Anglo-Saxon Submitted Surnames

Anglo-Saxon names were used by the Anglo-Saxons who inhabited ancient England. See also about Germanic names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AIMAR     Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon, Spanish
1. From the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Aethelmaer", meaning "famous noble." ... [more]
ALDANE     Anglo-Saxon
Derived from "dweller at the old enclosure".
AVERNE     Anglo-Saxon
Possibly deriving from the Olde English "fearn", meaning fern.
BEEKMAN     German, Anglo-Saxon
This name derives from the pre 5th century Olde German and later Anglo-Saxon word "bah" or "baecc". This word describes a stream, or as a name specifically someone who lived or worked by a stream.
BENNINGFIELD     English, Anglo-Saxon
Benningfield is believed to be either ... [more]
BLAGDEN     Anglo-Saxon
Blagden is a locational surname deriving from any one of the places called Blackden or Blagdon, or Blagden farm in Hempstead, Essex. Blackden in Cheshire, Blagden in Essex and Blagdon in Northumberland share the same meaning and derivation, which is "the dark or black valley", derived from the Old English pre 7th Century "blaec", black, with "denu", valley, while the places called Blagdon in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, recorded as Blakedone in 1242, Blakeson in 1234, and Blachedone in the Domesday Book of 1086 respectively mean "the black hill", derived from the Old English "blaec", black, and "dun", down, hill, mountain... [more]
BOORMAN     Anglo-Saxon, English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a topographical name for someone who lived in a particularly noteworthy or conspicuous cottage, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "bur", bower, cottage, inner room, with "mann", man, or a locational name from any of the various places called Bower(s) in Somerset and Essex, which appear variously as "Bur, Bure" and "Bura" in the Domesday Book of 1086... [more]
BRYER     Anglo-Saxon
This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and was originally given either as a topographical name to someone who lived by a briar patch, deriving from the Olde English pre 7th Century "braer, brer", Middle English "brer", prickly thorn-bush, or as a nickname to a prickly individual, "sharp as brere" (Chaucer), from the same word applied in a transferred sense.
BURBIDGE     Anglo-Saxon
This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a dialectal variant of the locational surname, deriving from any of the places called "Burbage", in the counties of Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Wiltshire... [more]
CLATTENBURG     Ancient Germanic, Anglo-Saxon
Most likely something to do with a fortress. Meaning currently unknown.
COMMANDER     Anglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
CRAN     Anglo-Saxon
This picturesque name is of Anglo Saxon origin and is a nickname surname given to a tall thin man, or someone with long legs, or some other fancied resemblance to the bird. The derivation is from the old English "cran(uc)", "cron(uc)", "cren(uc)", which means a crane and until the introduction of a separate word in the 14th Century also a heron... [more]
CULBERT     Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
DOWNING     Anglo-Saxon
from 'Dunning', a patronymic meaning 'Son of Dunn', 'Dunn' being a nickname for someone with brown coloring
EAMER     French, Anglo-Saxon
This interesting and unusual surname has two possible sources. ... [more]
EMER     Jewish, Anglo-Saxon
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): metonymic occupational name from Yiddish emer ‘pail’, ‘bucket’. ... [more]
EMOR     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
EYMER     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
EYMOR     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
FISING     Anglo-Saxon (Rare), Romanian
This surname specifically comes from a village in Transylvania, Romania named Gergeschdorf, currently named Ungurei in Transylvania, Romania. The surname is a Siebenburgen Saxon or Transylvanian Saxon specific surname... [more]
FOLAND     Anglo-Saxon (Archaic)
Originally an English name, Foland is actually a variant of the name Fowler (as in bird-catcher). Most migrating to Ireland, other Fowlers/Folands first came to the Americas in 1622; John Fowler.... [more]
FRENCH     English, Anglo-Saxon
Ethnic name for someone from France, Middle English frensche, or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who adopted French airs. Variant of Anglo-Norman French Frain.
GOULDING     English, Anglo-Saxon
From the late Old English personal name Golding.
GRIMM     Anglo-Saxon, English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Nickname for a dour and forbidding individual, from Old High German grim "stern, severe" or from the given name GRÍMR derived from Old Norse gríma "mask, helmet". The name had its greatest popularity in Germany but was almost equally popular in England, having been introduced there by the conquering Norman-French after the invasion of 1066... [more]
GRISSOM     Old Norman, Anglo-Saxon, French
Either from Old Norman griss meaning "keeper of pigs" or from French gris meaning "grey". The first known use of the name was Sir Thomas Gresham, the founder of the Royal Exchange and Gresham College.
HAWLEY     English, Anglo-Saxon
Means "hedged meadow". It comes from the English word haw, meaning "hedge", and Saxon word leg, meaning "meadow". The first name Hawley has the same meaning.
HENDESTON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENGESDON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENGESTES     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENGESTON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENGSTETON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HENKESTON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HEREWEARD     Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate to HARVARD
HESTITONA     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HINGESTON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HINGESTONE     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HINXSTONE     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HINXTON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HOLLOWAY     Anglo-Saxon, English, Medieval English
Variant of Halliwell, from Old English halig (holy) and well(a) (well or spring)... [more]
HUNGERFORD     Anglo-Saxon
Hungerford is a Saxon name, meaning "Hanging Wood Ford".... [more]
HYNDESTAN     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HYNDESTANE     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
HYNDESTON     Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname Hingston. See Hingston for full meaning.
IMMER     German, Anglo-Saxon
German: habitational name for someone from a place named Immer near Oldenburg in Lower Saxony. ... [more]
IMMERS     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
IMORE     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
IVEY     Anglo-Saxon, English
Anglo-Saxon: Ivey is a variant of the Anglo-Saxon baptismal name Ive. It is the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of "Son of Ive".... [more]
LAWFORD     Anglo-Saxon
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from any of the various places called Lawford which have as their component elements the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Lealla", cognate with the Old High German "Lallo", and the Olde English "ford", a ford... [more]
LAWFORD     Anglo-Saxon
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from any of the various places called Lawford which have as their component elements the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Lealla", cognate with the Old High German "Lallo", and the Olde English "ford", a ford... [more]
LUMB     English, Anglo-Saxon
Lumb valley system in Yorkshire, England.... [more]
MORGADE     Anglo-Saxon
It`s a derived from Anglo-Saxon Morgen Or Morgan. Its meaning is morning. It have a second meaning that is a variety or type of oil.
RODWELL     Anglo-Saxon
Rodwell, an interesting name of Anglo-Saxon origin, is a locational surname deriving from any one of various places in Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, and Kent, England. In English, the meaning of the name Rodwell is "Lives by the spring near the road"... [more]
SKIPWORTH     Anglo-Saxon
is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from Skipwith in the East Riding of Yorkshire. The placename was recorded as "Schipewic" in the Domesday Book of 1086; as "Scipewiz" in the 1166 Pipe Rolls of the county; and as "Skipwith" in the 1291 Pipe Rolls, and derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century "sceap, scip", sheep, and "wic", outlying settlement; hence, "settlement outside the village where sheep were kept"... [more]
VILLAR     Galician, Medieval Portuguese, Anglo-Saxon
It's a surname found in Galicia, Spain and also in Portugal. Its meaning is village or small town and also is a farm.
WIDUKIND     Anglo-Saxon
"wood-child." From Old Saxon widu ("wood") and kind ("child")
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