Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BIBLEEnglish
From the given name BIBEL or an altered spelling of German BIEBL.
BICKHAMEnglish
Habitational name from places so named in Devon and Somerset, most of which are most probably named with an Old English personal name Bicca and Old English cumb "valley". The first element could alternatively be from bica "pointed ridge".
BICKNELLEnglish (British)
Contracted form of the placename Bickenhill in Somerset, England.
BIDDLEEnglish, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
BIGELOWEnglish
Habitational name from a place in England called Big Low meaning "big mound".
BIGGINSEnglish
Habitational name from any of the various places in England named with northern Middle English bigging "building" (from Old Norse). This word came to denote especially an outbuilding, and is still used in and around Northumberland and Cumbria.
BILLARDEnglish, German
From a short form of the personal name Robillard, a derivative of Robert.... [more]
BILLINGHAMEnglish
A surname of English origin.
BILLSONEnglish
Means "Son of Bill."
BINGHAMEnglish
Ultimately deriving from the toponym of Melcombe Bingham in Dorset. The name was taken to Ireland in the 16th century, by Richard Bingham, a native of Dorset who was appointed governor of Connaught in 1584... [more]
BINGLEYEnglish
Habitual surname for someone from Bingley in West Yorkshire, derived either from the given name Bynna or the Old English element bing meaning "hollow" and leah meaning "woodland clearing"... [more]
BINKEnglish
Topographic name for someone living by a bink, a northern dialect term for a flat raised bank of earth or a shelf of flat stone suitable for sitting on. The word is a northern form of modern English bench.
BINKSEnglish
Variant of Bink.
BIRCHEnglish, German, Danish, Swedish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a birch tree or in a birch wood, from a Germanic word meaning ‘birch’ (Old English birce ‘birch’, Middle High German birche, Old Danish birk)... [more]
BIRCHALLEnglish
Probably a habitational name from Birchill in Derbyshire or Birchills in Staffordshire, both named in Old English with birce "birch" + hyll "hill".
BIRCHARDEnglish
From the Old English personal name, Burgheard. See also Burkett.
BIRCHFIELDEnglish
Variant of English BURCHFIELD or an anglicized form of German BIRKENFELD.
BIRDSONAfrican American
It means son of Bird and most likely came from someone who was given the name Bird. The word bird is found in all English language dictionaries and was not intended to be a name.
BIRDSONGEnglish
From the English words bird and song. Possibly an English translation of the German surname Vogelsang.
BIRDWHISTLEEnglish (Rare)
derived from whistling like a bird or the sound of the birds were sold.
BIRKETEnglish
It's a locational surname taken from the village of Birket Houses in Lancashire.
BIRKINEnglish
The surname "Birkin" comes from a village in Yorkshire of the same name, first recorded as "Byrcene" in the Yorkshire charters of 1030, and as "Berchine" and "Berchinge" in the Domesday Book. The first known person with the surname "Birkin" was Jon de Birkin, a baron who lived in the late-11th century.
BIRKSEnglish
Northern English variant of Birch.
BIRNEYEnglish
Scottish: habitational name from a place in Morayshire, recorded in the 13th century as Brennach, probably from Gaelic braonach 'damp place'.
BISBEEEnglish
Named after the city of Bisbee which is in Arizona.... [more]
BITTERMANEnglish, German
Name given to a person who was bitter.
BIZZELLEnglish
a corn merchant; one who made vessels designed to hold or measure out a bushel.
BLACKERBYEnglish, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLACKMOREEnglish
BLACKMORE, an English name, has two possible beginnings: ... [more]
BLACKSTOCKEnglish
English and southern Scottish: topographic name from Middle English blak(e) ‘black’, ‘dark’ + stok ‘stump’, ‘stock’.
BLACKWELLEnglish
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Cumbria, Derbyshire, County Durham, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire, named Blackwell, from Old English blæc "black, dark" and wæll(a), well(a) "spring, stream".
BLADEEnglish
Metonymic occupational name for a cutler, from Middle English blade "cutting edge, sword".
BLAINScottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name BLÁÁN, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of BLIN. It could also be a nickname for a person suffering from boils, from Middle English blain "blister"
BLAKEWAYEnglish
Literally means "black way", thus referring to a black road near which the original bearer must have lived. A famous bearer of this surname was Jacob Blakeway (b. 1583-?), the biological father of Mayflower passenger Richard More (1614-1696).
BLANCHFLOWEREnglish
From a medieval nickname applied probably to an effeminate man (from Old French blanche flour "white flower"). This surname was borne by Northern Irish footballer Danny Blanchflower (1926-1993).
BLANDEnglish
Bland is a habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire called Bland, the origin of which is uncertain. Possibly it is from Old English (ge)bland ‘storm’, ‘commotion’ (from blandan ‘to blend or mingle’), with reference to its exposed situation... [more]
BLANDFORDEnglish
Habitational name from Blandford Forum and other places called Blandford in Dorset (Blaneford in Domesday Book), probably named in Old English with bl?ge 'gudgeon' (genitive plural blægna) + ford 'ford'.
BLAYLOCKEnglish
The surname of James P. Blaylock (1950-), an early steampunk author. His surname may mean "black lock" from Middle English blakelok, originally referring to a person with dark hair.
BLAZEEnglish
Variant of Blaise.
BLEDSOEEnglish
Comes from a place in Gloucestershire called Bledisloe, comes from an Old English personal name Blið.
BLESSEDEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a fortunate person. This surname is borne by British actor Brian Blessed (1936-).
BLEWETTEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a blue-eyed person or one who habitually wore blue clothing (from Middle English bleuet "cornflower" or bluet "blue cloth").
BLISSETTEnglish
A different form of Blessed. A bearer of this surname is Luther Blissett (1958-), a Jamaican-born English footballer ("Luther Blissett" has been used since 1994 as a cover name for activists engaging in anti-cultural establishment polemics and spoofs on the internet and elsewhere).
BLIZZARDEnglish
A different form (influenced by blizzard "heavy snowstorm") of Blissett.
BLOODEnglish
Evidently from Old English blod ‘blood’, but with what significance is not clear. In Middle English the word was in use as a metonymic occupational term for a physician, i.e. one who lets blood, and also as an affectionate term of address for a blood relative.
BLOOMEnglish
Metonymic occupational name for an iron worker, from Middle English blome ‘ingot (of iron)’.
BLOOMFIELDEnglish
This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a locational name from either of the two places thus called in England, one in Staffordshire, and the other in Somerset, or it may be a dialectal variant of Blonville (-sur-Mer) in Calvados, Normandy, and hence a Norman habitation name... [more]
BLOUNTEnglish
Variant of Blunt.
BLOWEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone with a pale complexion (from Middle English blowe "pale"). This surname was borne by English composer John Blow (1649-1708) and British fashion editor Isabella Blow (original name Isabella Delves Broughton; 1958-2007); additionally, "Joe Blow" is a name used colloquially (in US, Canadian and Australian English) as representative of the ordinary uncomplicated unsophisticated man, the average man in the street (of which the equivalent in British English is "Joe Bloggs").
BLUFORDEnglish, American (South)
Possibly an English habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. The name occurs in records of the 19th century but is now very rare if not extinct in the British Isles. In the U.S. it is found chiefly in TX and TN.
BLUMEGerman, English
Could be from the Jewish surname Blum of from Swedish Blom. It could also be from the English word bloom.
BLUNTEnglish
From the Old French word blund which means "blonde, fair". It also coincides with the Middle English word blunt or blont meaning "dull". A famous bearer is Emily Blunt, a British actress.
BOCKGerman, Upper German, Jewish, English
Altered spelling of German Böck (see Boeck) or Bach.... [more]
BODENEnglish
Possibly a variant of BALDWIN.
BODINFrench, English
Derived from Old French personal name BODIN or a variant spelling of BAUDOUIN.
BODKINEnglish
From the medieval male personal name Bowdekyn, a pet-form of Baldwin.
BOEINGEnglish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of German Böing. This was the surname of American industrialist William Boeing (1881-1956) who founded The Boeing Company, a manufacturer of airplanes.
BOEKHOUTEnglish
Probably a habitational name from the village Boekhoute in northern Belgium, close to the border to The Netherlands.
BOHARTEnglish (Rare)
Meaning unknown.
BOLDINGEnglish, German
Patronymic from Bold as a personal name.
BOLENEnglish
Variant of BULLEN.
BOLEYNEnglish
Franciscanized form of "Bullens", a Dutch surname meaning "son of Baldo (meaning "strong")".
BOLLARDEnglish, Irish
According to MacLysaght, this surname of Dutch origin which was taken to Ireland early in the 18th century.
BOLTEnglish
From Middle English bolt meaning "bolt", "bar" (Old English bolt meaning "arrow’). In part this may have originated as a nickname or byname for a short but powerfully built person, in part as a metonymic occupational name for a maker of bolts... [more]
BONAPARTEItalian (Rare), French (Rare), Judeo-Italian (Rare), American (Rare), Caribbean (Rare)
Variant and French form of Buonaparte. This is also a Jewish surname. A notable bearer was Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1820), who ruled as Emperor of France from 1804 through 1814 and again briefly in 1815, who was of Italian (Tuscan) ancestry... [more]
BONDEOld Swedish, Swedish, English, Norwegian
English: variant spelling of Bond.... [more]
BONESEnglish
Derives from bon, "good" in Old French.
BONSALLEnglish (British)
This is a locational name which originally derived from the village of Bonsall, near Matlock in Derbyshire. The name is Norse-Viking, pre 10th Century and translates as 'Beorns-Halh' - with 'Beorn' being a personal name meaning 'Hero' and 'Halh' a piece of cultivated land - a farm.
BOOKEnglish (British)
The surname Book originated from the UK. When and where are still under investigation, however we believe it maybe within the Manchester area.
BOOKEREnglish
English occupational surname meaning "maker of books."
BOORMANAnglo-Saxon, English
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a topographical name for someone who lived in a particularly noteworthy or conspicuous cottage, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "bur", bower, cottage, inner room, with "mann", man, or a locational name from any of the various places called Bower(s) in Somerset and Essex, which appear variously as "Bur, Bure" and "Bura" in the Domesday Book of 1086... [more]
BOOTEnglish, Dutch, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of boots, from Middle English, Old French bote (of unknown origin).... [more]
BOOTSEnglish, Dutch, German
A variant of Boot meaning "shoemaker" in English or "boatman" in Dutch or German.
BORCHERTGerman, English
Variant of Borchardt (see BURKHARD).
BORECKIEnglish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Borek or Borki, from bór "pine forest".
BORMANDutch, Low German, English
Dutch and North German: variant of Bormann. ... [more]
BORNEEnglish, French, Dutch
1. English: variant spelling of Bourne. ... [more]
BOSLEYEnglish
English habitation surname derived from the Old English personal name Bosa and the Old English leah "clearing, field". It's also possibly a variant of the French surname Beausoleil meaning "beautiful sun" from the French beau 'beautiful, fair' and soleil 'sun'... [more]
BOSTONEnglish
Habitational name from the town Boston in Lincolnshire, England. The name means "Botwulf’s stone".... [more]
BOSTWICKEnglish
From an English surname which was from a lost or unidentified place name. The second element is clearly Old English wic "outlying (dairy) farm".
BOTTINGEnglish, Dutch
Patronymic from BOTT, an Old English personal name of unknown origin.
BOUDREAUEnglish
English variant of French Beaudreau.
BOWDENEnglish
Habitational name from any of several places called Bowden or Bowdon, most of them in England. From Old English boga "bow" and dun "hill", or from Old English personal names BUGA or BUCGE combined with dun.... [more]
BOWDLERFlemish, English
Originally de Boelare it evolved to Bowdler or Bowdle after Baldwin de Boelare came to England in 1105 & was given a lordship over Montgomery, Wales.
BOWEMedieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
BOWEREnglish, Scottish
Scottish: occupational name for a bow maker, Older Scots bowar, equivalent to English Bowyer. ... [more]
BOWERMANEnglish, American
1. English: occupational name for a house servant who attended his master in his private quarters (see Bower). ... [more]
BOWERSOCKEnglish
Likely an Americanized spelling of Bauersack.
BOWSEREnglish
Nickname from the Norman term of address beu sire ‘fine sir’, given either to a fine gentleman or to someone who made frequent use of this term of address.
BOWYEREnglish
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of bows (see Bow), as opposed to an archer. Compare Bowman.
BOYEEnglish, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From the Germanic given names Boio or Bogo, which are of uncertain origin. Also possibly a variant of Bothe.
BRADSHAWEnglish
Habitational name from any of the places called Bradshaw, for example in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, from Old English brad "broad" + sceaga "thicket".
BRAGGEnglish, Welsh
From a nickname for a cheerful or lively person, derived from Middle English bragge meaning "lively, cheerful, active", also "brave, proud, arrogant".
BRAGUEEnglish
Began being used in the 1700's
BRAITHWAITEEnglish
Northern English habitational name from any of the places in Cumbria and Yorkshire named Braithwaite, from Old Norse breiðr "broad" + þveit "clearing".
BRAMBLEEnglish
This surname is taken from the word which refers to a common blackberry (British) or any of several closely related thorny plants in the Rubus genus (US). It also refers to any thorny shrub. The word is derived from Old English bræmbel with a euphonic -b- inserted from the earlier bræmel or brémel, which is then derived from Proto-Germanic *bræmaz meaning "thorny bush."
BRANNERDanish, German, English
Danish variant of BRANDER and German variant of BRANTNER.
BRASSEnglish, German
English (Northumberland): variant of Brace.... [more]
BRATHWAITEEnglish
Place-name derived from the Old Norse words for a "broad clearing".
BRAUNERSHRITHERGerman, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
BRAYSONEnglish
Patronymic form of the surname Bray.
BRAZILEnglish (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BREAKSPEAREnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone who had achieved notable success in jousts or in battle. Nicholas Breakspear (?1100-1159) was the original name of Pope Hadrian IV, the only English pope.
BREEDEnglish
Habitational name from any of various minor places, for example Brede in Sussex, named with Old English brǣdu "breadth, broad place" (a derivative of brād "broad").
BREEDLOVEEnglish
Probably from a medieval nickname for a likable or popular person (from Middle English breden "to produce" + love). This surname is borne by Craig Breedlove (1937-), US land-speed record holder.
BRETONFrench, English
French and English: ethnic name for a Breton, from Old French bret (oblique case breton) (see Brett).
BREUNIGGerman, German (Austrian), American
Origin probably in Frankfurt am Main... [more]
BRICKIrish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
BRIDEIrish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MacBride, from the root for Brigid.
BRIDGEEnglish
Indicating one who lived near a bridge.
BRIDGESEnglish, Scottish
Plural of "Bridge"; dweller at the bridge.
BRIGGSEnglish, Flemish
This surname is a variant of the more common name Bridges, which, contrary to appearances, has two possible origins, one the perhaps obvious English topographical or occupational one, and the other locational, from Belgium... [more]
BRIGHTEnglish
From a Middle English nickname or personal name, meaning "bright, fair, pretty", from Old English beorht "bright, shining".
BRIGHTWENEnglish
From either of the two Old English given names Beohrtwine (a masculine name which meant "bright friend") or Beohrtwynn (a feminine name which meant "bright joy").
BRINDLEYEnglish
Habitational name from a place in England so named. From Old English berned "burnt" and leah "woodland clearing".
BRINSONEnglish
Habitational name from Briençun in northern France.
BRINTONEnglish
English locational surname, taken from the town of the same name in Norfolk. The name means "settlement belonging to Brun" - the personal name coming from the Old English word for "fire, flame".
BRITNELLEnglish
Habitational name from a place called Brinton in Norfolk, England. See BRINTON.
BRODERICKIrish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of Rhydderch". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
BROGDENEnglish
From the name of a place in West Yorkshire meaning "valley brook", from Old English broc "brook" and denu "valley".
BROGDONEnglish
Variant of Brogden The valley of the brook a rural place now in Lancanshire, England.
BROLINSwedish, English (Anglicized)
Swedish ornamental name composed of bro "bridge" and the suffix -in (derived from Latin -inus, -inius) "descendant of".... [more]
BROMLEYEnglish
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. Most of them derived from Old English brom "broom" and leah "woodland clearing".
BROOKEREnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, a variant of BROOK.
BROOKHOUSEEnglish
Means 'house by the brook'.
BROOKMANEnglish, American
English: variant of Brook. ... [more]
BROOMBYEnglish
A surname well represented in Cheshire, and Nottinghamshire.
BROOMFIELDEnglish
From a place name meaning "gorse field", from Old English brom "gorse" and feld "field, open country".
BROUGHTONEnglish
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. The first name element is derived from Old English broc "brook", burh "fortress", or beorg "castle". The second element is derived from Old English tun "settlement, dwelling".
BROWEREnglish (American)
English variant of Brewer. Respelling of Brauer or Brouwer.
BROWESEnglish (Canadian, ?)
My mothers maiden name.
BROWNINGEnglish
English: from the Middle English and Old English personal name Bruning, originally a patronymic from the byname Brun (see Brown).
BROWNLEEScottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
BROWNLEYEnglish, Scottish
Variant spelling of "Brownlee". Brown field in Old English.
BRUBAKERAmerican
American form of Brubacher
BRUCKEREnglish
Variant spelling of BROOKER.
BRUCKMANGerman, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
BRUGGERGerman, American
South German variant or Americanized spelling of North German Brügger (see Bruegger). habitational name for someone from any of various (southern) places called Bruck or Brugg in Bavaria and Austria.
BRUMBYAustralian (Rare), English
English habitational name from a place in Lincolnshire named Brumby, from the Old Norse personal name Brúni or from Old Norse brunnr ‘well’ + býr ‘farmstead’, ‘village’.
BRUNEYEnglish
First found in Languedoc, France, possibly meaning "brown."
BRUNSWICKEnglish, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
BUCHANANEnglish (American), English (Australian)
Uncertain. Possibly used as an anglicized form of any like-sounding surnames, such as German Buchholz and Bulgarian Buchvarov.
BUCKEnglish
From the given name Buck.
BUCKINGHAMEnglish
Habitational name from the former county seat of the county of Buckinghamshire, Old English Buccingahamm "water meadow (Old English hamm) of the people of (-inga-) Bucc(a)".
BUCKLANDEnglish
Habitational name from any of the many places in southern England (including nine in Devon) named Buckland, from Old English boc "book" and land "land", i.e. land held by right of a written charter, as opposed to folcland, land held by right of custom.
BUCKMANEnglish
Occupational name for a goatherd (Middle English bukkeman) or scholar (Old English bucman "book man"). It could also be a shortened form of BUCKINGHAM or a variant of BUCKNAM.
BUCKSEnglish
Variant of "Buck"; a deer.
BUCKSONEnglish
Either a patronymic from Buck, or possibly an altered form of Buxton.
BUCKWALTEREnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of German Buchwalder.
BUCSISEnglish (Canadian)
Perhaps of Hungarian origin, but the original surname is not known.
BUDGEEnglish
Nickname from Norman French buge "mouth" (Late Latin bucca), applied either to someone with a large or misshapen mouth or to someone who made excessive use of his mouth, i.e. a garrulous, indiscreet, or gluttonous person... [more]
BUELTERGerman, English
Middle European variant of Butler, also meaning "a vat or large trough used to contain wine." The name originated in southern Germany in the mid-seventeenth century.
BUFFORDEnglish
Meaning unknown.
BUFORDEnglish, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
BUGGEnglish
From the Old Norse nickname Buggi, literally "fat man", or from a medieval nickname for an eccentric or strangely behaved person (from Middle English bugge "bogeyman, scarecrow").
BUGGSAfrican American (Anglicized, Modern)
I do not know much about this surname except to say that an employee at my job has Buggs as their surname.
BULLIVANTEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a "good chap" or amiable companion (from Old French bon enfant, literally "good child").
BULSTRODEEnglish
Locational surname referring to the medieval village of Bulstrode in Berkshire. ... [more]
BUMPUSEnglish
(i) from a medieval nickname for a vigorous walker (from Old French bon "good" + pas "pace"); (ii) perhaps "person who lives by a place through which travel is easy" (from Old French bon "good" + pas "passage")
BUNCHEnglish
English: nickname for a hunchback, from Middle English bunche ‘hump’, ‘swelling’ (of unknown origin).
BUNDYEnglish (American)
This surname is most recognizable in North America as belonging to the serial killer named Ted Bundy who committed his crimes in the 1970s.
BUNTINGEnglish, German
English: nickname from some fancied resemblance to the songbird... [more]
BUONOItalian, English
Nickname derived from Italian buono "good".
BURBAGEEnglish
English: habitational name from places in Wiltshire, Derbyshire, and Leicestershire, so named with Old English burh ‘fort’ + bæc ‘hill’, ‘ridge’ (dative bece).
BURBRIDGEEnglish
English: perhaps a variant of Burbage, altered by folk etymology, or possibly a habitational name from a lost place so named.
BURCHEnglish
Variant of Birch.
BURGEREnglish, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
BURKENEnglish
English variant of Birkin (see Burkins).
BURKETTEnglish
English: from an Old English personal name, Burgheard, composed of the elements burh, burg ‘fort’ (see Burke) + heard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. ... [more]
BURKINSEnglish
English variant of Birkin, Burkin, a habitational name from the parish of Birkin in West Yorkshire, so named with Old English bircen ‘birch grove’, a derivative of birce (see Birch).
BURKSEnglish
English variant spelling of Birks.
BURLEnglish
Old English occupational name originally meaning "cup bearer" or "butler" for one who dispensed wine and had charge of the cellar. Eventually the name came to mean the chief servant of a royal or noble household and was replaced by the French language inspired named 'Butler,' akin to the world "bottler".
BURLEYEnglish
English habitation name from the elements burh meaning "stronghold or fortified settlement" and leah meaning "field or clearing".
BURLINGTONEnglish
Habitational name from Bridlington in East Yorkshire, from Old English Bretlintun meaning BERHTEL's town.
BURNETTEnglish
Scottish and English: descriptive nickname from Old French burnete, a diminutive of brun "brown" (see Brown).
BURNLEYEnglish
English (Lancashire and Yorkshire): habitational name from Burnley in Lancashire, so named with the Old English river name Brun (from brun ‘brown’ or burna ‘stream’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
BURRISEnglish
Variant of English BURROWS or German BÖRRIES.
BURROUGHSEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, Old English "beorg", a cognate of Old High German berg "hill", ‘mountain’ (see Berg). This name has become confused with derivatives of Old English burh ‘fort’ (see Burke)... [more]
BURROWSEnglish
Variant of Burroughs. A name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, also may be a further derivation from Old English bur "bower" and hus "house".
BURTEnglish
From the given name, which is a short form of Burton.
BUSBYEnglish
Habitational name from a place in North Yorkshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Buschebi, from Old Norse buskr "bush, shrub" or an Old Norse personal name Buski and býr "homestead, village", or from some other place so called.
BUSFIELDEnglish
This is a locational surname and originates from the hamlet of 'Bousfield', eight miles from the town of Appleby in Cumberland. This hamlet was controlled by Norse Vikings for several centuries until the Norman invasion of 1066... [more]
BUSHEEnglish
Variant of Bush.
BUSSEGerman, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
BUTTEREnglish, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
BUTTERFIELDEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pasture for cattle or at a dairy farm, or a habitational name from a place named Butterfield (for example in West Yorkshire), from Old English butere ‘butter’ + feld ‘open country’.
BUTTERFIELDEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pasture for cattle or at a dairy farm, or a habitational name from a place named Butterfield (for example in West Yorkshire), from Old English butere "butter" and feld "open country".
BUTTERYEnglish (British)
The baker in Old English.
BUXTONEnglish
1. A habitational name for someone from Buxton in Derbyshire, from the Middle English Buchestanes or Bucstones (meaning "bowing stones"), from Old English būgan meaning "to bow" and stanes, meaning "stones".... [more]
BYAMEnglish
Probably means "person from Bytham", Lincolnshire ("homestead in a valley bottom"). Glen Byam Shaw (1904-1986) was a British theatre director.
BYCRAFTEnglish (American, Rare, ?)
Found mostly in the American Great Lakes region and Canada, likely a singular extended family. Likely of 6th century English descent, though there are very few English natives who bear the name. Name either refers to the occupation running some sort of mill machine, the original holder living near a croft (enclosed pasture or tillage) or implies "craftiness" of its original holder.
BYERSScottish, English
Scottish and northern English topographic name for someone who lived by a cattleshed, Middle English byre, or a habitational name with the same meaning, from any of several places named with Old English b¯re, for example Byers Green in County Durham or Byres near Edinburgh.
BYREEnglish
Probably derived from Old English bȳre "farm, barn".
BYRONEnglish
An English place name, earlier Byram, from byre, meaning "farm" and the suffix -ham meaning "homestead". Famously borne by the aristocratic poet, Lord Byron.
BYRUMEnglish
Variant of Byron.
BYTHESEAEnglish (British)
Habitational name for someone who lived near the sea, this name is nearly extinct in England today.
BYTHEWOODEnglish (British)
A nearly extinct habitational surname for one who lived near, by or around a wooded (forested) area.
CABELLCatalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
CABLEEnglish, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
CABUCOSEnglish
Decended from Old English meaning "leader."
CADBURYEnglish
Derived from Norman French
CAINEFrench, English
Originally from a French derogatory nickname for someine with a bad temper.
CAKEEnglish
From the Middle English cake denoting a flat loaf made from fine flour (Old Norse kaka), hence a metonymic occupational name for a baker who specialized in fancy breads. It was first attested as a surname in the 13th century (Norfolk, Northamptonshire).
CALEnglish
Possibly from the given name Cal.
CALAWAYEnglish
Variant spelling of Callaway.
CALEBAmerican
Caleb norwood
CALLANDERScottish, English, Swedish (Rare)
Habitational name from various places so named in Scotland. ... [more]
CALLENEnglish (Rare)
From the forename Callen
CALLENDEREnglish
Occupational name for a person who finished freshly woven cloth by passing it between heavy rollers to compress the weave. From Old Franch calandrier, calandreur.
CALLOWAYAmerican (Modern, Rare)
Means "pebble". From the Old French cail(ou) 'pebble'. Traditionally an English surname, which is a regional name of French Norman origin from Caillouet-Orgeville in Eure, France.
CAMMEnglish
English (of Norman origin): habitational name for someone from Caen in Normandy, France.English: habitational name from Cam in Gloucestershire, named for the Cam river, a Celtic river name meaning ‘crooked’, ‘winding’.Scottish and Welsh: possibly a nickname from Gaelic and Welsh cam ‘bent’, ‘crooked’, ‘cross-eyed’.Americanized spelling of German Kamm.
CAMOYSEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone with a snub nose (from Old French camus "snub nose").
CAMPINGEnglish
The English form of Campana, means bells.
CANADAFrench, English
It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed.
CANDLINEnglish
Derived from the medieval English, male first name Gandelyn, of unknown meaning.
CANDYEnglish
Unexplained.There was a family of this name in Roussillon, France, descended from a partisan of James II named Kennedy, who was exiled in France in the 17th century. The family died out in France in 1868, but may have had an American branch.
CANNINGEnglish, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CANTEnglish
Means "singer in a chantry chapel", or from a medieval nickname for someone who was continually singing (in either case from Old Northern French cant "song").
CANTELLOWEnglish
Means "person from Canteleu, Canteloup, etc.", the name of various places in northern France ("song of the wolf").
CANTERBURYEnglish
Habitational name from Canterbury in Kent, named in Old English as Cantwaraburg "fortified town (burgh) of the people (wara) of Kent".
CANTWELLIrish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
CAPELEnglish
From the Domesday Book of 1086, from the old French word 'capele' meaning chapel.
CAPLINEnglish
Means "singer in a chantry chapel" (from Old Northern French capelain, a variant of standard Old French chapelain (cf. Chaplin)).
CAPSHAWEnglish
Unexplained. Perhaps a habitational name from Cadshaw near Blackburn, Lancashire, although the surname is not found in England.
CAPULETEnglish
This is the last name of Juliet from William Shakepeare's tragedy, Romeo and Juliet.
CARAWAYEnglish
Probably means "spice merchant" (from Middle English carewei "caraway").
CARBONELLEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a dark-haired or swarthy person, from Anglo-Norman carbonel, literally "little charcoal".
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