Submitted Surnames Starting with W

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
WINEGARDNER     English (American)
Anglicized form of the German occupational surname Weingartner. A known bearer of this surname is the American writer Mark Winegardner (b. 1961).
WINEHOUSE     Jewish, German
Anglicized variant of German and Yiddish 'Weinhaus'. From German wein, 'vine, grapevine' and haus 'house, building, home', likely indicating a house with a vineyard. ... [more]
WINFREY     English
From the Old English personal name Winfrith, literally "friend-peace". A famous bearer of this surname is Oprah Winfrey (1954-), a US television talk-show presenter.
WINKEL     German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
WINKELMANN     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner or kept a corner shop (see Winkel), with the addition of Middle High German man, German Mann ‘man’. ... [more]
WINKLER     German
My Great Grandmother's maiden name
WINNE     Dutch, English
Dutch: occupational name for an agricultural worker, Middle Low German winne ‘peasant’. ... [more]
WINNEY     English
Derived from an unattested Old English given name, *Wyngeofu, composed of the elements wyn "joy" and geofu "battle".... [more]
WINSETT     English
From an English surname of unexplained origin, perhaps related to Winslow, Winston or Windsor.
WINSININSKI     Polish (Anglicized)
Winsininski is an anglicized version of the name "Wisniewski", which is from multiple places in Poland called Wisniewo, Wisniew, and Wisniewa. These names all have "wisna" which means cherry, or cherry tree.... [more]
WINSTANLEY     English
Means "person from Winstanley", Lancashire ("Wynnstān's glade", Wynnstān being an Old English male personal name, literally "joy-stone"; cf. Winston). It was borne by English communist Gerrard Winstanley (?1609-60), leader of the Diggers.
WINTERBERG     German
Habitational name from any of several places named with Middle High German winter "winter" and berg "mountain".
WINTERBOURNE     English (British)
Probably meaning "born in winter". A large village in Gloucestershire, From the Thomas Hardy novel "The Woodlanders".
WINTERS     English, German
Patronymic form of Winter.
WINTERSON     English
Patronymic form of Winter.
WIREDU     Akan
Meaning unknown.
WIRTA     Finnish
From virta ‘stream’, used as a topographic name, also as a soldier’s name in the 17th century. Also adopted as an ornamental name, especially in western and southern Finland.
WISE     English
Nickname for a wise or learned person, or in some cases a nickname for someone suspected of being acquainted with the occult arts, from Middle English wise "wise" (Old English wis). This name has also absorbed Dutch Wijs, a nickname meaning "wise", and possibly cognates in other languages.
WISNESKI     Polish
A derivate of Wisniewski, which is said to mean "The Little Cherry Tree"
WIŚNIEWSKI     Polish
Taken from the word wiśnia meaning "sour cherry". It is sometimes said to be the third most popular surname in Poland.
WISSMACH     German
I think it is German
WITHALL     English
"Withall" comes from the village of "Cornwall" called "Withiel." There is also a connection to an aristocratic level, in the 15th at Henry VII court a noble man and knight went under the family name "Wit-hall"... [more]
WITHYCOMBE     English
Willow Valley. ... [more]
WITKOWSKI     Polish
habitational name for someone from any of the places in Poland called Witkowo, Witków, or Witkowice, named with the personal name Witek.
WITTE     Dutch
Nickname for someone with white or blonde hair or an unusually pale complexion, from Middle Dutch witte "white".
WITTENBERG     Low German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Wittenberg, Wittenberge, or Wittenbergen.
WITTENBORN     Low German
Habitational name from any of several places so named, for example near Bad Segeberg and near Neubrandenburg.
WITTER     German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements widu "wood" and hari "army".
WITTLIN     Jewish
Eastern Ashkenazic, from the Yiddish female personal name Vitle, a pet form of Vite combined with the eastern Slavic suffix -in
WITZ     German, Jewish
From the medieval personal name Witzo, a short form of any of several Germanic compound names beginning with wig ‘battle’. Also a variant of Witzig. ... [more]
WITZIG     German
German: nickname from Middle High German witzic ‘clever’, ‘prudent’, ‘knowing’.
WŁADYSŁAW     Polish
four polish kings names
WŁOSZCZOWSKI     Polish
This indicates familial origin within either of 2 Lesser Polish localities: the town of Włoszczowa or the village of Włoszczowice.
WODDA     Indian, Tamil
Another form of Odda.
WODZIŃSKI     Polish
Habitational name for someone from Wodzin in Piotrków voivodeship, named with Polish woda meaning "water".
WOELK     German
German variant spelling of Wölk (see Wolk).
WOELKE     German
German variant spelling of Wölke, itself a variant of Wolk.
WOGAN     Irish
From the Old Welsh personal name Gwgan or Gwgon, originally probably a nickname meaning literally "little scowler". (Cf. the second element in Cadogan.) This surname is borne by Irish radio and television presenter Terry Wogan (1938-).
WOJCIECHOWSKA     Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Wojciechowo or Wojciechów, named with the personal name WOJCIECH.
WOJCIECHOWSKI     Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Wojciechowo or Wojciechów, named with the personal name WOJCIECH.
WOJCIK     Polish
Comes from a diminutive of Wójt, a status name from Polish wójt village headman, a borrowing of German Vogt; also a pet form of the personal name Wojciech.
WÓJCIŃSKI     Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of the many places called Wójcin, or from Wójcina in Tarnów voivodeship, named with wójt meaning "village headman".
WOJICK     Polish
Pet form of the personal name WOJCIECH (see VOYTEK).
WOLF     English, German, Jewish
From Middle High German wolf meaning "wolf". It can also be given in reference to the Hebrew tribe of Benjamin; the symbol for that tribe was the wolf.
WOLF     English, German, Danish, Norwegian, Jewish, Scottish, Irish, Swedish, Dutch, Welsh, Flemish
From the Old English & German wulf and other Germanic cognates, all meaning 'wolf, wild dog'. (Swedish, Norwegian & Danish ulv, Scots wouf, Yiddish volf & Dutch wolf)... [more]
WOLF     English, Danish, German
From a short form of the various Germanic compound names with a first element wolf "wolf", or a byname or nickname with this meaning. The wolf was native throughout the forests of Europe, including Britain, until comparatively recently... [more]
WOLFHART     Ancient Germanic (Gothic)
Means "Hard Wolf".
WOLFIT     English
From the medieval male personal name Wolfet or Wolfat (from Old English Wulfgēat, literally "wolf-Geat" (the name of a Germanic people)). This surname was borne by Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-1968), a British actor and manager.
WOLFORD     German
Means where the wolves cross the river/stream. Wolf meaning the animal and Ford meaning crossing a body of shallow water.... [more]
WOLFRAM     English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
WOLFSON     English
Means "son of Wolf" in English.
WOLKEN     German
Surname derived from a diminutive of the given name Wolter, a Low German form of Walter.... [more]
WOLLSCHLÄGER     German
Occupational name for someone who prepared wool for spinning by washing and combing or carding it, from Middle High German wolle(n)slaher, -sleger, Middle Low German wullensleger (literally ‘wool beater’).
WOLOWITZ     Jewish
This is the surname of the character Howard in the American television show "The Big Bang Theory".
WOLSEY     English
From the medieval male personal name Wulsi (from Old English Wulfsige, literally "wolf-victory"). A famous bearer of the surname was English churchman and statesman Thomas Wolsey (Cardinal Wolsey), ?1475-1530.
WOLSTENHOLME     English (British, Rare)
A famous bearer is Chris Wolstenholme, bassist and sometimes vocalist of British alternative rock band Muse.
WOLSTON     English
From the Middle English personal name Wolfstan or Wolstan, Old English Wulfstan, composed of the elements wulf ‘wolf’ + stan stone or a habitational name from any of a large number of places called Woolston(e) or Wollston, all of which are named with Old English personal names containing the first element Wulf (Wulfheah, Wulfhelm, Wulfric, Wulfsige, and Wulfweard) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
WOLVERIDGE     English (British)
Derived from the personal name WULFRIC.
WOMMACK     English
Variant of Womack.
WONAI     Shona
It is a form of the Shona name Onai.
WONDERGEM     Dutch
gem cutter or gem setter-jewler
WONG     Chinese
Cantonese version of Huang. Can also be Cantonese version of Wang, meaning "king"
WONGAI     Shona
It is a form of the Shona name Vongai
WOODBRIDGE     English
Originated in old England and likely linked to the town of Woodbridge in Suffolk, East Anglia, United Kingdom. Well known Woodbridge's include the Australian Tennis player Todd Woodbridge. There was a famous lineage of six English John Woodbridge's in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries, all Church ministers... [more]
WOODFALL     English
English surname used as a first name. The name means "dweller by a fold in the woods" - in this case, "fold" means "sheep-pen".... [more]
WOODGER     English (British)
Woodger comes from the occupation of wood cutter in old english
WOODLEY     English (American)
The actress Shailene Woodley's last surname
WOODLOCK     Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
WOODMAN     English
Occupational name for a woodcutter or a forester (compare Woodward), or topographic name for someone who lived in the woods. ... [more]
WOODRUFF     English
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of land where woodruff grew, Anglo-Saxon wudurofe composed of wudu "wood" with a second element of unknown origin.
WOODSON     English
From a location in Yorkshire, England earlier spelled Woodsome and meaning "from the houses in the wood" or possibly a patronymic meaning "descendant of a wood cutter or forester."
WOOLDRIDGE     English
From the medieval personal name Wolrich (from Old English Wulfrīc, literally "wolf-power").
WOOLEVER     German
Morphed from the German surname Wohleber which means well-liver
WOOLF     German (Modern), English
Variant of WOLF.
WOOLGAR     English
From the medieval male personal name Wolgar (from Old English Wulfgār, literally "wolf-spear").
WOOLNOUGH     English
From the medieval male personal name Wolnoth or Wolnaugh (from Old English Wulfnōth, literally "wolf-daring").
WOOSENCRAFT     Welsh
though this surname has an exotic look & attracts legends, it has it's origins in the Lancashire place name Wolstencraft, from elements Wulfstan (personal name) + croft ("enclosure")
WOOTEN     English
Habitational name from any of the extremely numerous places named with Old English wudu "wood" + tun "enclosure", "settlement",
WOOTTON     English
Variant spelling of WOOTEN.
WORDEN     English
Guardian
WORK     Scottish
orkney isles
WORK     Scottish
Scottish: habitational name from the lands of Work in the parish of St. Ola, Orkney.
WORLEY     English
mostly found in Lancashire and Sussex. very old english surname. something to do with a hill near a stream.
WORSHIP     English (British)
Registered with the Guild of One Name Studies... [more]
WORTH     English
From the Old English WORÞ, meaning "enclosure".
WORTHINGTON     English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
WOULFE     English, Irish
English: variant spelling of Wolf. ... [more]
WOWEREIT     German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "squirrel", from Old Prussian wowere and Lithuanian voveraite (which, apart from "squirrel", also means "chanterelle").... [more]
WOYTEK     Czech, Slovak, Polish
Eastern European surname of unknown meaning. A variant of Vojtek.
WOŹNIAK     Polish, Jewish
Derivative or patronymic from the occupational or status term wozny ‘beadle’, ‘city official’.
WOZZEK     German
Germanized form of VOYTEK.
WRANGLER     English
Given to a person who worked as a wrangler.
WRENN     English
Derived from the surname Wren... [more]
WRIEDT     German, Dutch
Nickname from Middle Low German wrēt, wrede meaning "fierce", "evil", "angry".
WRINN     Irish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Ó Rinn "descendant of Rinn", a personal name perhaps based on reann "spear".
WRÓBEL     Polish
It literally means "sparrow" in Polish.
WROBLESKI     Polish
from Polish "wroble" wren.
WRZESIŃSKI     Polish
habitational name for someone from a place called Września in Poznań voivodeship, or a place called Wrzesina or Wrzesiny, named with wrzos ‘heather’.
WUBILIDOO     Welsh Mythology
The last name of the Welsh god of Wubilidoo
WUJEK     Polish
It literally means "uncle" in Polish but it could possibly refer to the Polesian village of the same name.
WULANDARI     Indonesian
A notable bearer is Indonesian pop singer Rini Wulandari (1990-).
WULF     North German, Danish
Variant of Wolf.
WULFHART     German
Could mean "brave wolf" from the German elements "wulf" (variant of "wolf") and "hard" (meaning "brave, hardy").
WUORI     Finnish
"mountain"
WÜRDEMANN     German
From the German "Würde"-honour or dignity, and "Mann"-man or person. "Man of Honour" or "Person of Dignity".
WURDEMANN     German (Rare)
This is a German surname, also spelled WÜRDEMANN (original) and often rendered as WUERDEMANN in English. It come from the German "würde", "dignity" or "honor" and "mann", meaning "man" or "person".... [more]
WURNIG     German
German origin from the place name am Virgen originally meaning a person from the town of Virgen in Tyrol. Construed as a family name in 1501.
WURSTER     German
Derived from German Wurst (Middle High German wurst) "sausage" and thus either denoted a butcher who specialized in the production of sausages, or was used as a nickname for a plump person or someone who was particularly fond of sausages.
WURÐINGTUN     English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
WÜRTTEMBERG     German
Württemberg is an historical German territory. Together with Baden and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg.
WYANDT     German
Americanized form of German WIEGAND... [more]
WYCHERLEY     English
Derived from a place name apparently meaning "elm-wood clearing" from Old English wice and leah. A famous bearer was the dramatist William Wycherley (1640-1715).
WYCKOFF     Dutch
name for someone living at the main farm in a district, from Dutch wijk ‘district’ + hof ‘farmstead’, ‘manor farm’.
WYCKOFF     East Frisian (Modern, Rare, Archaic)
The North Germanic meaning is "settlement on a bay," as in the cognate Viking (Viking is derived from Old Norse vík "bay").
WYLDEN     English
Variant of Wilden.
WYLER     English
English: variant of Wheeler or a respelling of Jewish Weiler.
WYLIE     Medieval English
It is of locational origin, and derives from the places called Willey in the counties of Cheshire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Devonshire and Surrey.
WYMER     English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Wymer (from Old English Wīgmǣr, literally "war-famous"); or (ii) from the Old Breton male personal name Wiumarch, literally "worthy-horse".
WYND     Scottish, Irish
Scotland or Ireland not sure of original origin. There was a childe Wynd some type of royal who slayed a dragon type thing worm or something and a Henery Wynd who was a mercenary in a battle at north inch in Scotland
WYNN     Welsh, English
The surname Wynn ,(also spelled Winn, and Gwynn), is derived from the Welsh element, Gwynn, which can loosely be translated as "white" or "fair". It features in the name of the North Welsh kingdom of Gwynedd, (meaning "white head" or "white land")... [more]
WYOMING     English (American)
From the name of the US state.
WYSOKIŃSKI     Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Lesser Polish village of Wysokin.
WYSZYŃSKI     Polish
It indicates familial origin within any of several Podlachian villages named ''Wyszonki''.
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