Submitted Surnames Starting with F

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
FIELD English, Scottish, Irish, Jewish (Anglicized)
English: topographic name for someone who lived on land which had been cleared of forest, but not brought into cultivation, from Old English feld ‘pasture’, ‘open country’, as opposed on the one hand to æcer ‘cultivated soil’, ‘enclosed land’ (see ACKER) and on the other to weald ‘wooded land’, ‘forest’ (see WALD)... [more]
FIELDER English
Southern English from Middle English felder ‘dweller by the open country’.
FIELDHOUSE English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a house in open pasture land. Reaney draws attention to the form de Felhouse (Staffordshire 1332), and suggests that this may have become Fellows.
FIELDING English
Topographic name from an Old English felding ‘dweller in open country’.
FIELDMAN English
This surname most likely means, "Field Man", if it's not derived from the English words themselves.
FIENE German, Low German
A nickname for an elegant person, from Middle Low German fin, meaning ‘fine’. Can also be a locational name from several fields and places named Fiene.
FIERARU Romanian
Means "smith."
FIERI Italian
A notable bearer is American restaurateur and television host Guy Fieri (1968-).
FIFER German, American, Slovene
Americanized and Slovenian spelling of German PFEIFFER.
FIFIELD English
Local. Has the same signification as Manorfield. Lands held in fee or fief, for which the individual pays service or owes rent.
FIGGIS English
From a medieval nickname for a trustworthy person (from the Anglo-Norman form of Old French fichais "loyal").
FIGUEIREDO Galician, Portuguese
It literally means "fig tree orchard", denoting someone who either lived near one or worked at one.
FIGUEROA Spanish
Habitational name from any of the places in Galicia named Figueroa, from a derivative of figueira, meaning "fig tree."
FIJAŁKOWSKI Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Masovian village of Fijałkowo.
FILAGIC Serbian, Croatian
Probably derived from the Turkish word aga. Agas were the Sultan's regents.
FILATOV Russian
Means "son of FILAT".
FILIPČIĆ Croatian
Derived from the forename FILIP.
FILIPOVICH Ukrainian
Patronymic from the personal name FILIP.
FILIPPELLI Italian
Means "Son of FILIPPO." Italian form of PHILLIPS.
FILKINS English
Means either (i) "person from Filkins", Oxfordshire ("settlement of Filica's people"); or "son of Filkin", a medieval personal name meaning literally "little Phil", from PHILIP.
FILLERY English
From a medieval nickname derived from Anglo-Norman fitz le rei "son of the king" (see also FITZROY), probably applied mainly (and ironically) to an illegitimate person or to someone who put on quasi-royal airs.
FILO Slovak, Greek
Filo is a Slovak pet form of the personal name FILIP.... [more]
FILOSA Italian
Southern Italian: Probably an occupational nickname for a fisherman, from Sicilian filuòsa ‘fishing net’. Also from the subphylum: Filosa. These are known as euglyphids, filose (which means stringy or thread-like), amoebae with shells of siliceous scales or plates, which are commonly found in soils, nutrient-rich waters, and on aquatic plants.
FILS French
From fils "son", used to identify the younger of two bearers of the same personal name in a family.
FILS-AIMÉ Haitian Creole
Means "beloved son" from French fils meaning "son" and aimé "love".
FINAN Irish
Means "descendant of FIONNÁN", anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fionnáin.
FINCH English
English: nickname from Middle English finch ‘finch’ (Old English finc). In the Middle Ages this bird had a reputation for stupidity. It may perhaps also in part represent a metonymic occupational name for someone who caught finches and sold them as songsters or for the cooking pot... [more]
FINCK English, German
From the German word for "finch" a type of bird
FINE English (?)
English nickname for a clever or elegant man, from Old French fin ‘fine’, ‘delicate’, ‘skilled’, ‘cunning’ (originally a noun from Latin finis ‘end’, ‘extremity’, ‘boundary’, later used also as an adjective in the sense ‘ultimate’, ‘excellent’).
FINE Jewish (Anglicized)
Jewish Americanized spelling of Fein.
FINGER English, German, Jewish
Probably applied as a nickname for a man who had some peculiarity of the fingers, such as possessing a supernumerary one or having lost one or more of them through injury, or for someone who was small in stature or considered insignificant... [more]
FINK German, Slovene, English, Jewish
Nickname for a lively or cheerful person, Jewish ornamental name derived from the Germanic word for "finch", and German translation of Slovene Šinkovec which is from šcinkovec or šcinkavec meaning "finch".
FINKELSTEIN Yiddish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic) ornamental compound name, literally 'sparkle stone', from Yiddish finkl 'sparkle' + stein 'stone'. See also GARFINKEL.
FINLAYSON Scottish
Patronymic from FINLAY.
FINNIGAN Irish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicization of the Gaelic O' Fionnagain, meaning the descendant(s) of Fionnagan, an Old Irish personal name derived from the word "fionn", white, fairheaded.
FINOÑA Chamorro
Chamorro for "their language/speech/talk"
FINSTAD Norwegian
Means "Finn's farmstead", from the given name FINN (2) and Old Norse staðr "farmstead, dwelling". This was the name of several farms in Norway.
FIORAVANTI Italian
Derived from the given name FIORAVANTE.
FIORELLI Italian
The surname Fiorelli was first found in Bolgna (Latin: Bononia), the largest city and the capital of Emilia-Romagna Region. The famous University of Bolgna was founded in the 11th century, by the 13th century the student body was nearly 10,000... [more]
FIRMAN English, French
From a medieval personal name meaning "firm, resolute, strong man." Borne by early saints and bishops. First name variants FIRMAN and FIRMIN... [more]
FIRTH English, Scottish, Welsh
English and Scottish: topographic name from Old English (ge)fyrhþe ‘woodland’ or ‘scrubland on the edge of a forest’.... [more]
FISCHBACH German
From a place called Fischbach, or a topographic name from German meaning fisch 'fish' + bach 'stream'.
FISCHIONI Italian (Rare)
Possibly deriving from fischiare, meaning to whistle, or from fischioni, the Italian word for widgeons.
FISCHKUS German
tax collector (fiscal)
FISCUS German
From Latin fiscus ‘basket’, a humanistic Latinization of the German name Korb. This is a metonymic occupational name for a basketmaker or a peddler, or a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a basket... [more]
FIŠER Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Czech, Slovak and Slovene form of FISCHER.
FISH Medieval English, Jewish
From Middle English fische, fish ‘fish’, a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone thought to resemble a fish.... [more]
FISING Anglo-Saxon (Rare), Romanian
This surname specifically comes from a village in Transylvania, Romania named Gergeschdorf, currently named Ungurei in Transylvania, Romania. The surname is a Siebenburgen Saxon or Transylvanian Saxon specific surname... [more]
FISK English (British)
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone supposedly resembling a fish in some way, from Old Norse fiskr ‘fish’ (cognate with Old English fisc).
FISKE English, Norwegian
From the traditionally Norwegian habitational surname, from the Old Norse fiskr "fish" and vin "meadow". In England and Denmark it was a surname denoting someone who was a "fisherman" or earned their living from selling fish.
FITCH Scottish
The name fitch is of anglo-saxon decent, it refers to a person of iron point inrefrence to a soldier or worrior it is derived from an english word (Fiche) which means iron point the name started in county suffolk
FITZEMPRESS History, Anglo-Norman
Means "son of the empress" in Anglo-Norman French. The three sons of Empress Matilda were known as Henry FitzEmpress (King Henry II of England), Geoffrey FitzEmpress, Count of Nantes, and William FitzEmpress, Count of Poitou.
FITZGIBBON Irish
Means "son of GIBBON" in Anglo-Norman French.
FITZHENRY Irish
Means "son of Henry" in Anglo-Norman French.
FITZHUGH English
English (Northamptonshire): Anglo-Norman French patronymic (see FITZGERALD) from the personal name Hugh.
FITZOOTH Folklore (?)
Fitzooth means "son of a nobleman". Robin Hood's real name was Robert Fitzooth.
FITZROBERT Anglo-Norman
Means "son of ROBERT" in Anglo-Norman French.
FITZWALTER Anglo-Norman
Means "son of WALTER" in Anglo-Norman French.
FITZWILLIAM Irish
Fitz appears to be a Norman term derived from the French word fils and the Latin word filius, each of which means son. The name is most common in England and Ireland, each of which was conquered by Normans between 1066-1167.
FIVELAND Norwegian (Rare)
From the name of a farm in Norway named with the word fivel possibly meaning "cottongrass, bog cotton". This plant grows in abundance in the marshy land near the location of the farm.
FLACK English
probably from Middle English flack, flak "turf", "sod" (as found in the place name Flatmoor, in Cambridgeshire), and hence perhaps an occupational name for a turf cutter.
FLAHERTY Irish (Anglicized)
Irish (Connacht) reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Flaithbheartaigh ‘descendant of Flaithbheartach’, a byname meaning ‘generous’, ‘hospitable’ (from flaith(eamh) ‘prince’, ‘ruler’ + beartach ‘acting’, ‘behaving’).
FLAKE English
Surname. Meaning, "lives by a swamp."
FLAM Jewish
Ornamental name from Yiddish flam "flame".
FLANDERS English
Given to a person who was from Flanders in the Netherlands (compare FLEMING).
FLANNER English
This early occupational and mainly 'midlands' English surname, is actually of pre-medieval French origins. Introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066, it derives from the French word flaonet meaning a 'little flan', and described a maker of patisserie or pancakes.
FLANNERY Irish
Appears originally in Irish Gaelic as O Flannabhra derived from flann, meaning "red", and abhra, meaning "eyebrow". First appeared in County Tipperary, Ireland.
FLASH English
Means "person who lives near a pool" (Middle English flasshe "pool, marsh").
FLAVIGNY French
French form of FLAVINIUS. The Flavigny Abbey, in the French region of Burgundy, became famous because of the candies made by its Benedictine monks, called the anise of Flavigny... [more]
FLAVINIUS Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman family name, probably deriving from FLAVIUS.
FLECK English
Meaning unknown. It is used in the 2019 movie Joker as the real name of the titular character played by actor Joaquin Phoenix.
FLECKENSTEIN German
German for "stain stone".
FLEETWOOD English
Means "From the town of Fleetwood, in Lancaster".
FLEIG German
Nickname for a restless or insignificant person from Middle Low German vleige ‘fly’.
FLEISCHMAN German (Austrian)
Fleischman translates in English to Meat Man, or Butcher It is most often used with a single "n" for those who were persecuted as Jews. Other Germanic spellings for Christians and others not deemed Jewish are Fleischmann, or Fleishmann... [more]
FLEISIG German
"industrious"
FLEMISTER Flemish
Name of a man from Flanders, the same as the surname FLEMING.
FLENOT American (South, ?)
I think this could be a French Indian name however, it may be misspelled, and I don't know the correct spelling.
FLERCHINGER German
Flerchinger is a name with origins from the city of Flörschingen or Flörange in the Saarland region on the French and German border.
FLETT Scottish
Probably originating in Orkney and Shetland, from a place in the parish of Delting, Shetland, named with an Old Norse term 'flotr' denoting a strip of arable land or pasture. Also possibly derived from the Old Norse byname Fljótr ‘swift’, ‘speedy’... [more]
FLINK Swedish
From Swedish flink, an adjective for someone who is quick and accurate.
FLINT English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a significant outcrop of flint, Old English, Low German flint, or a nickname for a hard-hearted or physically tough individual.
FLO Norwegian
Famous bearers include Norwegian footballers and relatives Tore ANDRE, HÅVARD, and JOSTEIN Flo of the Norwegian national team that upset Brazil twice in both a friendly in 1997 and a 1998 World Cup group match.
FLOAREA Romanian
Means "flower" in Romanian.
FLOBERG Swedish, Norwegian (Rare)
Of uncertain origin. Could possibly be combination of flo, an unexplained element (but probably either ornamental or locational), and berg "mountain", or a habitational name from a place so named.
FLODQVIST Swedish
Combination of Swedish flod "river" and kvist "twig, branch".
FLOERCHINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Flörchingen in the Saar region.
FLOERKE German
Floerke Name Meaning German (Flörke): from a pet form of the personal names Florian or Florentinus, from Latin Florus (from florere ‘to bloom’).Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4... [more]
FLOOD Irish
There are some English Flood's, but the name mainly derives from the Irish O'Taicligh or Mac an Tuile and was Anglicized to Flood, Floyd, and Tully when the Gaelic language was outlawed in Ireland by the English.
FLOOK English
Derived from the Old Norse name FLÓKI.
FLORÉN Swedish
Combination of Latin flor "flower" and the common surname suffix -én.
FLORESCU Romanian
Patronymic derived from the medieval given name Florea, which was probably a derivative of Romanian floare "flower" (from Latin flos, accusative florem) with the diminutive suffix -ea... [more]
FLORIS Dutch
"Personal name"... [more]
FLORKOWSKI Polish
Habitational name for someone from Florków in Częstochowa voivodeship, or Florki from Przemyśl voivodeship, both so named from Florek, a pet form of the personal name FLORIAN.
FLOWER Welsh
Anglicized form of the Welsh personal name LLYWARCH, of unexplained origin.
FLOWER English
Nickname from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flower’, ‘blossom’ (Old French flur, from Latin flos, genitive floris). This was a conventional term of endearment in medieval romantic poetry, and as early as the 13th century it is also regularly found as a female personal name.
FLOWER English
Metonymic occupational name for a miller or flour merchant, or perhaps a nickname for a pasty-faced person, from Middle English flo(u)r ‘flour’. This is in origin the same word as in 1, with the transferred sense ‘flower, pick of the meal’... [more]
FLOWER English
Occupational name for an arrowsmith, from an agent derivative of Middle English flō ‘arrow’ (Old English flā).
FLOWERS English
Patronymic from FLOWER.
FLUELLEN Welsh
Anglicized form of Welsh LLEWELLYN.
FLUTE English
From the English word flute which is an instrument.
FLYTE English
Means "stream" from Old English fleot.
FOGARTY Irish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fógartaigh ‘son of Fógartach’, a personal name from fógartha meaning "proclaimed", "banished", "outlawed". It is sometimes Anglicized as HOWARD.
FOGEL German
Variant of VOGEL
FOGELSTRÖM Swedish
From Swedish fågel "bird" and ström "stream".
FOGERTY Irish (Anglicized)
Variant spelling of FOGARTY.
FOGG Ancient Germanic
This surname appeared in Denmark during the time of the Vikings. It is believed to have Jute origin. It spread to Italy during the Roman Empire and to England as early as the 1080s, being listed in the Doomsday Book compiled by William the Conqueror... [more]
FOGLE German
Variant of VOGEL.
FOKOV Russian
Means "son of FOKA".
FOLAND Anglo-Saxon (Archaic)
Originally an English name, Foland is actually a variant of the name Fowler (as in bird-catcher). Most migrating to Ireland, other Fowlers/Folands first came to the Americas in 1622; John Fowler.... [more]
FOLEY Irish
As a northern Irish surname it is derived from the Gaelic personal name Searrach, which was based on searrach "foal, colt" and anglicized as Foley because of its phonetic similarity to English foal.
FOLIGNO Italian
Derived from the Latin word folium "leaf"
FOLLADORI Italian
It is the italian variant of the british surname WALKER.... [more]
FOLTZ German
It is from Germany and it is based on the personal name Volz, which was popular in former times. It means son or descendant of a Volz or Folz
FOMICHEV Russian
Variant transcription of Fomichyov.
FOMICHEVA Russian
Variant spelling of Fomichyova.
FOMICHYOV Russian
Means "son of Foma".
FOMICHYOVA Russian
Feminine transcription of Fomichyov.
FOMOV Russian
Means "son of FOKA".
FONTAÑEZ Spanish
From the Latin fons meaning "fountain."
FONTECCHIO Italian
Habitational name from Fontecchio in Aquila province or a topographic name from a diminutive of fonte meaning "spring".
FONTENOT French (Cajun)
From the Old French word "fontaine", meaning "fountain."
FOODY Irish
Anglicized version of ó Fuada, or 'descendent of Fuada'. It comes from the personal name 'fuad' or 'swift' but also 'rush' and 'speed'.
FOOT English
Variant of FOOTE.
FOOTE English
Nickname for someone with a peculiarity or deformity of the foot, from Middle English fot (Old English fot), or in some cases from the cognate Old Norse byname Fótr.
FORBES Irish, Scottish
Comes from a Scottish place meaning "field" in Gaelic. It can also be used as a first name.... [more]
FØRDE Norwegian
From Old Norse fyrði dative form of fjórðr "fjord". This was the name of several farmsteads in Norway.
FORDE English, Irish
Variant of FORD. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.
FORDHAM English
Habitational name from any of the places in Cambridgeshire, Essex, and Norfolk named Fordham, from Old English ford ‘ford’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘enclosure hemmed in by water’.
FORE English (American)
Americanized spelling of German FAHR.
FORET French, French Creole
From Old French forest ‘forest’, a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a royal forest, or an occupational name for a keeper or worker in one. See also FORREST... [more]
FORGIE Scottish
Possibly a variant of FERGIE or a shortened form of FERGUSON. It could also be a habitational name from a place so named in Scotland.
FORLAN Friulian
It's a toponymic and it means born in Cividale del Friuli (north of Italy).
FORMICA Italian
This surname is also spanish and it means "ant". it could indicate a person that is short and thin but works hard an constantly.... [more]
FORREN Norwegian (Rare)
Derived form the name of a farmstead in Norway named with a word meaning "hollow, gorge".
FORS Swedish
Means "rapid" (geology) in Swedish.
FORSLÖF Swedish
Combination of Swedish fors "rapid" and löv "leaf".
FORSMAN Swedish
Combination of Swedish fors "rapid" (geology) and man "man".
FORSTER English (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see FORREST). ... [more]
FORSYTH Scottish
Variant of FORSYTHE. Known bearers include the Scottish botanist William Forsyth (1737-1804), after whom the genus Forsythia is named, and Scottish inventor Alexander John Forsyth (1769-1843).
FORSYTHE Scottish, Northern Irish
This surname has two possible origins. The more accepted explanation is that it comes from the Gaelic given name Fearsithe, which means "man of peace" from the elements fear "man" and sithe "peace"... [more]
FORTE Italian
Italian word for "Strong"
FORTESCUE French
Means 'strong shield' from French elements fort meaning "strong" and escu meaning "shield#
FORTUNE Scottish
Originally meant "person from Fortune", Lothian ("enclosure where pigs are kept").
FOSSOYEUR American
A surname meaning "Gravedigger" in French.
FOUCAULT French
Derived from the Germanic given name Folcwald, which was composed of the elements fulc "people" and wald "power, leader, ruler"... [more]
FOUCH English
not sure how i can up with this but i used it for my hp professor oc
FOUCHE French
"people army"
FOULKES English (Anglicized, ?)
English variant spelling of FOULKS.
FOULKS English
English from a Norman personal name, a short form of various Germanic names formed with folk ‘people’. See also VOLK.
FOUQUEREAU French (Quebec)
Jean Fouquereau was born on November 6, 1617, in Anjou, Isère, France, his father, Louis, was 23 and his mother, Catherine, was 20. He married Renee Bataille on December 31, 1639, in Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France... [more]
FOURIE Afrikaans
Originates from French Huguenot settlers
FOUT German
[Foust} maybe german. The Fout name can be traced back to Denmark.
FOWL English, Popular Culture
This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and derives from the Old English pre 7th Century word fugol, "fowl", "bird", which was used as a byname and as a personal name. The medieval form of the word was the Middle English development foul, fowl(e), used as a continuation of the Old English personal name and also as a nickname for someone who in some way resembled a bird.
FOXWELL English
Means "fox stream", from Old English fox and well(a), meaning stream.
FOXWORTH English
"dweller at the homestead infested by foxes." or "house of Fox" aka Foxworthy... [more]
FOXX English
Variant of FOX.
FOY French
From a medieval nickname based on Old French foi "faith", applied either to a notably pious person or to one who frequently used the word as an oath; also, from the medieval French female personal name Foy, from Old French foi "faith".
FOY Irish (Anglicized)
A different form of FAHY (from Irish Gaelic Ó Fathaigh "descendant of Fathach", a personal name probably based on Gaelic fothadh "foundation").
FOY Irish
Variant of FEE.
FRAIN French
Topographic name for someone who lived near a prominent ash tree from Old French fraisne fresne "ash" from Latin fraxinus "ash".
FRALEY English (American)
Anglicized/Americanized version of the German surname "Frohlich", meaning "happy" or "cheerful".
FRAMPTON English
English: habitational name from any of various places so called, of which there are several in Gloucestershire and one in Dorset. Most take the name from the Frome river (which is probably from a British word meaning ‘fair’, ‘brisk’) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
FRANÇA Portuguese
Means "France" in Portuguese.
FRANCE French
Ethnic name for an inhabitant of France, a country in Europe.
FRANCE Czech
Variant of Franc.
FRANCE Slovene
Derived from the given name FRANCE, a vernacular form of Francišek, which is ultimately from Latin FRANCISCUS.
FRANCESCO Italian
From the given name FRANCESCO.
FRANCESE Italian
Ethnic name for a Frenchman.
FRANCK English, French
From the given name FRANCK.
FRANCOMAGARO Italian
I believe the first element is FRANCO, just don't know what the other element is.
FRANGOPOULOS Greek
Means "descendant of a Frank" in Greek.
FRANKEL German
Variant of Frank.
FRANKENSTEIN German
In German means "stone of the Franks". The name appeared mostly in the regions of Westphalia and Rhineland. In Mary Shelley (1797-1851)'s "Frankenstein", the main character, Victor Frankenstein (1770-1793) and his family bore this name... [more]
FRANKIEWICZ Polish
Michalena Frankiewicz born 1897 Lomza, Poland ... [more]
FRANKLAND English
Status name for a person whom lived on an area of land without having to pay obligations. From Norman French frank, 'free' and Middle English land, 'land'. This surname is common in Yorkshire.... [more]
FRANKS English
This surname is derived from the given name Frank.
FRANKSON English
This surname means "son of Frank."
FRANQUEZ Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese for "son of Franco."
FRANSSEN Dutch
From the given name FRANS and the Dutch woord zoon, meaning son.
FRANSSON Swedish
Means "son of FRANS".
FRANTZ German
Name given to a free man.
FRANZ German
Derived from "Francis".
FRANZBLAU Jewish
Means "french blue" in German. One of the many names assigned to Jews during the rule of Emperor Joseph II, who required all Jews in the Hapsburg Empire to adopt surnames.
FRANZÉN Swedish
Combination of the given name FRANZ and the popular surname suffix -én, derived from Latin -enius "descendant of".
FRASCATORE Italian (Rare)
Meaning uncertain. It is possibly derived from (or related to) Italian frasca meaning "bough, branch", which might possibly indicate that the surname had first started out as a nickname for someone who worked as a woodcutter or as a forester... [more]
FRATINI Medieval Italian (Tuscan, Modern)
My understanding is that the Fratini surname originated in the Arno River Valley somewhere between Arezzo and Florence.
FRATZKE German (East Prussian)
From Vras "glutton"
FRAY French, English
From the German surname FREY or the Old French given name FRAY.
FREDERICK English
Derived from the given name FREDERICK.
FREDERICKS English
Patronymic from FREDERICK.
FREDMAN Swedish, Jewish
Swedish: ornamental name composed of the elements fred ‘peace’ + man ‘man’.... [more]
FREE English
Nickname or status name from Old English frēo "free(-born)", i.e. not a serf.
FREELING English, Dutch
This is the surname of Christian Freeling (born February 1, 1947 in Enschede, Netherlands)a Dutch game designer and inventor. This surname was also used for the main character "Carol Anne Freeling" in the Poltergeist film of 1982 as well.... [more]
FREER French
Dutch spelling of Frere (brother); another variant spelling is Frear.
FREIBURG German
Derives from the German words, frei, which means free, and berg, which means hill, and is the name of a city in Germany.
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