Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BIRKET     English
It's a locational surname taken from the village of Birket Houses in Lancashire.
BIRKIN     English
The surname "Birkin" comes from a village in Yorkshire of the same name, first recorded as "Byrcene" in the Yorkshire charters of 1030, and as "Berchine" and "Berchinge" in the Domesday Book. The first known person with the surname "Birkin" was Jon de Birkin, a baron who lived in the late-11th century.
BIRKS     English
Northern English variant of Birch.
BIRNEY     English
Scottish: habitational name from a place in Morayshire, recorded in the 13th century as Brennach, probably from Gaelic braonach 'damp place'.
BISBEE     English
Named after the city of Bisbee which is in Arizona.... [more]
BITTERMAN     English, German
Name given to a person who was bitter.
BIZZELL     English
a corn merchant; one who made vessels designed to hold or measure out a bushel.
BLACKABY     English
Variant of Blackerby.
BLACKBIRD     English
Variation of Blackbeard.
BLACKERBY     English, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLACKMON     English
Variant of BLACKMAN.
BLACKMORE     English
BLACKMORE, an English name, has two possible beginnings: ... [more]
BLACKSTOCK     English
English and southern Scottish: topographic name from Middle English blak(e) ‘black’, ‘dark’ + stok ‘stump’, ‘stock’.
BLACKWELL     English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Cumbria, Derbyshire, County Durham, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire, named Blackwell, from Old English blæc "black, dark" and wæll(a), well(a) "spring, stream".
BLADE     English (Australian)
it is a name given to a hansom man
BLAIN     Scottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name BLÁÁN, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of BLIN. It could also be a nickname for a person suffering from boils, from Middle English blain "blister"
BLAKEWAY     English
Literally means "black way", thus referring to a black road near which the original bearer must have lived. A famous bearer of this surname was Jacob Blakeway (b. 1583-?), the biological father of Mayflower passenger Richard More (1614-1696).
BLANCHFLOWER     English
From a medieval nickname applied probably to an effeminate man (from Old French blanche flour "white flower"). This surname was borne by Northern Irish footballer Danny Blanchflower (1926-1993).
BLAND     English
Bland is a habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire called Bland, the origin of which is uncertain. Possibly it is from Old English (ge)bland ‘storm’, ‘commotion’ (from blandan ‘to blend or mingle’), with reference to its exposed situation... [more]
BLANDFORD     English
Habitational name from Blandford Forum and other places called Blandford in Dorset (Blaneford in Domesday Book), probably named in Old English with bl?ge 'gudgeon' (genitive plural blægna) + ford 'ford'.
BLAYLOCK     English
The surname of James P. Blaylock (1950-), an early steampunk author. His surname may mean "black lock" from Middle English blakelok, originally referring to a person with dark hair.
BLAZE     English
Variant of Blaise.
BLEDSOE     English
Comes from a place in Gloucestershire called Bledisloe, comes from an Old English personal name Blið.
BLESSED     English
From a medieval nickname for a fortunate person. This surname is borne by British actor Brian Blessed (1936-).
BLEWETT     English
From a medieval nickname for a blue-eyed person or one who habitually wore blue clothing (from Middle English bleuet "cornflower" or bluet "blue cloth").
BLISSETT     English
A different form of Blessed. A bearer of this surname is Luther Blissett (1958-), a Jamaican-born English footballer ("Luther Blissett" has been used since 1994 as a cover name for activists engaging in anti-cultural establishment polemics and spoofs on the internet and elsewhere).
BLIZZARD     English
A different form (influenced by blizzard "heavy snowstorm") of Blissett.
BLOOD     English
Evidently from Old English blod ‘blood’, but with what significance is not clear. In Middle English the word was in use as a metonymic occupational term for a physician, i.e. one who lets blood, and also as an affectionate term of address for a blood relative.
BLOOM     English
Metonymic occupational name for an iron worker, from Middle English blome ‘ingot (of iron)’.
BLOOMFIELD     English
This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a locational name from either of the two places thus called in England, one in Staffordshire, and the other in Somerset, or it may be a dialectal variant of Blonville (-sur-Mer) in Calvados, Normandy, and hence a Norman habitation name... [more]
BLOUNT     English
Variant of Blunt.
BLOW     English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a pale complexion (from Middle English blowe "pale"). This surname was borne by English composer John Blow (1649-1708) and British fashion editor Isabella Blow (original name Isabella Delves Broughton; 1958-2007); additionally, "Joe Blow" is a name used colloquially (in US, Canadian and Australian English) as representative of the ordinary uncomplicated unsophisticated man, the average man in the street (of which the equivalent in British English is "Joe Bloggs").
BLUFORD     English, American (South)
Possibly an English habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. The name occurs in records of the 19th century but is now very rare if not extinct in the British Isles. In the U.S. it is found chiefly in TX and TN.
BLUME     German, English
Could be from the Jewish surname Blum of from Swedish Blom. It could also be from the English word bloom.
BLUNT     English
From the Old French word blund which means "blonde, fair". It also coincides with the Middle English word blunt or blont meaning "dull". A famous bearer is Emily Blunt, a British actress.
BOCK     German, Upper German, Jewish, English
Altered spelling of German Böck (see Boeck) or Bach.... [more]
BODEN     English
Possibly a variant of BALDWIN.
BODIN     French, English
Derived from Old French personal name BODIN or a variant spelling of BAUDOUIN.
BODKIN     English
From the medieval male personal name Bowdekyn, a pet-form of Baldwin.
BOEING     English (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of German Böing. This was the surname of American industrialist William Boeing (1881-1956) who founded The Boeing Company, a manufacturer of airplanes.
BOEKHOUT     English
Probably a habitational name from the village Boekhoute in northern Belgium, close to the border to The Netherlands.
BOHART     English (Rare)
Meaning unknown.
BOLDEN     English
Varient of Bolding.
BOLDING     English, German
Patronymic from Bold as a personal name.
BOLEN     English
Variant of BULLEN.
BOLLARD     English, Irish
According to MacLysaght, this surname of Dutch origin which was taken to Ireland early in the 18th century.
BOLT     English
From Middle English bolt meaning "bolt", "bar" (Old English bolt meaning "arrow’). In part this may have originated as a nickname or byname for a short but powerfully built person, in part as a metonymic occupational name for a maker of bolts... [more]
BONAPARTE     Italian (Rare), French (Rare), Judeo-Italian (Rare), American (Rare), Caribbean (Rare)
Variant and French form of Buonaparte. This is also a Jewish surname. A notable bearer was Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1820), who ruled as Emperor of France from 1804 through 1814 and again briefly in 1815, who was of Italian (Tuscan) ancestry... [more]
BONDE     Old Swedish, Swedish, English, Norwegian
English: variant spelling of Bond.... [more]
BONES     English
Derives from bon, "good" in Old French.
BONSALL     English (British)
This is a locational name which originally derived from the village of Bonsall, near Matlock in Derbyshire. The name is Norse-Viking, pre 10th Century and translates as 'Beorns-Halh' - with 'Beorn' being a personal name meaning 'Hero' and 'Halh' a piece of cultivated land - a farm.
BOOK     English (British)
The surname Book originated from the UK. When and where are still under investigation, however we believe it maybe within the Manchester area.
BOOKER     English
English occupational surname meaning "maker of books."
BOORMAN     Anglo-Saxon, English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a topographical name for someone who lived in a particularly noteworthy or conspicuous cottage, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "bur", bower, cottage, inner room, with "mann", man, or a locational name from any of the various places called Bower(s) in Somerset and Essex, which appear variously as "Bur, Bure" and "Bura" in the Domesday Book of 1086... [more]
BOOT     English, Dutch, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of boots, from Middle English, Old French bote (of unknown origin).... [more]
BOOTS     English, Dutch, German
A variant of Boot meaning "shoemaker" in English or "boatman" in Dutch or German.
BORCHERT     German, English
Variant of Borchardt (see BURKHARD).
BORECKI     English
Habitational name for someone from a place called Borek or Borki, from bór "pine forest".
BORMAN     Dutch, Low German, English
Dutch and North German: variant of Bormann. ... [more]
BORNE     English, French, Dutch
1. English: variant spelling of Bourne. ... [more]
BOSLEY     English
English habitation surname derived from the Old English personal name Bosa and the Old English leah "clearing, field". It's also possibly a variant of the French surname Beausoleil meaning "beautiful sun" from the French beau 'beautiful, fair' and soleil 'sun'... [more]
BOSTON     English
Habitational name from the town Boston in Lincolnshire, England. The name means "Botwulf’s stone".... [more]
BOSTWICK     English
From an English surname which was from a lost or unidentified place name. The second element is clearly Old English wic "outlying (dairy) farm".
BOTTING     English, Dutch
Patronymic from BOTT, an Old English personal name of unknown origin.
BOUDREAU     English
English variant of French Beaudreau.
BOWDEN     English
Habitational name from any of several places called Bowden or Bowdon, most of them in England. From Old English boga "bow" and dun "hill", or from Old English personal names BUGA or BUCGE combined with dun.... [more]
BOWDLER     Flemish, English
Originally de Boelare it evolved to Bowdler or Bowdle after Baldwin de Boelare came to England in 1105 & was given a lordship over Montgomery, Wales.
BOWE     Medieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
BOWER     English, Scottish
Scottish: occupational name for a bow maker, Older Scots bowar, equivalent to English Bowyer. ... [more]
BOWERMAN     English, American
1. English: occupational name for a house servant who attended his master in his private quarters (see Bower). ... [more]
BOWERSOCK     English
Likely an Americanized spelling of Bauersack.
BOWSER     English
Nickname from the Norman term of address beu sire ‘fine sir’, given either to a fine gentleman or to someone who made frequent use of this term of address.
BOWYER     English
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of bows (see Bow), as opposed to an archer. Compare Bowman.
BOX     English
BOYE     English, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From a Germanic personal name, Boio or Bogo, of uncertain origin. It may represent a variant of Bothe, with the regular Low German loss of the dental between vowels, but a cognate name appears to have existed in Old English, where this feature does not occur... [more]
BRADSHAW     English
Habitational name from any of the places called Bradshaw, for example in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, from Old English brad "broad" + sceaga "thicket".
BRAGG     English, Welsh
From a nickname for a cheerful or lively person, derived from Middle English bragge meaning "lively, cheerful, active", also "brave, proud, arrogant".
BRAGUE     English
Began being used in the 1700's
BRAITHWAITE     English
Northern English habitational name from any of the places in Cumbria and Yorkshire named Braithwaite, from Old Norse breiðr "broad" + þveit "clearing".
BRAMBLE     English
This surname is taken from the word which refers to a common blackberry (British) or any of several closely related thorny plants in the Rubus genus (US). It also refers to any thorny shrub. The word is derived from Old English bræmbel with a euphonic -b- inserted from the earlier bræmel or brémel, which is then derived from Proto-Germanic *bræmaz meaning "thorny bush."
BRANNER     Danish, German, English
Danish variant of BRANDER and German variant of BRANTNER.
BRASS     English, German
English (Northumberland): variant of Brace.... [more]
BRATHWAITE     English
Place-name derived from the Old Norse words for a "broad clearing".
BRAUNERSHRITHER     German, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
BRAYSON     English
Patronymic form of the surname Bray.
BRAZIL     English (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BREAKSPEAR     English
From a medieval nickname for someone who had achieved notable success in jousts or in battle. Nicholas Breakspear (?1100-1159) was the original name of Pope Hadrian IV, the only English pope.
BREECE     English
Variant of BREESE or PREECE.
BREEDLOVE     English
Probably from a medieval nickname for a likable or popular person (from Middle English breden "to produce" + love). This surname is borne by Craig Breedlove (1937-), US land-speed record holder.
BRETON     French, English
French and English: ethnic name for a Breton, from Old French bret (oblique case breton) (see Brett).
BREUNIG     German, German (Austrian), American
Origin probably in Frankfurt am Main... [more]
BRICK     Irish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
BRIDE     Irish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MacBride, from the root for Brigid.
BRIDGE     English
Indicating one who lived near a bridge.
BRIDGER     English
Variant of Bridge.
BRIGGS     English, Flemish
This surname is a variant of the more common name Bridges, which, contrary to appearances, has two possible origins, one the perhaps obvious English topographical or occupational one, and the other locational, from Belgium... [more]
BRIGHT     English
From a Middle English nickname or personal name, meaning "bright, fair, pretty", from Old English beorht "bright, shining".
BRIGHTWEN     English
From either of the two Old English given names Beohrtwine (a masculine name which meant "bright friend") or Beohrtwynn (a feminine name which meant "bright joy").
BRINDLEY     English
Habitational name from a place in England so named. From Old English berned "burnt" and leah "woodland clearing".
BRINLEY     English
Variant of Brindley.
BRINLY     English
Variant of Brindley
BRINSON     English
Habitational name from Briençun in northern France.
BRINTON     English
English locational surname, taken from the town of the same name in Norfolk. The name means "settlement belonging to Brun" - the personal name coming from the Old English word for "fire, flame".
BRITNELL     English
Habitational name from a place called Brinton in Norfolk, England. See BRINTON.
BRODERICK     Irish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of Rhydderch". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
BROGDEN     English
From the name of a place in West Yorkshire meaning "valley brook", from Old English broc "brook" and denu "valley".
BROGDON     English
Variant of Brogden The valley of the brook a rural place now in Lancanshire, England.
BROLIN     Swedish, English (Anglicized)
Swedish ornamental name composed of bro "bridge" and the suffix -in (derived from Latin -inus, -inius) "descendant of".... [more]
BROMLEY     English
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. Most of them derived from Old English brom "broom" and leah "woodland clearing".
BROOKER     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, a variant of BROOK.
BROOKES     English
Variant of Brooks
BROOKHOUSE     English
Means 'house by the brook'.
BROOKMAN     English, American
English: variant of Brook. ... [more]
BROUGHTON     English
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. The first name element is derived from Old English broc "brook", burh "fortress", or beorg "castle". The second element is derived from Old English tun "settlement, dwelling".
BROWER     English (American)
English variant of Brewer. Respelling of Brauer or Brouwer.
BROWES     English (Canadian, ?)
My mothers maiden name.
BROWNBEAR     English (American, Rare)
From the Brown Bear.
BROWNING     English
English: from the Middle English and Old English personal name Bruning, originally a patronymic from the byname Brun (see Brown).
BRUBAKER     American
American form of Brubacher
BRUCKER     English
Variant spelling of BROOKER.
BRUCKMAN     German, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
BRUGGER     German, American
South German variant or Americanized spelling of North German Brügger (see Bruegger). habitational name for someone from any of various (southern) places called Bruck or Brugg in Bavaria and Austria.
BRUGH     English (Rare)
Variant of Brough.
BRUMBY     Australian (Rare), English
English habitational name from a place in Lincolnshire named Brumby, from the Old Norse personal name Brúni or from Old Norse brunnr ‘well’ + býr ‘farmstead’, ‘village’.
BRUMLEY     English
Variant of BROMLEY.
BRUNSWICK     English, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
BUCHANAN     English (American), English (Australian)
Uncertain. Possibly used as an anglicized form of any like-sounding surnames, such as German Buchholz and Bulgarian Buchvarov.
BUCK     English
From the given name Buck.
BUCKLAND     English
Habitational name from any of the many places in southern England (including nine in Devon) named Buckland, from Old English boc "book" and land "land", i.e. land held by right of a written charter, as opposed to folcland, land held by right of custom.
BUCKMAN     English
Occupational name for a goatherd (Middle English bukkeman) or scholar (Old English bucman "book man"). It could also be a shortened form of BUCKINGHAM or a variant of BUCKNAM.
BUCKSON     English
Either a patronymic from Buck, or possibly an altered form of Buxton.
BUCKWALTER     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Buchwalder.
BUCSIS     English (Canadian)
Perhaps of Hungarian origin, but the original surname is not known.
BUDGE     English
Nickname from Norman French buge "mouth" (Late Latin bucca), applied either to someone with a large or misshapen mouth or to someone who made excessive use of his mouth, i.e. a garrulous, indiscreet, or gluttonous person... [more]
BUELTER     German, English
Middle European variant of Butler, also meaning "a vat or large trough used to contain wine." The name originated in southern Germany in the mid-seventeenth century.
BUFFORD     English
Meaning unknown.
BUFORD     English, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
BUGG     English
From the Old Norse nickname Buggi, literally "fat man", or from a medieval nickname for an eccentric or strangely behaved person (from Middle English bugge "bogeyman, scarecrow").
BULLICK     English
Variant of Bullock.
BULLIVANT     English
From a medieval nickname for a "good chap" or amiable companion (from Old French bon enfant, literally "good child").
BULSTRODE     English
Locational surname referring to the medieval village of Bulstrode in Berkshire. ... [more]
BUMPUS     English
(i) from a medieval nickname for a vigorous walker (from Old French bon "good" + pas "pace"); (ii) perhaps "person who lives by a place through which travel is easy" (from Old French bon "good" + pas "passage")
BUNCH     English
English: nickname for a hunchback, from Middle English bunche ‘hump’, ‘swelling’ (of unknown origin).
BUNTING     English, German
English: nickname from some fancied resemblance to the songbird... [more]
BUONO     Italian, English
Nickname derived from Italian buono "good".
BURBAGE     English
English: habitational name from places in Wiltshire, Derbyshire, and Leicestershire, so named with Old English burh ‘fort’ + bæc ‘hill’, ‘ridge’ (dative bece).
BURBRIDGE     English
English: perhaps a variant of Burbage, altered by folk etymology, or possibly a habitational name from a lost place so named.
BURGER     English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
BURK     English, Irish
Variant of BURKE
BURKETT     English
English: from an Old English personal name, Burgheard, composed of the elements burh, burg ‘fort’ (see Burke) + heard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. ... [more]
BURKS     English
English variant spelling of Birks.
BURL     English
Old English occupational name originally meaning "cup bearer" or "butler" for one who dispensed wine and had charge of the cellar. Eventually the name came to mean the chief servant of a royal or noble household and was replaced by the French language inspired named 'Butler,' akin to the world "bottler".
BURLEY     English
English habitation name from the elements burh meaning "stronghold or fortified settlement" and leah meaning "field or clearing".
BURLINGTON     English
Habitational name from Bridlington in East Yorkshire, from Old English Bretlintun meaning BERHTEL's town.
BURNETT     English
Scottish and English: descriptive nickname from Old French burnete, a diminutive of brun "brown" (see Brown).
BURNLEY     English
English (Lancashire and Yorkshire): habitational name from Burnley in Lancashire, so named with the Old English river name Brun (from brun ‘brown’ or burna ‘stream’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
BURRIS     English
Variant of English BURROWS or German BÖRRIES.
BURROUGHS     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, Old English "beorg", a cognate of Old High German berg "hill", ‘mountain’ (see Berg). This name has become confused with derivatives of Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke)... [more]
BURROWS     English
Variant of Burroughs. A name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, also may be a further derivation from Old English bur "bower" and hus "house".
BUSBY     English
Habitational name from a place in North Yorkshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Buschebi, from Old Norse buskr "bush, shrub" or an Old Norse personal name Buski and býr "homestead, village", or from some other place so called.
BUSFIELD     English
This is a locational surname and originates from the hamlet of 'Bousfield', eight miles from the town of Appleby in Cumberland. This hamlet was controlled by Norse Vikings for several centuries until the Norman invasion of 1066... [more]
BUSHE     English
Variant of Bush.
BUSSE     German, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
BUTTER     English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
BUTTERFIELD     English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pasture for cattle or at a dairy farm, or a habitational name from a place named Butterfield (for example in West Yorkshire), from Old English butere ‘butter’ + feld ‘open country’.
BUXTON     English
1. A habitational name for someone from Buxton in Derbyshire, from the Middle English Buchestanes or Bucstones (meaning "bowing stones"), from Old English būgan meaning "to bow" and stanes, meaning "stones".... [more]
BYAM     English
Probably means "person from Bytham", Lincolnshire ("homestead in a valley bottom"). Glen Byam Shaw (1904-1986) was a British theatre director.
BYCRAFT     English (American, Rare, ?)
Found mostly in the American Great Lakes region and Canada, likely a singular extended family. Likely of 6th century English descent, though there are very few English natives who bear the name. Name either refers to the occupation running some sort of mill machine, the original holder living near a croft (enclosed pasture or tillage) or implies "craftiness" of its original holder.
BYERS     Scottish, English
Scottish and northern English topographic name for someone who lived by a cattleshed, Middle English byre, or a habitational name with the same meaning, from any of several places named with Old English b¯re, for example Byers Green in County Durham or Byres near Edinburgh.
BYRE     English
Probably derived from Old English bȳre "farm, barn".
BYRON     English
An English place name, earlier Byram, from byre, meaning "farm" and the suffix -ham meaning "homestead". Famously borne by the aristocratic poet, Lord Byron.
BYRUM     English
Variant of Byron.
BYTHESEA     English (British)
Habitational name for someone who lived near the sea, this name is nearly extinct in England today.
BYTHEWOOD     English (British)
A nearly extinct habitational surname for one who lived near, by or around a wooded (forested) area.
CABELL     Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
CABLE     English, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
CABUCOS     English
Decended from Old English meaning "leader."
CADBURY     English
Derived from Norman French
CAKE     English
From the Middle English cake denoting a flat loaf made from fine flour (Old Norse kaka), hence a metonymic occupational name for a baker who specialized in fancy breads. It was first attested as a surname in the 13th century (Norfolk, Northamptonshire).
CAL     English
Possibly from the given name Cal.
CALAWAY     English
Variant spelling of Callaway.
CALEB     American
Caleb norwood
CALLANDER     Scottish, English, Swedish (Rare)
Habitational name from various places so named in Scotland. ... [more]
CALLAWAY     English
Variant of Calloway.
CALLEN     English (Rare)
From the forename Callen
CALLENDER     English
Occupational name for a person who finished freshly woven cloth by passing it between heavy rollers to compress the weave. From Old Franch calandrier, calandreur.
CALLOWAY     American (Modern, Rare)
Means "pebble". From the Old French cail(ou) 'pebble'. Traditionally an English surname, which is a regional name of French Norman origin from Caillouet-Orgeville in Eure, France.
CAMM     English
English (of Norman origin): habitational name for someone from Caen in Normandy, France.English: habitational name from Cam in Gloucestershire, named for the Cam river, a Celtic river name meaning ‘crooked’, ‘winding’.Scottish and Welsh: possibly a nickname from Gaelic and Welsh cam ‘bent’, ‘crooked’, ‘cross-eyed’.Americanized spelling of German Kamm.
CAMOYS     English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a snub nose (from Old French camus "snub nose").
CAMPING     English
The English form of Campana, means bells.
CANADA     French, English
It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed.
CANDLIN     English
Derived from the medieval English, male first name Gandelyn, of unknown meaning.
CANDY     English
Unexplained.There was a family of this name in Roussillon, France, descended from a partisan of James II named Kennedy, who was exiled in France in the 17th century. The family died out in France in 1868, but may have had an American branch.
CANNING     English, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CANT     English
Means "singer in a chantry chapel", or from a medieval nickname for someone who was continually singing (in either case from Old Northern French cant "song").
CANTELLOW     English
Means "person from Canteleu, Canteloup, etc.", the name of various places in northern France ("song of the wolf").
CANTERBURY     English
Habitational name from Canterbury in Kent, named in Old English as Cantwaraburg "fortified town (burgh) of the people (wara) of Kent".
CANTWELL     Irish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
CAPEL     English
From the Domesday Book of 1086, from the old French word 'capele' meaning chapel.
CAPLIN     English
Means "singer in a chantry chapel" (from Old Northern French capelain, a variant of standard Old French chapelain (cf. Chaplin)).
CAPSHAW     English
Unexplained. Perhaps a habitational name from Cadshaw near Blackburn, Lancashire, although the surname is not found in England.
CAPULET     English
This is the last name of Juliet from William Shakepeare's tragedy, Romeo and Juliet.
CARAWAY     English
Probably means "spice merchant" (from Middle English carewei "caraway").
CARBONELL     English
From a medieval nickname for a dark-haired or swarthy person, from Anglo-Norman carbonel, literally "little charcoal".
CARD     English
English: metonymic occupational name for someone who carded wool (i.e. disentangled it), preparatory to spinning, from Middle English, Old French card(e) ‘carder’, an implement used for this purpose... [more]
CARDWELL     English
From the traditionally British surname, which is a variant of the British surname Caldwell, a from the Old English cald "cold" and well(a) "spring, stream".
CARE     English
Occupational name for a locksmith, Middle English keyere, kayer, an agent derivative of keye.
CARGILL     Scottish, English
Habitational name from a place so named in Scotland.
CARISBROOK     English
Carisbrooke is a village on the Isle of Wight; the name is thought to mean "Carey's brook". When in 1917 the British royal family changed its name from the "House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha" to the "House of Windsor" and renounced all German titles, the title of Marquess of Carisbrooke was created for the erstwhile German Prince Alexander of Battenberg.
CARMICHAEL     Scottish, English
Scottish place name meaning "fort of Michael".
CARNER     German, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
CAROSO     English (American)
Surname of Panther Caroso from the Star Fox 64 series.
CARRELL     English
English: from Old French carrel, ‘pillow’, ‘bolster’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of these. In some cases perhaps an altered spelling of Irish Carroll. In other cases perhaps an altered spelling of French Carrel.
CARRINGTON     English, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Carrington, probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Cara + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’.... [more]
CARSTAIRS     English (British)
From the manor or barony of the same name in the parish of Carstairs (= 1170 Casteltarres, 'Castle of Tarres').
CASE     English
From Anglo-Norman French cas(s)e "case, container" (from Latin capsa), hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of boxes or chests.
CASH     English
Variant of Case.
CASON     English
Habitational name for someone from Cawston in Norfolk; the form of the surname reflects the local pronunciation of the place name, which is from the Old Scandinavian personal name Kalfr and Old English tun "settlement".
CASSELL     English
Either (i) "person from Cassel", northern France, or "person from Kassel", Germany ("fort"); or (ii) a different form of Castle ("person who lives by or lives or works in a castle"). Cassell & Company is a British publishing company, established in 1848 by John Cassell (1817-1865).
CATCHPOLE     English
Meant "bailiff, especially (originally) one who could seize domestic animals in lieu of tax or debt" (from Anglo-Norman cachepol, from cacher "to chase" + pol "chicken").
CATER     English
Comes from the English word "caterer".
CATES     English
English patronymic from the Old Norse byname Káti (from káti ‘boy’).
CATLETT     American (South)
There are several towns in the American South named Catlett.
CATTLEY     English
Means "person from Catley", Herefordshire and Lincolnshire ("glade frequented by cats"). It was borne by the British botanical patron William Cattley (1788-1835).
CATTRALL     English
This surname is of Old Scandinavian origin, is an English locational name from Catterall, near Garstang in Lancashire, which appeared as "Catrehala" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and "Caterhale" in the Book of Fees of 1212... [more]
CAVELL     English
Nickname for a bald man, from a diminutive of Anglo-Norman French cauf.
CAVERLY     English
English surname, a variant of the English surname Calverley, itself derived from the Old English calf "calf" and leag "field, clearing".
CAWOOD     English
Traditional English habitational surname meaning "jackdaw wood" from the Old English ca referring to 'jackdaw' (a member of the crow family), and wudu 'wood'.
CAWTHORNE     English
Means "person from Cawthorn or Cawthorne", both in Yorkshire ("cold thorn bush").
CENA     English (American), English
Cena is a prominently used English name. It is derived from the word "see", however it rather than referring to the ability to see it, what it actually refers to is the inability to see as the other half of the name ("-na") means "naw" a synonym for "no"... [more]
CESTARE     English (American, Modern)
There is a similar name, Sastre, which is the Spanish form of the surname Sarto, meaning "tailor." The name CESTARE is phonetically similar to Sastre and could be a derivative of that name.... [more]
CHADBURN     English (Rare)
Form the wildcat brook
CHALLENGER     English
Probably from a medieval nickname for a touchy or quarrelsome person (from a derivative of Middle English chalangen "to challenge"). A fictional bearer is Professor George Challenger, irascible scientist and explorer, leader of the expedition to Amazonia in Arthur Conan Doyle's 'The Lost World' (1912).
CHAMPION     English (Rare)
From an English and French surname.
CHAMPLIN     Belgian, English
Means Champion, was a family name in Belgium, a status and influence that was envied by the princes of the region.... [more]
CHANTRY     English
Means "singer in a chantry chapel" or "one who lives by a chantry chapel". A chantry was a type of chapel, one endowed for the singing of Masses for the soul of the founder (from Old French chanterie, from chanter "to sing").
CHAPEL     English
English form of Chappell. Derived from the Old French word chape meaning "cape", "hooded cloak" or "hat". This surname is for a person who makes hats / capes or a wearer of hats and / or capes... [more]
CHARLES     English
Derived from the given name Charles.
CHARLESON     English
Patronymic from the personal name Charles.
CHARLESTON     English
Means "son of Charles."
CHARLTON     English
An Extremely kind person
CHATWIN     English
Old English given name CEATTA combined with Old English (ge)wind "winding ascent".
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