Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
NEW     English
Nickname for a newcomer to an area, from Middle English newe meaning "new".
NEWBORN     English
Habitational name from Newbourn in Suffolk or Newburn in Tyne and Wear (formerly part of Northumberland), both named with Old English niwe "new" and burna "stream", perhaps denoting a stream that had changed its course.
NEWBROUGH     English (British)
Newbrough surname is thought to be a habitational, taken on from a place name such as from Newbrough in Northumberland, which is derived from the Old English words niwe, meaning "new," and burh, meaning "fortification."
NEWBY     English
Means "person from Newby", Newby being a combination of the Middle English elements newe "new" and by "farm, settlement" (ultimately from Old Norse býr "farm"). British travel writer Eric Newby (1919-2006) bore this surname.
NEWEY     English
Topographic name for someone who lived at a "new enclosure", from Middle English newe "new" and haga "enclousire".
NEWHAM     English
Habitational name from any of the various places, for example in Northumbria and North Yorkshire, so named from Old English neowe "new" and ham "homestead".
NEWQUIST     English
Americansized form of Swedish Nyquist.
NEY     German, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
NICKERSON     English
Means "son of NICHOLAS".
NICKSON     English
Variant of Nixon, patronymic from the given name Nicholas.
Nickname for someone with a good voice, from Middle English nighti(n)gale, Old English nihtegal, from niht "night" and galan "sing" (cf. NACHTIGALL).
NINE     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Nein or Neun, from Middle High German niun meaning "nine".
NIX     English
NOAR     English
This surname is thought to be derived from nore which could mean "shore, cliff." This could denote that someone might have lived in a shore or cliff. It may also be used as a surname for someone who lived in the now 'diminished' village of Nore in Surrey.
NOBLE     English, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
NOCTE     American
Means "night" in Latin.
NOICE     English
Variant spelling of Noyce.
NOON     English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname for someone of a sunny disposition (noon being the sunniest part of the day); or (ii) from Irish Gaelic Ó Nuadháin "descendant of Nuadhán", a personal name based on Nuadha, the name of various Celtic gods (cf... [more]
NORELL     Swedish, English
Swedish ornamental name composed of norr "north" or nor "small strait" and the popular surname suffix -ell, from Latin adjectival suffix -elius. ... [more]
NORRELL     English, German (?)
A locational surname from the Germanic (Old English/Old Norse) term for the north. It either refers to someone who lived in a location called Northwell, lived north of a well, spring or stream (Old English weall)... [more]
NORRINGTON     English
Norrington is the name given to a person from the eponymous place.
NORSWORTHY     English
Habitational name from Norseworthy in Walkhampton, Devon.
NORTHERN     English
Topographic name, from an adjectival form of North.
NORWAY     English
From the country in Europe.
NOVEMBER     English (American)
From the name of the month.
NOY     English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Noye, the English form of the Hebrew name Noach "Noah"; or (ii) an invented Jewish name based on Hebrew noy "decoration, adornment".
NUNN     English
Means someone who is a nun
NUTTALL     English
English: habitational name from some place named with Old English hnutu ‘nut’ + h(e)alh ‘nook’, ‘recess’. In some cases this may be Nuthall in Nottinghamshire, but the surname is common mainly in Lancashire, and a Lancashire origin is therefore more likely... [more]
NUTTER     English
Means either (i) "scribe, clerk" (from Middle English notere, ultimately from Latin notārius); or (ii) "person who keeps or tends oxen" (from a derivative of Middle English nowt "ox")... [more]
OAK     English
Topographic name for someone who lived near an oak tree or in an oak wood, from Middle English oke "oak".
OAKES     English, Irish
English: Topographic name, a plural variant of Oak.... [more]
OAKLAND     English
This surname is derived from Old English āc and land and it, obviously, means "oak land."
OAKLEAF     English (American)
Probably an Americanized (translated) form of Swedish Eklöf.
OAKS     English
English variant spelling of Oakes and Americanized form of Jewish Ochs.
OATES     English
Patronymic from the Middle English personal name Ode (see Ott).
OATIS     English
Altered spelling of Otis, itself a variant of Oates.
OATS     English
Variation of Oates.
OBERLIN     German, English
From Oberst and the suffix Lynn.... [more]
OBESUS     American
Means "obese" in Latin.
OBSCURITE     English
A word which means "darkness" in French language.
ODD     English
Variant of Ott.
ODHAM     English
Variant of ODOM, altered by folk etymology as if derived from a place name formed with -ham.
ODOM     English
Medieval nickname for someone who had climbed the social ladder by marrying the daughter of a prominent figure in the local community, from Middle English odam ‘son-in-law’ (Old English aðum).
OFFICER     English (Canadian), English (American, Rare)
Occupational name for the holder of any office, from Anglo-Norman French officer (an agent derivative of Old French office ‘duty’, ‘service’, Latin officium ‘service’, ‘task’).
OGILVIE     Scottish, English
From the ancient Barony of Ogilvie in Angus, Northeast Scotland. The placename itself is derived from Pictish ocel, 'high' and fa, 'plain'.
OGILVY     Scottish, English
Variant of Ogilvie.
OLD     English
From Middle English old, not necessarily implying old age, but rather used to distinguish an older from a younger bearer of the same personal name.
OLIN     English, Dutch
English or Dutch name meaning either "from a low lying area" or from the word Hollander meaning "one from the Netherlands" a country well known for a low lying landscape.
OLIPHANT     English
Means "elephant" (from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German olifant "elephant"), perhaps used as a nickname for a large cumbersome person, or denoting someone who lived in a building distinguished by the sign of an elephant.
OLLIS     English
Unexplained surname found in records of Bristol and Bath.
OLLSON     English
Variant of Olsson or Olsen.
OLMSTEAD     English (British)
Comes from the Old French ermite "hermit" and Old English stede "place".... [more]
OPHEL     English
19th century name from the Cambridgeshire area. Probably derived from Oldfield. Variants include Opheld, Oful and Offel.... [more]
OPIE     English
From the medieval personal name Oppy or Obby, pet-forms of such names as Osbert and Osbold. John Opie (1761-1807) was a British portrait and history painter; other bearers of this surname include Peter Opie (1918-82), and his wife Iona Opie (née Archibald; 1923-), British authors and folklorists.
ORANGE     Medieval English, Medieval French, English
Derived from the medieval female name, or directly from the French place name. First used with the modern spelling in the 17th century, apparently due to William, Prince of Orange, who later became William III... [more]
ORBISON     English
From a village in Lincolnshire, England originally called Orby and later Orreby that is derived from a Scandinavian personal name Orri- and the Scandinavian place element -by which means "a farmstead or small settlement."
ORCHARD     English, Scottish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by an orchard, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower, from Middle English orchard.... [more]
ORCUTT     English
Perhaps a much altered spelling of Scottish Urquhart used predominantly in Staffordshire, England.
ORDWALD     English
English name meaning "spear strength".
ORE     English
ORGAN     English
Metonymic occupational name for a player of a musical instrument (any musical instrument, not necessarily what is now known as an organ), from Middle English organ (Old French organe, Late Latin organum ‘device’, ‘(musical) instrument’, Greek organon ‘tool’, from ergein ‘to work or do’).
ORGAN     English
From a rare medieval personal name, attested only in the Latinized forms Organus (masculine) and Organa (feminine).
ORLEY     Dutch, Flemish, English
A surname of uncertain origin found among the Dutch, Flemish and English. In England the name is primarily found in Yorkshire and Devon. Orley may be an adapted form of a French name D'Orley or a nickname for Orlando... [more]
ORPIN     English
Means "herbalist" (from Middle English orpin "yellow stonecrop", a plant prescribed by medieval herbalists for healing wounds). A variant spelling was borne by British painter Sir William Orpen (1878-1931).
OSBORN     English
From the given name OSBORN.
OSCARSON     English, Swedish (Rare)
Means "son of Oscar".
OSLER     English
Possibly derived from Ostler (from the the Norman 'Hostelier') meaning clerk or bookkeeper. First used in England after the Norman invasion of 1066. Surname of a 19th cent. Canadian doctor, Sir William Osler, widely viewed as the 'Father of Internal Medicine'.
OSMAR     English
Variant of Hosmer.
OSMOND     English
From the given name Osmond
OSWALD     English
From the given name Oswald.
OTTOWAY     English
From the Norman male personal names Otoïs, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "wealth-wide" or "wealth-wood", and Otewi, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "wealth-war".
OVERSON     English
Derived from the Old French name Overson, meaning "dweller by the river-banks". The name was probably brought to England in the wake of the Norman conquest of 1066.
OWNER     English
From English owner meaning "a person who owns something".
OYASKI     English (American)
A surname created by Michael Oyaski (formally Michael O'Yaski). The surname is currently known to only be used by one particular branch of the O'Yaski family tree. The surname means "Dragon Rider of the West" according to members of the Oyaski family.
PACEY     English
"Habitation name from Pacy-sur-Eure" which took its name from the Gallo-Roman personal name Paccius and the local suffix -acum.
PACKARD     English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PACKWOOD     English
Habitational name from a place in Warwickshire, so named from the Old English personal name Pac(c)a + wudu ‘wood’.
PADDINGTON     English
Believed to mean "Pada's farm", with the Anglo-Saxon name Pada possibly coming from the Old English word pad, meaning "toad".
PAINE     English
From the Middle English personal name Pain(e), Payn(e) (Old French Paien, from Latin Paganus), introduced to Britain by the Normans. The Latin name is a derivative of pagus "outlying village", and meant at first a person who lived in the country (as opposed to Urbanus "city dweller"), then a civilian as opposed to a soldier, and eventually a heathen (one not enrolled in the army of Christ)... [more]
PAINTER     English, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
PAITON     English
Locational surname derived from the village of Peyton in Essex, England; Variant of Peyton
PALACIO     American
Surname of author R.J. Palacio, who wrote the book Wonder (2012)
PALFREYMAN     English
Occupational name for a man responsible for the maintenance and provision of saddle-horses.
PALIN     English
(i) "person from Palling", Norfolk ("settlement of Pælli's people") or "person from Poling", Sussex ("settlement of Pāl's people"); (ii) from the Welsh name ap Heilyn "son of Heilyn", a personal name perhaps meaning "one who serves at table"
PALLISER     English
Means "maker of palings and fences" (from a derivative of Old French palis "palisade"). In fiction, the Palliser novels are a series of six political novels by Anthony Trollope, beginning with 'Can You Forgive Her?' (1864) and ending with 'The Duke's Children' (1880), in which the Palliser family plays a central role.
PAPAMICHAEL     Greek, English (Rare)
Means "Son of priest Michael".
PARDOE     English
From a medieval nickname based on the Old French oath par Dieu "by God" (cf. Purdie).
PARDY     English (Modern)
English (Dorset) variant of Perdue.
PARHAM     Irish, English
This name has been used amongst the Irish and English. This user's great grandmother came from Ireland and her maiden name was Parham. However, in English (London) it is a habitational name from places in Suffolk and Sussex, named in Old English with pere ‘pear’ + ham ‘homestead’.
PARKINSON     English
From the name Perkin, which is a medieval diminutive of Peter.
PARLEY     English
A place name meaning "pear field" from Old English 'per' with 'lee' or 'lea' meaning a field or clearing, perhaps where land was cleared to cultivate pear trees. Therefore this name denotes someone who lived near or worked at such a location or came from a habitation associated with the name... [more]
PARMLEY     English
Variant of Parley. This form is found more in northern England, specifically Cumberland and Durham, but is of like derivation.
PARNHAM     English
English habitational name from Parnham in Beaminster, Dorset.
PARR     English
Means "enclosure".
PARSLEY     Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
PARSON     English
Surname given to the parson (priest).
PARTINGTON     English
Habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Partington, from Old English Peartingtun "PEARTA's town".
PARTON     English
Habitational name from any of various places called Parton; most are named with Old English peretun ‘pear orchard’. A famous bearer of the surname is Dolly Parton.
PASH     English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Pasch.
PASSMORE     English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname for someone who crossed marshy moorland (e.g. who lived on the opposite side of a moor, or who knew the safe paths across it); or (ii) perhaps from an alteration of Passemer, literally "cross-sea", an Anglo-Norman nickname for a seafarer... [more]
PATE     English
Derives from the given name Pat(t), a short form of the personal name Patrick from the Latin Patricius meaning "son of a noble father".
PAULEY     English, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
PAVEY     English
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Pavia, perhaps from Old French pavie "peach"; or (ii) "person from Pavia", Italy.
PAXSON     English
This surname means "son of Pack." Pack may be a survival of the Old English personal name Pacca or it may have been a Middle English personal name derived from Paschalis (meaning "relating to Easter"), the Latin form of Pascal.
PAXTON     Scottish, English
From a place in England named with the Old English given name Pæcc and Old English name element -tun "settlement". A famous bearer was the actor Bill Paxton, (1955-2017).
PAY     English
PEABODY     English
Probably from a nickname for a showy dresser, from Middle English pe "peacock" (see Peacock) and body "body, person". Alternatively it may be from the name of a Celtic tribe meaning "mountain men" from Brythonic pea "large hill, mountain" combined with Boadie, the tribe's earlier name, which meant "great man" (or simply "man") among the Briton and Cambri peoples... [more]
PEACH     English (Rare)
Derived from the name of the fruit, which itself derived its name from Late Latin persica, which came from older Latin malum persicum meaning "Persian fruit."
PEARKS     English
Sir Stuart Edmond Pearks (1875–1931) served as the Chief Commissioner of the North-West Frontier Province of British India from 1930 until 1931. Sourced from Wikipedia.... [more]
PEARL     English
Metonymic occupational name for a trader in pearls, which in the Middle Ages were fashionable among the rich for the ornamentation of clothes, from Middle English, Old French perle (Late Latin perla).
PEARSALL     English
a British surname of French origin derived from the pre-9th-century word "pourcel", which described a breeder of animals or a farmer
PEGRAM     English
Variant of Pilgrim.
PELHAM     English
From the name of a place in Hertfordshire, which meant "Peotla's homestead" in Old English.
PENDARVIS     English (American)
The American English spelling of the Cornish surname Pendarves. Ultimately, the surname is traced back to Pendarves Island, Cornwall.
PENDERWICK     American
A family in a book series by Jeanne Birdsall.
PENDLEBURY     English
Likely originated from the area Pendlebury, in the Borough of Swindon and Pendlebury in Greater Manchester. Formed from the Celtic pen meaning "hill" and burh meaning "settlement".... [more]
PENDLETON     English
An Old English name meaning "overhanging settlement".
PENDRAGON     English
From 'Pen Dragon' meaning head dragon or dragons head. This was the name of the king Uther Pendragon who was King Arthurs father
PENN     English
One who lived near a fold or hill. From the Old English word "penn," meaning "hill" and "pen, fold."
PENNEY     English
Variant of PENNY.
PENNING     English, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
PENNINGTON     English
Habitual surname for someone from Pennington, Lancashire; Pennington, Cumbria; or Pennington, Hampshire.
PENNYFIELD     English (Rare, ?)
Probably derives from the two English words, 'Penny' and 'Field'.
PENNYWELL     English
English habitational name from Pennywell in Tyne and Wear or from a similarly named lost place elsewhere.
PENNYWORTH     English
From Old English pening, penig meaning "penny (the coin)" and worþ meaning "enclosure". A notable fictional bearer is Alfred Pennyworth, a DC Comics character notable for being the butler of the superhero Batman.
PENWELL     English
English probably a variant of Pennywell.
PEPYS     English
From the medieval personal name Pepis, a form of Old French Pepin, brought into England by the Normans. It may have been based on an earlier nickname meaning "awesome". It is standardly pronounced "peeps"... [more]
PERCHER     English
In textile mills, woven fabric coming off the mill / loom would pass over a frame, or rod, called a 'perch'. It was the job of the 'Percher' to examine the cloth for defects, and repair them when they were found... [more]
PERDUE     English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
PEREGRINE     English, Popular Culture
Derived from the given name Peregrine. A fictional bearer is Alma LeFay Peregrine, a character from the novel "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" (2011) by Ransom Riggs.
PERHAM     English
A variation of the English name Parham, based on the village of Parham (one in county Suffolk, another in county Sussex). From the Old English peru, meaning "pear" (the fruit), and ham, meaning "homestead".
PERKIN     English, Welsh
"Variant of Surname Perkins "
PERLEY     English
Variant of Parley or Burley.
PETRIE     English
Patronymic surname that was derived from the first name Peter.
PETTINGER     English
English version of Pottinger.
PETTIS     English
From the possessive or plural form of Middle English pytte, pitte ‘pit’, ‘hollow’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a pit, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Pett in East Sussex.
PHEONIX     English
A rare nickname given for someone's appearance of blonde and red hair just as a phoenix has colorful plumage and a tail of gold and scarlet.
PHILBERT     English
From the medieval French male personal name Filibert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "very bright, very famous".
PHILLIP     English
Derived from the given name Philip
PHILLISKIRK     English (Rare)
From a 'lost' medieval parish in England or Scotland, named with the Old Norse element kirk meaning 'church' or 'place of worship'.... [more]
PHILPOT     English
English (chiefly southeastern): from the Middle English personal name Philipot/Philpot, a pet form of Philip.
PHILSON     English
Patronymic from Phil, a short form of the personal name Philip.
PHOENIX     English
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years... [more]
PICKETT     English
of Norman origin, from the personal name "Pic", here with the diminutive suffixes "et" or "ot", and recorded as "Picot, Pigot" and Piket". The name is ultimately of Germanic derivation, from "pic", meaning "sharp", or "pointed", which was a common element in names meaning for instance, residence near a "pointed hill", use of a particular sharp or pointed tool or weapon, or a nickname for a tall, thin person.
PICKFORD     English
This surnames origins lie with the Anglo-Saxons. It is a product of their having lived in the parish of Pitchford in Shropshire. ... [more]
PICOT     English
PIERPONT     English
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Aisne and Calvados, so called from Old French pierre ‘stone’ + pont ‘bridge’.
PIKE     English, Irish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a sharp point, from Old English pic ‘point’, ‘hill’, which was a relatively common place name element.... [more]
PILGRIM     English, German
From Middle English pilegrim, pelgrim or Middle High German bilgerin, pilgerin (from Latin pelegrinus "traveler"; see Pellegrino). This originated as a nickname for a person who had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land or to some seat of devotion nearer home, such as Santiago de Compostella, Rome, or Canterbury... [more]
PILKINGTON     English (British), Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, England.
PINCH     English
Nickname for a chirpy person, from Middle English pinch, pink ‘(chaf)finch’. Compare Finch. possibly a metonymic occupational name from Middle English pinche ‘pleated fabric’, from Middle English pinche(n) ‘to pinch (pastry)’, ‘to pleat (fabric)’, ‘to crimp (hair, etc.)’, also ‘to cavil’, ‘to be niggardly’.
PINCHES     English (British, Rare)
This is one of the very earliest of surnames. This is an English name. First recorded in the 12th century it was a nickname of endearment for a bright, chirpy, person, thought by his peer group to be active like a finch... [more]
PINCKNEY     English
The surname Pinckney originally denoted someone from Picquigny, France, which derives from a Germanic personal name, Pincino (of obscure derivation) and the Latin locative suffix -acum... [more]
PINES     English (American)
Surname of the characters, Dipper, Mabel and Stan from Gravity Falls.
PINK     English, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
PINKHAM     English
habitational name from a lost or unidentified place in or bordering on Devon
PINKNEY     English
Variant spelling of Pinckney.
PITCOCK     English
Old English pytta
PITT     English
English from Middle English pytte, pitte ‘pit’, ‘hollow’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a pit or hollow, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Pitt in Hampshire.
PITTMAN     English
Described someone who lived in a hollow or pitt (see Pitt).
PLANT     English
An occupational surname for a gardener.
PLATTEN     English
Diminutive of Platt.
PLAYFAIR     English
From a medieval nickname for an enthusiastic competitor in sports and games (from Middle English pleyfere "companion in play, playmate"), or else a different form of Playford (from a Suffolk place-name meaning "ford where sports are held")... [more]
PLEASANCE     English
Either (i) from the medieval female personal name Plaisance, literally "pleasantness"; or (ii) "person from Piacenza", Italy (from Latin Placentia, literally "pleasing things").
PLEASANT     American
Means being a very bright man in the near future. Also can be used as a alias.
PLUM     English, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
PLUMER     German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
PLUMMER     English
1. Occupational name for a worker in lead, especially a maker of lead pipes and conduits, from Anglo-Norman French plom(m)er, plum(m)er ‘plumber’, from plom(b), plum(b) ‘lead’ (Latin plumbum)... [more]
POBJOY     English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a parrot, from Middle English papejai, popinjay "parrot". This probably denoted someone who was talkative or who dressed in bright colours, although it may have described a person who excelled at the medieval sport of pole archery, i.e. shooting at a wooden parrot on a pole.
POE     English
From a medieval nickname for a vain or flamboyantly dressed person (from Old Norse "peacock"). American author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was a famous bearer.
POGUE     Irish, American
An Irish surname meaning "kiss"
POLAND     English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
POLING     English, Welsh
Altered form of Bolling, possibly also of Bollinger or Pollinger.
POLLOCK     Scottish, English
Habitational name from a place in Glasgow, apparently so named from a diminutive of a British cognate of Gaelic poll ‘pool’, ‘pit’. The surname is also common in northeastern Ulster.... [more]
POLTIMORE     English (Rare)
Rare English surname derived from a Devon place name of Celtic origin, allegedly meaning “pool by the large house”.
POMEROY     English
From an English surname meaning "dweller by the apple orchard".
POMPEY     French, English
Variant of Italian POMPEI.
PONCE     Spanish, English
The Ponce name was carried into England after the migration from Normandy following the Norman Conquest of 1066.'Ponce' is derived from 'Ponsoby',a place in Cumberland, where the family settled. The Ponce motto is 'Pro rege, lege grege' meaning "For the King, law, and people"
PONDEXTER     English
Variant of Poindexter.
POOK     English
Pooke was the original version... [more]
POOL     English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pool or pond, Middle English pole (Old English pōl), or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Poole in Dorset, South Pool in Devon, and Poole Keynes in Gloucestershire.
POPP     German, English
From a Germanic personal name Poppo, Boppo, of uncertain origin and meaning, perhaps originally a nursery word or a short form of for example Bodobert, a Germanic personal name meaning ‘famous leader’... [more]
PORTUGAL     Spanish, Portuguese, English, Catalan, French, Jewish
Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, French, and Jewish surname meaning ethnic name or regional name for someone from Portugal or who had connections with Portugal. The name of the country derives from Late Latin Portucale, originally denoting the district around Oporto (Portus Cales, named with Latin portus ‘port’, ‘harbor’ + Cales, the ancient name of the city)... [more]
POSEY     English, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
POSY     English
Variant of Posey
POTEET     English, French
From the French name Pottet, which is derived from pot meaning "pot", originally a name for a potter.
POTHIER     English
One of the Many spellings of Pottier
POULTON     English
English surname that means "settlement by a pool".
POWALSKI     English (American)
Surname of Leon Powalski from the Star Fox 64 series.
POWIS     English
The English of Welsh Surname Powys, which derives from the place "Powys" in Wales.
POWYES     English
Unknown source. Surname of many early American pilgrims.
PRAT     English
Variant of Pratt.
PREECE     Welsh (Anglicized), English
Variant of PRICE. From Welsh ap Rhys meaning "son of RHYS". ... [more]
PRENTICE     English
Derived from apprentice.
PRESCOD     English
A cognate of Prescott.
PRESHAW     English (British, Rare)
This surname is a habitational name from a locality near Upham on the slopes of the South Downs. It is entirely within a private estate and has its own chapel.
PRESS     English, Jewish
A nickname for a pious individual from the Middle English form of "priest" or possibly someone employed by a priest. In the Jewish sense, one whose occupation was to iron clothes.
PREVOST     French, English
Derived from Old French prevost meaning "provost" (ultimately from Latin praepositus, the past participle of praeponere meaning "to place in charge") which is a status name for any of the various officials in a position of responsibility.
PREWITT     English
English surname meaning brave, valor.
PRIDMORE     English
unexplained; perhaps a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. Pridmore has long been a Leicestershire name.
PRIEST     English
Derived from the occupation priest, which is a minister of a church. It could also be a nickname for a person who is / was a priest.
PRINCE     English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
PRIOR     English, Scottish, Dutch, German
Derived from Latin prior meaning "superior". It was used as an occupational surname for a prior, which is a head of a religious house, below an abbot.
PRIVETT     French, English, Welsh (?)
French, from the given name Privat (see PRIVATUS). Also an English habitational name from a place so named in Hampshire, derived from Old English pryfet "privet".
PROCTOR     English
proctor was originally used for the test examiner but later had been adopted as a suraname
PROCTOR     English
Occupational name from Middle English prok(e)tour "steward" (reduced from Old French procurateour, Latin procurator "agent", from procurare "to manage"). The term was used most commonly of an attorney in a spiritual court, but also of other officials such as collectors of taxes and agents licensed to collect alms on behalf of lepers and enclosed orders of monks.
PROPHET     English, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
PROVOST     English, French
Derived from the Middle English provost; referring to the person who heads a religious chapter in a cathedral or educational establishment. It was also used as a nickname for a self-important person and is a French variant of Prevost.
PRUDHOMME     French, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
PRUE     English, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
PRUITT     English, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
PUCHOL     English, English (American)
Puchol is name prominently used in the English culture. "Puchol" means "Little Bitch" and is generally associated with weakness. Studies show that the name and those who have it give cancer to others... [more]
PUCKETT     English
Of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Pocket(t), from a diminutive of Anglo-Norman French poque "small pouch", hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of purses and pouches or a nickname... [more]
PUDDEPHAT     English
From a medieval nickname for someone with a roly-poly physique (from Middle English puddy fat "round-bellied vat").
PUETT     English (American)
Americinized form of Pütt.
PULSIFER     English
Probably a variant of Percival.
PULVER     Low German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
PURDEY     English
Variant of Purdie (see Purdie on the given name site)
PURDIE     English
The first name Purdie is transferred usage of this surname, which means "by God" in Norman French.
PURDOM     English
English: metathesized variants of Prudhomme; the -ru- reversal is a fairly common occurrence in words where -r- is preceded or followed by a vowel.
PURDUM     English
Variant spelling of English Purdom.
PURPLE     English
Nickname for someone wore purple clothing or has a purple complexion
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