Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
HARTFORD English
Habitational name from Hertford, or from either of two places called Hartford, in Cheshire and Cumbria; all are named with Old English heorot ‘hart’ + ford ‘ford’.
HARTLEY English, Scottish
Derived from the Old English words meaning heorot meaning "hart" and leah meaning "clearing". Also from Scottish Ó hArtghaile meaning "descendant of Artghal". HARTLEY is also an English given name.
HARTON English
This surname is a habitational one, denoting someone who lived in a village in County Durham or in North Yorkshire.... [more]
HARTWELL English
Habitational name from places in Buckinghamshire, Northamptonshire, and Staffordshire called Hartwell, from Old English heorot ‘stag’, ‘hart’ + wella ‘spring’, ‘stream’... [more]
HARVARD English
From the Old English given name Hereweard, composed of the elements here "army" and weard "guard", which was borne by an 11th-century thane of Lincolnshire, leader of resistance to the advancing Normans... [more]
HARWOOD English, Scots
Habitation name found especially along the border areas of England and Scotland, from the Old English elements har meaning "gray" or hara referring to the animals called "hares" plus wudu for "wood"... [more]
HASCHAK English (American)
This may be influenced from the English word hashtag, meaning number.
HASHLEY American
Variant of ASHLEY (?).
HASKELL English
From the Norman personal name ASCHETIL.
HASLEY English
Habitational name of uncertain origin. The surname is common in London, and may be derived from Alsa (formerly Assey) in Stanstead Mountfitchet, Essex (recorded as Alsiesheye in 1268). nother possible source is Halsway in Somerset, named from Old English hals ‘neck’ + weg ‘way’, ‘road’.
HASSALL English
Means "person from Hassall", Cheshire ("witch's corner of land").
HASSELHOFF American
The surname of the singer, David Hasselhoff.
HASTINGS English, Scottish
Habitational name from Hastings, a place in Sussex, on the south coast of England, near which the English army was defeated by the Normans in 1066. It is named from Old English H?stingas ‘people of H?sta’... [more]
HATCH English
English (mainly Hampshire and Berkshire): topographic name from Middle English hacche ‘gate’, Old English hæcc (see Hatcher). In some cases the surname is habitational, from one of the many places named with this word... [more]
HATCHER English
Southern English: topographic name for someone who lived by a gate, from Middle English hacche (Old English hæcc) + the agent suffix -er. This normally denoted a gate marking the entrance to a forest or other enclosed piece of land, sometimes a floodgate or sluice-gate.
HAVELOCK English
From the Middle English male personal name Havelok, from Old Norse Hafleikr, literally "sea sport". It was borne by the British general Sir Henry Havelock (1795-1857).
HAVERFORD Welsh, English
Haverford's name is derived from the name of the town of Haverfordwest in Wales, UK
HAWKS English
Variant of or patronymic from HAWK.
HAWLEY English, Scottish
Means "hedged meadow". It comes from the English word haw, meaning "hedge", and Saxon word leg, meaning "meadow". The first name HAWLEY has the same meaning.
HAWTHORN English, Scottish
English and Scottish: variant spelling of HAWTHORNE.
HAWTREY English (British)
It is the surname of Mr. Hawtrey from the book The Boy In The Dress, by David Walliams. Hawtrey means "To succeed".
HAY English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAYCOCK English
English (West Midlands): from a medieval personal name, a pet form of HAY, formed with the Middle English hypocoristic suffix -cok (see COCKE).
HAYFORD English
English habitational name from several places called Heyford in Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire, or Hayford in Buckfastleigh, Devon, all named with Old English heg ‘hay’ + ford ‘ford’.
HAYLING English
Either (i) "person from Hayling", Hampshire ("settlement of Hægel's people"); or (ii) from the Old Welsh personal name Heilyn, literally "cup-bearer" (see also PALIN).
HAYLOCK English
English surname of uncertain origin, possibly from the Old English given name Hægluc, a diminutive of the unrecorded name *Hægel, found in various place names... [more]
HAYMES English
Patronymic derived from the Norman given name HAMO.
HAYWORTH English
English: habitational name from Haywards Heath in Sussex, which was named in Old English as ‘enclosure with a hedge’, from hege ‘hedge’ + worð ‘enclosure’. The modern form, with its affix, arose much later on (Mills gives an example from 1544).
HAZARD English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
HAZELDEN English
Means "person from Hazelden", the name of various places in England ("valley growing with hazel trees").
HAZELTON English
Hazel is referring to hazel trees, while ton is from old english tun meaning enclosure, so an enclosure of hazel trees, or an orchard of hazel trees.
HAZELWOOD English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Devon, Derbyshire, Suffolk, Surrey, and West Yorkshire, so called from Old English hæsel (or Old Norse hesli) ‘hazel (tree)’ + wudu ‘wood’; or a topographic name from this term.
HAZLETT English (British)
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hazel copse, Old English hæslett (a derivative of hæsel ‘hazel’). habitational name from Hazelhead or Hazlehead in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, derived from Old English hæsel ‘hazel’ + heafod ‘head’, here in the sense of ‘hill’; also a topographic name of similar etymological origin.
HAZZARD English
Variant spelling of HAZARD.
HEACOCK English
variant spelling of HAYCOCK
HEALEY English
Habitational surname for a person from Healey near Manchester, derived from Old English heah "high" + leah "wood", "clearing". There are various other places in northern England, such as Northumberland and Yorkshire, with the same name and etymology, and they may also have contributed to the surname.
HEARD English
Occupational name for a tender of animals, normally a cowherd or shepherd, from Middle English herde (Old English hi(e)rde).
HEART English
Variant of HART.
HEATHCOTE English
English habitational name from any of various places called Heathcote, for example in Derbyshire and Warwickshire, from Old English h?ð ‘heathland’, ‘heather’ + cot ‘cottage’, ‘dwelling’.
HEATON English
Comes from "town (or farmstead) on a hill".... [more]
HEDDLE English
Famous bearer is William Heddle Nash (1894-1961), the English lyric tenor.
HEDGE English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hedge, Middle English hegg(e). In the early Middle Ages, hedges were not merely dividers between fields, but had an important defensive function when planted around a settlement or enclosure.
HEDSTROM American
Anglicized form of HEDSTRÖM.
HELLIWELL English
From various place names in United Kingdom. Derived from Olde English elements of "halig" meaning holy, and "waella", a spring.
HELMSLEY English
This English habitational name originates with the North Yorkshire village of Helmsley, named with the Old English personal name Helm and leah, meaning 'clearing'.
HELTON English
Habitational name from Helton in Cumbria, named in Old English probably with helde "slope" and tun "farmstead, settlement", or possibly a variant of HILTON... [more]
HEMBER English
From the West Country area near Bristol.
HEMMINGS English
Derived from the given name HEMMING. It is the last name of the band member of Five Seconds of Summer (5sos), Luke Hemmings.
HEMMINGTON English
Origin uncertain, possibly derived from the given name HEMMING.
HEMSLEY English
English: habitational name from either of two places in North Yorkshire called Helmsley. The names are of different etymologies: the one near Rievaulx Abbey is from the Old English personal name Helm + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’, whereas Upper Helmsley, near York, is from the Old English personal name HEMELE + Old English eg ‘island’, and had the form Hemelsey till at least the 14th century
HEMSWORTH English
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, England, meaning "Hymel's enclosure".
HENCE German, English, Welsh
An American spelling variant of HENTZ derived from a German nickname for HANS or HEINRICH or from an English habitation name found in Staffordshire or Shropshire and meaning "road or path" in Welsh.
HENDESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENDRYX English
This name was derived from HENDRIX and means "home ruler". This name is the 25841st most popular surname in the US.
HENGESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENGSTETON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENKESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HENLEY English, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
HENNE English
From a diminutive of HENRY.
HENNEBERY English (American)
A berry and an alias used by March McQuin
HENNES English
From the diminutive of HENRY.
HENNI English
A name coined by the contributor of this name, to describe himself
HENRIE English (Rare)
Derived from the given name HENRIE, a variant of HENRY.
HENSEN English, Irish
English patronymic from the personal name HENN/HENNE, a short form of HENRY, HAYNE (see Hain), or Hendy... [more]
HENSLEY English
Probably a habitational name from either of two places in Devon: Hensley in East Worlington, which is named with the Old English personal name HEAHMUND + Old English leah ‘(woodland) clearing’, or Hensleigh in Tiverton, which is named from Old English hengest ‘stallion’ (or the Old English personal name HENGEST) + leah... [more]
HENSLEY-BOOK English (British)
The surname Hensley-Book was originated in December 2013 in Bath by SAMUEL BOOK who changed his name by deed poll... [more]
HERBAUGH English (American)
Americanized form of German HARBACH.
HEREFORD English
Habitational name from Hereford in Herefordshire, or Harford in Devon and Goucestershire, all named from Old English here "army" + ford "ford".
HERITAGE English (Rare)
English status name for someone who inherited land from an ancestor, rather than by feudal gift from an overlord, from Middle English, Old French (h)eritage ‘inherited property’ (Late Latin heritagium, from heres ‘heir’).
HERNDON English
From Herne, a cottage, and den, a valley. The cottage in the valley.
HERO English
From the personal name ROBERT
HEROLD English, Dutch, German
From the given name HEROLD. This was the surname of David Herold, one of the conspirators in the Abraham Lincoln assassination plot.
HERRINGTON English
habitational name from Herrington in County Durham, England
HESTER English
This surname is derived from a given name, which is the Latin form of Esther.
HEYER English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
HIBBARD English
English: variant of HILBERT.
HIBBERTS English
A variant of HIBBERT, ultimately coming from HILBERT to begin with.
HIBBS English
This possibly derived from a medieval diminutive, similar to Hobbs for Robert.
HICK English
From the medieval personal name HICKE. The substitution of H- as the initial resulted from the inability of the English to cope with the velar Norman R-.
HICKSON Irish, English
It means ‘countryman’ similar to Hickman
HIDDLESTON English, Scottish
Habitational name from a place called Huddleston in Yorkshire, England. The place name was derived from the Old English personal name HUDEL.
HIELD English (British)
Olde English pre 7th Century. Topographical name meaning slope.
HIGDON English
From the personal name Hikedun.
HIGGINBOTHAM English
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire now known as Oakenbottom. The history of the place name is somewhat confused, but it is probably composed of the Old English elements ǣcen or ācen "oaken" and botme "broad valley"... [more]
HIGGINS English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of HICK.
HIGGINSON English
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Higgin, a pet form of HICK.
HIGHLAND English, German
English, Scottish, and Irish: variant spelling of Hyland.... [more]
HILBERT English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HILDERSLEY English
Meadow of the hilldweller.
HILLARY English
From the given name HILLARY. A famous bearer is explorer Edmund Hillary (1919-2008)
HILLIARD English
English: from the Norman female personal name Hildiarde, HILDEGARD, composed of the Germanic elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + gard ‘fortress’, ‘stronghold’... [more]
HILLS English
Variant of HILL.
HINCKLEY English
From the name of a place in Leicestershire meaning "Hynca's wood", from the Old English byname Hynca, derivative of hún "bear cub", and leah "woodland, clearing".
HIND English, Scottish
English (central and northern): nickname for a gentle or timid person, from Middle English, Old English hind ‘female deer’.... [more]
HINDLEY English
English (Lancashire): habitational name from a place near Manchester, so named from Old English hind ‘female deer’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
HINGESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HINGESTONE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HINGSTON English
The distribution of the Hingston surname appears to be based around the South Hams area of Devon. The English Place Name Society volumes for Devon give the best indication of the source of the name... [more]
HINKLE American
Americanized spelling of Dutch and German HINKEL. Variant spelling of English HINCKLEY.
HINTON English (Archaic)
Comes from Old English heah meaning "high" and tun meaning "enclosure" or "settlement." A notable person with the surname is female author S.E Hinton.
HINXSTONE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HIPKIN English
English name meaning relative of HERBERT
HISAW English
Of uncertain origin and meaning.
HISCOCK English
From a pet form of HICK.
HITCHINS English
Comes from the town Hitchin
HIX English
Variant of HICKS
HOAGLAND American
American form of Scandinavian topographical surnames, such as Swedish Högland or Norwegian HAUGLAND, both essentially meaning "high land".
HOAR English
Nickname meaning gray haired.
HOCKENHULL English
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous neighborhood of Tarvin, Cheshire West and Chester.
HODGE English
From the given name HODGE, a medieval diminutive of ROGER.
HODGE English
Nickname from Middle English hodge "hog", which occurs as a dialect variant of hogge, for example in Cheshire place names.
HODGSON English (British)
English patronymic form of the personal name Hodge, a pet form of Rodger. The surname in most cases originated in the North Yorskire Dales, where it is still common to the present day.
HODSEN English
Variant of HODSON.
HOERMAN English, German
Variant of HERMAN. Variant of HÖRMANN.
HOGG English
An occupational name for someone who herded swine.
HOGGATT English
A name for someone who worked as a keeper of cattle and pigs.
HOIT English
A variant of HOYT.
HOLBROOK English, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Derbyshire, Dorset, and Suffolk, so called from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’ + broc ‘stream’. ... [more]
HOLCOMB English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Greater Manchester, Oxfordshire, and Somerset, so named from Old English hol meaning "hollow", "sunken", "deep" + cumb meaning "valley".
HOLE English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a depression or low-lying spot, from Old English holh "hole, hollow, depression".
HOLIDAY English
Variation of HOLLADAY.
HOLL German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
HOLLADAY English
English: from Old English haligdæg ‘holy day’, ‘religious festival’. The reasons why this word should have become a surname are not clear; probably it was used as a byname for one born on a religious festival day.
HOLLANDER German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
HOLLEY English
English (chiefly Yorkshire) topographic name from Middle English holing, holi(e) ‘holly tree’. Compare Hollen.
HOLLIER English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
HOLLIMAN English
Possibly means "holly man"
HOLLING English
Location name for someone who lived near holly trees.
HOLLINGER English, Northern Irish, Scottish
Topographical name from Middle English holin 'holly' + the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
HOLLINGSHEAD English
Habitational name from a lost place in County Durham called Hollingside or Holmside, from Old English hole(g)n "holly" and sīde "hillside, slope"; there is a Hollingside Lane on the southern outskirts of Durham city... [more]
HOLLIS English
Topographic name for someone who lived where holly trees grew.
HOLLISTER English
English: occupational name for a brothelkeeper; originally a feminine form of HOLLIER.
HOLLOBONE English
Common surname in the southeast England, predominantly Sussex
HOLLOMAN English (British)
Nickname, perhaps ironic, from Middle English holy ‘holy’ + man ‘man’.
HOLLOWAY Anglo-Saxon, English, Medieval English
Variant of Halliwell, from Old English halig (holy) and well(a) (well or spring)... [more]
HOLM Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from Old Norse holmr, meaning "islet".
HOLTER English, German, Norwegian
Derived from English holt meaning "small wood". A topographic name for someone who lived near a small wooden area, as well as a habitational name from a place named with that element.
HOLWELL English
Originating from "Haligwiella", this surname means "Lives by the Holy Spring"
HOME English, Scottish
English and Scottish variant spelling of HOLME.
HONEYBALL English
From Honeyball, a medieval personal name of uncertain origin: perhaps an alteration of ANNABEL, or alternatively from a Germanic compound name meaning literally "bear-cub brave" (i.e. deriving from the elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and bald "bold, brave").
HOOD English, Scottish, Irish
English and Scottish: metonymic occupational name for a maker of hoods or a nickname for someone who wore a distinctive hood, from Middle English hod(de), hood, hud ‘hood’. Some early examples with prepositions seem to be topographic names, referring to a place where there was a hood-shaped hill or a natural shelter or overhang, providing protection from the elements... [more]
HOOK English
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. "at the hook," from residence in the bend or sudden turn of a lane or valley.
HOOKHAM English
This surname may derive from Old English hóc meaning "hook, angle" and hám meaning "village, hamlet, dwelling."
HORNBY English
A habitational name from locations called Hornby in northern England, though predominantly associated with Lancashire. Derived from the Norse horni meaning "horn" and býr meaning "farm" or "settlement".
HORNSBY English
A habitational name from Cumbria, derived from the Norse Ormr meaning "serpent" and býr meaning "farm". Similar in form to HORNBY, Hornsby is a widespread surname in northern England.
HORNTON English (Rare, Archaic)
Derived from the surname Horton or perhaps used to describe a horn maker meaning “maker of horns.”
HORVITZ English (American)
Surname of Richard Steven Horvitz, a voice actor in Angry Beavers, The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, and Invader Zim.
HOSEASON English
Means "son of Hosea", a personal name that was originally probably Osie, a pet-form of OSWALD, but came to be associated with the biblical personal name HOSEA.
HOSKIN English
From the Middle English personal name OSEKIN.
HOSKINS English
Patronymic form of HOSKIN.
HOSKINSON English
Patronymic form of HOSKIN.
HOSMER English
From the Old English name Osmaer, a combination of the Old English elements oss, meaning "god", and maer, meaning "fame".
HOTALING English (American)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Hoogteijling, an indirect occupational name for a productive farmer, from hoogh ‘high’ + teling ‘cultivation’, ‘breeding’.
HOTCHKISS English
Patronymic from Hodgkin, a pet form of HODGE.
HOUGH English
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Cheshire and Derbyshire, so named from Old English hoh ‘spur of a hill’ (literally ‘heel’). This widespread surname is especially common in Lancashire... [more]
HOUGHTON English
English habitational name from any of the various places so called. The majority, with examples in at least fourteen counties, get the name from Old English hoh ‘ridge’, ‘spur’ (literally ‘heel’) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
HOUSER English
Variant of HOUSE.
HOWARDSON English
Means "Son of Howard".
HOWARTH English
"From a hedged estate", from Old English haga ("hedge, haw") and worð ("farm, estate"). Likely originating from the Yorkshire village of the same name. Common in Lancashire and recorded from at least 1518, as Howorthe, with an earlier version of Hauewrth in Gouerton dated 1317 recorded in the Neubotle charters.
HOWDYSHELL American, German
Americanized (i.e., Anglicized) form of the Swiss German Haudenschild, which originated as a nickname for a ferocious soldier, literally meaning "hack the shield" from Middle High German houwen "to chop or hack" (imperative houw) combined with den (accusative form of the definite article) and schilt "shield".
HOY English
Metonymic occupational name for a sailor, from Middle Dutch hoey "cargo ship".
HOYT English
Generally a topographical name for someone who lived on a hill or other high ground. As such Hoyt is related to words such as heights or high. Hoyt is also possibly a nickname for a tall, thin person where the original meaning is said to be "long stick".
HUBBARD English
Variant of HUBERT. "Old Mother Hubbard" is a traditional nursery rhyme. This was additionally borne by American author and religious leader L. Ronald Hubbard (1911-1986), the founder of the Church of Scientology.
HUBBLE English
From the Norman personal name Hubald, composed of the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind, spirit" and bald "bold, brave".
HUBERT German, Dutch, English, French, Jewish
Derived from the given name HUBERT.
HUCK English, Dutch
From the medieval male personal name Hucke, which was probably descended from the Old English personal name Ucca or Hucca, perhaps a shortened form of Ūhtrǣd, literally "dawn-power".
HUCKABY English
Means "person from Huccaby", Devon (perhaps "crooked river-bend"), or "person from Uckerby", Yorkshire ("Úkyrri's or Útkári's farmstead").
HUCKLE English
English surname
HUDD English (British)
From the medieval forename Hudde
HUDDLESTUN English
Variant spelling of HUDDLESTON.
HUFFINGTON English
Means "Uffa's town". A famous bearer is Arianna Huffington, born Αριάδνη-Άννα Στασινοπούλου
HUGHSON Scottish, English
Means "son of HUGH".
HULLER English
Topographical name for a 'dweller by a hill', deriving from the Old English pre 7th Century 'hyll' a hill, or in this instance 'atte hulle', at the hill.
HUMBLE English
Nickname for a meek or lowly person, from Middle English, Old French (h)umble (Latin humilis "lowly", a derivative of humus "ground").
HUMPHERY English, Irish
English and Irish: variant of HUMPHREY.
HUMPHREYS Welsh, English
Patronymic form of HUMPHREY. A famous bearer was Murray Humphreys (1899-1965), an American mobster of Welsh descent.
HUMPHRIES English, Welsh
Patronymic from HUMPHREY.
HUNGATE English
A habitational name from Old English hund,'hound', and Old Norse gata, 'gate'.
HUNTINGTON English
English: habitational name from any of several places so called, named with the genitive plural huntena of Old English hunta ‘hunter’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’ or dun ‘hill’ (the forms in -ton and -don having become inextricably confused)... [more]
HUNTLEY English, Scottish
Habitational name from a place in Gloucestershire, so named from Old English hunta 'hunter' (perhaps a byname (see Hunt) + leah 'wood', 'clearing'). Scottish: habitational name from a lost place called Huntlie in Berwickshire (Borders), with the same etymology as in 1.
HURD English
Variant of HEARD.
HURLEY English, Irish
Meaning is "from a corner clearing" in Old English. Also an anglicized form of an Irish name meaning "sea tide" or "sea valor".
HURRELL English, Norman
English (of Norman origin) from a derivative of Old French hurer ‘to bristle or ruffle’, ‘to stand on end’ (see Huron).
HURRY English
From a Norman form of the Middle English personal name Wol(f)rich (with the addition of an inorganic initial H-).
HUSHOUR English
English. Maybe means tailor or carpenter
HUSSEY English, Irish
As an English surname, it comes from two distinct sources. It is either of Norman origin, derived from Houssaye, the name of an area in Seine-Maritime which ultimately derives from Old French hous "holly"; or it is from a Middle English nickname given to a woman who was the mistress of a household, from an alteration of husewif "housewife"... [more]
HUSSIE English, Irish
Variant of HUSSEY. A notable bearer is American webcomic author/artist Andrew Hussie (1979-).
HUTCH English
From the medieval personal name Huche, a pet form of HUGH.
HUTCHINS English
Southern English patronymic from the medieval personal name Hutchin, a pet form of HUGH.
HUTTON English, Scottish
Scottish and northern English habitational name from any of the numerous places so called from Old English hoh ‘ridge’, ‘spur’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
HUX English
Means "insult, scorn" in Old English. This is used in Popular Culture by First Order General Armitage Hux, played by Domhnall Gleeson in the Star Wars sequel trilogy.
HUXFORD English
Habitational name from a place in Devon called Huxford (preserved in the name of Huxford Farm), from the Old English personal name Hōcc or the Old English word hōc ‘hook or angle of land’ + ford ‘ford’.
HYATT English
English (mainly London and Surrey): possibly a topographic name from Middle English hegh, hie ‘high’ + yate ‘gate’. ... [more]
HYDE English
Topographic name for someone living on (and farming) a hide of land, Old English hī(gi)d. This was a variable measure of land, differing from place to place and time to time, and seems from the etymology to have been originally fixed as the amount necessary to support one (extended) family (Old English hīgan, hīwan "household")... [more]
HYLAN Scottish, English
Variation of the surname Hyland.
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