Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is SeaHorse15.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ACQUAVIVA     Italian
From an Italian place name meaning "running water, spring", literally "living water".
ASLANIAN     Armenian
Means "son of Aslan" in Armenian.
ASPLIN     English
From a short form of the given name Absalom.
BABUSHKIN     Russian, Jewish
Derived from Russian бабушка (babushka) meaning "grandmother".
BÉGON     French
Probably from French béguin "(male) Beguin", referring to a member of a particular religious order active in the 13th century, and derived from the surname of Lambert le Bègue, the mid-12th-century priest responsible for starting it... [more]
BEVILACQUA     Italian
From Italian bevi l'acqua "drinks water", a nickname likely applied ironically to an alcoholic.
BRANNOCK     Irish
Originally taken from the Welsh place name Brecknock. Medieval settlers brought this name to Ireland.
BRIGHTWEN     English
From either of the two Old English given names Beohrtwine (a masculine name which meant "bright friend") or Beohrtwynn (a feminine name which meant "bright joy").
BYLILLY     Navajo
Derived from Navajo ‎"for him" and álílee "magic power".
CATTLEY     English
Means "person from Catley", Herefordshire and Lincolnshire ("glade frequented by cats"). It was borne by the British botanical patron William Cattley (1788-1835).
COKAYNE     English
Medieval English nickname which meant "idle dreamer" from Cockaigne, the name of an imaginary land of luxury and idleness in medieval myth. The place may derive its name from Old French (pays de) cocaigne "(land of) plenty", ultimately from the Low German word kokenje, a diminutive of koke "cake" (since the houses in Cockaigne are made of cake).
DANZ     German
Derived from a given name, a short form of the name Tandulf, the origins of which are uncertain. (In some cases, however, this surname may have originated as a nickname denoting a person who liked to dance, from the Middle High German word tanz, danz "dance".)
DEBS     French
From the given name Debus, a variant of Thebs or Thebus, which was an altered short form of Mattheus. This was borne by American union leader Eugene V. Debs (1855-1926).
DRURY     English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
EBERLE     Upper German, German (Swiss)
From a diminutive of Eberhard.
ELPHEE     English
Derived from the Old English given name Ælfwig.
ELSEGOOD     English (British), English (Australian)
Derived from an Old English given name, possibly *Ælfgod or *Æðelgod, in which the second element is god "god". (Another source gives the meaning "temple-god", presumably from ealh and god.)... [more]
ENEVOLDSEN     Danish
Means "son of Enevold".
ESPLIN     Scottish
Scottish variant of Asplin. This was borne by the English stained glass artist and muralist Mabel Esplin (1874-1921).
FAHEY     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fathaidh or Ó Fathaigh ‘descendant of Fathadh’, a personal name derived from fothadh ‘base’, ‘foundation’. This name is sometimes Anglicized as Green(e as a result of erroneous association with faithche ‘lawn’.
FALSEN     Norwegian
Means "son of Falle".
FEOKTISTOV     Russian
Means "son of Feoktist".
FILEMONSEN     Greenlandic
Means "son of Filemon".
FINNBOGASON     Icelandic
Means "son of Finnbogi".
GREENWAY     English
Originally given to a person who lived near a grassy path, from Middle English grene "green" and weye "road, path" (cf. Way).... [more]
GREENWAY     Welsh
Derived from the given name Goronwy.
GULLIVER     English
From a medieval nickname for a greedy person (from Old French goulafre "glutton"). Jonathan Swift used it in his satire 'Gulliver's Travels' (1726), about the shipwrecked ship's surgeon Lemuel Gulliver, whose adventures "offer opportunities for a wide-ranging and often savage lampooning of human stupidity and vice."
HATATHLI     Navajo
From Navajo hataałii meaning ‎"medicine man, shaman", literally "singer" (from the verb hataał ‎"he sings, he is chanting").
HAVELOCK     English
From the Middle English male personal name Havelok, from Old Norse Hafleikr, literally "sea sport". It was borne by the British general Sir Henry Havelock (1795-1857).
HEARD     English
Occupational name for a tender of animals, normally a cowherd or shepherd, from Middle English herde (Old English hi(e)rde).
HINCKLEY     English
From the name of a place in Leicestershire meaning "Hynca's wood", from the Old English byname Hynca, derivative of hún "bear cub", and leah "woodland, clearing".
HOLLIER     English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
HURD     English
Variant of Heard.
IPATIEV     Russian
Means "son of Ipatiy".
KELLEN     German
From the name of a place in Rhineland, which is derived from Middle Low German kel (a field name denoting swampy land) or from the dialect word kelle meaning "steep path, ravine".
KELTY     Scottish
From the name of a village in Fife, Scotland, which was derived from Scottish Gaelic coillte "wooded area, grove".
KILGORE     Scottish
Habitational name for someone from Kilgour in Fife, named with the Gaelic coille "wood" and gobhar, gabhar "goat".
LANSING     Dutch
Patronymic from Lans, Germanic Lanzo, a Dutch cognate of Lance.
LANSING     English
Derived from the name of Lancing, a place in West Sussex, which was composed of the Old English personal name Wlanc and -ingas meaning "family of" or "followers of".
LARAMORE     English, Scottish
Variant of Lorimer.
LAVERDURE     French
From the French place name La Verdure meaning "greenness, greenery".
LAVERICK     English
Derived from Old English lāferce meaning "lark", making it a cognate of Lark.
LAZENBY     English
From a place name which was derived from leysingi and byr, two Norse words meaning "freedman" and "settlement" respectively.
LUSTER     English
Variant of Lester.
MAC PHÁIDÍN     Irish
Patronymic of (a Gaelic diminutive of) Patrick.
MARLING     English
Variant of Merlin.
MAZARIN     French
French form of Italian Mazzarino.
MAZZARINO     Italian
A diminutive of Mazzaro, an Italian surname meaning "mace-bearer".
MCFADDEN     Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Phaid(e)in (Scottish) and Mac Pháidín (Irish) - both patronymics of Patrick (via Gaelic diminutives of the given name).
MOWBRAY     English
Ultimately from the name of a place in Normandy meaning "mud hill" in Old French.
PALAFOX     Spanish (Mexican)
From Palafolls, a Catalan place name.
PELTIER     French
Variant of Pelletier (from Old French pellet, a diminutive of pel "skin, hide").
PENROSE     Cornish, Welsh
Originally meant "person from Penrose", Cornwall, Herefordshire and Wales ("highest part of the heath or moorland"). It is borne by the British mathematician Sir Roger Penrose (1931-).... [more]
PILGRIM     English, German
From Middle English pilegrim, pelgrim or Middle High German bilgerin, pilgerin (from Latin pelegrinus "traveler"; see Pellegrino). This originated as a nickname for a person who had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land or to some seat of devotion nearer home, such as Santiago de Compostella, Rome, or Canterbury... [more]
POBJOY     English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a parrot, from Middle English papejai, popinjay "parrot". This probably denoted someone who was talkative or who dressed in bright colours, although it may have described a person who excelled at the medieval sport of pole archery, i.e. shooting at a wooden parrot on a pole.
POLIDORI     Italian
Means "son of Polidoro". Famous bearers include John William Polidori (1795-1821), a physician to Lord Byron and author of 'The Vampyre' (1819), and his sister Frances Polidori (1800-1886), the mother of painter and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti, poet Christina Rossetti, critic William Michael Rossetti, and author Maria Francesca Rossetti.
POSTHUMUS     Dutch, Low German
From a personal name which was given to a posthumous child, i.e., one born after the death of his father, derived from Latin postumus "last, last-born" (superlative of posterus "coming after, subsequent") via Late Latin posthumus, which was altered by association with Latin humare "to bury", suggesting death (i.e., thought to consist of post "after" and humus "grave", hence "after death"); the one born after the father's death obviously being the last.
RAVENHILL     English
From Rauenilde or Ravenild, medieval English forms of the Old Norse given name Hrafnhildr.
ROSEVEAR     Cornish, English
From the name of a Cornish village near St Mawgan which derives from Celtic ros "moor, heath" and vur "big".
SEVERSON     American
Probably an Americanized form of Sivertsen, Sivertson, or Sievertsen.
SHELDRAKE     English
From a medieval nickname for a dandyish (showy) or vain man, from Middle English scheldrake, the male of a type of duck with brightly-coloured plumage (itself from the East Anglian dialect term scheld "variegated" combined with drake "male duck").
SHIVERS     Irish
Irish variant of Chivers.
SHUCK     English
Origin uncertain; perhaps a nickname from Middle English schucke "devil, fiend".
SIEVERTSEN     German
Patronymic of Sievert.
SIVERTSEN     Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Patronymic of Sivert.... [more]
SIVERTSON     American
Americanized form of Sivertsen or Sivertsson.
SIVERTSSON     Swedish
Swedish cognate of Sivertsen.
SORRELL     English
From a medieval nickname meaning literally "little red-haired one", from a derivative of Anglo-Norman sorel "chestnut".
SPENDLOVE     English
From a medieval nickname for someone who spread their amorous affections around freely. A different form of the surname was borne by Dora Spenlow, the eponymous hero's "child-wife" in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849-50).... [more]
ST FLEUR     Haitian Creole
From the French place name St Fleur.
ST LEGER     Irish, English
Anglo-Irish surname, from one of the places in France called Saint-Léger, which were named in honour of St. Leodegar.
SWAN     English, Scottish
Originally given as a nickname to a person who was noted for purity or excellence, which were taken to be attributes of the swan, or who resembled a swan in some other way. In some cases it may have been given to a person who lived at a house with the sign of a swan... [more]
TURRENTINE     American
Origin unidentified ('Dictionary of American Family Names': "1881 census has 0, Not in RW, EML"), perhaps from the Italian surname Tarantino.
UNTHANK     English
From a place name meaning "squatter's holding" from Old English unthanc (literally "without consent").
WELD     English
Meant "one who lives in or near a forest (or in a deforested upland area)", from Middle English wold "forest" or "cleared upland". A famous bearer is American actress Tuesday Weld (1943-).
WELTY     German (Swiss)
From a Swiss German diminutive of the German given name Walther. A literary bearer was the American writer Eudora Welty (1909-2001).
WINNEY     English
Derived from an unattested Old English given name, *Wyngeofu, composed of the elements wyn "joy" and geofu "battle".... [more]
WINTERSON     English
Patronymic form of Winter.
ZAFEIRIOU     Greek
Means "son of Zafeiris".
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