Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is Frollein Gladys.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AACKERGerman
Variant spelling of the surname Acker.
ABASYANArmenian
This is a last name. Abasyan's were Kings and Queens, having Kingdoms from the years 750-1280.
ABELSONEnglish
This name derives from the surname Abelson, meaning "son of Abel." Patronymic.
ABERCROMBIEScottish
Derived from a surname. It is the name of a parish in Fife, Scotland, on the northern shore of the Frith of Forth, whence the possessor took his surname; from Aber, marshy ground, a place where two or more streams meet; and cruime or crombie, a bend or crook... [more]
ABERNATHYScottish
A different form of Abernethy, which originally meant "person from Abernethy", Perth and Kinross ("confluence of the (river) Nethy"). This was one of the surnames of the Scots who settled in northern Ireland during the ‘plantation’ in the 17th century, and it was brought to the U.S. as the name of a Southern plantation owner.
ABIDAOUDArabic
Arabic surname meaning "son of Dawud".
ABOULAFIAJewish
Variant spelling of Abulafia, which was originally a Sephardi Jewish surname of Arabic etymological origin.
ABREGOSpanish
As a Spanish surname, it was from Spanish ábrego, which originally meant "African", from Latin africus. The vocabulary word in modern Spanish has lost this general sense and now means "south wind" (literally, "African (wind)").
ACEROSpanish
Spanish word for "steel" which is a metal.
ACHAMPOMAAAfrican
Allegedly a feminine form of Achampong used in Ghana.
ACHIOSpanish (Latin American)
Possibly derived from the town, Achio, near Guadalajara in Mexico. The name itself is probably from the Nahuatl achio meaning "frequent".
ACKERLEYEnglish
Old English surname which came from a place name which meant "Oak meadow." See Ackley.
ACKLEYEnglish
From an Old English surname: a place name which meant "Oak meadow". A variation of this is: "dwells at the oak tree meadow". ... [more]
ADORNOItalian
Southern Italian: from the personal name Adorno, meaning ‘adorned’.... [more]
AETÓSGreek
"Eagle" - in Greek, spelled αετός.
AGASSIArmenian, Persian, Italian
The surname Agassi most likely evolved from a nickname for someone resembling a mappie, perhaps jokingly referred to as chattering or nagging person. ... [more]
AGHATurkish
Means "chief, master, lord" in Turkish. From the Turkish ağa 'chief, master, lord', from the Old Turkish aqa 'elder brother'. Traditionally it was a title for a civilian or military officer, or often part of such title, and was placed after the name of certain military functionaries in the Ottoman Empire... [more]
AHEARNAIrish (Anglicized, Rare)
Either from an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Eachthighearna meaning "descendant of Eachthighearna", or else an anglicized form of Eachthighearna.
ALABASTEREnglish
From the name of a whitish kind of gypsum used for vases, ornaments and busts, ultimately deriving from Greek alabastros, itself perhaps from Egyptian 'a-labaste "vessel of the goddess Bast"... [more]
ALARDYCEScottish
Scottish regional surname meaning "southern cliff". From the Gaelic all 'cliff' and deas 'southern'.
ALBRIGHTAmerican
This name was originally Albrecht. It was changed by German imigrants to America in the 1600s.
ALDERSONEnglish (Modern)
Patronymic from the Middle English forename Alder, derived from two Old English names, Ealdhere ‘ancient army’ and Æ{dh}elhere ‘noble army’. Means "son of Aldert".
ALFORDEnglish, Scottish
Habitation name found in Lincolnshire, Surrey and Somerset, England and Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The name can be derived by combining the Old English female personal name Ealdg- and -ford meaning "water crossing" or can mean "from the alder tree ford".
ALISTONEnglish
Variant of Allerston, a habitational surname derived from a place so named in North Yorkshire.
ALTHOFFGerman
A surname predominantly found in Westphalia and the Rhineland region of Germany which is derived from German alt "old" and Hof (Hoff in the local dialects) "farmstead; farm; manor".
AMESEnglish, German
English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius.... [more]
AMICOItalian
Means "friend".
AMIDALAPopular Culture
Queen Amidala is a character from the Star Wars universe. Amidala is her regnal name, having been born Padmé Naberrie.
ANJUMIndian (Muslim), Bengali (Muslim), Urdu
From Arabic نَجْم (najm) meaning "celestial body, star, planet".
ARAFAArabic (Egyptian)
Possibly from Arabic عَرَفَ (ʿarafa) meaning “to know”.
ARAGONSpanish, Catalan, French
A surname and an autonomous community of Spain.
ARAQUISTAINBasque, Spanish
''Place of the ferns'' in Basque. It first appeared when a family arrived for the first time to a part of the Pyrenees where they where a lot of ferns. Then, that family, changed their last name to ''Araquistain'' which means ''place of the ferns'' in basque.
ARISENEnglish (Modern)
From a Dutch surname that means "son of Aris". In The Netherlands, this name is never used as a first name, since Dutch law strictly prohibits the use of surnames as first names. Therefore, if this name is indeed sometimes used as a first name in the United States (where it *is* allowed to use surnames as first names), one should classify Arisen as an (American-)English first name.
ARNDTGerman
Derived from the personal name Arndt.
ARUNDELEnglish
English surname which comes from two distinct sources. Either it was derived from a place name meaning "horehound valley" in Old English (from harhune "horehound (a plant)" and dell "valley"), or it was from Old French arondel, diminutive of arond "swallow", which was originally a Norman nickname given to someone resembling a swallow.
ASPINALLEnglish
A locational name of Anglo-Saxon origin, it means “aspen well”.
ATLEYEnglish
Variant of Atlee.... [more]
ATMOREEnglish
Locational surname derived from Middle English atte more meaning "at the marsh".
AULCYEnglish
English surname, of unknown meaning.
AURINKOFinnish
Aurinko means "sun" in Finnish.
AUSLEYEnglish (Modern)
Rare surname which was from an English place name in which the second element is Old English leah "wood, clearing". The first element may be hors "horse" (in which case the name likely referred to a place where horses were put out to pasture) or the river name Ouse (ultimately from the ancient British root ud- "water").
AVENASpanish, Italian
A traditionally Spanish and Italian occupational surname for a "grain grower or merchant", or the Italian habitation surname for Avena, Calabria. Means "oats". From the Latin avēna meaning 'oats, wild oats, straw'.
AVIÑAGalician
Galician surname referring to someone who "lives by a vineyard", from d’Aviña, a variant of da viña.
AYLEREnglish
occupational name from Old French aillier ‘garlic seller’, from ail ‘garlic’ (from Latin allium).... [more]
BACLANCeltic (Rare)
Form of the surname Backlund
BADRINETTEEnglish
Apparently an extremely rare name of French origin, but isn't used as a first name in France. It might come from the rather uncommon French surname Bardinette, which apparently is a variant spelling of the surname Bardinet... [more]
BAINEBRIDGEEnglish, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
BANNIONScottish
Scottish/Irish
BARBONFrench (Quebec)
Derived from the nickname barbon meaning "old codger" as well as referring to a "confirmed bachelor".
BARKEREnglish
SURNAME Town cryer, or someone who shouts out notices
BAUERDICKGerman
A surname originating from the Rhineland region of Germany. It is derived from German Bauer (Bur in the locals dialects) "farmer" and Deich (Diek and Dick in the local dialects) "levee" or Teich "pond"... [more]
BAUERSACKGerman
Semi-Germanized form of the Polish surname Burczak, originally derived from Polish burczec "growl; shout".... [more]
BAUMFREEDutch, American, African American
This name is clearly derived from Sojourner Truth, a former African-American slave who was born as Isabella Bomefree (but at some point the surname was changed to the more German-looking Baumfree). Although Sojourner's original owners - James and Elizabeth Bomefree/Baumfree - were apparently of Dutch descent, it is questionable whether the surname is really of Dutch origin... [more]
BEARDENEnglish
English habitational name, a variant of Barden, or from places in Devon and Cornwall called Beardon.
BECHERGerman
Shortened form of Becherer as well as a surname given to for someone who distilled or worked with pitch, in which case it is derived from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch".
BECHMANNGerman (Rare)
Surname denoting someone who worked with pitch, from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch" and man, a suffix which can mean "man" or simply be used as a name suffix.
BECKETTEnglish
An Old English name simply meaning "beehive". Famous Irish playwrite Samuel Beckett bears this name.
BECKLEYEnglish
This surname was taken from an English habitational name from any of the various places, in Kent, Oxfordshire, and Sussex, named Beckley whose name was derived from the Old English byname Becca and the Old English lēah "woodland clearing".... [more]
BENDERGerman, German (East Prussian)
As a German surname, Bender is a regional occupational surname from the Rhineland area denoting a "barrel-maker" (the Standard German Fassbinder became "Fassbender" in the local dialects and ultimately was shortened to Bender).... [more]
BENNINGTONEnglish
Habitational name from either of two places called Benington, in Hertfordshire and Lincolnshire, or from Long Bennington in Lincolnshire. The first is recorded in Domesday Book as Benintone "farmstead or settlement (Old English tūn) by the Beane river"; both Lincolnshire names are derived from the Old English personal name Beonna combined with -ing-, a connective particle denoting association, and tūn.
BERGHOLDGerman
Surname that denoted the owner of a vineyard.
BERNOULLIFrench
French patronymic surname that was derived from the first name Bernoul (which was probably derived from Bernold or Bernolf).
BERTRAMGerman
Derived from the German given name Bertram.
BERUŠKACzech
Allegedly derived from Czech beruška "ladybird; ladybug".
BESKEGerman
Likely derived from Peschke and Peske, vernacular forms of the given name Petrus.
BETZGerman
Derived from a Thuringian short form of the personal name Bernhard.
BIRKETEnglish
It's a locational surname taken from the village of Birket Houses in Lancashire.
BLAKESMITHGerman (Anglicized)
Derived from the German, Blechschmidt, it means "tin smith", and/or, blacksmith.
BLAYLOCKEnglish
The surname of James P. Blaylock (1950-), an early steampunk author. His surname may mean "black lock" from Middle English blakelok, originally referring to a person with dark hair.
BLINWelsh
The same as Blaen, a point, the inland extremity of a valley. Blin also signifies weary, troublesome.
BOSLEYEnglish
English habitation surname derived from the Old English personal name Bosa and the Old English leah "clearing, field". It's also possibly a variant of the French surname Beausoleil meaning "beautiful sun" from the French beau 'beautiful, fair' and soleil 'sun'... [more]
BOSTWICKEnglish
From an English surname which was from a lost or unidentified place name. The second element is clearly Old English wic "outlying (dairy) farm".
BOWERSOCKEnglish
Likely an Americanized spelling of Bauersack.
BRAQUEFrench
Surname of cubist artist Georges Braque.
BRAZILEnglish (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BRINTONEnglish
English locational surname, taken from the town of the same name in Norfolk. The name means "settlement belonging to Brun" - the personal name coming from the Old English word for "fire, flame".
BUCHERGerman
Upper German surname denoting someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, derived from Middle High German buoche "beech tree".
BULSTRODEEnglish
Locational surname referring to the medieval village of Bulstrode in Berkshire. ... [more]
BYAMEnglish
Probably means "person from Bytham", Lincolnshire ("homestead in a valley bottom"). Glen Byam Shaw (1904-1986) was a British theatre director.
CABLEEnglish, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
CALLOWAYAmerican (Modern, Rare)
Means "pebble". From the Old French cail(ou) 'pebble'. Traditionally an English surname, which is a regional name of French Norman origin from Caillouet-Orgeville in Eure, France.
CANELLAItalian
Italian regional surname denoting someone who lived by a canal. From the Italian canale 'canal', from the Latin canalis meaning "canal; conduit; groove; funnel; or ditch". Alternatively, it may come the genus name of wild cinnamon, a diminutive of the Latin canna "reed, cane".
CARDWELLEnglish
From the traditionally British surname, which is a variant of the British surname Caldwell, a from the Old English cald "cold" and well(a) "spring, stream".
CARISBROOKEnglish
Carisbrooke is a village on the Isle of Wight; the name is thought to mean "Carey's brook". When in 1917 the British royal family changed its name from the "House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha" to the "House of Windsor" and renounced all German titles, the title of Marquess of Carisbrooke was created for the erstwhile German Prince Alexander of Battenberg.
CARMICHAELScottish, English
Scottish place name meaning "fort of Michael".
CARRINGTONEnglish, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Carrington, probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Cara + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’.... [more]
CATEREnglish
Comes from the English word "caterer".
CAVERLYEnglish
English surname, a variant of the English surname Calverley, itself derived from the Old English calf "calf" and leag "field, clearing".
CAWOODEnglish
Traditional English habitational surname meaning "jackdaw wood" from the Old English ca referring to 'jackdaw' (a member of the crow family), and wudu 'wood'.
CHAMPIONEnglish (Rare)
From an English and French surname.
CHAMPLINBelgian, English
Means Champion, was a family name in Belgium, a status and influence that was envied by the princes of the region.... [more]
CHÉNIERFrench
French surname which indicated one who lived in an oak wood or near a conspicuous oak tree, derived from Old French chesne "oak" (Late Latin caxinus). In some cases it may be from a Louisiana dialectical term referring to "an area of shrub oak growing in sandy soil" (i.e., "beach ridge, usually composed of sand-sized material resting on clay or mud... [more]
CHIRICOItalian
Surname of Italian surrealist artist, Giorgio de Chirico
CHOLMONDELEYEnglish
An aristocratic surname derived from a place name in Cheshire which means "Ceolmund's grove" in Old English.
CLELANDBelgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
COMBEFERRELiterature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
CONKLINIrish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
CONNICKYiddish
Variation on Koenig.
COPELANDEnglish
Some sources say that Copeland is English: "one that is good at coping". Another says Copeland is Northern English and Scottish, from Cumberland and Northumberland meaning "bought land". Old Norse, kaupa-land for‘bought land’.
CORRIGANEnglish
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
COURFEYRACLiterature
Courfeyrac is the surname that Victor Hugo used for Marius' closest friend in the friend of the ABC. Meaning is unknown.
COUTEREnglish
The couter (also spelled "cowter") is the defense for the elbow in a piece of plate armour. Initially just a curved piece of metal, as plate armor progressed the couter became an articulated joint.... [more]
COWARDEnglish
several origins... [more]
CROFTEREnglish
A surname of Scottish origin used in the Highlands and Islands and means “an owner or a tenant of a small farm”. The Old English word croft seems to correspond with the Dutch kroft meaning “a field on the downs”.
CUDAKPolish
Means "oddity, crank" in Polish. It can also come from the word cud meaning "miracle, wonder".
CULLYEnglish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same Connla).
DEMMAEnglish
Possibly an Anglicization of the Italian surname Demma, a metronymic from the personal name Emma.
DIDSCHUSGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German name meaning "tall; big", from Old Prussian didis (or Old Prussian didszullis "the tall one").
DIMONDEnglish, Irish
English and Irish variant of Diamond.
DINJERGerman (Rare)
Occupational surname that originated in the German dialect spoken in the Rhineland-Palatinate region. ... [more]
DOBILEITGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "clover; trefoil".
DOEPNERGerman
Derived from Middle Low German top and dop "pot". This is an occupational surname originally given to a potter.
DRUXGerman
Variant of Trux, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
DURETFrench
Derived from French dur meaning "hard, tough".
EALEYEnglish
Variant of ELY.
EARENFIGHTEnglish
appears in early American history in Pennsylvania and New Jerssey. Jacob Earenfight fought in the Battle of Princeton in the American Revolutionary War.
EDELSTEINJewish
Ornamental name derived from German Edelstein "gemstone; precious stone".
EDGELYEnglish
A surname of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a place name taken from either a village in Cheshire or one in Shropshire. The name means “park by the wood” in Old English.
EINHORNGerman
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
ELLENDEREnglish
English variant of Allender.
EMSLEYEnglish
A name that came from a family that lived in Yorkshire, where they derived the family name from Helmsley. Probably of Old English origin Helm and ley or leah, which means "a clearing in the woods."
ENGELSENNorwegian
Means "son of Engel".
ENJOLRASLiterature
From a surname which was from Occitan enjeura meaning "to terrify". This was the name of a charismatic activist in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862).
ESCHERDutch, German
German habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Esch, Esche, or Eschen.
ESKELLOld Danish
Variant of Eskil, a form (found in Old Danish) of the Norse name Áskell, Ásketill.
FAGANIrish
From a surname, "The name Fagan in Ireland is usually of Norman origin, especially in Counties Dublin and Meath. In the County Louth area the name is derived from the native Gaelic O'Faodhagain Sept of which there are a number of variants including Feighan, Fegan and Feehan." (from irishsurnames.com)
FANCOURTEnglish
Derived from the English surname Fancourt, which originated in the county of Bedfordshire in England.
FARADAYEnglish
From an English surname meaning "servant of Fair", Fair being derived from Old English fæger used as a personal name.
FARANDEnglish (Canadian), French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name FARIMOND or from the French word ferrer meaning "to be clad in iron" or "to shoe a horse".
FARROWEnglish
A small litter of pigs
FENNEREnglish
A surname of either Old French origin, allegedly meaning “huntsman”, or else more probably referring to those who were brought over from the Low Countries to assist in draining the “fens” or wetlands of England and Ireland – a process which lasted from the 9th to the 18th centuries.
FERRELLIrish
Irish variant of Farrell.
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