French Submitted Surnames

French names are used in France and other French-speaking regions. See also about French names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
RAISON English, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
RAMAGE French, Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for a hot-tempered or unpredictable person (from Old French ramage "wild, uncontrollable" (applied to birds of prey)).
RAMBEAU French (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Frankish)
Altered spelling of the southern French family name Rambaut, from an Old French personal name, RAINBAUT, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave", or alternatively from the Germanic personal name Hrambehrt or Hrambald, composed of the elements hramn "crow" & berht "bright" or bald "bold", "brave".
RANCOURT French (Quebec)
Habitational name from places in France named Rancourt.
RANDEL French, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name RANDO, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element. Compare RANDALL.... [more]
RANGE German, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
RANGER English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
RAVENEL English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
RAYMOND English, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
RÉAL French
This can derive from several different sources: southern French réal "royal", a word which was applied to someone either as a nickname (presumably given to people perceived as being regal) or as an occupational name (given to a person in the service of the king); or the French place name Réal, in which case this is a habitational name taken from any of various places which were named for having been part of a royal domain (also compare Reau, Reaux).
REISS German, Jewish, French (Huguenot)
German: variant of REIS or from any of several Germanic personal names composed with ric ‘power(ful)’. Also from the French Huguenot forename RIS, rendered as REIS and REISS.... [more]
RENAUDIN French
From the given name RENAUD.
REVERE English, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
RHINE German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see RHEIN). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RHOTON German, French
Rhoton is a German and French surname from the 1800s. Some people believe that it is derived from the French word for red, but the origin is overall unknown. The name represents strength and power.
RICHE English, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RIS French (Huguenot)
Surname of unknown meaning.
RITCHINGS French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
RIVES French, Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from the Yiddish female personal name RIVE a back-formation from RIVKE (see Rifkin).... [more]
RIVET French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see RIVES).... [more]
RIVETT English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
RIVIERE French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
Possibly from the French word meaning "river"
ROBBEN French, Dutch
It is a French surname that was originally derived from the Germanic name ROBERT, which is composed of the elements hrod, meaning famous, and berht, meaning bright.
ROBERTIN French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robertin, which was a diminutive of the given name ROBERT.
ROBICHAUX French
An altered spelling of ROBICHON or Roubichou, pet forms of ROBERT.
ROBINET French
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name ROBIN.... [more]
ROCHER French
From French roche, meaning "rock'. It indicates a person who worked at a quarry.
ROCKETT French
From the French "la roche," or "of the rock." Some family histories trace this back to French Hugenots (sp) who immigrated to England in the 1500's from the Normandy region of France.
ROCQUEMORE French
Variant of Roquemore.
ROLAND French, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare ROWLAND).... [more]
ROMAN Catalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the Latin personal name ROMANUS, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
ROSIER French
French for "rose tree" or "rose bush". A common surname in Francophone areas. It is also the name of a fallen angel who was considered the patron demon of tainted love and seduction.
ROSSEAU French, American
Variant spelling of ROUSSEAU. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
ROSSIGNOL French
Means "nightingale" or "picklock" in French.
ROUGE French
Nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
ROUGEAU French
Diminutive of Rouge, a nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
ROZELLE French
Beautiful flower from France brought over by an immigrant named Page Rozelle. People said when she said something nice or touched you, good luck would come to you.
RUELAS French
A last name common in Mexico which is believed to have derived from the French word ruelle (or Portuguese word ruela) meaning lane or alley.
RUNDLETT French
this is a french word for little wine barrels.
SABA French, Occitan
Nickname from a variant of Occitan sabe meaning "tasty, flavorsome". Compare SABOURIN.
SABAT French
Nickname for a noisy, rowdy person, from Middle French sab(b)at "noise", "racket".
SABOURIN French (Quebec), French (Huguenot)
Southern French surname, originally a nickname for a pleasant or amiable person, from a diminutive of sabor meaning "flavor, taste" (Old French saveur). The Huguenots brought this surname to England, and from there it may have been introduced to North America.
SAINT English, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
SAINT-JEAN French
Means Saint John in French
SALAÜN Breton, French
Form of the given name SOLOMON.
SALE English, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
SANTERRE French
Habitational name from a place to the southeast of the Somme river, named with Latin sana terra "healthy, wholesome land".
SARAZEN French
From a medieval French nickname for a swarthy person, or for someone who had gone on a Crusade (from Old French sarrazin "Saracen"). It was borne by American golfer Gene Sarazen (1902-99), original name Eugene Saraceni.
SARD English, French, Spanish, Italian
In the book "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary by Henry Harrison and Gyda (Pulling) Harrison 1912 - Reprinted 1996.... The Sard surname (which has been in England, Italy and Europe for a long time) is defined thus on page 136...... [more]
SARTAIN French
Means, "Tailor".
SAULNIER French
In Middle French (the form of French spoken from 1340 to 1610), it literally means "salt merchant".
SAUVE' French
Sauve' from France to Canada. Changed probably due to an "a" and an "o" confusion in cursive. My granfather's was typo-ed on WW II old men's sign up in MA. or RI, USA.
SAVARD French (Quebec)
Derived from the Old French word savart meaning "wasteland". It is also formed from the etymological elements sav and hard ('hard' meaning "strong"). Notable bearers are Serge and Denis Savard; both Canadian ice hockey players.
SEBERT German, French
From a German personal name composed of the elements sigi meaning "victory" + berht meaning "bright", "famous".
SERRE French
Means 'greenhouse' in French.
SEUL French
From Fr. "only, alone"
SÉVIGNY French
A kind of bush.
SIVELLE French
A rare surname.
SOLITAIRE French
the card game
SOULE English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
SOULIER French
Metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker, from Old French soulier ‘shoe’, ‘sandal’.... [more]
SOVEREIGN French
Translation of the French surname Souverain which is derived from Old French souverain meaning "high place".
SOYER French
French surname (Alexis Benoist Soyer is a famous bearer).
ST CLAIR French, English
From the place name St CLAIR
ST-GELAIS French (Quebec)
From the French place name Saint-Gelais which was allegedly named for a 5th-century bishop of Poitiers. The name Gelais is a variant of GÉLASE.
ST GEORGES French
“Saint George.”
ST LOUIS French, English
In honor of Saint Louis.
STLOUIS French
Habitational name from any of several places named with a religious dedication to a St. Louis.
TAILLEUR French
French for "tailor."
TALBERT English, French
From a continental Germanic personal name composed of the elements tal "valley" and berth "bright".
TALBOT English, Norman
Disputed origin, but likely from a Germanic given name composed of the elements tal "to destroy" and bod "message". In this form the name is also found in France, taken there apparently by English immigrants; the usual French form is TALBERT.
TALCOTT English, Norman
Norman habitational name from Taillecourt in France.... [more]
TALLANT English (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
TALLON English, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare TALBOT) or as an independent byname... [more]
TANGUAY French, English
From a personal name, a contraction of Tanneguy, from Breton tan meaning 'fire', and ki meaning 'dog', which was the name of a 6-th century Christian saint associated with Paul Aurelian.
TAPON French
From the old French word tapon, meaning "cork". Hence this surname was first given to corks makers.
TEBOW Dutch, Belgian, French
From the Old French personal name Teobaud, Tibaut (see THEOBALD).
TEMPLE English, French
Occupational name or habitational name for someone who was employed at or lived near one of the houses ("temples") maintained by the Knights Templar, a crusading order so named because they claimed to occupy in Jerusalem the site of the old temple (Middle English, Old French temple, Latin templum)... [more]
TEMPLIN French
Possibly from a French diminutive of TEMPLE.
TERRIEN French
Topographic name from an adjectival derivative of terre "land", denoting someone who lived and worked on the land, i.e. a peasant. It is Americanized frequently as Landers, and occasionally as Farmer.
TETRAULT French
French, Franko-American
TETREAULT French
Ultimately derived from French tistre "to weave".
THERIAULT French (Rare)
Possibly from the Greek "therion" which means a beast of a nondescript nature.
THEROUX French (Quebec)
Southern French (Théroux): of uncertain origin; perhaps a topographic name for someone living by "the wells", from a plural variant of Occitan théron "well".
TISSERAND French
French for "weaver."
TONNELIER French
French for "cooper."
TOURVILLE French
The name Tourville is a very old, and in one case, very famous name. One of the Marshall's of France was named Anne Hilarion de Cotentin de Tourville. This reads: Anne Hilarion of/from Cotentin, Comte (Count) of Tourville... [more]
TOUSSAINT French
Derived from the given name TOUSSAINT, which in turn is derived from Toussaint, the French name for the Christian feast day All Saints' Day (celebrated on November 1st every year). The French name for the feast day is a contraction of French tous les saints meaning "all (of) the saints".... [more]
TOWERS French
1. Variant of Tower, with later -s. ... [more]
TRAYLOR French
Assumed to mean "by the trail". May have originally been "Trouillart". Variations may include: Trail Traill Treil Trelly Teign Pentrail
TROY German, Jewish, French, Dutch
As a German and Jewish surname, it is and Anglicized form of TREU or a similar surname.... [more]
TRUMBO French, German
French (Alsatian) form of German TRUMBAUER.
TURBEFIELD French, Norman
The name is a village in Normandy. Is documented in Gloucester Abbey in 1044.
TURCAT French, French (Quebec)
Means "Turkman"
TURCOTTE Welsh, French
A Welsh and French surname, meaning “tower”.
TURNEY English, Norman
Habitational name from places in France called Tournai, Tournay, or Tourny. All named with the pre-Roman personal name TURNUS and the locative suffix -acum.
URBAN English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Hungarian, Jewish
From a medieval personal name (Latin Urbanus meaning "city dweller", a derivative of urbs meaning "town", "city").
VACHON French
French definition, cattle herder. Vashon English variant. Vaca Spanish.
VADEBONCOEUR French (Quebec)
Means "go with a merry heart" in French. This was a secondary surname, common among soldiers, which has been adopted as a principal surname.
VAILLANCOURT French (Quebec)
Possibly a variant of Valencourt. This is the surname of a noble family who probably lived near Willencourt.
VAILLANT French
From a medieval nickname for a brave person (from Old French vaillant "brave, sturdy").
VAL Spanish, French
It means valley. It comes from Britain and then moved to Aragón (Spain).
VALENTÎN Jèrriais
From the given name VALENTÎN.
VALMONT English, French
Means "Hill of the vale"
VANGARDE French
"(A soldier) in the leading edge of an army formation"
VASSAR French, English
Name indicating the status of "a vassal or serf" in feudal society.
VASSIE French, English
Meaning "playful or merry" for a cheerful person.
VAUX French
French, English, and Scottish habitational name from any of various places in northern France called Vaux, from the Old French plural of val ‘valley’.
VERDIER French, Norman, English
Occupational name for a forester. Derived from Old French verdier (from Late Latin viridarius, a derivative of viridis "green"). Also an occupational name for someone working in a garden or orchard, or a topographic name for someone living near one... [more]
VERDON French
Habitational name from a place so named, for example in Dordogne, Gironde, and Marne.
VERGAN French (Huguenot)
Family history states that original name was "du Vergau" French Huguenot chased from France to Germany.
VERMONT French (French, Rare)
Derived from french, meaning "green mountain" (Vert, "green"; mont, "mountain").
VERNE French, English
As a French surname refers to someone who lived where alder trees grew. While the English version can mean someone who lived where ferns grew, Verne can also mean a seller of ferns which in medieval times were used in bedding, as floor coverings and as animal feed.
VERNEY English, French
The surname Verney was first found in Buckinghamshire, England, when they arrived from Vernai, a parish in the arrondissement of Bayeux in Normandy.
VERNIER French
Surname for a person who lived near an alder tree. Also a variant of Garnier and Varnier and the eastern French form of WARNER.
VERRET French
From the French word verre, meaning "glass." Possibly denoting someone who worked with glass.
VERVILLE French
variant of Vervelle, which Morlet derives from a word denoting the metal keeper or ring through which a bolt is secured.
VICKERY French (Huguenot, Anglicized)
La Vache = having to do with cows, cow fields, cow pastures, cow barns; French Language. ... [more]
VIDRINE French (Cajun)
Vidrines are French Cajuns that live mostly around south central Louisiana, towns and cities like Mamou, Eunice and Ville Platte.
VILLEIN French
"Used in medieval England and France. Villein is another term used for the serfs in the lowest classes of the feudal system."
VIOLETTE French
Perhaps a topographic name from a diminutive of viol "path", itself a derivative of vie "way". It is more likely, however, that this name is from the secondary surname LAVIOLETTE "the violet (flower)", which was common among soldiers in French Canada.
VIRAY Occitan, French, Catalan
Southern French (Occitan) and Catalan variant of Occitan Verai and Veray, nickname from Occitan verai ‘honest’. From southern France this name spread to northern Catalonia.
VIVIER French
Derived from Latin vivarium, ultimately from Latin vivus "alive". This name is locational relating to living near a fish pond.
WEASLEY Norman
Variant of WESLEY... [more]
WELLSPEAK French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Beauparlant.
WOODLOCK Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, WUDLAC, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
XAVIER English, French
Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries.
YATTEAU French (Acadian)
I was always told it was French
ZAY French
Frenchified form of German SEE.
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