Submitted Surnames Starting with C

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
CLUTTERBUCK English, Dutch (Anglicized, ?)
English surname of unknown origin, possibly a corrupted form of a Dutch surname derived from Dutch klateren "to clatter" and beek "brook". The original surname may have been brought to England by Flemish weavers whom Edward III brought to England in the 14th century to teach their techniques to the English, or by Huguenots who fled the Netherlands in the 16th century to escape religious persecution... [more]
CLWYD Welsh
This indicates familial origin near the River Clwyd.
CLY Navajo
From Navajo tłʼaaí meaning ‎"lefty, left-handed one", from the verb nishtłʼa ‎"to be left-handed".
CLYDE Scottish
A river in the south-west of Scotland, running through Inverclyde, Ayrshire, Dunbartonshire, Lanarkshire, and the city of Glasgow. The second longest in Scotland; and the eighth longest in the United Kingdom... [more]
CMIEL Polish
From the Polish noun 'trzmiel', which means "bumblebee."
COACH Irish
Origin uncertain. Most probably a reduced form of Irish McCoach, which is of uncertain derivation, perhaps a variant of MCCAIG.
COACH French
Possibly an altered spelling of French Coache, from the Norman and Picard term for a damson, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of plums.
COAKLEY Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Caochlaoich "son of Caochlaoch", a personal name meaning literally "blind warrior".
COALLA Asturian (Spanish)
Castilianized form of CUAYA.
COARD German
Derived from the first name KONRAD.
COATES English
Meaning of the Cottage or Cottages
COATH English
Derived from the Cornish word for smith, goff.
COATNEY English
The initial bearer of this surname lived in a little cottage.
COBAIN Scottish
This unusual surname is of Old Norse origin and is found particularly in Scotland. It derives from an Old Norse personal name Kobbi, itself from an element meaning large, and the Gaelic bain, denoting a fair person, with the diminutive ('little' or 'son of') form Cobbie.
COBALT English
Name given to a person who mined cobalt.
ÇOBAN Turkish
Means "shepherd" in Turkish.
ČOBAN Croatian, Serbian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''. Cognate of Turkish ÇOBAN.
ČOBANAC Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANIĆ Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANKOVIĆ Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANOV Croatian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANOVIĆ Croatian, Serbian
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
ČOBANSKI Croatian (Rare)
From čoban meaning ''shepherd''.
COBBOLD English
From the medieval male personal name Cubald (from Old English Cūthbeald, literally "famous-brave").
COBERLEY English
Possibly from a village in England called Coberley
COCHRANE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
COCIÑA Galician
It literally means "kitchen".
COCKE English
nickname from Middle English cok ‘cock’, ‘male bird or fowl’ (Old English cocc), given for a variety of possible reasons. Applied to a young lad who strutted proudly like a cock, it soon became a generic term for a youth and was attached with hypocoristic force to the short forms of many medieval personal names (e.g. Alcock, Hancock, Hiscock, Mycock)... [more]
COCUZZA Italian
From cocuzza "gourd", "pumpkin", applied either as an occupational name for a grower or seller of gourds or a nickname for a rotund individual.
CODEY Irish
Based off of the given name Cody
CODREANU Romanian, Moldovan
A common surname in Romania and Moldova.... [more]
COE English
English (Essex and Suffolk): nickname from the jackdaw, Middle English co, Old English ca (see Kay). The jackdaw is noted for its sleek black color, raucous voice, and thievish nature, and any of these attributes could readily have given rise to the nickname.
COENS Medieval German
Variation of Coen. A diminutive of KONRAD/CONRAD, an old German Emperor's name (compare its Dutch form 'Coenraad')... [more]
COERS German, Dutch
Derived from the given name KONRAD
COFFEE Irish
Variant of COFFEY.
COFFEY Irish
Ireland County Cork
COFFIN English
The House of Coffin is an ancient English family which originated in Devonshire.
COGGESHALL English
Habitational name from Coggeshall in Essex, England, which was derived from Cogg, an Old English personal name, and Old English halh meaning "nook, recess".
COILL Irish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COISH Anglo-Saxon, English, English (Australian), English (American)
Derived from Old English cosche and cosshe (c.1490), meaning "small cottage" or "hut". The medieval Coish family held a seat in Cambridgeshire.
COIT Medieval Welsh, French, English
The surname Coit was first found in Carnarvonshire, a former country in Northwest Wales, anciently part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd, and currently is divided between the unitary authorities of Gwynedd and Conwy, where they held a family seat... [more]
COITO Medieval Italian (Tuscan, Latinized, ?)
That means a wedding or the nuptials.
COJUANGCO Filipino
From Hokkien 許寰哥 (Khó͘ Hoân-ko), which was the nickname of Co Yu Hwan (許玉寰), the Chinese predecessor of the family who arrived in the Philippines in the 19th century. This is the name of a prominent political and business family in the Philippines.
COKAYNE English
Medieval English nickname which meant "idle dreamer" from Cockaigne, the name of an imaginary land of luxury and idleness in medieval myth. The place may derive its name from Old French (pays de) cocaigne "(land of) plenty", ultimately from the Low German word kokenje, a diminutive of koke "cake" (since the houses in Cockaigne are made of cake).
ÇOLAK Turkish
Means "one-armed, crippled" in Turkish.
COLBATH English
Means "cold".
COLBURN English
Habitational name from a place near Catterick in North Yorkshire.
COLDEN English, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Colden, from Old English cald ‘cold’ col ‘charcoal’ + denu ‘valley’.... [more]
COLELLA Italian
diminutive of personal name COLA, a short form of Nicola, an Italian equivalent of NICHOLAS... [more]
COLES English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of NICHOLAS.... [more]
COLEY English
With variant COLLEY can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas.
COLFAX English
From a medieval nickname for someone with dark or black hair, from Old English cola "charcoal" and feax "hair".
COLLABRUSCO Italian
From the region Calabria in southern Italy; widely moved to US.
COLLARD English, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
COLLET French
From a pet form of Colle.
COLLEY English
With variant COLEY, can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas. Colley was used as a surname for generations of students from the same family taught by a teacher over many years in James Hilton's sentimental novel "Goodbye, Mr... [more]
COLLIER English
This name is derived from Middle English cole, from Old English col meaning "coal", combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a burner, gatherer or seller of coal.
COLLINES French
French for "hillbanks".
COLLINSWORTH English
Variant spelling of Collingsworth, itself a variant of Collingwood.
COLLIS English
A variant of Collins, itself a patronymic of given names Collin or Colin, both ultimately nicknames for Nicholas.
COLLUM Northern Irish
Reduced form of northern Irish MCCOLLUM.
COLMENARES Spanish
It literally means "apiaries", denoting someone who either worked at some or lived near some.
COLO Italian
From the personal name Colo, a short form of Nicolo (see Nicholas). (Colò) nickname from medieval Greek kolos ‘lame’, classical Greek kylos.
COLOMBRES Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish in Ribadeva.
COLONEL American
From a French word for a military rank of an officer who led a column of regimental soldiers. Could be a nickname for someone with a military bearing or demeanor.
COLSTON English
Colston means “Coal town settlement.” It is also a variant of COLTON.
COLTONSON English
Means "Son of COLTON".
COLTRANE Irish (Anglicized)
Northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coltaráin.
COMAN English, French, Romanian
Means "bent or crooked".
COMBEFERRE Literature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
COMEAU French, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
COMEAUX French (Acadian), French Creole
Variant spelling of French COMEAU.
COMIM Italian
It mans waiter in italian.
COMINERO Medieval Spanish (Latinized, Rare)
Means "gatherer of cumin" from the spanisgh word "comino".
COMMANDER Anglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
COMMEGNO Friulian
Imaginative, wealth, adventurer
COMPTON English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places throughout England (but especially in the south) named Compton, from Old English cumb meaning "short, straight valley" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
CONAHAN Irish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó CONNACHAÍN (see CUNNINGHAM).
CONATSER English (Anglicized)
A variant of the German last name Konitzer.
CONCEIÇÃO Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of CONCEPCIÓN.
CONCEPCIÓN Spanish
Means "conception'' in Spanish, in reference to the Immaculate Conception of Virgin Mary.
CONDON Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton... [more]
CONE Irish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
CONEY English
Means "seller of rabbits", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rabbit (in either case from Middle English cony "rabbit").
CONG TANG TON NU Vietnamese
Often written with the middle two words uncapitalized when with a full name; example: Con tang ton Nu Hue Hue. The first name is Hue Hue, and the surname is Cong tang ton Nu. It is a female royal Vietnamese surname created by the NGUYEN Dynasty.
CONKLIN Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish COUGHLIN.
CONLEY Irish
Variant of CONNOLLY.
CONLIN Irish
Variant of Conlon.
CONLON Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
CONNICK Yiddish
Variation on KOENIG.
CONQUEST English
Probably from a medieval nickname, perhaps applied to a domineering person. This surname is borne by the British poet, historian and critic Robert Conquest (1917-).
CONRAD German
Americanized spelling of KONRAD.
CONRADI German, Danish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Derived from a patronymic from the given name KONRAD.
CONRAN Irish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
CONROY Irish
meaning, "hound of prosperity"
CONSIGLIO Italian
Meaning "Counselor" or "One who gives good advice".
CONTE Italian
Italian: from the title of rank conte ‘count’ (from Latin comes, genitive comitis ‘companion’). Probably in this sense (and the Late Latin sense of ‘traveling companion’), it was a medieval personal name; as a title it was no doubt applied ironically as a nickname for someone with airs and graces or simply for someone who worked in the service of a count.
CONTINO Italian
Diminutive of Italian CONTE or CONTI.
CONTRACTOR Indian (Parsi)
Parsi occupational surname for a contractor, or someone who works on the basis of a contract. As the British rule of India demanded for all Parsees to adopt a surname, many adopted English vocabulary based on their occupation (i.e. ENGINEER or MERCHANT).
CONWAY Welsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
COOGAN Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
COOGLAN Irish
Irish surname of unknown meaning. May be a variant of COGHLAN.
COOGLER German (Americanized)
Americanized form of KUGLER.
COOLEY Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chúille ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Mochúille’, a rare Clare name.
COOLIDGE English
Probably an occupational name for a college servant or someone with some other association with a university college, for example a tenant farmer who farmed one of the many farms in England known as College Farm, most of which are or were owned by university colleges.
COONROD Dutch
Americanized spelling of Dutch Coenraet or Koenraadt or German Kühnrat (KONRAD).
COOTER English
A Sussex, England surname of uncertain meaning. Could be a local pronunciation of COTTER, meaning "cottage dweller" for a serf in the feudal system allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
COPELAND English
Some sources say that Copeland is English: "one that is good at coping". Another says Copeland is Northern English and Scottish, from Cumberland and Northumberland meaning "bought land". Old Norse, kaupa-land for‘bought land’.
COPPENHAVER German
Americanized spelling, probably originally spelled Kopenhaver or Koppenhaver. Means "owner of a hill".
COPPINS English
From a reduced diminutive of JACOB.
COPPOLA Italian
Coppola is an occupational name for someone who makes 'coppolas', which are a type of hat. The word 'coppola' literally means 'hat' in Neapolitan dialect. The name also could have been for someone who frequently wore a coppola too.... [more]
COPUS English
For full analysis of the origin for the name Copus/Copas I would refer you to my family website copusfamily.co.uk
CORBALÁN Aragonese
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
CORBEDDU Sardinian
Means "son of Corbu" in Sardinian.
CORBELLI Italian (Emilian-Romagnol, Italian)
May be mean 'raven-like' or 'basket maker'.
CORBETT English, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
CORBIN English, French
Derived from French corbeau meaning "raven," originally denoting a person who had dark hair.
CORBYN English
Variant of CORBIN, notably borne by current Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn (1949-).
CORCOVADO Spanish
Means "hunchback" in Spanish. It would denote a person with a curved spine.
CORD Northern Irish
Reduced form of MCCORD.
CORDASCO Italian
From the given name Corda or Cordio (a short form of Accord(i)o, literally "agreement") + the suffix -asco denoting kinship.
CORDAY French
Either from the French word corde meaning "cord/rope/string", or from the Latin word cor meaning "heart." This was the surname of Charlotte Corday, the assassin who killed Jacobin leader Jean-Paul Marat during the French revolution.
CORDEIRO Portuguese, Galician
Means "young lamb" in Portuguese and Galician (Latin cordarius, a derivative of cordus "young", "new")... [more]
CORDEN English
Derives from Old French Cordon meaning "a seller of ribbon" or from Cordoan, a locational job description for a worker in fine kid leather. Originally associated with the city of Cordova in Spain... [more]
CORDER French (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
CÓRDOBA Spanish
Indicates someone who was originally from the city of Córdoba (Cordova) in Andalusia, Spain. The name itself is derived from Phonecian Qʾrtuba meaning "Juba’s city", itself from Phonecian qʾrt meaning "city" and juba referring to King Juba I of Numidia.
CORDOVEIRU Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Pravia.
CORDRAY English
From a medieval nickname for a proud man (from Old French cuer de roi "heart of a king").
CORDS German
Derived from the first name KONRAD.
CORE English (American), German (Anglicized)
Core is the anglicized form of the German surname KOHR, also spelled Kürr. Alternately, it is an English name of Flemish origin.
CORIO Italian
Variant of COIRO.
CORK English
Metonymic occupational name for a supplier of red or purple dye or for a dyer of cloth, Middle English cork (of Celtic origin; compare CORKERY).
CORKE English
Variant of CORK.
CORKERY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
CORLETT Manx
From Manx Gaelic Mac Thorliot "son of Thorliot", a male personal name derived from Old Norse Thórrljótr, literally "Thor-bright".
ĆORLUKA Croatian
Derived from Turkish körlük, meaning "blindness".... [more]
CORMICAN Scottish
From a pet form of the Gaelic personal name Cormac (see MCCORMICK).
CORMIER French
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
CORNACCHIA Italian
Nickname meaning "crow, jackdaw" in Italian, applied to someone who was talkative or thought to resemble a crow or jackdaw in some other way.
CORNELLANA Asturian (Spanish)
Castilianized form of CURNIANA.
CORNISH Celtic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORNWALL Celtic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CORNWALLIS Scottish
Example: Lord Charles Cornwallis.
CORNWELL English
Habitational name from Cornwell in Oxfordshire, named from Old English corn, a metathesized form of cron, cran ‘crane’ + well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’.variant of Cornwall.
CORPUS Anglo-Saxon
It was a name given to a dark-haired person. In Yorkshire and Suffolk, the surname Corpus is derived from the Old Norse word korpr, which means raven; in Oxfordshire, the surname is derived from the Old French word corp, which has the same meaning.
CORR Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of CORRA".
CORRADO Italian
From the personal name CORRADO.
CORRALES Filipino, Spanish
Denoting someone who worked in a barn or on a farm . Corral means "barnyard", "corral", "yard" ,"sheepshed".
CORRAO Italian
Reduced form CORRADO.
CORREA Portuguese, Spanish
From Spanish, meaning "leather garment."
CORREIA Portuguese
meaning "leather strap" or "belt", "rein", or "shoelace"; denoting a person who worked with leather products
CORRIE English
Habitational name from places in Arran, Dumfries, and elsewhere, named Corrie, from Gaelic coire "cauldron", applied to a circular hanging valley on a mountain.
CORRIE Scottish
Scottish spelling of MCCORRY.
CORRIGAN English
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
CORRIN Manx, Scottish
First documented in 1290, sources suggest prototypes to be of Norse and/or Irish origins.
CORSAUT French
Possibly a variant of COSSART.
CORSI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of CORSO.
CORSON English
Nickname from Old French 'corson', a diminutive of curt ‘short’
CORT Polish, Russian, Jewish
Derived from the surname "Kutalczuk", "Kotelchik", "Cuttlechuck", or "Kuttlechuck"
CORTÁZAR Basque (Spanish)
Castilianized form of KORTAZAR.
CORTÈS Catalan
Catalan form of CORTÉS.
CORTÊS Portuguese
Portuguese form of CORTÉS.
CORTRIGHT English
Habitational surname from the Dutch Kortrijk for a person from a place of this name in Flanders. Perhaps also a respelling of English CARTWRIGHT.
CORVIN Hungarian (Americanized)
Shortened and Americanized form of CORVINUS.
CORVINUS Hungarian
dirived from Corvin, maning raven.
COSCA Italian
Topographic name from the Calabrian dialect word c(u)oscu "oak", also "wood".
COSCO Italian
Masculinized form of COSCA.
COSCOLLOLA Catalan
This indicates familial origin within or within the vicinity of the eponymous farmhouse in the municipality of Lladurs.
COSGROVE English
Habitational name from Cosgrove in Northamptonshire, named with an Old English personal name Cof + Old English graf "grove", "thicket".
COSGROVE Irish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of COSCRACH."
ĆOSIĆ Croatian, Serbian
Means ''beardless''.
ČOSIĆ Croatian
Variant spelling of ĆOSIĆ.
COSS English
English short form of Cossio.
COSSACK Irish
Variant of CUSACK
COSSART English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
COSTABILE Italian
Italian name.... [more]
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