Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
MILLAYEnglish
This surname is thought to be a respelling of Millais, which may come from the French surname Millet, a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of millet or panic grass (derived from a diminutive form of Old French mil which is then derived from Latin milium meaning "millet").... [more]
MILLENEnglish
A mill worker.
MILLINGTONEnglish
Parishes in Cheshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire.
MILLSAPEnglish (American), English
Judging by the name and how it sounds, I guess it's occupational. This is the name of a town in Texas, named after Fuller Millsap.
MILNEREnglish, Scottish
Northern English (mainly Yorkshire) and Scottish: variant of Miller, retaining the -n- of the Middle English word, which was a result of Scandinavian linguistic influence, as in Old Norse mylnari.
MILOEnglish
Derived from the given name Milo.
MIMSEnglish (British)
Habitational name from Mimms (North and South Mimms) in Hertfordshire, most probably derived from an ancient British tribal name, Mimmas.
MINEREnglish
English occupational name for someone who built mines, either for the excavation of coal and other minerals, or as a technique in the medieval art of siege warfare. The word represents an agent derivative of Middle English, Old French mine ‘mine’ (a word of Celtic origin, cognate with Gaelic mein ‘ore’, ‘mine’).
MINOREnglish, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
MISSINGHAMEnglish
The name means "lost home", and it's from the Old English words "missan" and "ham".
MISTRYEnglish
Influenced by the English word mystery meaning unknown.
MOATSEnglish
Variant of Moat.
MOHLERGerman, English
The Mohler surname is derived from the Low German word möhl which means mill. Thus the name originally denoted someone who live or worked near a mill. Variant of Müller.
MOLAISONAmerican
Unexplained meaning.
MOLEEnglish
Mole is (in some but not all cases) the English form of the German Möhl meaning mill.
MOLTENEnglish
The surname Molten refers to one who melts lead.
MONEYMAKEREnglish (American)
Translated form of German Geldmacher or Geldschläger, occupational names for a coiner.
MONEYPENNYEnglish
Probably from a medieval nickname for a rich person or a miser. A fictional bearer is Miss Moneypenny, secretary to M (the head of MI6) in the James Bond novels of Ian Fleming and in the films based on them.
MONGEREnglish
Name for a retail trader or a stallholder in a market, Middle English monger, manger.
MONKEnglish
Nickname for someone of monkish habits or appearance, or an occupational name for a servant employed at a monastery, from Middle English munk, monk "monk" (Old English munuc, munec, from Late Latin monachus, Greek monakhos "solitary", a derivative of monos "alone").
MONTGOMERIEScottish, English
Variation of MONTGOMERY. A famous bearer was Margaret Montgomerie Boswell (1738 to 1789), wife of author James Boswell.
MOORCOCKEnglish
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a moorcock (the male of the red grouse). It is borne by British author Michael Moorcock (1939-).
MOOREHOUSEEnglish
Variant spelling of Morehouse.
MORALEEEnglish, French
First found in Norfolk where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings.
MORANTEnglish
From the Old French personal name Morant, perhaps from a nickname meaning "steadfast", or alternatively of Germanic origin and meaning literally "courage-raven". A known bearer was the British-born Australian soldier and poet Breaker Morant, original name Edwin Henry Murrant (?1864-1902).
MORDAUNTEnglish
Recorded as Mordant, Mordaunt (English), Mordagne, Mordant (French) and apparently Mordanti in Italy, this is a surname of French origins. According to the famous Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley writing in the year 1880, the name was originally Norman, and was brought to England by a follower of Duke William of Normandy, when he conquered England in 1066... [more]
MORDENEnglish
Parish in Surrey; one mile from Mitcham. "Moor Hollow" in Old English.
MOREDOCKEnglish
From the fact that boats get moored at a dock.
MOREHOUSEEnglish
Habitational name from any of various places, for example Moorhouse in West Yorkshire, named from Old English mōr meaning "marsh", "fen" + hūs meaning "house".
MORGANTONEnglish (Canadian)
Created by combining the last names Morgan and Middleton in Calgary, Alberta, Canada in September of 2013.
MOROUXLouisiana Creole
From the surname Moroux.
MORTEnglish
Perhaps from a Norman nickname based on Old French mort "dead", possibly referring to someone with a deathly pallor or otherwise sepulchral appearance.
MORTIMEREnglish
Derived from a place name meaning "still water" in Old French.
MOSCOWEnglish (American, Rare)
From the city of Moscow in Russia.
MOSLEYEnglish
Habitational name from any of several places called Mos(e)ley in central, western, and northwestern England. The obvious derivation is from Old English mos ‘peat bog’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’, but the one in southern Birmingham (Museleie in Domesday Book) had as its first element Old English mus ‘mouse’, while one in Staffordshire (Molesleie in Domesday Book) had the genitive case of the Old English byname Moll.
MOSSEnglish, Welsh, Scottish, Northern Irish
English and Welsh: from the personal name Moss, a Middle English vernacular form of the Biblical name Moses. ... [more]
MOSSEnglish, Welsh
From the personal name Moss, a Middle English vernacular form of the Biblical name Moses.
MOSSMANEnglish
This interesting name is a variant of the surname Moss which is either topographical for someone who lived by a peat bog, from the Old English pre 7th Century 'mos' or a habitational name from a place named with this word, for example Mosedale in Cumbria or Moseley in West Yorkshire.
MOTAAmerican
Surname of YouTuber and Dancing with the Stars competitor Bethany Mota.
MOTLEYEnglish
This surname may come from a nickname for someone wearing parti-coloured clothes (from Anglo-French motteley, which may come from Old English mot meaning "speck").
MOUNTEnglish
Mount is often used as part of the name of specific mountains.
MOUNTAINEnglish
Topographic name from Old French montagne "mountain" (see Montagne).
MOUNTJOYEnglish
Habitational surname for a person from Montjoie in La Manche, France, named with Old French mont "hill", "mountain" + joie "joy".
MOWBRAYEnglish
Ultimately from the name of a place in Normandy meaning "mud hill" in Old French.
MOWERSScottish, English
English: variant of Mower
MOXLEYEnglish, Irish, Welsh, Scottish
From the name of a minor place in the West Midlands.
MOXONEnglish
Means "son of Magge", a pet-form of Margaret, a female personal name which came into English via French from Late Latin Margarita, literally "pearl".
MOYESEnglish
From the medieval personal name Moise, a vernacular variant of Moses (the biblical name of the Hebrew prophet who led the Children of Israel out of captivity).
MUDDEnglish
Either (i) "person who lives in a muddy area"; (ii) from the medieval female personal name Mudd, a variant of Maud (variously Mahalt, Mauld, Malt, vernacular versions of Anglo-Norman Matilda); or (iii) from the Old English personal name Mōd or Mōda, a shortened form of various compound names beginning with mōd "courage".
MULLISEnglish
As either Mulles and Mullis, the surname first found in Parish Registers in Cornwall Co. by 1548 in Michaelstow. Manorial tenement rolls trace that particular family to 1483. Between 1337 and 1453 random tenants were recorded between Tintagel and Altarnun as Molys and Mollys... [more]
MURREYEnglish, Scottish, Irish
English, Scottish, and Irish variant of Murray.
MUSKEnglish
Perhaps a variant of Dutch Musch.
MUSSEYEnglish
Nickname from Middle English mūs ‘mouse’ + ēage ‘eye’.
MUSTONEnglish
Habitational name from places so named, from Old English mus "mouse", or must, "muddy stream or place" combined with tun "enclosure, settlement". Another explanation could be that the first element is derived from an old Scandinavian personal name, Músi (of unknown meaning), combined with tun.
MYATTEnglish
From the medieval personal name Myat, literally "little Mihel", an Anglo-Norman variant of Michael.
NAISMITHEnglish
Means either "nail-maker" (from Old English nægelsmith) or "knife-maker" (from Old English cnīfsmith).
NAPIERScottish, English
Scottish occupational name for a producer or seller of table linen or for a naperer, the servant in charge of the linen in use in a great house from the Middle English, Old French nap(p)ier, an agent derivative of Old French nappe ‘table cloth’ (Latin mappa)... [more]
NARAMOREnglish, Welsh
Naramor, also Narramore or Naramore, is a corruption of Northmore, and has Welsh/English background. "More North"
NASMITHScottish, English
This surname is derived from an occupation, "nail-smith", but may also mean "knife-smith".
NATEEnglish
From the given name Nate.
NATESEnglish, Jewish
It's probably from the given name Nate, the origin is said to be Jewish*, but the ancestors immigrated to English speaking countries.
NATHANEnglish
From the given name Nathan.
NATIONEnglish
Most probably a variant of Nathan, altered by folk etymology under the influence of the English vocabulary word nation
NAUGHTONEnglish
Habitational name from a place in Suffolk, named in Old English with nafola meaning "navel" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement", i.e. "settlement in the navel or depression".
NAVARROSpanish, French, English
Describes a former member of the ancient kingdom of Navarre. Possibly means 'the treeless country' or 'the country above the trees'
NEADEnglish
1. English: possibly a metonymic nickname for a needy person, from Middle English ne(e)d ‘need’. ... [more]
NEALEEnglish, Scottish, Irish
English, Scottish, and Irish variant of Neal.
NEARSEnglish
French in origin, it is derived from the word "Noir," which is the equivalent of the English word "Black." It could have referred to a person with dark features, hair, or perhaps even one who was thought to engage in nafarious, or "dark," deeds.
NEDDEnglish, Welsh
Son of "Edward" in Old English.... [more]
NEEVEEnglish, Scottish
An English surname, of Norman origin, meaning the nephew. One who was in care of their uncle. A surname first recorded in Perthshire.
NEILSONEnglish
Means "son of Neil". Often an English respelling of the surnames Nielsen or Nilsen.
NELVINEnglish (American)
Female named after her uncle who surname was Melvin. Born in Shreveport, Louisiana in 1931.
NEMIROWEnglish
Is the English for the Russian/Ukrainian Surname Nemirov
NEMOEnglish
A different form of Nimmo (a Scottish name of unknown origin).
NESBITTScottish, Irish, English
Derives from the hamlets of East Nisbet and West Nisbet, Berwickshire. Some bearers of Nisbet/Nesbitt (and variant) names may originate from the village of Nisbet in Roxburghshire.
NESTOREnglish
Transferred use of given name Nestor
NEVELSEnglish, Scottish
(1) Variant of Neville (2) Possibly variant of Dutch Nevens, which is derived from Neve, from Middle English, Old Norse, Middle Dutch neve ‘nephew’, presumably denoting the nephew of some great personage.
NEVILEnglish
"Variant of the name Neville"
NEWEnglish
Nickname for a newcomer to an area, from Middle English newe meaning "new".
NEWBORNEnglish
Habitational name from Newbourn in Suffolk or Newburn in Tyne and Wear (formerly part of Northumberland), both named with Old English niwe "new" and burna "stream", perhaps denoting a stream that had changed its course.
NEWBROUGHEnglish (British)
Newbrough surname is thought to be a habitational, taken on from a place name such as from Newbrough in Northumberland, which is derived from the Old English words niwe, meaning "new," and burh, meaning "fortification."
NEWBYEnglish
Means "person from Newby", Newby being a combination of the Middle English elements newe "new" and by "farm, settlement" (ultimately from Old Norse býr "farm"). British travel writer Eric Newby (1919-2006) bore this surname.
NEWEYEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived at a "new enclosure", from Middle English newe "new" and haga "enclousire".
NEWHAMEnglish
Habitational name from any of the various places, for example in Northumbria and North Yorkshire, so named from Old English neowe "new" and ham "homestead".
NEWQUISTEnglish
Americansized form of Swedish Nyquist.
NEYGerman, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
NICKERSONEnglish
Means "son of NICHOLAS".
NICKSEnglish, German
From the nickname of Nicholas.
NICKSONEnglish
Variant of Nixon, patronymic from the given name Nicholas.
NIGHTINGALEEnglish
Nickname for someone with a good voice, from Middle English nighti(n)gale, Old English nihtegal, from niht "night" and galan "sing" (cf. NACHTIGALL).
NINEEnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of German Nein or Neun, from Middle High German niun meaning "nine".
NOAREnglish
This surname is thought to be derived from nore which could mean "shore, cliff." This could denote that someone might have lived in a shore or cliff. It may also be used as a surname for someone who lived in the now 'diminished' village of Nore in Surrey.
NOBBSEnglish
Derived from Hob, a Medieval English diminutive of Robert.
NOBLEEnglish, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
NOCKCeltic, English
Dweller at the oak tree; originally spelt as "Noake" evolved into "Nock".
NOCTEAmerican
Means "night" in Latin.
NOICEEnglish
Variant spelling of Noyce.
NOONEnglish
Either (i) from a medieval nickname for someone of a sunny disposition (noon being the sunniest part of the day); or (ii) from Irish Gaelic Ó Nuadháin "descendant of Nuadhán", a personal name based on Nuadha, the name of various Celtic gods (cf... [more]
NORELLSwedish, English
Swedish ornamental name composed of norr "north" or nor "small strait" and the popular surname suffix -ell, from Latin adjectival suffix -elius. ... [more]
NORRELLEnglish, German (?)
A locational surname from the Germanic (Old English/Old Norse) term for the north. It either refers to someone who lived in a location called Northwell, lived north of a well, spring or stream (Old English weall)... [more]
NORRINGTONEnglish
Norrington is the name given to a person from the eponymous place.
NORSWORTHYEnglish
Habitational name from Norseworthy in Walkhampton, Devon.
NORTHERNEnglish
Topographic name, from an adjectival form of North.
NORWAYEnglish
From the country in Europe.
NOVEMBEREnglish (American)
From the name of the month.
NOYEnglish
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Noye, the English form of the Hebrew name Noach "Noah"; or (ii) an invented Jewish name based on Hebrew noy "decoration, adornment".
NUNNEnglish
Means someone who is a nun
NUTTALLEnglish
English: habitational name from some place named with Old English hnutu ‘nut’ + h(e)alh ‘nook’, ‘recess’. In some cases this may be Nuthall in Nottinghamshire, but the surname is common mainly in Lancashire, and a Lancashire origin is therefore more likely... [more]
NUTTEREnglish
Means either (i) "scribe, clerk" (from Middle English notere, ultimately from Latin notārius); or (ii) "person who keeps or tends oxen" (from a derivative of Middle English nowt "ox")... [more]
OAKEnglish
Topographic name for someone who lived near an oak tree or in an oak wood, from Middle English oke "oak".
OAKESEnglish, Irish
English: Topographic name, a plural variant of Oak.... [more]
OAKLANDEnglish
This surname is derived from Old English āc and land and it, obviously, means "oak land."
OAKLEAFEnglish (American)
Probably an Americanized (translated) form of Swedish Eklöf.
OAKSEnglish
English variant spelling of Oakes and Americanized form of Jewish Ochs.
OATESEnglish
Patronymic from the Middle English personal name Ode (see Ott).
OATISEnglish
Altered spelling of Otis, itself a variant of Oates.
OATSEnglish
Variation of Oates.
OBERLINGerman, English
From Oberst and the suffix Lynn.... [more]
OBESUSAmerican
Means "obese" in Latin.
OBSCURITEEnglish
A word which means "darkness" in French language.
ODDEnglish
Variant of Ott.
ODHAMEnglish
Variant of ODOM, altered by folk etymology as if derived from a place name formed with -ham.
ODOMEnglish
Medieval nickname for someone who had climbed the social ladder by marrying the daughter of a prominent figure in the local community, from Middle English odam ‘son-in-law’ (Old English aðum).
OFFICEREnglish (Canadian), English (American, Rare)
Occupational name for the holder of any office, from Anglo-Norman French officer (an agent derivative of Old French office ‘duty’, ‘service’, Latin officium ‘service’, ‘task’).
OGILVIEScottish, English
From the ancient Barony of Ogilvie in Angus, Northeast Scotland. The placename itself is derived from Pictish ocel, 'high' and fa, 'plain'.
OLDEnglish
From Middle English old, not necessarily implying old age, but rather used to distinguish an older from a younger bearer of the same personal name.
OLINEnglish, Dutch
English or Dutch name meaning either "from a low lying area" or from the word Hollander meaning "one from the Netherlands" a country well known for a low lying landscape.
OLIPHANTEnglish
Means "elephant" (from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German olifant "elephant"), perhaps used as a nickname for a large cumbersome person, or denoting someone who lived in a building distinguished by the sign of an elephant.
OLLISEnglish
Unexplained surname found in records of Bristol and Bath.
OLLSONEnglish
Variant of Olsson or Olsen.
OLMSTEADEnglish (British)
Comes from the Old French ermite "hermit" and Old English stede "place".... [more]
OPHELEnglish
19th century name from the Cambridgeshire area. Probably derived from Oldfield. Variants include Opheld, Oful and Offel.... [more]
OPIEEnglish
From the medieval personal name Oppy or Obby, pet-forms of such names as Osbert and Osbold. John Opie (1761-1807) was a British portrait and history painter; other bearers of this surname include Peter Opie (1918-82), and his wife Iona Opie (née Archibald; 1923-), British authors and folklorists.
ORANGEMedieval English, Medieval French, English
Derived from the medieval female name, or directly from the French place name. First used with the modern spelling in the 17th century, apparently due to William, Prince of Orange, who later became William III... [more]
ORBISONEnglish
From a village in Lincolnshire, England originally called Orby and later Orreby that is derived from a Scandinavian personal name Orri- and the Scandinavian place element -by which means "a farmstead or small settlement."
ORCHARDEnglish, Scottish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by an orchard, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower, from Middle English orchard.... [more]
ORCUTTEnglish
Perhaps a much altered spelling of Scottish Urquhart used predominantly in Staffordshire, England.
ORDWALDEnglish
English name meaning "spear strength".
ORGANEnglish
Metonymic occupational name for a player of a musical instrument (any musical instrument, not necessarily what is now known as an organ), from Middle English organ (Old French organe, Late Latin organum ‘device’, ‘(musical) instrument’, Greek organon ‘tool’, from ergein ‘to work or do’).
ORGANEnglish
From a rare medieval personal name, attested only in the Latinized forms Organus (masculine) and Organa (feminine).
ORLEYDutch, Flemish, English
A surname of uncertain origin found among the Dutch, Flemish and English. In England the name is primarily found in Yorkshire and Devon. Orley may be an adapted form of a French name D'Orley or a nickname for Orlando... [more]
ORPINEnglish
Means "herbalist" (from Middle English orpin "yellow stonecrop", a plant prescribed by medieval herbalists for healing wounds). A variant spelling was borne by British painter Sir William Orpen (1878-1931).
OSBORNEnglish
From the given name OSBORN.
OSLEREnglish
Possibly derived from Ostler (from the the Norman 'Hostelier') meaning clerk or bookkeeper. First used in England after the Norman invasion of 1066. Surname of a 19th cent. Canadian doctor, Sir William Osler, widely viewed as the 'Father of Internal Medicine'.
OSMAREnglish
Variant of Hosmer.
OSMONDEnglish
From the given name Osmond
OSWALDEnglish
From the given name Oswald.
OTTOWAYEnglish
From the Norman male personal names Otoïs, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "wealth-wide" or "wealth-wood", and Otewi, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "wealth-war".
OVERSONEnglish
Derived from the Old French name Overson, meaning "dweller by the river-banks". The name was probably brought to England in the wake of the Norman conquest of 1066.
OWNEREnglish
From English owner meaning "a person who owns something".
OYASKIEnglish (American)
A surname created by Michael Oyaski (formally Michael O'Yaski). The surname is currently known to only be used by one particular branch of the O'Yaski family tree. The surname means "Dragon Rider of the West" according to members of the Oyaski family.
PACEYEnglish
"Habitation name from Pacy-sur-Eure" which took its name from the Gallo-Roman personal name Paccius and the local suffix -acum.
PACKARDEnglish, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PACKWOODEnglish
Habitational name from a place in Warwickshire, so named from the Old English personal name Pac(c)a + wudu ‘wood’.
PADDINGTONEnglish
Believed to mean "Pada's farm", with the Anglo-Saxon name Pada possibly coming from the Old English word pad, meaning "toad".
PAINEEnglish
From the Middle English personal name Pain(e), Payn(e) (Old French Paien, from Latin Paganus), introduced to Britain by the Normans. The Latin name is a derivative of pagus "outlying village", and meant at first a person who lived in the country (as opposed to Urbanus "city dweller"), then a civilian as opposed to a soldier, and eventually a heathen (one not enrolled in the army of Christ)... [more]
PAINTEREnglish, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
PAITONEnglish
Locational surname derived from the village of Peyton in Essex, England; Variant of Peyton
PALACIOAmerican
Surname of author R.J. Palacio, who wrote the book Wonder (2012)
PALFREYMANEnglish
Occupational name for a man responsible for the maintenance and provision of saddle-horses.
PALINEnglish
(i) "person from Palling", Norfolk ("settlement of Pælli's people") or "person from Poling", Sussex ("settlement of Pāl's people"); (ii) from the Welsh name ap Heilyn "son of Heilyn", a personal name perhaps meaning "one who serves at table"
PALLISEREnglish
Means "maker of palings and fences" (from a derivative of Old French palis "palisade"). In fiction, the Palliser novels are a series of six political novels by Anthony Trollope, beginning with 'Can You Forgive Her?' (1864) and ending with 'The Duke's Children' (1880), in which the Palliser family plays a central role.
PAPAMICHAELGreek, English (Rare)
Means "Son of priest Michael".
PARDOEEnglish
From a medieval nickname based on the Old French oath par Dieu "by God" (cf. Purdie).
PARDYEnglish (Modern)
English (Dorset) variant of Perdue.
PARHAMIrish, English
This name has been used amongst the Irish and English. This user's great grandmother came from Ireland and her maiden name was Parham. However, in English (London) it is a habitational name from places in Suffolk and Sussex, named in Old English with pere ‘pear’ + ham ‘homestead’.
PARKINSONEnglish
From the name Perkin, which is a medieval diminutive of Peter.
PARLEYEnglish
A place name meaning "pear field" from Old English 'per' with 'lee' or 'lea' meaning a field or clearing, perhaps where land was cleared to cultivate pear trees. Therefore this name denotes someone who lived near or worked at such a location or came from a habitation associated with the name... [more]
PARMLEYEnglish
Variant of Parley. This form is found more in northern England, specifically Cumberland and Durham, but is of like derivation.
PARNHAMEnglish
English habitational name from Parnham in Beaminster, Dorset.
PARREnglish
Means "enclosure".
PARSLEYMedieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
PARSONEnglish
Surname given to the parson (priest).
PARTINGTONEnglish
Habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Partington, from Old English Peartingtun "PEARTA's town".
PARTONEnglish
Habitational name from any of various places called Parton; most are named with Old English peretun ‘pear orchard’. A famous bearer of the surname is Dolly Parton.
PASHEnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of German Pasch.
PASSMOREEnglish
Either (i) from a medieval nickname for someone who crossed marshy moorland (e.g. who lived on the opposite side of a moor, or who knew the safe paths across it); or (ii) perhaps from an alteration of Passemer, literally "cross-sea", an Anglo-Norman nickname for a seafarer... [more]
PATEEnglish
Derives from the given name Pat(t), a short form of the personal name Patrick from the Latin Patricius meaning "son of a noble father".
PAULEYEnglish, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
PAVEYEnglish
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Pavia, perhaps from Old French pavie "peach"; or (ii) "person from Pavia", Italy.
PAXSONEnglish
This surname means "son of Pack." Pack may be a survival of the Old English personal name Pacca or it may have been a Middle English personal name derived from Paschalis (meaning "relating to Easter"), the Latin form of Pascal.
PAXTONScottish, English
From a place in England named with the Old English given name Pæcc and Old English name element -tun "settlement". A famous bearer was the actor Bill Paxton, (1955-2017).
PEABODYEnglish
Probably from a nickname for a showy dresser, from Middle English pe "peacock" (see Peacock) and body "body, person". Alternatively it may be from the name of a Celtic tribe meaning "mountain men" from Brythonic pea "large hill, mountain" combined with Boadie, the tribe's earlier name, which meant "great man" (or simply "man") among the Briton and Cambri peoples... [more]
PEACHEnglish (Rare)
Derived from the name of the fruit, which itself derived its name from Late Latin persica, which came from older Latin malum persicum meaning "Persian fruit."
PEARKSEnglish
Sir Stuart Edmond Pearks (1875–1931) served as the Chief Commissioner of the North-West Frontier Province of British India from 1930 until 1931. Sourced from Wikipedia.... [more]
PEARLEnglish
Metonymic occupational name for a trader in pearls, which in the Middle Ages were fashionable among the rich for the ornamentation of clothes, from Middle English, Old French perle (Late Latin perla).
PEARSALLEnglish
a British surname of French origin derived from the pre-9th-century word "pourcel", which described a breeder of animals or a farmer
PEGGEnglish, Welsh
Son of "Margaret", in Old English.
PELHAMEnglish
From the name of a place in Hertfordshire, which meant "Peotla's homestead" in Old English.
PENDARVISEnglish (American)
The American English spelling of the Cornish surname Pendarves. Ultimately, the surname is traced back to Pendarves Island, Cornwall.
PENDERWICKAmerican
A family in a book series by Jeanne Birdsall.
PENDLEBURYEnglish
Likely originated from the area Pendlebury, in the Borough of Swindon and Pendlebury in Greater Manchester. Formed from the Celtic pen meaning "hill" and burh meaning "settlement".... [more]
PENDLETONEnglish
An Old English name meaning "overhanging settlement".
PENDRAGONEnglish
From 'Pen Dragon' meaning head dragon or dragons head. This was the name of the king Uther Pendragon who was King Arthurs father
PENNEnglish
One who lived near a fold or hill. From the Old English word "penn," meaning "hill" and "pen, fold."
PENNEYEnglish
Variant of PENNY.
PENNINGEnglish, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
PENNINGTONEnglish
Habitual surname for someone from Pennington, Lancashire; Pennington, Cumbria; or Pennington, Hampshire.
PENNYFIELDEnglish (Rare, ?)
Probably derives from the two English words, 'Penny' and 'Field'.
PENNYWELLEnglish
English habitational name from Pennywell in Tyne and Wear or from a similarly named lost place elsewhere.
PENNYWORTHEnglish
From Old English pening, penig meaning "penny (the coin)" and worþ meaning "enclosure". A notable fictional bearer is Alfred Pennyworth, a DC Comics character notable for being the butler of the superhero Batman.
PENWELLEnglish
English probably a variant of Pennywell.
PEPYSEnglish
From the medieval personal name Pepis, a form of Old French Pepin, brought into England by the Normans. It may have been based on an earlier nickname meaning "awesome". It is standardly pronounced "peeps"... [more]
PERCHEREnglish
In textile mills, woven fabric coming off the mill / loom would pass over a frame, or rod, called a 'perch'. It was the job of the 'Percher' to examine the cloth for defects, and repair them when they were found... [more]
PERDUEEnglish, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
PEREGRINEEnglish, Popular Culture
Derived from the given name Peregrine. A fictional bearer is Alma LeFay Peregrine, a character from the novel "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" (2011) by Ransom Riggs.
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