Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is AngelM0113.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AARONSEnglish
Means "Son of Aaron."
ANGELSONEnglish
Means son of Angel.
BEEKMANGerman, Anglo-Saxon
This name derives from the pre 5th century Olde German and later Anglo-Saxon word "bah" or "baecc". This word describes a stream, or as a name specifically someone who lived or worked by a stream.
BELIĆSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the word belo meaning "white".
BERGDORFGerman
Origin unidentified. Possibly a German habitational name from places in Hamburg and Lower Saxony called Bergedorf, Bargdorf in Lower Saxony, or Bergsdorf in Brandenburg.
BILLSONEnglish
Means "Son of Bill."
BINGHAMEnglish
Ultimately deriving from the toponym of Melcombe Bingham in Dorset. The name was taken to Ireland in the 16th century, by Richard Bingham, a native of Dorset who was appointed governor of Connaught in 1584... [more]
BITTERMANEnglish, German
Name given to a person who was bitter.
BLANDFORDEnglish
Habitational name from Blandford Forum and other places called Blandford in Dorset (Blaneford in Domesday Book), probably named in Old English with bl?ge 'gudgeon' (genitive plural blægna) + ford 'ford'.
BLAZKOWICZPolish
From the video game series, Wolfenstein, Blazkowicz is the main character.
BÓBSKIPolish
Possibly derived from the Polish word bób, which means "broad bean".
CLATTENBURGAncient Germanic, Anglo-Saxon
Most likely something to do with a fortress. Meaning currently unknown.
COBALTEnglish
Name given to a person who mined cobalt.
DAHLSTRÖMSwedish
Derived from Swedish dal "valley" and ström "stream".
DAKEEnglish
The origins of the name Dake are from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It is derived from the personal name David. Daw was a common diminutive of David in the Middle Ages. The surname is a compound of daw and kin, and literally means "the kin of David."
DEATHRIDGEEnglish
Name given to someone who lived near a cemetery on a ridge.
DE LA MUERTESpanish (Rare)
Means "of death" in Spanish. Name given to a person who worked as a graveyard worker.
DI MAGGIOItalian
Came from a child who was born in the month of May. The surname Maggio is derived from the Italian word Maggio, which literally means the month of May.
DORADOSpanish
From Spanish dorado, from the verb dorar ‎(“gild, give a golden color”‎).
DRYDENAnglo-Saxon, Scottish
This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a Scottish locational name from a place thus called, near Roslin, in Midlothian. The derivation of the placename is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "dryge", dry, with "denu", valley; hence "dry valley".
ESCOBARSpanish
A topographic name from a collective form of escoba, meaning 'broom' (from the late Latin, scopa), or a habitational name from either of two minor places in Santander province called Escobedo.
FICHTNERGerman
The Fichtner family name first began to be used in the German state of Bavaria. After the 12th century, hereditary surnames were adopted according to fairly general rules, and names that were derived from locations became particularly common
FILIPPELLIItalian
Means "Son of Filippo." Italian form of Phillips.
FINNIGANIrish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicization of the Gaelic O' Fionnagain, meaning the descendant(s) of Fionnagan, an Old Irish personal name derived from the word "fionn", white, fairheaded.
GANZGerman, German (Swiss)
Variant of Gans 'goose'. German: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Ganso, a cognate of modern German ganz 'whole', 'all'.
GOBEREnglish, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
GOLDWATERGerman (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
This name is an Anglicized form of the German or Ashkenazic ornamental surname 'Goldwasser', or 'Goldvasser'. The name derives from the German or Yiddish gold', gold, with 'wasser', water, and is one of the very many such compound ornamental names formed with 'gold', such as 'Goldbaum', golden tree, 'Goldbert', golden hill, 'Goldkind', golden child, 'Goldrosen', golden roses, and 'Goldstern', golden star.
HAVERFORDWelsh, English
Haverford's name is derived from the name of the town of Haverfordwest in Wales, UK
HEIDENREICHGerman
From the medieval personal name Heidenrich, ostensibly composed of the elements heiden 'heathen', 'infidel' (see Heiden 2) + ric 'power', 'rule', but probably in fact a variant by folk etymology of Heidrich.
HIGHLANDEREnglish
Name given to a person who lived in the high lands of England.
JÄGERMEISTERSSENGerman
Means son of the "Master-Hunter". Originally given to the son of the master-hunter in hunting camps.
KNAUERGerman (Silesian)
Nickname for a gnarled person, from Middle High German knur(e) 'knot', 'gnarl'. habitational name for someone from either of two places in Thuringia called Knau.
KONEČNÝCzech, Slovak
From Czech and Slovak konečný meaning ''final, last, finite''. Perhaps a nickname for the youngest son of a family, a topographic name for someone who lived at the end of a settlement, or a nickname for someone who brought something to a conclusion.
LAHEYIrish
Lahey and Leahy originate from two different Gaelic surnames. Lahey, Lahy, Lahiff, Lahiffe, Laffey, and Lahive all originate from the Gaelic surname O Laithimh, which itself is a variant of O Flaithimh... [more]
LESNARGerman
Variant spelling of German Lessner, a habitational name from any of various places in eastern Germany called Lessen, all named with Slavic les 'forest'.
LONGGerman
Famous bearer is Luz Long a former Olympic competitor.
MARSTELLERGerman
Occupational name for a stable boy in or for the supervisor of the stables on a noble estate, from Middle High German mar(c) 'noble horse' stall 'stable' + the agent suffix -er.
MARTINESPortuguese
Means "Son of Martin." Portuguese form of Martínez.
MCCLINTOCKScottish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Deriving from an Anglicization of a Gaelic name variously recorded as M'Ilandick, M'Illandag, M'Illandick, M'Lentick, McGellentak, Macilluntud, McClintoun, Mac Illiuntaig from the 14th century onward... [more]
MCELHENNEYIrish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicized form of the Old Gaelic "MacGiolla Chainnigh". The Gaelic prefix "mac" means "son of", plus "giolla", devotee of, and the saint's name "Canice".
MCGIVERNNorthern Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Uidhrín, a patronymic from a personal name which is from a diminutive of odhar 'dun'. This surname is also found in Galloway in Scotland, where it is of Irish origin.
MCTONYAmerican
Tony McTony!
MEISTERGerman
Means "Master" in German.
MIRAMONTESSpanish
Looker of mountains.
MOLINAROItalian
The surname Molinaro is a name for a person who owned, managed, or worked in a mill deriving its origin from the Italian word "molino," which meant mill.
MOSSMANEnglish
This interesting name is a variant of the surname Moss which is either topographical for someone who lived by a peat bog, from the Old English pre 7th Century 'mos' or a habitational name from a place named with this word, for example Mosedale in Cumbria or Moseley in West Yorkshire.
OLANOBasque
Province of Araba, so named from ola 'forge', 'ironworks' + the diminutive suffix -no.
ÖSTERREICHERGerman, German (Austrian)
Means "One from Austria", "the Austrian".
PALMEROItalian
The Palmero family lived in the territory of Palma, which is in Campania, in the province of Naples. The surname Palma was also a patronymic surname, derived from the personal name Palma, which was common in medieval times... [more]
RICARDEZSpanish
Means "Son of Ricardo". Spanish form of Richardson.
RIISScandinavian
Nickname from ris 'twigs', 'scrub', or a habitational name from any of several places so named in Denmark. Norwegian: habitational name from any of five farmsteads named Ris, from Old Norse hrís 'brushwood'.
ROSENBORGNorwegian
Norwegian form of Rosenberg.
SCHUELERGerman
The surname Schueler was first found in southern Germany, where the name was closely identified in early mediaeval times with the feudal society which would become prominent throughout European history.
SIEBERGerman
The roots of the German surname Sieber can be traced to the Old Germanic word "Siebmacher," meaning "sieve maker." The surname is occupational in origin, and was most likely originally borne by someone who held this position
SIMPLETONEnglish
A name for someone who is simple, derived from old English.
STALLMANGerman
Variant of Staller. German: topographic name for someone who lived in a muddy place, from the dialect word stal. English: habitational name from Stalmine in Lancashire, named probably with Old English stæll 'creek', 'pool' + Old Norse mynni 'mouth'.
STEINBACHGerman, Jewish
German habitational name from any of the many places named Steinbach, named with Middle High German stein ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’, ‘creek’. ... [more]
STINSONEnglish, Scottish
This is one of the many patronymic forms of the male given name Stephen, i.e. son of Stephen. From these forms developed the variant patronymics which include Stim(p)son, Stenson, Steenson, and Stinson.
SUMTEREnglish
This surname is derived from an official title. 'the sumpter.' Old French sommetier, a packhorseman, one who carried baggage on horseback
TREXLERGerman
It is derived from the Middle High German "Drehseler," meaning "turner," and was most likely initially borne by a turner or lathe worker.
ÜBERMACHTGerman
Same given to someone with a lot of power.
UHLERGerman
Uhler is an Ortsgemeinde – a municipality belonging to a Verbandsgemeinde, a kind of collective municipality – in the Rhein-Hunsrück-Kreis in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. It belongs to the Verbandsgemeinde of Kastellaun, whose seat is in the like-named town.
VAN KELTPopular Culture
Used for a character from the 1992 film, School Ties, Rip Van Kelt.
VON HAMMERSMARKPopular Culture, German (?)
Means "from Hammersmark" in German. Bridget von Hammersmark is a fictional character in Quentin Tarantino's film 'Inglourious Basterds' from 2009.
WASSERGerman, Jewish
Wasser Family History. German: topographic name from Middle High German wazzer 'water'. Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name or a metonymic occupational name for a water-carrier, from German Wasser, Yiddish vaser 'water'.
WATERSONEnglish
It is a patronymic of the male given name Water or Walter.
WEAPONSWORTHEnglish
Means maker of weapons
WEIDMANNGerman
Name meaning, "hunter".
WERDUMGerman
Werdum is a municipality in the district of Wittmund, in Lower Saxony, Germany.
WRANGLEREnglish
Given to a person who worked as a wrangler.
WÜRTTEMBERGGerman
Württemberg is an historical German territory. Together with Baden and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg.
YOHEMedieval English
The Yohe surname comes from the Old English word "ea," or "yo," in Somerset and Devon dialects, which meant "river" or "stream." It was likely originally a topographic name for someone who lived near a stream.
ZARAGOZASpanish, Aragonese
Name given to someone who was from the city Zaragoza in the Aragon region in Spain.
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