning ‘big, lumbering fellow’, ‘lout’.
HALLMARK     English
From Middle English halfmark ‘half a mark’, probably a nickname or status name for someone who paid this sum in rent.
HAMILL     Scottish
Habitational name from Haineville or Henneville in Manche, France, named from the Germanic personal name Hagano + Old French ville "settlement".
HAMILL     English
Nickname for a scarred or maimed person, from Middle English, Old English hamel "mutilated", "crooked".
HAMILL     Irish
According to MacLysaght, a shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÁdhmaill "descendant of Ádhmall", which he derives from ádhmall "active".
HANAFIN     Irish
Shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAinbhthín (modernized as Ó hAinifín) ‘descendant of Ainbhthín’, a personal name derived from ainbhíoth ‘non-peace’, ‘storm’.
HANES     English, Welsh
variant spelling of Haynes.
HANNAM     English
Habitational name from a place called Hanham in Gloucestershire, which was originally Old English Hānum, dative plural of hān ‘rock’, hence ‘(place) at the rocks’. The ending -ham is by analogy with other place names with this very common unstressed ending.
HAPPYGOD     English (African, Rare)
Possibly from the English words happy and god.
HARLIN     English
English surname transferred to forename use, from the Norman French personal name Herluin, meaning "noble friend" or "noble warrior."
HATSU     Japanese
Hatsu is both a Japanese surname and a unisex name meaning "Beginning." Notable bearers of this surname is Akiko Hatsu (Japanese manga artist) and a bearer of the first name form is Hatsu Hioki (Japanese wrestler).
HAYDT     German
Varient of Heid.
HAZARD     English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
1  2  3      Next Page         641 results (this is page 1 of 3)