Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English or American.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
HYNDESTAN Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HYNDESTANE Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
HYNDESTON Anglo-Saxon, English
A an earlier variation of the surname HINGSTON. See HINGSTON for full meaning.
ICKES German, English
In German the meaning is unknown.... [more]
IDDENDEN English (Rare)
Iden as a village name is to be found in both the counties of Kent and Sussex, and describes a pasture, or strictly speaking an area within a marsh suitable for pasture. The origination is the pre 6th century phrase ig-denn with ig meaning an island... [more]
IDDON English
From the Old Norse female personal name Idunn, literally probably "perform love" (cf. IDONY).
IDEN English
Habitational name from a place called Iden Green in Benenden, Kent, or Iden Manor in Staplehurst, Kent, or from Iden in East Sussex. All these places are named in Old English as meaning "pasture by the yew trees", from ig meaning "yew" + denn meaning "pasture".
ILES English (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
IMPEY English
From Impey, the name of various places in England, derived from Old English *imphaga, *imphæg "sapling enclosure". Alternatively it could have indicated a person who lived near an enclosure of young trees.
INCHBALD English
From the medieval male personal name Ingebald, brought into England by the Normans but ultimately of Germanic origin and meaning literally "brave Ingel" (Ingel was a different form of ENGEL - a shortened form of various Germanic compound personal names (e.g. ENGELBERT and ENGELHARD) that begin with Engel-; the two main sources of that were Angel "Angle" (the name of the Germanic people) and Ingal, an extended form of ING (the name of a Germanic god)).
IND English (?)
Meaning deweller at the end of a villiage (Gypsy)
INGALLS English, Scandinavian (Anglicized)
Patronymic from the Anglo-Scandinavian personal name Ingell, Old Norse INGJALDR.... [more]
INGLE English
Derived from the Old Norse given names INGIALDR or INGÓLF.
INGOLD English
Derived from the given names Ingell (see INGLE), INGJALDR or INGWALD.
INGOLDSBY English
Habitational name from Ingoldsby in Lincolnshire, named from the Old Norse personal name Ingjaldr + bý meaning "farmstead", "settlement".
INMAN English (British)
Anglo-Saxon in Origin. Occupational surname given to a person who "tended a lodge or an inn". Surname first found in Lancashire, England.
IOANE English (New Zealand), English (Australian), American, Samoan, Polynesian, Romanian
May come from the given name JOHN or variants of this name, such as ION.
IREDELL English
An English name originating in Anglo-Saxon England. Originally found in an area that was referred to as Airedale, which refers to those who lived in the valley of the river Aire in the counties of Yorkshire and Cumberland.
IRELAND English, Scottish
Ethnic name for someone from Ireland, Old English Iraland. The country gets its name from the genitive case of Old English Iras "Irishmen" and land "land". The stem Ir- is taken from the Celtic name for Ireland, Èriu, earlier Everiu... [more]
IRETON English
Habitational name from either of two places in Derbyshire called Ireton, or one in North Yorkshire called Irton. All of these are named from the genitive case of Old Norse Íri ‘Irishmen’ (see Ireland) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.... [more]
IRISH English
Derived from Ireland
IRONS English
English (of Norman origin): habitational name from Airaines in Somme, so named from Latin harenas (accusative case) ‘sands’. The form of the name has been altered as a result of folk etymology, an association of the name with the metal... [more]
ISAAC Jewish, English, Welsh, French
Derived from the given name ISAAC.
ISHAM English
The name of a village in Northamptonshire, England from the Celtic name of a local river Ise and the Anglo-Saxon term for a small settlement or homestead -ham.
ISLEY English
Of Old English origin, derived from a place named Hesli, meaning "a hazel wood or grove".
ISOM English
Variant of ISHAM.
ISSAC English, Spanish
From the given name ISSAC.
IVANS English
Meaning "son of IVAN
IVES English
Means "son of Ive", a medieval male personal name, brought into England by the Normans but ultimately of Germanic origin, a shortened form of any of a range of compound names beginning with īv "yew" (cf... [more]
IVEY Anglo-Saxon, English
Anglo-Saxon: Ivey is a variant of the Anglo-Saxon baptismal name Ive. It is the Anglo-Saxon equivalent of "Son of Ive".... [more]
IVORY English
Habitational name from Ivry-la-Bataille in Eure, northern France.
IVSEN English (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of IBSEN or IVERSEN.
IYKOFOS American
A surname means "Twilight" in Greek.
JACE English (Rare)
Derived from the given name JACE
JACEY American
Derrived from the given name JACEY
JACKETT English
From a pet form of the given name JACK.
JACKS English
Possibly derived as a diminutive of the given name JACK. A famous bearer is Canadian singer-songwriter Terry Jacks, best known for his 1974 single 'Seasons in the Sun.'
JACKSO English (Rare)
Rare English variant of JACKSON.
JACOBI Jewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
JACOWAY English (American)
Altered form of the personal name JACQUES.
JACOX English
A variant spelling of JAYCOX.
JADE English, French
From the given name JADE. It could also indicate someone with jade green eyes.
JADWIN English
"Jadwin" is said to mean "friend of a stonecutter" (Anglo-Saxon jad "stonecutter" + win or "friend.")
JAGGER English
English (West Yorkshire): occupational name from Middle English jagger ‘carter’, ‘peddler’, an agent derivative of Middle English jag ‘pack’, ‘load’ (of unknown origin). ... [more]
JAKESON English
It means "son of JAKE"
JANEWAY English
Derived from Middle English Janaways, the name for someone from the city of Genoa, Italy. A notable fictional bearer is Kathryn Janeway, the captain of starship USS Voyager on the TV-series 'Star Trek: Voyager' (1995-2001).
JANISON American (Modern, Rare)
Means son of JANE. Extremely rare surname.
JANKINS English (American)
Variant of Jenkins.
JASMINE English, Japanese
means a fragrant shrub or flower used as perfume
JASON English
Probably a patronymic from JAMES or any of various other personal names beginning with J-.
JASPERS English
Derived from the given name JASPER. A famous bearer is the German existential philosopher Karl Jaspers (1883-1969).
JASPERSON English
Means "Son of JASPER".
JAXTON English
Means "JACK's town" in English
JAY English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French jay(e), gai "jay (the bird)", probably referring to an idle chatterer or a showy person, although the jay was also noted for its thieving habits.
JAYCOX English
A patronymic surname from a pet form of the given name JACK.
JAYDEN English
Surname of the fictional character Norman Jayden, a character from the video game Heavy Rain.
JAYE English
Variant of JAY.
JEFFERIES English
Derived from the given name JEFFREY.
JEFFREY English
From a Norman personal name that appears in Middle English as Geffrey and in Old French as Je(u)froi. Some authorities regard this as no more than a palatalized form of GODFREY, but early forms such as Galfridus and Gaufridus point to a first element from Germanic gala "to sing" or gawi "region, territory"... [more]
JEFSON English
"Son of Jef".
JENCKES English
"Back-formation" of Jenkin, a medieval diminutive of JOHN.
JENKS English, Welsh
English (also found in Wales) patronymic from the Middle English personal name Jenk, a back-formation from JENKIN with the removal of the supposed Anglo-Norman French diminutive suffix -in.
JENNER English
Occupational name for an engineer.
JENNESS English
English surname, a patronymic from the Middle English personal name JAN.
JEPSEN English
Variant of JEPSON.
JEREMY English
From the given name JEREMY.
JESSEL English
From a pet-form of Jessop (a medieval male personal name - a different form of JOSEPH). A literary bearer is Miss Jessel, the governess who has charge of the two troubled and enigmatic children in Henry James's ghost story 'The Turn of the Screw' (1898).
JESSIE English
Possibly a variant of Jessey, an occupational name for someone making jesses (a short strap fastened around the leg of a bird used in falconry).
JESSUP English
From the given name Joseph.
JETSON English
A patronymic from the personal name Jutt, a pet form of JORDAN... [more]
JEW English
Ethnic name for a Jew, from Middle English jeu meaning "Jew" from Old French giu.
JEWETT English
A mainly Northern English surname, derived from a pet form of JULIAN.
JEWITT English
Variant of JEWETT.
JIMERSON English (British), Scottish
Variant of Scottish and northern English JAMESON, based on a pet form of the personal name.
JOB English, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name IYOV or JOB, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
JOCELYN English
Another of the names brought to England in the eleventh century by the Normans, and mentioned in the Domesday Book. Originally a masculine name only.
JOELSON English
Means "son of JOEL".
JOLIE English
From the given name JOLIE meaning pretty.
JONSON English
Variant of JOHNSON and English form of JOHNSSON
JORDISON English
Possibly meaning son of Jordan. This name is surname of American drummer Joey Jordison.
JORGENSON German, English
Respelling of JØRGENSEN or Jörgensen (see Jorgensen) or the Swedish cognate Jörgens(s)on.
JOSEPHSEN English
Variant of JOSEPHSON meaning "Son of Joseph."
JOURDINE French, English
English and French variant of Jordan.
JOWETT English
From the medieval male personal name Jowet or the female personal name Jowette, both literally "little Jowe", a pet-form of JULIAN... [more]
JOYCE English, Irish
From the Breton personal name Iodoc, a diminutive of iudh "lord", introduced by the Normans in the form Josse. Iodoc was the name of a Breton prince and saint, the brother of Iudicael (see JEWELL), whose fame helped to spread the name through France and western Europe and, after the Norman Conquest, England as well... [more]
JUDKINS English
Means "decsendent of JUD".
JUDSON English
Means son of "Judah"
JULES English
Patronymic or metronymic from a short form of JULIAN.
JUMP English
Perhaps from the English word jump. A notable namesake was American scientist Annie Jump Cannon (1863-1941).
JUSTICE English
Simply form the abstract noun "Justice"
JUSTIN French, English, Slovene
From a medieval personal name, Latin JUSTINUS, a derivative of JUSTUS.
KAIGLER English (American)
Americanized spelling of KEGLER.
KAINE English
Variant of CAINE.
KAPITY English
Meaning unknown.
KARKUS English
Anyone with information about this last name please edit.
KARLSON English
Means "Son of KARL".
KARP English
From the given name KARP.
KASPERSON English
Means "Son of KASPER".
KAYE English
From the first name KAYE.
KEATE English
Variant of KEAT.
KEATON English
Variant of KEETON.
KEEL English
English habitational name from Keele in Staffordshire, named from Old English cy ‘cows’ + hyll ‘hill’, or from East and West Keal in Lincolnshire, which are named from Old Norse kjolr ‘ridge’... [more]
KEELER English
English: occupational name for a boatman or boatbuilder, from an agent derivative of Middle English kele ‘ship’, ‘barge’ (from Middle Dutch kiel). Americanized spelling of German Kühler, from a variant of an old personal name (see KEELING) or a variant of Kuhl.
KEENE English
Variant of KEEN.
KEENER English
Anglicized form of KIENER or Kühner.
KEETON English
Habitational name from a place called Ketton in Durham or one in Rutland or from Keaton in Ermington, Devon. The first is named from the Old English personal name Catta or the Old Norse personal name Káti and Old English tūn "settlement"; the second is probably from an old river name or tribal name Cētan (possibly a derivative of Celtic cēd "wood") and Old English ēa "river"; and the last possibly from Cornish kee "hedge, bank" and Old English tūn.
KELHAM English
Derived from the village of Kelham, near Newark-upon-Trent, Nottingham.
KELSHAW English
Derived from the villages of North or South KELSEY in Lincolnshire.
KELSON English
Means "son of KEL"
KEMPTON English
From the name of a place in Shropshire meaning "Cempa's town" or "warrior town", from a combination of either the Old English word cempa "warrior" or the byname derived from it and tun "farmstead, settlement".
KENDREW English
Variant of ANDREW, possibly influenced by MCANDREW. Notable namesake is Nobel Prize winning chemist John Kendrew (1917-1997).
KENNAWAY English
From the medieval personal name Kenewi, from Old English Cynewīg, literally "royal war", or Cēnwīg, literally "bold war".
KENNETHSON English
Means “Son Of Kenneth.”
KENNEY English
Variant of KENNY
KENNY English, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coinnigh "descendant of COINNEACH" or Ó Cionaodha "descendant of CIONAODH".
KENSINGTON English
English surname meaning "CYNESIGE's town", from the Old English personal name Cynesige and ton 'town'.
KENSLEY English
This surname might derive from the surname KINSLEY or from the locational surname KELSEY (denoting someone who is from either North or South Kelsey in Lincolnshire).
KENT English (?)
Region in England
KENTIE Scottish, English, Dutch
Origin and meaning unknown. The name Kentie was spread in the Netherlands when a Scottish soldier, Alexander Kenti, settled at Woudrichem, the Netherlands around 1650. Alexander Kenti was born and raised in the Scottish highlands... [more]
KENWOOD English
From the settlement of Kenwood in the parish of Kenton, county of Devon, England. ... [more]
KENYON English, Welsh
Kenyon is a surname from Wales meaning "a person from Ennion's Mound"
KETCHAM English
Reduced form of KITCHENHAM
KETLEY English
Means "person from Ketley", Shropshire ("glade frequented by cats").
KICKLIGHTER American
Americanized spelling of German Kückleiter, literally ‘chicken ladder’, probably a nickname for a chicken farmer.
KIDDER English
English: possibly an occupational name from early modern English kidd(i)er ‘badger’, a licensed middleman who bought provisions from farmers and took them to market for resale at a profit, or alternatively a variant of KIDMAN... [more]
KIDMAN English
English: occupational name, probably for a goatherd (from Middle English kid(e) ‘young goat’ + man ‘man’), but possibly also for a cutter of wood used for fuel. (from Middle English kidde ‘faggot’ (an archaic English unit for a bundle of sticks)).
KIDWELL Welsh, English
The origins of this surname are uncertain, but it may be derived from Middle English kidel "fish weir", denoting a person who lived by a fish weir or made his living from it, or from an English place called Kiddal, probably meaning "Cydda's corner of land" from the Old English given name Cydda and halh "nook or corner of land".
KIFF English
the origin of the name KIFF could have come from a variation of KITH as in "kith and kin". The O.E.D. definition of the word KITH is that of a native land, familiar place or home so "kith and kin" meant your home and your relations... [more]
KILVERT English
Probably from an Old Norse personal name Ketilfrith, literally "cauldron peace". The surname was borne by British clergyman and diarist Francis Kilvert (1840-1879).
KIND English, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
KINDNESS English (Puritan)
Simply from the English abstract noun
KINGSFORD English
English habitational name from any of various places named Kingsford, for example in Essex, Devon, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire. The name ostensibly means ‘the king’s ford’, but the one in Worcestershire is named as Ceningaford ‘ford of Cena’s people’.
KINGSLEIGH English
It is a variant of KINGSLEY.
KINGSOLVER English (American)
Altered form of English CONSOLVER, which is unexplained. Compare Kinsolving.
KINGSWELL English
An English surname meaning "Lives by the King's spring"
KINGSWOOD English
Means “King’s wood.”
KINSEY English
Anglo-Saxon
KINSOLVING English
Altered form of English CONSOLVER
KIPPS English
From Middle English Kipp, perhaps a byname for a fat man, from an unattested Old English form Cyppe, which according to Reaney is from the Germanic root kupp 'to swell'.
KIRKBY English
Variant of KIRBY.
KIRKLAND English, Scottish
Derived from the Scottish 'kirk', meaning church, and land. This name denoted one who lived near or tended to the land belonging to or surrounding a church. A famous /fictional/ bearer is Arthur Kirkland, a main character in the highly popular anime/webmanga Axis Powers Hetalia... [more]
KIRKMAN English
A name originally found in both Scotland and England. From Kirk- meaning "church" and -man for someone who lived near or worked at a church.
KIRKPATRICK English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Habitational name from various places so called from the dedication of their church to St. Patrick. See KIRK.
KIRKSEY English
English: probably a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. This surname is also common in the American South.
KIRSTEN English
English and modernized version of KIRSTEIN
KIRTON English
habitational name from any of various places, for example in Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, and Staffordshire, named with Old English cirice or Old Norse kirkja 'church' + Old English tun 'enclosure', 'settlement'.
KISH English
A name for a person who worked as a maker of leather armor for the knight's legs.
KITCHENER English (British), Scottish
Variant spelling of Kitchen. A famous bearer was senior British Army officer and colonial administrator, Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener (1850-1916).
KITCHENHAM English
Occupational surname for a person who was in charge of the kitchen in a royal or noble house, or a monastery. From the Anglo Saxon cycene (German: Küche Dutch: kjøkken Latin: cocina Italian: cucina)
KITLEY English
Derived from a place name in Devonshire, England, and was first recorded in the form of Kitelhey in 1305.... [more]
KITSON Scottish, English
Patronymic form of KIT.
KITTREDGE English
Derived from the given name Keterych.
KIX English (Rare)
Location name from one of two rivers in West Yorkshire called Kex.
KLARICH English
English spelling of KLARIĆ.
KLINE American
Kline is one of the smaller groups of anglicized forms of the German surname Klein.... [more]
KLOSS English (British)
Surname from the model, Karlie Kloss (1992-)
KNAPP English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hillock, Middle English "nappe, Old English cnæpp, or habitational name from any of the several minor places named with the word, in particular Knapp in Hampshire and Knepp in Sussex.
KNIGHTON English
English surname which was derived from a place name composed of the Old English elements cnihta meaning "servant, retainer" (genitive plural of cniht) and tun "enclosure, settlement".
KNIPE English
The lineage of the name Knipe begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes in Britain. It is a result of when they lived on the peak of a hill or highland. The surname Knipe is primarily familiar in the regions of Lancashire and Westmoreland.... [more]
KNITTS English
Derived from the given name KNUT.
KNOCK English
Topographic name for someone living by a hill, from Middle English knocke "hill" (Old English cnoc).
KNOLL English, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
KNOTT English
Either from the Middle English personal name KNUT, or denoting a person who lived "at the knot", which is the summit of a rocky hill.
KNOTTS English
Variant of KNOTT
KNOWLTON English
Habitational name from either of two places so named, one in Dorset and the other in Kent.
KNOX English (Modern), Scottish, Northern Irish
Topographic name derived from Old English cnocc "round hill" referring to someone living on or near a hill top.
KOHEN Jewish, Hebrew, English
Hebrew form of COHEN.
KOLE English
Variant of COLE.
KOON American
Americanized spelling of German KUHN or Dutch KOEN.
KOSTEN American (South)
All of the individuals I know named Kosten are very homosexual.
KOX English
Variant of COX
KRISTENSON English
Anglicized form of KRISTENSEN
KYTE English
Variant of KITE.
LADLEY English
Probably a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
LADSON English
Patronymic of LADD.
LAGADU English
Possible French origins
LAITHEN English
English habitational name from any of various places so called, for example in Lancashire (near Blackpool) and in North Yorkshire. The former was named in Old English as ‘settlement by the watercourse’, from Old English lad ‘watercourse’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’; the latter as ‘leek enclosure’ or ‘herb garden’, from leac ‘leek’ + tun... [more]
LAKE English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, Old English lacu, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, for example in Wiltshire and Devon. Modern English lake (Middle English lake) is only distantly related, if at all; it comes via Old French from Latin lacus... [more]
LAMB English
A nickname for a gentle or malleable person or an occupational name for someone who raised or cared for young sheep. Can take the form LUM.
LAMBE English
Variant of LAMB.
LAMPERT German, English
German & English variant of LAMBERT.... [more]
LAMSHED English
Surname common in Australia & the UK. A variation of Lambshead which was originally a mis-spelling of Lambside which was the area from which the family originated in Pommyland. Other variations include Lambshed, Lamshead, Lammyside and Lamesta... [more]
LANCASHIRE English
Shire of Lancaster; One who came from Lancashire, a county in the North of England.
LANCASTER English
Habitational name from Lancaster in northwestern England, named in Old English as ‘Roman fort on the Lune’, from the Lune river, on which it stands, + Old English cæster ‘Roman fort or walled city’ (Latin castra ‘legionary camp’)... [more]
LANCE English
From the Germanic personal name LANZO, originally a short form of various compound names with the first element land ‘land’, ‘territory’ (for example, Lambert), but later used as an independent name... [more]
LAND English, German
Topographic name from Old English land, Middle High German lant, "land, territory". This had more specialized senses in the Middle Ages, being used to denote the countryside as opposed to a town or an estate.
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