French Submitted Surnames

French names are used in France and other French-speaking regions. See also about French names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
MANSELLEnglish (Canadian), Norman
Of Norman origin, a habitational or regional name from Old French mansel ‘inhabitant of Le Mans or the surrounding area of Maine’. The place was originally named in Latin (ad) Ceromannos, from the name of the Gaulish tribe living there, the Ceromanni... [more]
MANSELLAnglo-Norman, French
A status name for a particular type of feudal tenant, Anglo-Norman French mansel, one who occupied a manse (Late Latin mansa ‘dwelling’), a measure of land sufficient to support one family... [more]
MANUELSpanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
MARCFrench
Derived from the French given name Marc.
MARCEAUFrench
From the given name Marcellus.
MARCHANTFrench, English, Spanish
Variant of Marchand, from French marchand meaning "merchant, mercantile". Though it is of French origin, it was transferred into the Spanish-speaking world, especially Chile, by French invasion of the Iberian Peninsula.
MARTELLEEnglish, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
MARTINEAUFrench
Used in Western France. From a pet form of Martin.
MARTINETFrench
From a pet form of the personal name Martin.
MARYFrench
Habitational name from places in Saône-et-Loire, Seine-et-Marne, and Nièvre, named in Latin as Mariacum meaning "estate of Marius".
MASEYEnglish, Scottish, French, Norman
English and Scottish (of Norman origin) and French: habitational name from any of various places in northern France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Maccius + the locative suffix -acum.... [more]
MASSEEnglish, French, Dutch
English: variant of Mace ... [more]
MATHENYFrench (Anglicized)
Of French origin. According to Matheny family tradition, this surname comes from the name of a village in France named Mathenay. This may also have been a French Huguenot surname.
MATHIASFrench, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
MATURINFrench
From the French male personal name Maturin, from Latin Mātūrīnus, a derivative of Mātūrus, literally "timely". It was borne by the Irish "Gothic" novelist Charles Maturin (1782-1824).
MAURICEEnglish, French
This surname is taken from a given name which is derived from the Roman name Mauritius, a derivative of Maurus.
MAXIMEFrench
From the French given name Maxime.
MAYNEScottish, English, Irish, French
Scottish and English variant spelling of Main.
MAYNEFrench
French variant of Maine.
MAYSONETProvençal
Mason,Mason "Deriving from the Old French word machun, which meant 'stone cutter.' Inferring the original bearer of the name worked in stone or mason."
MAZARINFrench
French form of Italian Mazzarino.
MÉEFrench
French habitational name from places called (Le) Mée in Mayenne, Eure-et-Loir, and Seine-et-Marne, derived from Old French me(i)s ‘farmstead’ (Latin mansus).
MENEZBreton
Menez means mount or mountain in Breton.
MESSIAENDutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
MEUNIERFrench
French word for "miller."
MÉZECBreton
Mézec derives from mezeg which means physician in Breton
MICHELETFrench (Latinized, Rare)
Its name comes from the name Michael, the angel.
MICKLEYFrench
It originated when an immigrant family named Michelet came to New York from Northern France. Because they had a foreign surname, they made up the names Mickley and Michelin. The originator was Jean Jacques Michelet (John Jacob Mickley), a private in the Revolutionary War... [more]
MINOREnglish, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
MONNIERFrench
It means Miller, someone operating a mill; from "meunier" or "mounier" in Old French.
MONTAGNEFrench
Possibly connected to the Irish and or English surname "Manton" as a result of the historical Norman invasions of Ireland and England.
MONTAGNETFrench, Basque
Meaning "mountains," this name is commonly found in the Basque Pyrenees.
MONTEBLANCOFrench, Spanish
Originally from France "Mont Blanc" but translated when arrived in Spain.
MORALEEEnglish, French
First found in Norfolk where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings.
MOTELFrench
Topographic name from a derivative of Old French motte ‘fortified stronghold’.
MULLINIXFrench
A locational name "of de Moloneaux" probably from the noble family who trace their descent from William the Conqueror, from Molineaux-sur-Seine, near Rouen. The name came to England during the wake of the Norman Conquest... [more]
NADEAUFrench
Variant of Nadal, which can be a name or the meaning "Christmas".... [more]
NAVARREFrench
The name means "By the sea". Originally a country of its own, located between Spain and France, Navarre became a part of France in 1284 when the Queen of Navarre married King Philip IV of France. After much war, becoming independent once again, and falling into Spanish rule, the Kingdom of Navarre is now split between Spain and France.
NAVARROSpanish, French, English
Describes a former member of the ancient kingdom of Navarre. Possibly means 'the treeless country' or 'the country above the trees'
NEUGERGerman, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
NICOLAYGerman, French
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay. This is the name of a French family of nobility.
NICOLINFrench
From the given name Nicolas.
NOBLEEnglish, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
NOËLFrench
Means "Christmas".
NOIRFrench
Means "black" in French, originally used in Northern France as an ethnic nickname for someone from Southern France, Spain, Italy or North Africa. It also may have been used for someone who wore dark clothing or for someone who had an occupation during the night or was associated with the night.
NOISETTEFrench
This is a French surname meaning "hazelnut".
NOLANDIrish, French
Irish: variant of Nolan.... [more]
NOONSFrench
From the Portuguese name Nunes.
NORMANDFrench
Means North Man, meaning vikings
OCTOBREFrench
Means "October" in French.
ODELINFrench
Not to be confused with the similarly spelled ODELÍN, which is Spanish rather than French, though they could have similar origins in name.
ODIGEFrench, African
A Name from french Odige (O.DI Zeouf) zeouf with means egg Zeouf is spelled as ge to shorten the name. This surname means fighter The French has been known to be Lovely and the language of love un-violent... [more]
ONFROYFrench
From a form of the given name Humphrey.
ORLEANSFrench
From France. Middle ages??
OUELLETTEFrench (Quebec)
Canadian spelling of French (Norman and Champenois) Ouilet, from a Frenchified form of Willet, a pet form of William.
PACKARDEnglish, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PADGETTFrench
In French the meaning of the name Padgett is: Attendant
PAQUETTEFrench
From the personal name Paquet, a pet form of Pascal.
PARAMOREFrench (Rare)
origin is unknown but the meaning of the name is lover used in France and England
PARROTFrench
Form of Pierone.... [more]
PARSLEYMedieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
PÊCHEURFrench
French for "fisher."
PELKEYFrench (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surnames Peltier and Pelltier.
PELLEFrench
Nickname for a bald man, from Old French pelé, from Latin depilatus " "stripped (of hair)".
PELTIERFrench
Variant of Pelletier (from Old French pellet, a diminutive of pel "skin, hide").
PÉPINFrench
From the Old French name Pepis, itself a form of the given name Pépin. Alternatively, it may be derived from French pépin meaning "(fruit) seed", thus making it an occupational name for a gardener or someone who grew fruit-bearing trees.
PERDUEEnglish, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
PEREIREBreton (Latinized, Archaic)
This surname is the Gallic (Gaulish) origin and it means wild pear tree. There are also similar spellig in the Iberian Peninsula such as Pereiro, Pereyro, Pereiros, Perero and Pereros. These surnames (last names) correspond to families of the Celtiberian culture.
PERESSBreton (Latinized, Rare, Archaic)
It means Son of Peter (Pedro).
PEYRONFrench
Unknown meaning. French surname. Famous bearer of this name is Bruno Peyron and the German princess Louise Peyron (1918-1989).... [more]
PHÉNIXFrench (Quebec)
French Canadian variant of Phoenix.
PHENIXFrench (Quebec, Anglicized)
Either (i) an anglicization of French Canadian Phénix, literally "phoenix", probably originally a nickname of now lost import; or (ii) a different form of Fenwick.
PICARDFrench
Picard is the name given to a person from Picardy, a historical region and cultural area of France. The Star Trek: Next Generation Jean-Luc Picard has this name.
PIEDNOELFrench
Modern (and also more common) form of Piénoel.
PIÉNOELFrench (Rare)
French surname that possibly refers to the buckled shoes that the original bearer was wearing, in which case it is derived from Old French pié meaning "foot" combined with Old French noiel meaning "buckle"... [more]
PILLOTFrench
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from Middle French pilot or pillot both meaning "stake, pole". This is the name of a wealthy merchant family from Besançon, France.
PITTLERFrench
A surname which originally belonged to a person who lived by a pit or hollow. Meaning "King of the Pit" or "King of the Hollow".
PLATTEFrench
From Old French plat, meaning "flat."
PLIMSOLLFrench (Acadian)
I don't know the meaning, but it is my maiden name, and I understand it to be French. Samuel Plimsoll is my ancestor. He was born in Bristol, UK. He was an MP who spoke up in parliament and subsequently the Plimsoll or loading line was introduced on ships... [more]
POIROTFrench, Literature
A French occupational name referring to a merchant who sells pears (poire). Used by Agatha Christie for her Belgian private detective Hercule Poirot, but she came up with the name by combining the surnames Poiret and Popeau, the names of two contemporary fictional detectives.
POISSONFrench
Poisson is the French word for fish, and was given to one who was a fishmonger, fisherman, or could be a nickname for one who had the appearance similar to a fish.
POLANDEnglish, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
POLEYFrench, German, Jewish
French: variant of Polet, Paulet, pet forms of Paul.... [more]
POMPEYFrench, English
Variant of Italian POMPEI.
PONTIFFFrench
Means "bridge builder". Comes from the French word pont, which means bridge. ... [more]
POPUCHETFrench
Wise and classy
PORTUGALSpanish, Portuguese, English, Catalan, French, Jewish
Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, French, and Jewish surname meaning ethnic name or regional name for someone from Portugal or who had connections with Portugal. The name of the country derives from Late Latin Portucale, originally denoting the district around Oporto (Portus Cales, named with Latin portus ‘port’, ‘harbor’ + Cales, the ancient name of the city)... [more]
POSEYEnglish, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
POTEETEnglish, French
From the French name Pottet, which is derived from pot meaning "pot", originally a name for a potter.
POTTIERFrench
A variant of the french word for potter, potier.... [more]
PREVOSTFrench, English
Derived from Old French prevost meaning "provost" (ultimately from Latin praepositus, the past participle of praeponere meaning "to place in charge") which is a status name for any of the various officials in a position of responsibility.
PREVOTFrench
A prevot was a govenment position during the Ancient Régime
PRIMEAUFrench
First found in Burgundy France.
PRINCEEnglish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
PRIVETTFrench, English, Welsh (?)
French, from the given name Privat (see PRIVATUS). Also an English habitational name from a place so named in Hampshire, derived from Old English pryfet "privet".
PROPHETEnglish, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
PROUSTFrench
Variant of the French nickname Preaux meaning "wise, worthy, valiant". A famous bearer is Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust--simply known as Marcel Proust--(1871-1922), a French author.
PROVENCHERFrench
From the French word for the flower periwinkle. (pervenche) Brought to Canada from France in 1660 by Sebastien Provencher.
PROVOSTEnglish, French
Derived from the Middle English provost; referring to the person who heads a religious chapter in a cathedral or educational establishment. It was also used as a nickname for a self-important person and is a French variant of Prevost.
PRUDHOMMEFrench, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
PRUEEnglish, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
PRUITTEnglish, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
PULVERLow German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
PUSEYFrench
Habitational name form Pusey in Haute-Saône, so named from a Gallo-Roman personal name, Pusius, + the locative suffix -acum.
RAISONEnglish, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
RAMAGEFrench, Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for a hot-tempered or unpredictable person (from Old French ramage "wild, uncontrollable" (applied to birds of prey)).
RAMBEAUFrench (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Frankish)
Altered spelling of the southern French family name Rambaut, from an Old French personal name, Rainbaut, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave", or alternatively from the Germanic personal name Hrambehrt or Hrambald, composed of the elements hramn "crow" & berht "bright" or bald "bold", "brave".
RANCOURTFrench (Quebec)
Habitational name from places in France named Rancourt.
RANDELFrench, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Rando, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element. Compare Randall.... [more]
RANGEGerman, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
RANGEREnglish, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
RAVENELEnglish, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
RAYMONDEnglish, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
REISSGerman, Jewish, French (Huguenot)
German: variant of Reis or from any of several Germanic personal names composed with ric ‘power(ful)’. Also from the French Huguenot forename Ris, rendered as Reis and Reiss.... [more]
RENAUDINFrench
From the given name Renaud.
REVEREEnglish, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
RHINEGerman, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RICHEEnglish, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RITCHINGSFrench, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
RIVESFrench, Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from the Yiddish female personal name Rive a back-formation from Rivke (see Rifkin).... [more]
RIVETFrench, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
RIVETTEnglish, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
RIVIEREFrench, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
Possibly from the French word meaning "river"
ROBERTINFrench (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robertin, which was a diminutive of the given name Robert.
ROBICHAUXFrench
An altered spelling of Robichon or Roubichou, pet forms of Robert.
ROBINScottish, English, French, German
From the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert, composed of the short form Rob and the hypocoristic suffix -in.
ROBINETFrench
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Robin.... [more]
ROCKETTFrench
From the French "la roche," or "of the rock." Some family histories trace this back to French Hugenots (sp) who immigrated to England in the 1500's from the Normandy region of France.
ROGERScottish, English, North German, French, Catalan
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hrōd "renown" and gār, gēr "spear, lance", which was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Rog(i)er... [more]
ROLANDFrench, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare Rowland).... [more]
ROMANCatalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belorussian
From the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
ROSIERFrench
French for "rose tree" or "rose bush". A common surname in Francophone areas. It is also the name of a fallen angel who was considered the patron demon of tainted love and seduction.
ROSSEAUFrench, American
Variant spelling of Rousseau. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
ROSSIGNOLFrench
Means "nightingale" or "picklock" in French.
ROUGEFrench
Nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
ROUGEAUFrench
Diminutive of Rouge, a nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
ROZELLEFrench
Beautiful flower from France brought over by an immigrant named Page Rozelle. People said when she said something nice or touched you, good luck would come to you.
RUELASFrench
A last name common in Mexico which is believed to have derived from the French word ruelle (or Portuguese word ruela) meaning lane or alley.
RUNDLETTFrench
this is a french word for little wine barrels.
SABAFrench, Occitan
Nickname from a variant of Occitan sabe meaning "tasty, flavorsome". Compare Sabourin.
SABATFrench
Nickname for a noisy, rowdy person, from Middle French sab(b)at "noise", "racket".
SABOURINFrench
Nickname for a pleasant or amiable person, from a diminutive of sabor meaning "flavor", "taste" (Old French saveur). The name Sabourin was introduced to England through Huguenot immigration, and from there it may have been brought to North America.
SAINTEnglish, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
SALAÜNBreton, French
Form of the given name Solomon.
SALEEnglish, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
SANTERREFrench
Habitational name from a place to the southeast of the Somme river, named with Latin sana terra "healthy, wholesome land".
SARAZENFrench
From a medieval French nickname for a swarthy person, or for someone who had gone on a Crusade (from Old French sarrazin "Saracen"). It was borne by American golfer Gene Sarazen (1902-99), original name Eugene Saraceni.
SARDEnglish, French, Spanish, Italian
In the book "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary by Henry Harrison and Gyda (Pulling) Harrison 1912 - Reprinted 1996.... The Sard surname (which has been in England, Italy and Europe for a long time) is defined thus on page 136...... [more]
SARTAINFrench
Means, "Tailor".
SAULNIERFrench
In Middle French (the form of French spoken from 1340 to 1610), it literally means "salt merchant".
SAVARDFrench (Quebec)
Derived from the Old French word savart meaning "wasteland". It is also formed from the etymological elements sav and hard ('hard' meaning "strong"). Notable bearers are Serge and Denis Savard; both Canadian ice hockey players.
SEBERTGerman, French
From a German personal name composed of the elements sigi meaning "victory" + berht meaning "bright", "famous".
SERREFrench
Means 'greenhouse' in French.
SÉVIGNYFrench
A kind of bush.
SINCLAIRFrench
Derived from a Norman French place name meaning "Saint Claire".
SIVELLEFrench
A rare surname.
SOLITAIREFrench
the card game
SOULEEnglish, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
SOULIERFrench
Metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker, from Old French soulier ‘shoe’, ‘sandal’.... [more]
SOVEREIGNFrench
Translation of the French surname Souverain which is derived from Old French souverain meaning "high place".
SOYERFrench
French surname (Alexis Benoist Soyer is a famous bearer).
ST CLAIRFrench, English
From the place name St CLAIR
STLOUISFrench
Habitational name from any of several places named with a religious dedication to a St. Louis.
TAILLEURFrench
French for "tailor."
TALBERTEnglish, French
From a continental Germanic personal name composed of the elements tal "valley" and berth "bright".
TALBOTEnglish, Norman
Disputed origin, but likely from a Germanic given name composed of the elements tal "to destroy" and bod "message". In this form the name is also found in France, taken there apparently by English immigrants; the usual French form is Talbert.
TALCOTTEnglish, Norman
Norman habitational name from Taillecourt in France.... [more]
TALLANTEnglish (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
TALLONEnglish, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
TANGUAYFrench, English
From a personal name, a contraction of Tanneguy, from Breton tan meaning 'fire', and ki meaning 'dog', which was the name of a 6-th century Christian saint associated with Paul Aurelian.
TAPONFrench
From the old French word tapon, meaning "cork". Hence this surname was first given to corks makers.
TEBOWDutch, Belgian, French
From the Old French personal name Teobaud, Tibaut (see Theobald).
TEMPLEEnglish, French
Occupational name or habitational name for someone who was employed at or lived near one of the houses ("temples") maintained by the Knights Templar, a crusading order so named because they claimed to occupy in Jerusalem the site of the old temple (Middle English, Old French temple, Latin templum)... [more]
TEMPLINFrench
Possibly from a French diminutive of Temple.
TERRIENFrench
Topographic name from an adjectival derivative of terre "land", denoting someone who lived and worked on the land, i.e. a peasant. It is Americanized frequently as Landers, and occasionally as Farmer.
TETRAULTFrench
French, Franko-American
TETREAULTFrench
Ultimately derived from French tistre "to weave".
THERIAULTFrench (Rare)
Possibly from the Greek "therion" which means a beast of a nondescript nature.
THEROUXFrench (Quebec)
Southern French (Théroux): of uncertain origin; perhaps a topographic name for someone living by "the wells", from a plural variant of Occitan théron "well".
TISSERANDFrench
French for "weaver."
TONNELIERFrench
French for "cooper."
TOURVILLEFrench
The name Tourville is a very old, and in one case, very famous name. One of the Marshall's of France was named Anne Hilarion de Cotentin de Tourville. This reads: Anne Hilarion of/from Cotentin, Comte (Count) of Tourville... [more]
TOUSSAINTFrench
Derived from the given name Toussaint, which in turn is derived from Toussaint, the French name for the Christian feast day All Saints' Day (celebrated on November 1st every year). The French name for the feast day is a contraction of French tous les saints meaning "all (of) the saints".... [more]
TOWERSFrench
1. Variant of Tower, with later -s. ... [more]
TRAYLORFrench
Assumed to mean "by the trail". May have originally been "Trouillart". Variations may include: Trail Traill Treil Trelly Teign Pentrail
TROYIrish, English, German, Jewish, French, Dutch
As an Irish surname, it is a reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Troighthigh, meaning ‘descendant of Troightheach’.... [more]
TRUDEAUFrench (Quebec)
From a pet form of the personal name Thouroude or Gertrude.
TRUMBOFrench, German
French (Alsatian) form of German Trumbauer.
TURBEFIELDFrench, Norman
The name is a village in Normandy. Is documented in Gloucester Abbey in 1044.
TURNEYEnglish, Norman
Habitational name from places in France called Tournai, Tournay, or Tourny. All named with the pre-Roman personal name TURNUS and the locative suffix -acum.
URBANEnglish, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Hungarian, Jewish
From a medieval personal name (Latin Urbanus meaning "city dweller", a derivative of urbs meaning "town", "city").
VADEBONCOEURFrench
Secondary surname, common among soldiers, which has been adopted as a principal surname; it means "Go with a merry heart".
VAILLANCOURTFrench (Quebec)
Possibly a variant of Valencourt. This is the surname of a noble family who probably lived near Willencourt.
VAILLANTFrench
From a medieval nickname for a brave person (from Old French vaillant "brave, sturdy").
VALSpanish, French
It means valley. It comes from Britain and then moved to Aragón (Spain).
VALMONTEnglish, French
Means "Hill of the vale"
VANGARDEFrench
"(A soldier) in the leading edge of an army formation"
VAUXFrench
French, English, and Scottish habitational name from any of various places in northern France called Vaux, from the Old French plural of val ‘valley’.
VERDIERFrench, Norman, English
Occupational name for a forester. Derived from Old French verdier (from Late Latin viridarius, a derivative of viridis "green"). Also an occupational name for someone working in a garden or orchard, or a topographic name for someone living near one... [more]
VERDONFrench
Habitational name from a place so named, for example in Dordogne, Gironde, and Marne.
VERGANFrench (Huguenot)
Family history states that original name was "du Vergau" French Huguenot chased from France to Germany.
VERNEFrench, English
As a French surname refers to someone who lived where alder trees grew. While the English version can mean someone who lived where ferns grew, Verne can also mean a seller of ferns which in medieval times were used in bedding, as floor coverings and as animal feed.
VERNEYEnglish, French
The surname Verney was first found in Buckinghamshire, England, when they arrived from Vernai, a parish in the arrondissement of Bayeux in Normandy.
VERNIERFrench
Surname for a person who lived near an alder tree. Also a variant of Garnier and Varnier and the eastern French form of Warner.
VERRETFrench
From the French word verre, meaning "glass." Possibly denoting someone who worked with glass.
VICKERYFrench (Huguenot, Anglicized)
La Vache = having to do with cows, cow fields, cow pastures, cow barns; French Language. ... [more]
VIDRINEFrench (Cajun)
Vidrines are French Cajuns that live mostly around south central Louisiana, towns and cities like Mamou, Eunice and Ville Platte.
VILLEINFrench
"Used in medieval England and France. Villein is another term used for the serfs in the lowest classes of the feudal system."
VIOLETTEFrench
Perhaps a topographic name from a diminutive of viol "path", itself a derivative of vie "way". It is more likely, however, that this name is from the secondary surname Laviolette "the violet (flower)", which was common among soldiers in French Canada.
VIRAYOccitan, French, Catalan
Southern French (Occitan) and Catalan variant of Occitan Verai and Veray, nickname from Occitan verai ‘honest’. From southern France this name spread to northern Catalonia.
VIVIERFrench
Derived from Latin vivarium, ultimately from Latin vivus "alive". This name is locational relating to living near a fish pond.