French Submitted Surnames

French names are used in France and other French-speaking regions. See also about French names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
EAMER     French, Anglo-Saxon
This interesting and unusual surname has two possible sources. ... [more]
ELEANOR     French
Derives from the given name Eleanor. Not popular as a last name.
EMERY     English, French, Norman
English and French from a Germanic personal name, Emaurri, composed of the elements amja ‘busy’, ‘industrious’ + ric ‘power’. The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
EMPERAIRE     French
Means "Emperor".
ENGELBERT     German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
ERASMUS     French, Dutch
it means beloved one or king
ERMAN     German (Modern), French (Modern)
Erman is a shortened French adaption of the Swiss-German surname Ermendinger, itself derived from the older surname Ermatinger, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence during the early or middle 18th century when Jean-Georges Ermendinger (1710-1767), a Swiss fur trader from Geneva, married into a French speaking Huguenotte family... [more]
ESTIMÉ     Haitian Creole, French
Means "valued, esteemed" in French.
FAFARD     French
Possibly derived from the french 'fard' meaning 'made-up' or 'make-up'. This is in a theatrical sense and does not imply lying. Very possibly a derivation form a theatrical occupation
FARAND     English (Canadian), French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name FARIMOND or from the French word ferrer meaning "to be clad in iron" or "to shoe a horse".
FARGE     French
Reduced or Americanized form of La Farge/Lafarge.
FARRAGUT     Breton, French, Catalan, American
A Breton-French surname of unknown origin. A notable bearer was American naval flag officer David Farragut (1801-1870), who is known for serving during the American Civil War. His father was of Catalan ancestry... [more]
FAYE     French, English
Refers to one who came from Fay or Faye (meaning "beech tree") in France.
FERRAND     French, English
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from a nickname (thus making it a descriptive surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the medieval French masculine given name Ferrand, which was a variant form of the name Fernand, itself a contraction of Ferdinand.... [more]
FERRANDIN     French (Rare)
This French surname can be derived from a given name (thus making it a patronymic surname) as well as from the name of a profession (thus making it an occupational surname). In the case of a patronymic surname, the surname is derived from the masculine given name Ferrandin, which was a diminutive of the medieval French given name Ferrand... [more]
FEUILLE     French
This is actually a standard word in French, correctly pronounce like "furry" without the r's. It means "leaf", or "sheet" (i.e. feuille de papier).
FÉVRIER     French
Meaning, "February."
FEY     German, English, French, Danish
English: variant of Fay. ... [more]
FIRMAN     English, French
From a medieval personal name meaning "firm, resolute, strong man." Borne by early saints and bishops. First name variants Firman and Firmin. Expressed in Latin as Firminus.
FORET     French, French Creole
From Old French forest ‘forest’, a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a royal forest, or an occupational name for a keeper or worker in one. See also Forrest. This surname is frequent in Louisiana.
FORTESCUE     French
Means 'strong shield' from French elements fort meaning "strong" and escu meaning "shield#
FOUCHE     French
"people army"
FOUQUEREAU     French (Quebec)
Jean Fouquereau was born on November 6, 1617, in Anjou, Isère, France, his father, Louis, was 23 and his mother, Catherine, was 20. He married Renee Bataille on December 31, 1639, in Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France... [more]
FOY     French
From a medieval nickname based on Old French foi "faith", applied either to a notably pious person or to one who frequently used the word as an oath; also, from the medieval French female personal name Foy, from Old French foi "faith".
FRAIN     French
Topographic name for someone who lived near a prominent ash tree from Old French fraisne fresne "ash" from Latin fraxinus "ash".
FRANCE     French
Ethnic name for an inhabitant of France, a country in Europe.
FRANCOIS     French
Last name of the given name Francois
FRAY     English, French, Norwegian
Meaning "peace" or "brother," descended from the French term "Frere" in turn descended from the name of ancient Norse deity Frey, the deity of peace and prosperity.
FREER     French
Dutch spelling of Frere (brother); another variant spelling is Frear.
GAGNEAU     French
Variation of Gagne.
GAINES     English, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
GALANTE     Italian, French, Jewish
Comes from the ancient French word "galant" meaning someone in love or who has fun. In the case of Mordecai Galante, a Spanish exile in 16th century Rome, his courteous manners won for him from the Roman nobles the surname "Galantuomo" (gentleman), from which Galante was eventually derived.... [more]
GAMELIN     French
From pet form of any of the compound personal names formed with gamal, related to Old Norse gamall, Old German gamel "old", "aged". ... [more]
GARRIGUES     French, Provençal
This surname comes from Old Provençal garrique meaning "grove of holm oaks or kermes oaks."
GASNIER     French
Variant of Garnier.
GAUTIER     French
Variant of Gauthier. In this spelling, the name has been established in both Italy (Turin) and Germany (Brunswick) since about 1700
GAY     English, French
Nickname for a lighthearted or cheerful person, from Middle English, Old French gai.
GAY     English, Norman
Habitational name from places in Normandy called Gaye, from an early proprietor bearing a Germanic personal name cognate with Wade.
GEE     Irish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
GENTRY     French
From the English word, which is in turn from French gentrie, referring to that which is "noble," or the "nobility." From earlier gentillece, which was originally from gentil, "refinement."
GEORGE     English, French, German
Derived from the given name George.
GÉRALD     French
Derived from the given name Gérald.
GERMAN     English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
GERVAIS     English, French
From the French given name Gervais.
GILLARD     English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
GILLETTE     English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
GILLIARD     French, Swiss
French and Swiss French from a derivative of Gillier, from the Germanic personal name Giselher, composed of gisil ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble offspring’ (see Giesel) + heri ‘army’.
GIRAUD     French
from a vernacular form of Gérald (see Gerald).
GIROUD     French
Variant of Giraud.... [more]
GOBER     English, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
GOGNON     French, Occitan
Nickname for an aggressive or belligerent man, from Old French Gagnon ‘ mastiff’, ‘guard dog’. Possibly from Occitan ganhon ‘young pig’, applied as an offensive nickname. See also Gonyeau.
GOMBERT     French, German
French and German: from Gundbert, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements gund ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The name was relatively popular in both France and Germany during the Middle Ages, and was also adopted by Ashkenazic Jews... [more]
GONYEAU     French
Respelling of French Gagnon, found predominantly in New England, possibly also of Gagneau, from a diminutive of Gagne.
GONZE     French
My family surname originated in southern French-speaking Belgium. There is a tiny village called Gonzeville in northern France near the Belgian border which you can find on Wikipedia. Many surnames from French speaking Belgium have 5 or 6 letters and end in -ze, such as Gonze and Meeze... [more]
GOURCUFF     Breton
Variant of Gourkuñv. ... [more]
GOURKUÑV     Breton
Breton combination of gour and kuñv meaning "a charming, affable, gentle or conciliatory man". The digraph -ff was introduced by Middle Ages' authors to indicate a nasalized vowel.
GRANGE     English, French
English and French topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, from Middle English, Old French grange (Latin granica ‘granary’, ‘barn’, from granum ‘grain’)... [more]
GRAS     French
French last name.
GRAVE     French
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of gravelly soil, from Old French grave "gravel" (of Celtic origin).
GRAVES     English, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
GRAVES     French, English
Topographic name from the plural of Old French grave "gravel"
GRAVES     English, French
English: patronymic from Grave.
GREELEY     English, Norman
English (of Norman origin): nickname for someone with a pock-marked face, from Old Northern French greslé ‘pitted’, ‘scarred’ (from gresle ‘hailstone’, of Germanic origin).
GRENIER     French
Occupational name for a grain merchant (from Latin granarius), or a topographic name for someone who lived by a granary (from Latin granarium) or a metonymic occupational name for someone who supervised or owned one.
GRIFFON     French
From a diminutive of Old French griffe "claw", hence a nickname for a grasping or vicious person, or perhaps for someone with a deformed or otherwise remarkable hand.
GRISSOM     Old Norman, Anglo-Saxon, French
Either from Old Norman griss meaning "keeper of pigs" or from French gris meaning "grey". The first known use of the name was Sir Thomas Gresham, the founder of the Royal Exchange and Gresham College.
GROULX     French
French spelling, often found in Canada, of Groult, Grould, possibly reduced forms of Gréoul, a personal name of Germanic origin, composed of the elements gred "hunger" + wolf, wulf "wolf".
GUIDRY     French (Cajun)
From a personal name based on the Germanic root waido ‘hunt’. The name is particularly associated with Cajuns in LA, who seem all to be descended from Claude Guédry dit Grivois, who arrived in Acadia before 1671.... [more]
GUILLAUME     French
Derived from the French personal name Guillaume.
GUILLIOT     French
From a pet form of the personal name Guille, itself a short form of Guillaume.
GUILLOU     French, Breton
Possibly derived from the given name Guillaume.
GUION     French
French: from the Germanic personal name Wido (see Guy).
GUIVARC'H     Breton
Guivarc'h means 'swift stallion' in the Breton language.
GULLETTE     French
Comes from Guillemme or William of Normandy. Reference 1066: The Battle of Hastings.
GUY     English, French
From a French form of the Germanic personal name Wido, which is of uncertain origin. This name was popular among the Normans in the forms Wi, Why as well as in the rest of France in the form Guy.
HAMELIN     French
from the Norse word HAMO meaning home.
HARBOUR     English, French
English: metonymic occupational name for a keeper of a lodging house, from late Old English herebeorg ‘shelter’, ‘lodging’ (from here ‘army’ + beorg ‘shelter’). (The change of -er- to -ar- is a regular phonetic process in Old French and Middle English.... [more]
HARGIER     French
Known back to the 15th or 16th century in France.... [more]
HAROLD     English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans. These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari ‘army’ + wald ‘rule’, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian Tacitus records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of the Batavi, as early as the 1st century ad... [more]
HARRETT     French
France, England
HÄSSLI     German (Swiss), French (Rare)
Swiss German diminutive form of Haas. This is a French surname via Alsace-Lorraine. A notable bearer is French footballer (soccer player) Eric Hassli (1981-).
HAY     English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAZARD     English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
HERBARTH     German, Norman
References Old Norse Deity "Odin" being one of the "Son's of Odin". Remember that the Geats became the Ostrogoths through the Denmark pass--referenced in Beowulf. Or, it means "Warrior of the Bearded One", perhaps a King... [more]
HILBERT     English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HODDSON     French
Variation of the surname, HODSON.
HOLLIER     English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
HOUSEAL     French (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
French (Lorraine) spelling of German Häusel, a topographic name meaning ‘small house’, a diminutive of Haus. ... [more]
HUBERT     German, Dutch, English, French, Jewish
From a Germanic given name composed of the elements hug "heart", "mind", "spirit" and berht "bright", "famous".
HUGO     French
Victor Hugo was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. He was also the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HUMBERT     German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hun "Hun, giant" or hun "bear cub" and berht "bright, famous". This was particularly popular in the Netherlands and North Germany during the Middle Ages as a result of the fame of a 7th-century St... [more]
HUON     Breton
Huon is a form of the name Hugh.
HURRELL     English, Norman
English (of Norman origin) from a derivative of Old French hurer ‘to bristle or ruffle’, ‘to stand on end’ (see Huron).
HUVAL     French (Cajun)
The Huval name has historically been labeled German or Acadian (Cajun), however, recently more information has been discovered that shows the Huvals came directly from France.... [more]
ILES     English (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
IMBERT     French
From the medieval French personal name Imbert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "vast-bright".
ISELLE     French
Frenchified forms of Iseli, a Swiss German variant of Eisele.... [more]
JACQUEMAN     French
Alsace-Lorraine
JARY     French
France-England-USA
JAY     English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French jay(e), gai "jay (the bird)", probably referring to an idle chatterer or a showy person, although the jay was also noted for its thieving habits.
JEAN     French
Derived from the French given name JEAN.
JEAN-BAPTISTE     Haitian Creole, French
From the French given name Jean-Baptiste.
JEANPETIT     French
French translation of Littlejohn.
JETER     French (Huguenot), German
Jeter is a French and German surname. It is the last name of former New York Yankees baseball player, Derek Jeter. It's also the last name of Carmelita Jeter, an American sprinter who specializes in the 100 meter sprint.
JETT     French
Form of Jette
JOB     English, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name Iyov or Job, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
JOLIET     French
17th- century Quebecois explorer Louis Jolliet. He and Father Jacques Marquette were the first to map the Mississippi River. Later, Jolliet's name was misspelled as Joliet, most likely due to the influence of the French word joli or jolie, "handsome/pretty"... [more]
JOLY     French
JOURDINE     French, English
English and French variant of Jordan.
JOY     French (Latinized)
Joy \joy\ as a girl's name is pronounced joy. It is of Old French and Latin origin, and the meaning of Joy is "joy". Used in the Middle Ages, and made popular in the 17th century under the influence of the Puritans, to whom being "joyful in the Lord" was an important duty... [more]
JUILLET     French
Means "July" in French.
JUSTIN     French, English, Slovene
From a medieval personal name, Latin Justinus, a derivative of Justus.
KARTER     Breton
Breton form of Carter. This was the birth surname of Breton-French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557), who is known for discovering the gulf of St. Lawrence.
KERGOAT     Breton, French
From Breton ker "Village" or "Area" and koad "Woods".
KERHERVÉ     Breton
From Breton ker "Village" or "Area" and the name Hervé.
KIPPENBERGER     German, French, Scottish
Mainly means "Shepard".
LABEOUF     French (Cajun)
Meaning unknown. A famous bearer is American actor Shia LaBeouf (1986-present).
LABORDE     French
Occupational or status name for a tenant farmer, from borde "small farm" (from Frankish bord "plank") and the definite article la.
LABRIE     French
Topographic name from l’abri meaning "the shelter", or a habitational name from a place named with this word.
LACOMBE     French
French (western and southwestern): topographic name for someone living in or near a ravine, from la combe ‘the ravine’ (a word of Gaulish origin, related to English Combe).... [more]
LADOUCEUR     French
french canadian
LAFLAMME     French (Quebec)
Means "The Flame" in French.
LAFLÈCHE     French (Quebec)
A French-Canadian secondary surname from "Richer dit Laflèche," used independently since 1746. Laflèche is derived from the French town of La Flèche, in the former province of Anjou.
LA FORGE     French
This is my Grandmother's maiden name
LAGASSE     French
French: nickname from Old French agace, agasse ‘magpie’ + the definite article l’.
LAGRANGE     French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, a variant of Grange, with the definite article la.
LAHAIE     French
Locational name for someone who lived near a hedge or large bush, from old French "La" the and "Haie" hedge.
LALAURIE     French (Cajun)
A French surname meaning "the laurel".
LA LIVERES     French
Means 'the books' in French
LALONDE     French
French (Normandy): habitational name from any of various places in Normandy, so named from Old Norse lundr ‘grove’, with the definite article la.
LAMARCHE     French
French: topographic name or habitational name, a variant of LaMarque.
LAMARRE     French
Habitational name from any of the places in Normandy called La Mare, from Old Northern French mare "pool, pond" (Old Norse marr).
LAMBILLOTTE     French (Modern)
Currently, a common name in Wallonia, Belgium with some descendants in USA. Believed to be derived from three terms..."lamb" "ill" "otte". The first term has remained unchanged from early Germanic term; the second is latin for "of the" and the third a dimiuative or feminine form suffix... [more]
LAMONT     Scottish (Modern), Northern Irish, French
Scottish and northern Irish: from the medieval personal name Lagman, which is from Old Norse Logmaðr, composed of log, plural of lag ‘law’ (from leggja ‘to lay down’) + maðr, ‘man’ (genitive manns).... [more]
L'AMOREAUX     French
French surname meaning "The Lovers"
LANDE     French, Norwegian, Jewish
French: topographic name for someone living on a heath, lande (from Gaulish landa ‘space’, ‘land’), or a habitational name from any of numerous minor places named La Lande from this word.... [more]
LANDRY     French, English
From the Germanic personal name Landric, a compound of land "land" and ric "powerful, ruler".
LANSDOWNE     French, English
The first marquis lansdowne, land owners for there lords and farmers also know as tenants.
LAPIN     French
Means "Rabbit" in French.
LAPORTE     French
Topographic name for someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town (and often was in charge of them; thus in part a metonymic occupational name), from Old French porte "gateway", "entrance" (from Latin porta, "door", "entrance"), with the definite article la... [more]
LARIVIÈRE     French (Modern)
From the region of Bourgoigne, in France, meaning 'the river'. The name is likely a topographic reference to the physical location, likely a river in this case.
LASALLE     French
1. French: local name or occupational name for someone who lived or worked at a manor house, from Old French sal(e) ‘hall’ (modern French salle; see also Sale), with the definite article la. ... [more]
LAURENCE     English, French
From the given name Laurence.
LAVEAU     French (Cajun)
A Cajun surname meaning "the calf".
LAVELLE     French
From Old French val "valley".... [more]
LAVERDIÈRE     French
Habitational name from various places named La Verdière in France, or a variant of the name Leverdier (see VERDIER).
LAVERDURE     French
From the French place name La Verdure meaning "greenness, greenery".
LAVIOLETTE     French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
A secondary surname, associated with some forty family names in Canada and also used independently since 1698, a nickname from the flower violette ‘violet’, with the definite article la. In feudal France it was a name given to soldiers and domestic servants.
LECHAT     French
Means "The Cat" in French.
LEDGER     English, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’. The name was borne by a 7th-century bishop of Autun, whose fame contributed to the popularity of the name in France... [more]
LEFRANÇOIS     French, French (Quebec)
Derived from the given name François.
LE HOUÉROU     Breton
Derived from Breton c'hwerv "bitter".
LEIX     French
LELOUP     French
Means “the wolf” in French.
LE MAISTRE     French
From French meaning 'master'
LEMERCIER     French
French surname designating a vendor of sewing materials, from the word mercier.
LEMOINE     French, French (Quebec)
Means "The Monk" in French. Lemoine is also an English given name derived from this surname.
LENOIR     French
French surname which was originally a nickname for a person with dark hair or skin, derived from noir "black" combined with the definite article le.
LÉOTARD     French
From the given name Leopold. Jules Léotard was an acrobat who popularized the leotard, a gymnastics garment. The garment is named after him.
LE PEN     Breton
Le Pen is a Breton surname meaning "the head", "the chief" or "the peninsula".
LE ROUX     French
Nickname for a person with red hair, from Old French rous "red." Variant spelling of Leroux.
LESUEUR     French
Occupational surname for a shoemaker, cobbler, or rarely a tailor; derived from Old French sueur "one who sews" (from Latin sutor).
LE TALLEC     Breton
Tallec derives from talek which means someone with a large forehead in Breton.
LETOURNEAU     French
From Old French estournel 'starling'.... [more]
LEVA     Bulgarian (Rare), Czech (Rare), French (Rare), Jewish (Rare)
From the Hebrew given name Lev, meaning Lion. It is also the name of the currency in Bulgaria, and a verb in French meaning to lever or to lift.
LEVAN     French, English
Comes from le vent, meaning "the wind."
LEVASSEUR     French
Status name from Old French vasseor, a short form of vavasour, a term of the feudal system for a tenant ranking immediately below a baron. Such a tenant would have been a prosperous man, and the surname may have been used for someone in his service more often than for the man himself... [more]
LEVER     French, English
Nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from Old French levre ‘hare’ (Latin lepus, genitive leporis). It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a hunter of hares... [more]
LEVIN     Jewish, Lithuanian, Belarusian, German, Russian, French (Quebec, Anglicized), Various
As a Lithuanian Jewish and Belarusian Jewish name, it is a Slavicized form of Levy. As a German and German Jewish name, it is derived from the given name Levin. As a Jewish name, it can also be related to Loewe... [more]
LEVY     English, French, Jewish
There are three possible sources of this surname. ... [more]
LINCOURT     French (Quebec)
Possibly a habitational name.
LISLE     Norman, English, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: variant spelling of Lyle.
LOISEAU     French
Means "The Bird" in French.
LORAIN     French
Occupational name for a saddler, derived from the Old French word lorain, meaning "a leather strap used on a horse's breastplate".
LORANG     French
Surname of uncertain origin. Might be derived from:... [more]
LORD     French
Nickname from Old French l'ord "the dirty one".
LOUIS     English, French, Greek (Rare), Dutch
From the given name Louis. In Greece, it is known for Spyridon Louis.
LUPIN     French
Lupin is a variant on the Latin word "lupus", meaning "wolf". Two important literary characters, Arsène Lupin, the famous French gentleman-burglar, and Professor Remus Lupin, from the world of Harry Potter, have this name... [more]
LUXENBERG     German, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
LY     French (?)
Meaning unknown. Probabily a rare,europenized spelling of Lee or Li.
LYÉ     French
A habitational name from places named Lié located in Deux-Sèvres and Vendée.
MACE     English, French
English: from a medieval personal name, a survival of Old English Mæssa, which came to be taken as a pet form of Matthew.... [more]
MACK     Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus). Shortened form of any of the many Scottish and Irish names beginning M(a)c-.... [more]
MACON     French, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères. ... [more]
MAFFRET     French
beleived to originated in{ NICE, france} in the late 19th century, emmigration from france to london,{stepney}, where the surname was mistakenly added an extra letter "T" resulting in the surname MAFFRETT
MAIN     Scottish, English, French, Norman
Various origins explained include:... [more]
MAINE     French
French topographic name from Old French maine ‘dwelling’, ‘residence’, ‘abode’, or a habitational name from any of numerous places so named.
MAISON     French
Means "house" in French.
MALECUIT     French
Means "doughy," "soggy," or "undercooked" in French.
MALFAIT     French
Derived from French mal fait, which literally means "poorly done, badly done". In the context of the surname, it refers to the first bearer being "malformed" or "deformed" (as it was in the eyes of people from older times), which means that he either was physically disabled or able-bodied but with a physical trait that deviated from the norm.
MALFOY     French
Malfoy is a French name roughly translating to "bad faith"
MALIN     English, French, Dutch
From the given name Malin (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
MALPASS     English, Scottish, French
Habitational name from any of various places named Malpas, because of the difficulty of the terrain, from Old French mal pas "bad passage" (Latin malus passus). It is a common French minor place name, and places in Cheshire, Cornwall, Gwent, and elsewhere in England were given this name by Norman settlers... [more]
MANSELL     English (Canadian), Norman
Of Norman origin, a habitational or regional name from Old French mansel ‘inhabitant of Le Mans or the surrounding area of Maine’. The place was originally named in Latin (ad) Ceromannos, from the name of the Gaulish tribe living there, the Ceromanni... [more]
MANSELL     Anglo-Norman, French
A status name for a particular type of feudal tenant, Anglo-Norman French mansel, one who occupied a manse (Late Latin mansa ‘dwelling’), a measure of land sufficient to support one family... [more]
MANUEL     Spanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
MARC     French
Derived from the French given name Marc.
MARCEAU     French
From the given name Marcellus.
MARCELIN     Haitian Creole, French
From the given name Marcelin.
MARRIOTT     English, French
Derived from Mary.
MARTELLE     English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
MARTINEAU     French
Used in Western France. From a pet form of Martin.
MARTINET     French
From a pet form of the personal name Martin.
MARY     French
Habitational name from places in Saône-et-Loire, Seine-et-Marne, and Nièvre, named in Latin as Mariacum meaning "estate of Marius".
MASEY     English, Scottish, French, Norman
English and Scottish (of Norman origin) and French: habitational name from any of various places in northern France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Maccius + the locative suffix -acum.... [more]
MASSE     English, French, Dutch
English: variant of Mace ... [more]
MATHENY     French (Anglicized)
Of French origin. According to Matheny family tradition, this surname comes from the name of a village in France named Mathenay. This may also have been a French Huguenot surname.
MATHIAS     French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
MATURIN     French
From the French male personal name Maturin, from Latin Mātūrīnus, a derivative of Mātūrus, literally "timely". It was borne by the Irish "Gothic" novelist Charles Maturin (1782-1824).
MAURICE     English, French
This surname is taken from a given name which is derived from the Roman name Mauritius, a derivative of Maurus.
MAXIME     French
From the French given name Maxime.
MAYNE     Scottish, English, Irish, French
Scottish and English variant spelling of Main.
MAYNE     French
French variant of Maine.
MAYSONET     Provençal
Mason,Mason "Deriving from the Old French word machun, which meant 'stone cutter.' Inferring the original bearer of the name worked in stone or mason."
MAZARIN     French
French form of Italian Mazzarino.
MÉE     French
French habitational name from places called (Le) Mée in Mayenne, Eure-et-Loir, and Seine-et-Marne, derived from Old French me(i)s ‘farmstead’ (Latin mansus).
MENEZ     Breton
Menez means mount or mountain in Breton.
MESSIAEN     Dutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
MEUNIER     French
French word for "miller."
MÉZEC     Breton
Mézec derives from mezeg which means physician in Breton
MICHELET     French (Latinized, Rare)
Its name comes from the name Michael, the angel.
MICKLEY     French
It originated when an immigrant family named Michelet came to New York from Northern France. Because they had a foreign surname, they made up the names Mickley and Michelin. The originator was Jean Jacques Michelet (John Jacob Mickley), a private in the Revolutionary War... [more]
MINOR     English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
MONTAGNE     French
Possibly connected to the Irish and or English surname "Manton" as a result of the historical Norman invasions of Ireland and England.
MONTAGNET     French, Basque
Meaning "mountains," this name is commonly found in the Basque Pyrenees.
MONTEBLANCO     French, Spanish
Originally from France "Mont Blanc" but translated when arrived in Spain.
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