Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
VERNE     French, English
As a French surname refers to someone who lived where alder trees grew. While the English version can mean someone who lived where ferns grew, Verne can also mean a seller of ferns which in medieval times were used in bedding, as floor coverings and as animal feed.
VERNEY     English, French
The surname Verney was first found in Buckinghamshire, England, when they arrived from Vernai, a parish in the arrondissement of Bayeux in Normandy.
VERRALL     English
An uncommon Anglo-Saxon surname.
VERRILL     English
This is an uncommon Anglo-Saxon surname.
VICARY     English (British)
There are a number of theories as to the origins of the name, Spanish sailors shipwrecked after the Armada and French Huguenots fleeing the Revolution are two of the more romantic ones. It is more likely to have come as someone associated with the church - the vicar, who carried out the pastoral duties on behalf of the absentee holder of a benefice... [more]
VICKERS     English
Means "son of the vicar". It could also be the name of someone working as a servant of a vicar.
VIDLER     English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname based on Anglo-Norman vis de leu, literally "wolf-face"; or (ii) "violinist, fiddle player" (cf. Fiedler).
VINCE     English
From a short form of the personal name Vincent.
VINING     English (British)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Fyning in Rogate in Sussex.
VINSON     English
This surname means "son of Vincent."
VIRTUE     English
Used as a name for someone who had played the part of Virtue in a medieval mystery play, or as a nickname for someone noted for their virtuousness or (sarcastically) for someone who parades their supposed moral superiority.
VIRTUOSO     English (American), Spanish, Italian
This Italian surname could possibly be connected to those whose ancestors were involved in playing a musical instrument or somehow connected to the musical instrument industry.
VISE     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a boundary, Old French devise.
VIVEASH     English
English surname of uncertain origin. May be Anglo-Norman from French vivace meaning "lively, vigorous", however its pronunciation has led to its connection to various places in southern England called Five Ash Trees.
VIVIS     English (Rare)
Found in the 1891, 1901 & 1911 British census, other Ancestry.co.uk records & FreeBMD. Could derive from Vivas from Spanish Catalan
VOIT     English
A famous bearer of This surname is Angelina Jolie 's father and actor John Voit.
WADDINGTON     English
Habitational name from any of various places called Waddington. One near Clitheroe in Lancashire and another in Lincolnshire (Wadintune in Domesday Book) were originally named in Old English as the "settlement" (Old English tūn) associated with Wada.
WAINWRIGHT     English
Occupational name indicating one who made horse-drawn wagons.
WAITE     English
Occupational name for a watchman, Anglo-Norman French waite (cf. WACHTER).
WAKE     English, Scottish
From the Old Norse byname Vakr meaning "wakeful", "vigilant" (from vaka meaning "to remain awake"), or perhaps from a cognate Old English Waca (attested in place names such as Wakeford, Wakeham, and Wakeley).
WAKEHAM     English, Cornish
A locational surname for someone who lived in one of three places called Wakeham in various parts of England, including Cornwall and/or Devon.
WAKELEY     English
Habitational name from Wakeley in Hertfordshire, named from the Old English byname Waca, meaning ‘watchful’ (see Wake) + Old English leah ‘woodland clearing’.
WAKELIN     English
From the Anglo-Norman male personal name Walquelin, literally "little Walho", a Germanic nickname meaning literally "foreigner".
WAKELY     English
Damp meadow
WALD     German, English
Topographic name for someone who lived in or near a forest (Old High German wald, northern Middle English wald).
WALDRON     Medieval German, Old Norman, Scottish Gaelic, English (British)
Derived from the German compound wala-hran, literally "wall raven", but originally meaning "strong bird". Also derived from the Gaelic wealdærn, meaning "forest dwelling", thought to be derived from the Sussex village of Waldron... [more]
WALDROOP     English, Scottish
Variant of Wardrop.
WALES     English (Modern), Scottish
English and Scottish patronymic from Wale.
WALKINGTON     English
Habitational name from a place in East Yorkshire named Walkington, from an unattested Old English personal name Walca + -ing- denoting association with + tūn.
WALLAS     English, Scottish
A variant of Wallace. The name originates from Scotland and its meaning is "foreigner" or "from the south", taken to mean someone from Wales or England.
WALLIAMS     English
Very rare form of Williams.... [more]
WALLINGTON     American
From the surname of two girls from Rebel Starzz.
WALMER     English
Habitational name from Walmer in Kent, so named from Old English wala (plural of walh "Briton") + mere "pool", or from Walmore Common in Gloucestershire.
WALWYN     English
Either (i) from the Old English personal name Wealdwine, literally "power-friend"; or (ii) perhaps from the medieval personal name Walwain, the Anglo-Norman form of Old French Gauvain (cf... [more]
WANLESS     English
From a medieval nickname for an ineffectual person (from Middle English wanles "hopeless, luckless").
WARDEN     English, Scottish, Northern Irish
From Norman French wardein and warder meaning "to guard". It coincides the English word warden and can be used as an occupational surname for a warden.
WARTON     English
"From the poplar-tree farm"
WASHBURN     English
Northern English topographic name for someone living on the banks of the Washburn river in West Yorkshire, so named from the Old English personal name Walc + Old English burna ‘stream’... [more]
WATERSON     English
It is a patronymic of the male given name Water or Walter.
WATKISS     English (Rare)
Variant of Watkins.
WATNEY     English
Probably means "person from Watney", an unidentified place in England (the second syllable means "island, area of dry land in a marsh"; cf. Rodney, Whitney). This surname is borne by Watneys, a British brewery company.
WAYCASTER     English
The surname Waycaster is German in origin. It means "roll-eater," and was likely derived from a derisive nickname on a baker.
WEAKLY     English
Variant spelling of Weekley.
WEAPONSWORTH     English
Means maker of weapons
WEATHERFORD     English
Topographic name or a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
WEDMORE     English (British)
Habitational name from Wedmore in Somerset, recorded in the 9th century as Wethmor, possibly meaning ‘marsh (Old English mor) used for hunting (w?the)’.
WEE     English
WEEKLEY     English
Originally meant "person from Weekley", Northamptonshire ("wood or clearing by a Romano-British settlement"). British philologist Ernest Weekley (1865-1954) bore this surname.
WEINSTEIN     Jewish, American, German
Means "wine stone" in German.
WEINSTOCK     English, German, Hebrew
This surname of WEINSTOCK is the English variant of the German surname WENSTOCK, an occupational name for a producer or seller of wine, derived originally from the Old German WEIN. The name was also adopted by Ashkenazic Jews, largely recollecting the prominence of wine in the Jewish Scriptures and its used in Jewish ceremonies... [more]
WEIR     Scottish, English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dam or weir on a river.
WELBORN     English
Habitational name from Welborne in Norfolk, Welbourn in Lincolnshire, or Welburn in North Yorkshire, all named with Old English wella ‘spring’ + burna ‘stream’.
WELBY     English (British, Rare)
Lincolnshire family name
WELD     English
Meant "one who lives in or near a forest (or in a deforested upland area)", from Middle English wold "forest" or "cleared upland". A famous bearer is American actress Tuesday Weld (1943-).
WELL     English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a spring or stream, Middle English well(e) (Old English well(a)).
WELLAND     English (British, Rare)
From the name of the place, derived from Old English wig - war and landa - territory, land.
WELLER     English, German
Either from the Olde English term for a person who extracted salt from seawater, or from the English and German "well(e)," meaning "someone who lived by a spring or stream."... [more]
WELLES     English
Variant of Wells.
WELLINGTON     English
Habitational name from any of the three places named Wellington, in Herefordshire, Shropshire, and Somerset. All are most probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Weola + -ing- (implying association with) + tun ‘settlement’.
WELSH     Scottish, English
Ethnic name for someone from Wales or a speaker of the Welsh language. Compare Walsh and Wallace.
WELTON     English
Habitational name from any of various places named Welton, for example in Cumbria, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, and East Yorkshire, from Old English well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
WENN     English
Surname from Norfolk, England
WENTWORTH     English
Habitational name from places in Cambridgeshire and South Yorkshire called Wentworth, probably from the Old English byname Wintra meaning ‘winter’ + Old English worð ‘enclosure’. It is, however, also possible that the name referred to a settlement inhabited only in winter.
WESSON     English
Variant of Weston.
WESTBURY     English
English British surname originating as a place name. There are several Westbury villages, parishes and even Manors across England that have given the name Westbury to people who take up residence in or come from those places... [more]
WESTERLY     English
The name is originated from a term meaning 'winds from the West'. The name could be given to someone who is born in the west.
WESTERMAN     English, American
Derived from Old English westerne meaning "western" and mann meaning "man", thus making it a topographic surname for someone who lived west of a settlement, or a regional surname for someone who had moved to the west... [more]
WESTGATE     English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a west gate in a city, or a habitual surname for someone from Westgate. It is derived from Middle English west meaning "west" and gate "gate" (or "street" in northern and eastern areas; from Old Norse gata).
WESTLAKE     English (Canadian)
Combined of West and Lake.
WESTON     English
Combination of Old English west "west" and tun "settlement, enclosure".
WESTWOOD     English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Westwood, from Old English west "west" and wudu "wood".
WEY     English
Variant of Way.
WHEELDON     English
Habitational name from a place in Derbyshire named Wheeldon, from Old English hweol ‘wheel’ (referring perhaps to a rounded shape) + dun ‘hill’, or from Whielden in Buckinghamshire, which is named with hweol + denu ‘valley’.
WHEELWRIGHT     English (British)
Middle English "maker of wheels"
WHETZEL     American
Altered spelling of German Wetzel.
WHINERAY     English
Means "person from Whinneray", Cumbria, or "person who lives in a nook of land growing with gorse" (in either case from Old Norse hvin "whin, gorse" + vrá "nook of land"). It was borne by New Zealand rugby player Sir Wilson Whineray (1935-2012).
WHIPPLE     English
English surname of uncertain meaning. It might be a shortened form of “whippletree”; an early name for the dogwood. It may also be a variation of Whipp – an early surname for someone who carried out judicial punishments.
WHISMAN     English
Variation of Wisman or Wiseman.
WHISTLER     English
An English occupational surname, meaning "one who whistles."
WHITBY     English
English surname which was from either of two place names, that of a port in North Yorkshire (which comes from the Old Norse elements hvítr "white" (or Hvíti, a byname derived from it) combined with býr "farm") or a place in Cheshire (from Old English hwit "white" (i.e., "stone-built") and burh "fortress").
WHITCOMB     English (British)
means wide valley
WHITEHEAD     English, Scottish
Nickname for someone with fair or prematurely white hair, from Middle English whit "white" and heved "head".
WHITEMAN     English
From a nickname (see White).
WHITGIFT     English
Means "person from Whitgift", Yorkshire ("Hvítr's dowry"). This surname was borne by Anglican churchman John Whitgift (?1530-1604), archbishop of Canterbury 1583-1604 (in addition, Whitgift School is an independent day school for boys in South Croydon, founded in 1595 by John Whitgift; and Whitgift Centre is a complex of shops and offices in the middle of Croydon, Greater London, on a site previously occupied by Whitgift School).
WHITLAM     English
From a medieval nickname for a mild-mannered person (from Middle English whit "white" + lam "lamb"). This surname is borne by Australian Labour politician Gough Whitlam (1916-), prime minister 1972-75.
WHITLEY     English
This surname is derived from a place name composed of Old English elements hwit meaning "white" and leah meaning "clearing, grove."
WHITLOCK     English
Nickname for someone with white or fair hair, from Middle English whit ‘white’ + lock ‘tress’, ‘curl’. Compare Sherlock. ... [more]
WHITMAN     English
From Middle English whit ‘white’ + man ‘man’, either a nickname with the same sense as White, or else an occupational name for a servant of a bearer of the nickname White.... [more]
WHITMARSH     English
English habitational name from Whitemarsh, a place in the parish of Sedgehill, Wiltshire, named from Old English hwit ‘white’ (i.e. ‘phosphorescent’) + mersc ‘marsh’. Compare Whitmore.
WHITMORE     English
Variant of WHITTEMORE
WHITTAKER     English
Variant of Whitaker.
WHITTINGTON     English
From a place name, meaning "Hwita’s settlement".
WHYBROW     English
From the medieval female personal name Wyburgh, literally "war-fortress". (Cf. Germanic cognate Wigburg.)
WHYTE     Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of White.
WICK     English, German
English: topographic name for someone who lived in an outlying settlement dependent on a larger village, Old English wic (Latin vicus), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, of which there are examples in Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Somerset, and Worcestershire... [more]
WICKERSHAM     English
A habitational surname that originates from a lost medieval site or village of Norse origins.... [more]
WICKSEY     English
Two separate surnames, joined together to form Wicksey, when the Vikings invaded England. The name means "Dairy Farmer on the Marsh".
WIDGER     English
From the Old English male personal name Wihtgār, literally "elf-spear".
WIGGIN     English
Either (i) from the Germanic male personal name Wīgant, literally "warrior", introduced into England by the Normans; or (ii) from the Breton male personal name Wiucon, literally "worthy-noble", introduced into England by the Normans.
WIGGINS     English
Patronymic from the personal name Wiggin.
WIGHT     Scottish, English
Nickname from Middle English wiht, wight "nimble, strong".
WILBERFORCE     English
Means "person from Wilberfoss", Yorkshire ("Wilburh's ditch"). This is borne by Wilberforce University, a university in Xenia, Ohio, USA, founded in 1856 and named in honour of the British philanthropist and anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce (1759-1833)... [more]
WILBRAHAM     English
Originally meant "person from Wilbraham", Cambridgeshire ("Wilburg's homestead or estate").
WILBURN     English
A habitation name of uncertain origin found in the East Midlands. Speculation includes the possibility of the meaning "well" and "burn, borne" therefore meaning one who lived near a well or spring by a waterway crossing.
WILD     Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
WILDBLOOD     English
From a medieval nickname for a rakish or hot-headed person.
WILDE     Irish, English, German, Dutch, Jewish
Variant of Wild.
WILDER     English, German, Danish, Yiddish
Variant of Wild.
WILDRICK     English
From German Wildreich, a medieval personal name, from Old High German wildi "wild".
WILDSMITH     English
Probably means "maker of wheels, wheelwright".
WILES     English
Occupational name for a trapper or hunter, from Middle English wile "trap, snare". It could also be a nickname for a devious person.
WILK     Polish, Scottish, English
Polish: from Polish wilk ‘wolf’, probably from an Old Slavic personal name containing this element, but perhaps also applied as a nickname for someone thought to resemble a wolf or connected with wolves.... [more]
WILKES     English, Frisian
English: patronymic from Wilk.... [more]
WILL     Scottish, English, German
Scottish and northern English from the medieval personal name Will, a short form of William, or from some other medieval personal names with this first element, for example Wilbert or Willard... [more]
WILLETT     English
From a pet form of Will, or an Americanized form of French Ouellette.
WILLIAM SCOTT BURNS     English (American)
William Scott Burns ( Martin)
WILLING     English
Patronymic from the Old English personal name Willa.
WILLINGHAM     English
Habitational name from a place named Willingham meaning "homestead (Old English ham) of the people of a man called Wifel".
WILLOCK     English
From the medieval male personal name Willoc, a pet-form based on the first syllable of any of a range of Old English compound names beginning with willa "will, desire".
WILLS     English
Patronymic from Will.
WIMPEY     English
Perhaps a deliberate alteration of Impey. It is borne by George Wimpey, a British construction company, founded in Hammersmith, London in 1880 by George Wimpey (1855-1913). A fictional bearer of the variant Wimpy is J. Wellington Wimpy, a character in the 'Popeye' cartoons of Elzie C. Segar who is always portrayed eating a hamburger.
WIN     Dutch, English, Burmese, Thai
Southeast Asian: unexplained. ... [more]
WINCHEL     English
from Old English wencel ‘child’, perhaps used to distinguish a son from his father with the same forename or perhaps a nickname for a person with a baby face or childlike manner
WIND     English, German, Danish
Nickname for a swift runner, from Middle English wind "wind", Middle High German wint "wind", also "greyhound".
WINDHAM     English, Irish (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Wyndham in West Sussex, near West Grinstead, probably named from an unattested Old English personal name Winda + Old English hamm ‘water meadow’; or from Wymondham in Leicestershire and Norfolk, named from the Old English personal name Wigmund (see Wyman) + Old English ham ‘homestead’... [more]
WINEGARDNER     English (American)
Anglicized form of the German occupational surname Weingartner. A known bearer of this surname is the American writer Mark Winegardner (b. 1961).
WINFREY     English
From the Old English personal name Winfrith, literally "friend-peace". A famous bearer of this surname is Oprah Winfrey (1954-), a US television talk-show presenter.
WINNE     Dutch, English
Dutch: occupational name for an agricultural worker, Middle Low German winne ‘peasant’. ... [more]
WINNEY     English
Derived from an unattested Old English given name, *Wyngeofu, composed of the elements wyn "joy" and geofu "battle".... [more]
WINSETT     English
From an English surname of unexplained origin, perhaps related to Winslow, Winston or Windsor.
WINSTANLEY     English
Means "person from Winstanley", Lancashire ("Wynnstān's glade", Wynnstān being an Old English male personal name, literally "joy-stone"; cf. Winston). It was borne by English communist Gerrard Winstanley (?1609-60), leader of the Diggers.
WINTERBOURNE     English (British)
Probably meaning "born in winter". A large village in Gloucestershire, From the Thomas Hardy novel "The Woodlanders".
WINTERS     English, German
Patronymic form of Winter.
WINTERSON     English
Patronymic form of Winter.
WISE     English
Nickname for a wise or learned person, or in some cases a nickname for someone suspected of being acquainted with the occult arts, from Middle English wise "wise" (Old English wis). This name has also absorbed Dutch Wijs, a nickname meaning "wise", and possibly cognates in other languages.
WITHALL     English
"Withall" comes from the village of "Cornwall" called "Withiel." There is also a connection to an aristocratic level, in the 15th at Henry VII court a noble man and knight went under the family name "Wit-hall"... [more]
WITHYCOMBE     English
Willow Valley. ... [more]
WOLF     English, German, Jewish
From Middle High German wolf meaning "wolf". It can also be given in reference to the Hebrew tribe of Benjamin; the symbol for that tribe was the wolf.
WOLF     English, German, Danish, Norwegian, Jewish, Scottish, Irish, Swedish, Dutch, Welsh, Flemish
From the Old English & German wulf and other Germanic cognates, all meaning 'wolf, wild dog'. (Swedish, Norwegian & Danish ulv, Scots wouf, Yiddish volf & Dutch wolf)... [more]
WOLF     English, Danish, German
From a short form of the various Germanic compound names with a first element wolf "wolf", or a byname or nickname with this meaning. The wolf was native throughout the forests of Europe, including Britain, until comparatively recently... [more]
WOLFIT     English
From the medieval male personal name Wolfet or Wolfat (from Old English Wulfgēat, literally "wolf-Geat" (the name of a Germanic people)). This surname was borne by Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-1968), a British actor and manager.
WOLFRAM     English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
WOLFSON     English
Means "son of Wolf" in English.
WOLSEY     English
From the medieval male personal name Wulsi (from Old English Wulfsige, literally "wolf-victory"). A famous bearer of the surname was English churchman and statesman Thomas Wolsey (Cardinal Wolsey), ?1475-1530.
WOLSTENHOLME     English (British, Rare)
A famous bearer is Chris Wolstenholme, bassist and sometimes vocalist of British alternative rock band Muse.
WOLSTON     English
From the Middle English personal name Wolfstan or Wolstan, Old English Wulfstan, composed of the elements wulf ‘wolf’ + stan stone or a habitational name from any of a large number of places called Woolston(e) or Wollston, all of which are named with Old English personal names containing the first element Wulf (Wulfheah, Wulfhelm, Wulfric, Wulfsige, and Wulfweard) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
WOLVERIDGE     English (British)
Derived from the personal name WULFRIC.
WOMMACK     English
Variant of Womack.
WOODBRIDGE     English
Originated in old England and likely linked to the town of Woodbridge in Suffolk, East Anglia, United Kingdom. Well known Woodbridge's include the Australian Tennis player Todd Woodbridge. There was a famous lineage of six English John Woodbridge's in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries, all Church ministers... [more]
WOODFALL     English
English surname used as a first name. The name means "dweller by a fold in the woods" - in this case, "fold" means "sheep-pen".... [more]
WOODGER     English (British)
Woodger comes from the occupation of wood cutter in old english
WOODLEY     English (American)
The actress Shailene Woodley's last surname
WOODLOCK     Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
WOODMAN     English
Occupational name for a woodcutter or a forester (compare Woodward), or topographic name for someone who lived in the woods. ... [more]
WOODRUFF     English
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of land where woodruff grew, Anglo-Saxon wudurofe composed of wudu "wood" with a second element of unknown origin.
WOODSON     English
From a location in Yorkshire, England earlier spelled Woodsome and meaning "from the houses in the wood" or possibly a patronymic meaning "descendant of a wood cutter or forester."
WOOLDRIDGE     English
From the medieval personal name Wolrich (from Old English Wulfrīc, literally "wolf-power").
WOOLF     German (Modern), English
Variant of WOLF.
WOOLGAR     English
From the medieval male personal name Wolgar (from Old English Wulfgār, literally "wolf-spear").
WOOLNOUGH     English
From the medieval male personal name Wolnoth or Wolnaugh (from Old English Wulfnōth, literally "wolf-daring").
WOOTEN     English
Habitational name from any of the extremely numerous places named with Old English wudu "wood" + tun "enclosure", "settlement",
WOOTTON     English
Variant spelling of WOOTEN.
WORDEN     English
Guardian
WORLEY     English
mostly found in Lancashire and Sussex. very old english surname. something to do with a hill near a stream.
WORSHIP     English (British)
Registered with the Guild of One Name Studies... [more]
WORTH     English
From the Old English WORÞ, meaning "enclosure".
WORTHINGTON     English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
WOULFE     English, Irish
English: variant spelling of Wolf. ... [more]
WRANGLER     English
Given to a person who worked as a wrangler.
WRENN     English
Derived from the surname Wren... [more]
WURÐINGTUN     English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
WYCHERLEY     English
Derived from a place name apparently meaning "elm-wood clearing" from Old English wice and leah. A famous bearer was the dramatist William Wycherley (1640-1715).
WYLDEN     English
Variant of Wilden.
WYLER     English
English: variant of Wheeler or a respelling of Jewish Weiler.
WYMER     English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Wymer (from Old English Wīgmǣr, literally "war-famous"); or (ii) from the Old Breton male personal name Wiumarch, literally "worthy-horse".
WYNN     Welsh, English
The surname Wynn ,(also spelled Winn, and Gwynn), is derived from the Welsh element, Gwynn, which can loosely be translated as "white" or "fair". It features in the name of the North Welsh kingdom of Gwynedd, (meaning "white head" or "white land")... [more]
WYOMING     English (American)
From the name of the US state.
XAVIER     English, French
Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries.
YABSLEY     English
It is believed to be a derived spelling of Abboldesi, a place now more commonly known as Abbotsley or Abbotsleigh. However, the original surname had nothing to do with "Abbots" in any spelling, and derives from to the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Eadbeald" meaning "Prosperity-bold".
YARDLEY     English
Either a habitual surname for someone from Yardley, West Midlands, Essex, Northamptonshire, etc… or derived from the elements gerd, gyrd meaning "pole, stick" and leah meaning "wood, clearing".
YARDY     English
The most likely origin of this surname is that it was used to denote someone who held a piece of land known as a "yarde", from the Middle English word "yerd".
YAXLEY     English
Meant "person from Yaxley", Cambridgeshire and Suffolk ("glade where cuckoos are heard").
YEAGER     English, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of German JÄGER.
YEATS     English
Scottish and northern English variant spelling of Yates.
YELLOW     English
Form the name of the color
YOCUM     German (Anglicized), English
Americanized form of Jochum, a Low German form of the given name Joachim.
YOHO     American (Anglicized)
American Anglicized spelling of Swiss surname 'Joho'
YOST     American, Dutch, Afrikaans
Americanized spelling of Dutch surname Joost or German surname Jost
YOUNGBLOOD     English
Americanisation of the German surname Jungbluth.
YOUNGER     English, American
English (mainly Borders) from Middle English yonger ‘younger’, hence a distinguishing name for, for example, the younger of two bearers of the same personal name. In one case, at least, however, the name is known to have been borne by an immigrant Fleming, and was probably an Americanized form of Middle Dutch jongheer ‘young nobleman’ (see Jonker)... [more]
ZACHARY     English
A reference to Sacheverell, a location in Normandy. May also refer to the given name Zacharias, meaning "to remember God," or "the Lord recalled."
ZACHER     English
A reference to Sacheverell, a location in Normandy. May also refer to the given name Zacharias, meaning "to remember God," or "the Lord recalled."
ZACHRY     English
A reference to Sacheverell, a location in Normandy. May also refer to the given name Zacharias, meaning "to remember God," or "the Lord recalled."
ZACKERT     English, German
An Americanization of the German surnames Zacher and Zachert. It comes from a vernacular form of the personal name Zacharias.
ZALICK     English
Comes from the Greek surname Tsalikis.
ZANE     English
Meaning unknown. It could be a Americanization of the German surname Zahn. Zane is also used as a given name.
ZEAGLER     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Ziegler.
ZELLER     German, Dutch, English, Jewish
Originally denoted someone from Celle, Germany or someone living near a hermit's cell from German zelle "cell". It is also occupational for someone employed at a zelle, for example a small workshop.
ZESCOI     English
derived from the word zesty when used to describe someone
ZIMMON     English (American)
Variant of Zinon
ZOLLNER     English
Variant of ZOLLER.
ZUILL     English, Scottish
From the town of Zuill, Scotland. The "Z" pronounced as "Y" comes from ancient yogh representing a variety of sounds. The name itself is of unknown origin.
ZYLSTRA     Dutch, Frisian, English
Derived from Dutch zijl "canal" or "sluice". Originally indicated someone who lives near a canal or sluice.
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