Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
SURRIDGE     English
From the medieval personal name Seric, a descendant of both Old English Sǣrīc, literally "sea power", and Sigerīc, literally "victory power".
SURRIDGE     English
Originally meant "person from Surridge", Devon ("south ridge").
SURRIDGE     English
Meant "person from the south" (from Old French surreis "southerner").
SUSAN     English
Comes from the female personal name Susanna, Susanne (Middle English), Susanna (Dutch), from Hebrew Shushannah ‘lily’, ‘lily of the valley’. Southern French: from Occitan susan ‘above’, ‘higher’, hence a topographic name for someone living at the top end of a village or on the side of a valley... [more]
SUTCLIFFE     English
The name means ''south of the cliff/hill''.
SUTTER     German, English
English and South German occupational name for a shoemaker or cobbler (rarely a tailor), from Middle English suter, souter, Middle High German suter, sutære (from Latin sutor, an agent derivative of suere ‘to sew’).
SUTTERFIELD     English
Possibly derives from the Old English word ''sutere'', and the Latin word ''sutor'', meaning a shoemaker.
SUTTOR     English
English... [more]
SWAILE     English
Recorded in the spellings of Swaile, Swale and Swales, this is an English surname. It is locational, and according to the famous Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley, originates from either a hamlet called Swallow Hill, near Barnsley in Yorkshire, with Swale being the local dialectal pronunciation and spelling... [more]
SWAIN     Scottish, Irish, English
Northern English occupational name for a servant or attendant, from Middle English swein "young man attendant upon a knight", which was derived from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant"... [more]
SWALLOW     English
From Middle English swal(e)we, swalu "swallow", hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the bird, perhaps in swiftness and grace.
SWAN     English, Scottish
Originally given as a nickname to a person who was noted for purity or excellence, which were taken to be attributes of the swan, or who resembled a swan in some other way. In some cases it may have been given to a person who lived at a house with the sign of a swan... [more]
SWANN     English
Variant of Swan.
SWANNELL     English
From the Old Norse female personal name Svanhildr, literally "swan-battle".
SWANSON     American
Either an anglicized spelling of Svensson or Svendsen, or a patronymic meaning "son of Swan".
SWANWICK     English
Habitational name from Swanwick in Derbyshire, possibly also Swanwick in Hampshire. Both are named from Old English swan, "herdsman," and wic, "outlying dairy farm."
SWASEY     English
Unexplained. Possibly an Anglicized form of Dutch Swijse(n), variant of Wijs "wise" (see Wise).
SWIFT     English, Irish
As an English surname, it is originated as a nickname for a swift, fast runner (from Old English swift meaning "swift, fleet, quick.")... [more]
SWING     English
Probably an Americanized spelling of German Schwing or from Middle High German zwinc meaning "legal district", hence possibly a metonymic occupational name for a district administrator.
SWISS     English (American)
Americanized form of German Schweitz.
SWITSER     English
Either (i) from the medieval nickname Swetesire (literally "sweet sir, amiable master"), applied sarcastically either to someone who used the expression liberally as a form of address or to someone with a de-haut-en-bas manner; or (ii) an anglicization of Schweitzer (from Middle High German swīzer "Swiss person").
SYCAMORE     English
Probably comes from the tree Sycamore
SYKES     English
English Surname (mainly Yorkshire): topographic name for someone who lived by a stream in a marsh or in a hollow, from Middle English syke ‘marshy stream’, ‘damp gully’, or a habitational name from one of the places named with this word, in Lancashire and West Yorkshire.
SYLVESTER     English
From the given name Sylvester.
SYMERE     English (American, Rare)
Name of unknown origin, typically used in the United States. It is best known as the real first name of American rapper Lil Uzi Vert.
SYNGE     English (British)
First found in Shropshire where they had been anciently seated as Lords of the Manor of Bridgenorth, from the time of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 A.D.
SYRETT     English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Syred (from Old English Sigerǣd, literally "victory-counsel"); or (ii) from the medieval female personal name Sigerith (from Old Norse Sigfrithr, literally "victory-lovely").
TABER     English, Polish
English: variant spelling of Tabor. ... [more]
TABOR     English, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
English: metonymic occupational name for a drummer, from Middle English, Old French tabo(u)r ‘drum’.... [more]
TALBERT     English, French
From a continental Germanic personal name composed of the elements tal "valley" and berth "bright".
TALBOT     English, Norman
Disputed origin, but likely from a Germanic given name composed of the elements tal "to destroy" and bod "message". In this form the name is also found in France, taken there apparently by English immigrants; the usual French form is Talbert.
TALBOTT     English
Variant of TALBOT.
TALCOTT     English, Norman
Norman habitational name from Taillecourt in France.... [more]
TALLANT     English (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
TALLENT     English
Habitational name from Talland in Cornwall, which is thought to be named as ‘hill-brow church site’, from Cornish tal + lann.
TALLENTIRE     English (Rare)
From a small village in Cumbria, England, meaning 'head of the land' in Cumbric.
TALLON     English, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
TANCOCK     English
From a shortened variant of the male personal name Andrew, with the suffix -cock (literally "cockerel", hence "jaunty or bumptious young man"), that was often added to create pet-forms of personal names in the Middle Ages.
TANDY     English
From a pet-form of the male personal name Andrew.
TANGERINE     English
Possibly means "from Tangier".
TANGUAY     French, English
From a personal name, a contraction of Tanneguy, from Breton tan meaning 'fire', and ki meaning 'dog', which was the name of a 6-th century Christian saint associated with Paul Aurelian.
TARBELL     English
Tarbell is an alteration of the English placename Turville in Buckinghamshire in England.
TARVER     English
Sodhut dweller, from old English
TATLOW     English (British, Rare)
I heard it was from a small village in England called Tallow.
TAUNTON     English
Habitational name from Taunton in Somerset, Taunton Farm in Coulsdon, Surrey, or Tanton in North Yorkshire. The Somerset place name was originally a combination of a Celtic river name (now the Tone, possibly meaning ‘roaring stream’) + Old English tūn ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
TEACH     English
This surname is derived from the Middle English phrase "at asche," meaning at,or near the ash tree.
TEBBS     English
Variant of Tibbs.
TEE     English
TEFFT     English
Variant of English Taft. This surname was already well established in Connecticut and Rhode Island by 1715.
TEGAN     English
Variant of Teagan.
TELFAIR     Scottish, English
Variant of TELFER.
TELFER     Scottish, English, Italian
From a personal name based on a byname for a strong man or ferocious warrior, from Old French taille or tailler "to cut" + fer "iron" Latin: ferrum "iron" (see Tagliaferro).
TEMPEST     English (British)
English (Yorkshire): nickname for someone with a blustery temperament, from Middle English, Old French tempest(e) ‘storm’ (Latin tempestas ‘weather’, ‘season’, a derivative of tempus ‘time’).
TEMPLE     English, French
Occupational name or habitational name for someone who was employed at or lived near one of the houses ("temples") maintained by the Knights Templar, a crusading order so named because they claimed to occupy in Jerusalem the site of the old temple (Middle English, Old French temple, Latin templum)... [more]
TEMPLETON     English
Derived from Templeton, from the English words 'temple' and 'town'.
TENNEY     English
Variant of Tennyson.
TERSE     English
This name means literally curt, short or stiff. Similar to Stiff (surname) (see STIFF under user submitted names) Not very commonly used. If you're looking for a name for a fictional character who is either an antagonist or just likes to stir things up, you could probably use this.
TERWILIGER     American
a name adopted by a Dutch family in New York
TERWILLIGER     English
An anglicized version of the Dutch surname, Der Willikeur, meaning "a by-law; a statute". Also, Der willige-waar, means "serviceable ware", or "ware that sells well" and could be related as well.
THACKERY     English
English (Yorkshire) habitational name from Thackray in the parish of Great Timble, West Yorkshire, now submerged in Fewston reservoir. It was named with Old Norse þak ‘thatching’, ‘reeds’ + (v)rá ‘nook’, ‘corner’.
THACKWRAY     English
Means Thatcher, or someone who thatches roofs. A varient of the name Thatcher
THOMASON     Welsh, English, Swedish (Rare)
Means "son of Thomas".
THOMASSON     English
Son of Thomas.
THOMPKINS     English
Derived from the forename Thomas.
THOREAU     English
Last name of famous American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, sage writer and philosopher, Henry David Thoreau.
THORNBURG     English
The name Thornburg comes from the Old English thorn broc, because the original bearers lived near a "stream by the thorns" in Buckinghamshire and North Yorkshire.
THORNHILL     English
Habitational name from any of various places named Thornhill, for example in Derbyshire, West Yorkshire, Dorset, and Wiltshire, from Old English þorn "thorn bush" + hyll "hill".
THORNLEY     English
Derived from Thornley, which is the name of three villages in England (two are located in the county of Durham, the third in Lancashire). All three villages derive their name from Old English þorn "thorn" and Old English leah "clearing (in a wood), glade", which gives their name the meaning of "the thorny glade"... [more]
THOROGOOD     English
Variant form of Thurgood.
THRALL     English
English status name from Old English þr?l ‘thrall’, ‘serf’ (from Old Norse þræll).
THREADGOLD     English
Means "person who embroiders cloth with gold thread".
THREEPWOOD     English
The last name of the main pirate character in Lucaart's Monkey Island.
THREET     American (Anglicized), German
Americanization of German Tritt.
THURGOOD     English
From the Old English given name Thurgod (see Þórgautr).
THURMAN     English (Rare)
Composed of the elements þórr (see Thor) and mundr "protection".
THURSTON     English
Derived from the Old Norse personal name þórsteinn (see Torsten).
TIDD     English
This Old English Surname was derived from a hill named after its resemblance to a teat or tead (mammary gland) of which Tidd is a variant. That name became a name for the locale and further by extension for its people... [more]
TIFFANY     English
From the medieval female personal name Tiffania (Old French Tiphaine, from Greek Theophania, a compound of theos "God" and phainein "to appear"). This name was often given to girls born around the feast of Epiphany.
TILNEY     English
Used in farming familys back in the 18th century but its still living true! but this very rare and uniqe name is only used in three family in australia.
TIMBERLEY     American, English (Rare)
Means "timber clearing" in English. From the Middle English words tymber, meaning wood trees, and leah, meaning clearing. The name's origin be related to tree farming.... [more]
TIMM     German, Dutch, English
English: probably from an otherwise unrecorded Old English personal name, cognate with the attested Continental Germanic form Timmo. This is of uncertain origin, perhaps a short form of Dietmar... [more]
TIMPSON     English (British)
Means son of Tim
TINDLE     English
Variant of Tindall.
TINSLEY     English
From a place name in England composed of the unattested name Tynni and Old English hlaw "hill, mound, barrow".
TIPPETTS     English (American)
Tippetts Recorded as Tipp, Tippe, diminutives Tippell, Tippets, Tipping, patronymics Tippett, Tipples, Tippins, and possibly others, this is a medieval English surname. ... [more]
TODHUNTER     English
From the Old English word todde, meaning "fox", with "hunter",
TOLER     English
Variant of Toller.
TOLIVAR     Asturian (Modern, Rare), English (Rare)
Variant of Tolliver. Apparently, this name may have originated in Candamo, Asturias, in the 18th (or earlier) century. The "var" last syllable may be related to "fer," and the meaning may be related to iron, e.g. iron miner, iron refiner, etc... [more]
TOLLIVER     Italian, English (American)
Americanized version of Taliaferro
TOMKIN     English
Derived from the forename Thomas.
TOMKINS     English
Derived from the forename Thomas.
TOMLIN     English
From a pet form of Tom, a short form of the personal name Thomas.
TOMLINSON     English
Patronymic from the personal name Tomlin.
TOMPKINS     English
Derived from the forename Thomas.
TOOKE     English (Rare)
This unusual English surname is of pre 7th century Old Scandinavian origin.
TORKINGTON     English
Means "of Torkington". Torkington is an area in Greater Manchester, England.
TOUGH     Scottish, English
Scottish variant of Tulloch. In Scotland it is pronounced tyookh. ... [more]
TOVEY     English
From the Old Norse male personal name Tófi, a shortened form of various compound names beginning with Thorf- or Thorv- (e.g. Thorvaldr), based on the name of the thunder god Thórr... [more]
TOWE     English
English variant of Tow.
TRAIN     English (British), English (Devon)
English (Devon): 1. metonymic occupational name for a trapper or hunter, from Middle English trayne, Old French traine ‘guile’, ‘snare’, ‘trap’. ... [more]
TREACHER     English
From a medieval nickname for a tricky or deceptive person (from Old French tricheor "trickster, cheat").
TREGORY     Cornish (Anglicized, Rare), English (Rare)
This obscure British surname is a variant form of Tregury, which is an anglicization of the rare Cornish surname Tregurtha.... [more]
TRENFIELD     English (Rare)
Relatives from Gloucestershire
TRESSILLIAN     English
Derived from a Cornish place name meaning "Sulyen's farmstead" (see Sulien).
TRIGG     English (Rare)
Variant of Triggs
TRIGGA     English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Triggs or Trigg.
TRIMBLE     English, Scottish, Northern Irish
A variant of Trumble, recorded in Northern Ireland since the 17th century.... [more]
TRINKET     English, Popular Culture
Effie Trinket's surname: one of "The Hunger Games"'s trilogy character.
TROLLOPE     English, Medieval English
Derived from the place name Troughburn in Northumberland, England, originally Trolhop, meaning "troll valley". Derived from Old Norse troll "troll, supernatural being" and hop "enclosed valley, enclosed land"
TROTT     English
"Trott" is an early recorded surname of the 17th century in America. It is five hundred years older when linked to Medieval Britain.
TROTTER     English, Scottish, German
Northern English and Scottish: occupational name for a messenger, from an agent derivative of Middle English trot(en) 'to walk fast' (Old French troter, of Germanic origin). ... [more]
TROY     Irish, English, German, Jewish, French, Dutch
As an Irish surname, it is a reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Troighthigh, meaning ‘descendant of Troightheach’.... [more]
TRUE     English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and has three distinct possible sources, each with its own history and derivation. ... [more]
TRUETT     English
English habitational name from Trewhitt in Northumbria, named from Old Norse tyri ‘dry resinous wood’ + possibly an Old English wiht ‘river bend’.
TRUMP     English
Metonymic occupational name for a trumpeter, from Middle English trumpe "trumpet".
TRUSTY     English
This is a late medieval occupation descriptive name given to a professional witness, in effect an early Solicitor, the name deriving from the Olde French "Attester" - one who testifies or vouches for a contract or agreement.
TUNSTALL     English
Means "of Tunstall"; Tunstall is a town in the United Kingdom. Derived from the Old English elements tun meaning "farm" and staell which has about the same meaning as tun.
TURNEY     English, Norman
Habitational name from places in France called Tournai, Tournay, or Tourny. All named with the pre-Roman personal name TURNUS and the locative suffix -acum.
TURRENTINE     American
Origin unidentified ('Dictionary of American Family Names': "1881 census has 0, Not in RW, EML"), perhaps from the Italian surname Tarantino.
TUTTLE     English, English (American), Irish
Derived from the Old Norse given name Þorkell, derived from the elements þórr (see Thor) and ketill "cauldron". The name evolved into Thurkill and Thirkill in England and came into use as a given name in the Middle Ages... [more]
TWAIN     American
Most famously borne in the pen name of American author and one time Mississippi riverboat pilot Mark Twain (1835-1910), whose real name is Samuel Langhorne Clemens. The term twain is an Old English word for "two." The name Mark Twain is derived from a riverboat term meaning a mark of two fathoms depth on a line sunk in the river... [more]
TWEEDEL     English
Tweedel is Scottish for "the dell on the tweed river"
TWIDDY     English
Possibly derived from TWEEDY perhaps originating from the area around the River Tweed. Most common in England around the Lincolnshire area, but also found in Yorkshire and Lancashire. There are also people called TWIDDY in the USA who probably emigrated from England or the Scottish Borders originally.
TWYFORD     English
English habitational name from any of the numerous places named Twyford, for example in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Derbyshire, Hampshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Middlesex, and Norfolk, from Old English twi- ‘double’ + ford ‘ford’.
TYLSON     English, German (Anglicized)
English: variant of Dyson (see surname Dye). ... [more]
UMBLE     English
Variant of Humble.
UNTHANK     English
From a place name meaning "squatter's holding" from Old English unthanc (literally "without consent").
UNWIN     English
From the Old English male personal name Hūnwine, literally "bearcub-friend" (later confused with Old English unwine "enemy"). Bearers include British publisher Sir Stanley Unwin (1885-1968) and "Professor" Stanley Unwin (1911-2002), South African-born British purveyor of comical nonsense language.
UPHAM     English
"enclosure surrounded by water"
UPSHUR     English
Most probably an altered spelling of English Upshire, a habitational name from Upshire in Essex, named with Old English upp "up" and scir "district". Alternatively, it may be a variant of Upshaw.
URBAN     English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Hungarian, Jewish
From a medieval personal name (Latin Urbanus meaning "city dweller", a derivative of urbs meaning "town", "city").
URIE     Scottish, English, Irish
From the Scottish Fetteresso parish, Kincardineshire. May mean someone who is brave and loud.
USELTON     English
Perhaps a variant of Osselton, a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place, probably in northeastern England, where this name is most common.
UXBRIDGE     English
Place in England. Like Enfield.
VADEN     English, Swedish
Apparently of English origin, but of unexplained etymology. ... [more]
VALE     English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a valley, Middle English vale (Old French val, from Latin vallis). The surname is now also common in Ireland, where it has been Gaelicized as de Bhál.
VALEN     English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from a medieval personal name, Latin Valentinus, a derivative of Valens (see also Valente), which was never common in England, but is occasionally found from the end of the 12th century, probably as the result of French influence... [more]
VALIANT     English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Old French vaillant meaning "heroic, courageous".
VALLANCE     English
Means "person from Valence", southeastern France (probably "place of the brave").
VALLEY     English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a valley, Middle English valeye.
VALMONT     English, French
Means "Hill of the vale"
VAMPYR     English (American)
A gothic surname.
VANDERLEY     English (American)
English spelling of Van Der Leij.
VASS     English
Status name denoting a serf, Middle English, Old French vass(e), from Late Latin vassus, of Celtic origin. Compare Welsh gwas "boy", Gaelic foss "servant".
VEEVERS     English
Means "dealer in foodstuffs" (from Old French vivres "victuals").
VENTRIS     English
Probably from a medieval nickname for a bold or slightly reckless person (from a reduced form of Middle English aventurous "venturesome"). It was borne by British architect and scholar Michael Ventris (1922-1956), decipherer of the Mycenaean Greek Linear B script.
VERDIER     French, Norman, English
Occupational name for a forester. Derived from Old French verdier (from Late Latin viridarius, a derivative of viridis "green"). Also an occupational name for someone working in a garden or orchard, or a topographic name for someone living near one... [more]
VERNE     French, English
As a French surname refers to someone who lived where alder trees grew. While the English version can mean someone who lived where ferns grew, Verne can also mean a seller of ferns which in medieval times were used in bedding, as floor coverings and as animal feed.
VERNEY     English, French
The surname Verney was first found in Buckinghamshire, England, when they arrived from Vernai, a parish in the arrondissement of Bayeux in Normandy.
VERRALL     English
An uncommon Anglo-Saxon surname.
VERRILL     English
This is an uncommon Anglo-Saxon surname.
VESEY     American
Famous bearer is Denmark Vesey (1767-1822).
VICARY     English (British)
There are a number of theories as to the origins of the name, Spanish sailors shipwrecked after the Armada and French Huguenots fleeing the Revolution are two of the more romantic ones. It is more likely to have come as someone associated with the church - the vicar, who carried out the pastoral duties on behalf of the absentee holder of a benefice... [more]
VICKERS     English
Means "son of the vicar". It could also be the name of someone working as a servant of a vicar.
VIDLER     English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname based on Anglo-Norman vis de leu, literally "wolf-face"; or (ii) "violinist, fiddle player" (cf. Fiedler).
VINCE     English
From a short form of the personal name Vincent.
VINING     English (British)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Fyning in Rogate in Sussex.
VINSON     English
This surname means "son of Vincent."
VINT     English, Scottish
Either an English habitational name from places so named, or a Scottish variant of Wint.
VIOLET     English
Derived from the given name Violet
VIRGIN     English
Form of Virgo.
VIRTUE     English
Used as a name for someone who had played the part of Virtue in a medieval mystery play, or as a nickname for someone noted for their virtuousness or (sarcastically) for someone who parades their supposed moral superiority.
VIRTUOSO     English (American), Spanish, Italian
This Italian surname could possibly be connected to those whose ancestors were involved in playing a musical instrument or somehow connected to the musical instrument industry.
VISE     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a boundary, Old French devise.
VIVEASH     English
English surname of uncertain origin. May be Anglo-Norman from French vivace meaning "lively, vigorous", however its pronunciation has led to its connection to various places in southern England called Five Ash Trees.
VIVIS     English (Rare)
Found in the 1891, 1901 & 1911 British census, other Ancestry.co.uk records & FreeBMD. Could derive from Vivas from Spanish Catalan
VOIT     English
A famous bearer of This surname is Angelina Jolie 's father and actor John Voit.
VOX     English
Variant of Fox
WADDINGTON     English
Habitational name from any of various places called Waddington. One near Clitheroe in Lancashire and another in Lincolnshire (Wadintune in Domesday Book) were originally named in Old English as the "settlement" (Old English tūn) associated with Wada.
WAINWRIGHT     English
Occupational name indicating one who made horse-drawn wagons.
WAITE     English
Occupational name for a watchman, Anglo-Norman French waite (cf. WACHTER).
WAKE     English, Scottish
From the Old Norse byname Vakr meaning "wakeful", "vigilant" (from vaka meaning "to remain awake"), or perhaps from a cognate Old English Waca (attested in place names such as Wakeford, Wakeham, and Wakeley).
WAKEHAM     English, Cornish
A locational surname for someone who lived in one of three places called Wakeham in various parts of England, including Cornwall and/or Devon.
WAKELEY     English
Habitational name from Wakeley in Hertfordshire, named from the Old English byname Waca, meaning ‘watchful’ (see Wake) + Old English leah ‘woodland clearing’.
WAKELIN     English
From the Anglo-Norman male personal name Walquelin, literally "little Walho", a Germanic nickname meaning literally "foreigner".
WAKELY     English
Damp meadow
WALD     German, English
Topographic name for someone who lived in or near a forest (Old High German wald, northern Middle English wald).
WALDRON     Medieval German, Old Norman, Scottish Gaelic, English (British)
Derived from the German compound wala-hran, literally "wall raven", but originally meaning "strong bird". Also derived from the Gaelic wealdærn, meaning "forest dwelling", thought to be derived from the Sussex village of Waldron... [more]
WALDROOP     English, Scottish
Variant of Wardrop.
WALES     English (Modern), Scottish
English and Scottish patronymic from Wale.
WALKINGTON     English
Habitational name from a place in East Yorkshire named Walkington, from an unattested Old English personal name Walca + -ing- denoting association with + tūn.
WALLAS     English, Scottish
A variant of Wallace. The name originates from Scotland and its meaning is "foreigner" or "from the south", taken to mean someone from Wales or England.
WALLIAMS     English
Very rare form of Williams.... [more]
WALLINGTON     American
From the surname of two girls from Rebel Starzz.
WALMER     English
Habitational name from Walmer in Kent, so named from Old English wala (plural of walh "Briton") + mere "pool", or from Walmore Common in Gloucestershire.
WALWYN     English
Either (i) from the Old English personal name Wealdwine, literally "power-friend"; or (ii) perhaps from the medieval personal name Walwain, the Anglo-Norman form of Old French Gauvain (cf... [more]
WANLESS     English
From a medieval nickname for an ineffectual person (from Middle English wanles "hopeless, luckless").
WARDEN     English, Scottish, Northern Irish
From Norman French wardein and warder meaning "to guard". It coincides the English word warden and can be used as an occupational surname for a warden.
WARTON     English
"From the poplar-tree farm"
WASHBURN     English
Northern English topographic name for someone living on the banks of the Washburn river in West Yorkshire, so named from the Old English personal name Walc + Old English burna ‘stream’... [more]
WATERSON     English
It is a patronymic of the male given name Water or Walter.
WATKISS     English (Rare)
Variant of Watkins.
WATNEY     English
Probably means "person from Watney", an unidentified place in England (the second syllable means "island, area of dry land in a marsh"; cf. Rodney, Whitney). This surname is borne by Watneys, a British brewery company.
WATTSON     English, Scottish
Variant of Watson.
WAYCASTER     English
The surname Waycaster is German in origin. It means "roll-eater," and was likely derived from a derisive nickname on a baker.
WEAKLY     English
Variant spelling of Weekley.
WEAPONSWORTH     English
Means maker of weapons
WEATHERFORD     English
Topographic name or a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
WEBBE     English (Rare)
Variant of "Webb", meaning weaver.
WEDMORE     English (British)
Habitational name from Wedmore in Somerset, recorded in the 9th century as Wethmor, possibly meaning ‘marsh (Old English mor) used for hunting (w?the)’.
WEE     English
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