German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
CUSTERGerman (Anglicized)
Anglicization of the German surname Köster or Küster, literally "sexton". A famous bearer was George Custer (1839-1876), the American cavalry general. General Custer and his army were defeated and killed by Sioux and Cheyenne forces under Sitting Bull in the Battle of Little Bighorn (1876; also known colloquially as Custer's Last Stand).
CYPHERGerman (Anglicized, Rare)
Fanciful Americanized spelling of German Seifer.
DAHLKEGerman
Eastern German: from a pet form of the Slavic personal names Dalibor or Dalimir, which are both derived from dal- ‘present’, ‘gift’.
DAHMERGerman, Danish
A northern German or Danish habitual name for someone from one of the many places named Dahme in Brandenburg, Holstein, Mecklenburg, or Silesia. A famous bearer of this name was Jeffrey Dahmer, serial killer (1960 - 1993).
DALEIDENGerman, Dutch (Rare)
Habitational name from a place in the Rhineland called Daleiden.
DAMMGerman
From a short form of a personal name containing the Old High German element thank "thanks", "reward".
DAMMGerman, Danish
Topographic name from Middle High German damm "dike".
DANGERSGerman
Patronymic from the personal name Anger. Habitational name for someone from the city of Angers.
DANSERGerman, French, English
German: variant of Danzer. Altered spelling of English Dancer.... [more]
DANZGerman
Derived from a given name, a short form of the name Tandulf, the origins of which are uncertain. (In some cases, however, this surname may have originated as a nickname denoting a person who liked to dance, from the Middle High German word tanz, danz "dance".)
DÄNZERGerman
Occupational name for a professional acrobat or entertainer; variant of Tanzer.
DAUMGerman, Jewish
Nickname for a short person, from Middle High German doum "tap", "plug", or dume, German Daumen "thumb".
DEGRAFFENRIEDGerman, German (Swiss)
Derived from a place in Switzerland. ... [more]
DEHNGerman
the Germanic ethnic name for someone from Denmark
DENNINGERGerman
Habitational name for someone from Denning in Bavaria. Denning is related to Middle Low German denne meaning "wooded vale".
DEPPGerman
Derived from Germanic depp which is a nickname for a joker (person who plays jokes on others). A notable bearer is Johnny Depp, an American actor.
DEPPEGerman
Variant spelling of Depp.
DERHODESGerman
We think this is German or maybe French
DEUTCHGerman (Rare), Jewish (Rare)
"German". Used as a last name for those who had none in the 17-18th century. Continues to today, albeit rarely.
DEXHEIMERGerman
From the German village Dexheim (south of Mainz).
DICKERMANEnglish, German, Jewish
Possibly derived from Middle High German dic(ke) "strong, thick" and Mann "man, male, husband".
DICKTERGerman
From dichter, the German word for "poet".
DIDSCHUSGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German name meaning "tall; big", from Old Prussian didis (or Old Prussian didszullis "the tall one").
DIECKMANNGerman
"one who lives on a dike"
DIEHLGerman
From the given name Diel, Tiel, from Thilo, a diminutive of given names beginning with Diet-, as such as Dietrich.
DIELMANNGerman (Modern)
It was once spelled as "Dielhmann" and sometimes with one "n". The meaning is unknown, but when I used Google's translator "dielh" means "the" and "mann" was "man.
DIETERLINGerman
From "Dieterlein", a diminuative of the given name Dieter
DIETZGerman
From a short form of the personal name Dietrich.
DILLIEGerman
Probably an altered spelling of Dilley or Dilly or possibly of German Dillier. A variant of Dilger.
DINJERGerman (Rare)
Occupational surname that originated in the German dialect spoken in the Rhineland-Palatinate region. ... [more]
DISTELGerman, North German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of ground overgrown with thistles, or perhaps a nickname for a "prickly" person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch distel "thistle".
DISTLERGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived in a place where thistles grew, from German Distel "thistle" (see Distel) and -er, suffix denoting an inhabitant.
DITTMANGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Dittmann.
DITTMANNGerman
Variant of Dittmar. In eastern Germany, this form has been used for Dittmar since the 15th century.
DOBILEITGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "clover; trefoil".
DOEPNERGerman
Derived from Middle Low German top and dop "pot". This is an occupational surname originally given to a potter.
DOERFLINGERGerman
Habitational name for someone from any of several places in Bavaria named Dörfling.
DOHRMANNLow German
North German topographic name for someone who lived by the gates of a town or city (see Thor).
DOLLSouth German, German, English
South German: nickname from Middle High German tol, dol ‘foolish’, ‘mad’; also ‘strong’, ‘handsome’.... [more]
DONTHLow German (Rare)
Donth is a very rare surname that comes from Germany. No real information about this surname.
DORNGerman, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
DOSCHGerman
Topographic name for someone living near bushes or brush, from Middle High German doste, toste ‘leafy branch’, or a habitational name from a house with a sign depicting a bush. Also an altered spelling of Dasch.
DOSSGerman, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
German: Habitational name for someone from Dosse in Altmark. Variant of Dose ... [more]
DÖTTERGerman
From a Germanic personal name formed with theud ‘people’, ‘race’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘strong’ or hari, heri ‘army’
DOWScottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DREYFUSFrench, German, Jewish
French-influenced variant of DREYFUSS, popular amongst people of Alsatian Jewish descent.
DREYFUSSGerman, Jewish
Originates from the German city of Trier. The Latin name for the city was "Treveris," whose pronunciation eventually developed into Dreyfuss. The spelling variants tend to correspond to the country the family was living in at the time the spelling was standardized: the use of one "s" tends to be more common among people of French origin, while the use of two tends to be found among those of German descent
DRUXGerman
Variant of Trux, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
DUBACHGerman (Swiss)
A surname describing a person from the town of Tübach in St. Gallen, Switzerland.
DÜCKLow German, German
North German nickname for a coward, from Low German duken ‘to duck or dive’. ... [more]
DUCKEnglish, Irish, Dutch, Low German, German
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
DUESLERUpper German
DueslerDuesslerDüslerDußlerhttp://www.duesler.com/html/charles_duelser_s_book.HTM "Duesler / Duessler / Dueßler http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-6 , http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-2 Andrew & brother Jacob were the Progenitors of Duesler, Duessler, Dueßler s from 1752 Germany to America... [more]
DUESTERWALDGerman
Variant spelling of Düsterwald.
DÜSTERWALDGerman
Derived from Middle Low German düster "dark" combined with Old High German wald "forest".
EARLYIrish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
EGNERGerman
From a Germanic personal name formed with the element agi ‘point (of a sword)’.
EHLERGerman
Variant of EHLERT.
EHLERTGerman
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements agil "edge", "point (of a sword)" + hard "brave", "hardy", "strong" or ward "guard".
EHRENBERGJewish (Anglicized, Rare, Archaic), German
"In German it means 'mountain of honor'"
EHRENREICHGerman, Jewish, Yiddish
Jewish/Yiddish German ornamental surname meaning “Rich in honour”
EHRMANTRAUTGerman
A Latinized joining of the German words irmin(world, all-encompassing) and trud(strength)
EICHGerman
German from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near an oak tree. In some cases, it may be a habitational name for someone from any of several places named with this word, for example Eiche or Eichen, or for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of an oak.
EICHELBERGGerman
Habitational name from any of various places, notably one southeast of Heidelberg, named from Middle High German eichel meaning "acorn" + berc meaning "mountain", "hill", or topographic name for someone who lived on an oak-covered hill.
EICHELBERGERGerman
Habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Eichelberg.
EICHHORNGerman, Jewish
German topographic name for someone who lived on or near an oak-covered promontory, from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’ + horn ‘horn’, ‘promontory’. German from Middle High German eichhorn ‘squirrel’ (from Old High German eihhurno, a compound of eih ‘oak’ + urno, from the ancient Germanic and Indo-European name of the animal, which was later wrongly associated with hurno ‘horn’); probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal, or alternatively a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a squirrel... [more]
EICHHORSTGerman (East Prussian)
Prussian in origin. Brandenburg area
EICHLERUpper German
South German variant of Eich, the -ler suffix denoting association. "eager"
EILANDGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned property surrounded by water, from Middle High German eilant, "island"
EINGEWEIDEGerman
A German surname meaning "guts" or "viscera".
EINHORNGerman
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
EINSTEINGerman, Jewish
From German ein meaning “one” and stein meaning “stone”; also a habitational name from any of the various locations from Middle High German einsteinen meaning “to enclose or surround with stone”... [more]
EISELEGerman
From a short pet form of the personal name Isenhart, from Old High German isan ‘iron’ + hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’. From Isenlin, a compound of Middle High German isen ‘iron’ + the hypocoristic suffix -lin, hence a nickname for a blacksmith, ironworker, or dealer in iron.
EISENGerman, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): metonymic occupational name for an ironworker or smith, or an ironmonger, from Middle High German isen ‘iron’, German Eisen. It may also have been used as a nickname, with reference to the strength and hardness of iron or to its color, while as a Jewish name it was also adopted as an ornamental name from modern German Eisen ‘iron’ or the Yiddish cognate ayzn.
EISENBERGGerman, Jewish
Means "iron hill" from German isen meaning "iron" and berg meaning "hill".
EISENBERGERGerman, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of the several places called Eisenberg. As a Jewish name it is also an ornamental name.
EISENHOWERGerman
Americanized spelling of German Eisenhauer.
ELICHGerman, American
Surname meaning "noble" from edelik or edelich. Notable bearer is professional ice hockey player Matt Elich.
ELLENDERGerman
Respelling of German Elender, a nickname for a stranger or newcomer, from Middle High German ellende ‘strange’, ‘foreign’, or a habitational name for someone from any of twenty places named Elend, denoting a remote settlement, as for example in the Harz Mountains or in Carinthia, Austria.
ELLERHOFFGerman
This name means "Black Alder Tree Courtyard" and was inspired by a tree in a yard at the family farm in Nettelstedt, Germany.
ELSINGGerman
From a variant of the old personal name Elsung.
ELSINGERGerman (Swiss)
Probably a derivative of Elsing.
ELVERMANGerman
The name Elverman means Eel fisherman.
EMMERGerman
A topographic name for someone who lived by land where grain was grown, a status name for someone who owned such land, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who grew or dealt in grain.
EMMERICHGerman
From the given name Emmerich.
ENGELBERTGerman, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
ENGLANDERGerman, Jewish
Ethnic name derived from German Engländer, meaning 'Englishman', thus denoting an incomer from England. In some cases, the Jewish name may be an ornamental adoption.
EPPLERGerman
Occupational name for a fruit grower or dealer, from Middle High German epfeler meaning "grower of or dealer in apples".
ERMANGerman (Modern), French (Modern)
Erman is a shortened French adaption of the Swiss-German surname Ermendinger, itself derived from the older surname Ermatinger, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence during the early or middle 18th century when Jean-Georges Ermendinger (1710-1767), a Swiss fur trader from Geneva, married into a French speaking Huguenotte family... [more]
ERMATINGERGerman (Swiss)
The surname Ermatinger derives from the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance. It simply means "from Ermatingen".... [more]
ERMENDINGERGerman
The surname Ermendinger was derived from the older surname Ermatinger, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence at some point during the early 17th or late 16th century when a branch of the Ermatinger family relocated from Schaffhausen, Switzerland, to Mulhouse, Alsace... [more]
ERNSBERGERGerman (Anglicized, Modern)
Also spelled (Ehrnsberger) has been said that a Christian Ernsberger or Ehrnsberger came to the U.S. in 1710 from Germany but i dont know from where in Germany.
ERTELGerman
South German: from a pet form of a personal name beginning with Ort-, from Old High German ort "point" (of a sword or lance)
ESAUWelsh, German
From the Biblical personal name Esau, meaning ‘hairy’ in Hebrew (Genesis 25:25).
ESCHERDutch, German
German habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Esch, Esche, or Eschen.
ESLERGerman
German: byname or occupational name for someone who drove donkeys, from Middle High German esel ‘donkey’ + the agent suffix -er.
ESSLow German, German (Swiss)
North German: topographic name for someone living on or owning land that was waterlogged or partly surrounded by water, from Middle Low German es ‘swamp’, ‘water’. ... [more]
EULERGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for a potter, most common in the Rhineland and Hesse, from Middle High German ul(n)ære (an agent derivative of the dialect word ul, aul "pot", from Latin olla).
FAHNLow German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bog, from a Westphalian field name van "marsh", or a habitational name from a place named with this word.
FAHNGerman
A short form of the personal name Stephan (see also Steven).
FALKENBERGGerman, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from any of several places named from Old High German falk "falcon" and berg "mountain, hill".
FALKENHAGENGerman
Habitational name from any of several places named from Old High German falke meaning "falcon" + hag meaning "hedge", "fencing". A place so named is documented west of Berlin in the 14th century.
FALKNERGerman
Occupational name for a falconer, Middle High German vakenoere. In medieval times falconry was a sport practised only by the nobility; it was the task of the falconer to look after the birds and train young ones.
FASTGerman
North German: nickname for a reliable steadfast person, or from a short form of any of the various personal names beginning with the element fast ‘steadfast’, ‘firm’, for example Fastert.
FEDIELow German
Originally spelled as 'Fidi' in Austria, later changed to Fedie when bearers of the name immigrated to the United States. The meaning of the name is "faith."
FEIDTGerman
Variant spelling of Feit.
FEILERGerman
Occupational name for a filemaker, from Feil + the agent suffix -er.
FEISTGerman (Austrian)
taken from St. Veit (Vitus in Latin), Protector against fire and lightning
FEITGerman, Jewish
Variant of Veit. Also, nickname from Middle High German feit ‘adorned’, ‘pretty’ (the same word as French fait, Latin factus).
FELDERGerman, Croatian
Derived from German feld, meaning "field".
FELLEnglish, German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a furrier, from Middle English fell, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel, all of which mean "skin, hide, pelt". Yiddish fel refers to untanned hide, in contrast to pelts "tanned hide" (see Pilcher).
FELLEREnglish, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative of Middle English fell, Middle Low German, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel "hide, pelt". See also Fell.
FELLERGerman
Habitational name for someone from a place called Feld(e) or Feld(a) in Hesse.
FELTYUpper German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of South German Velte, from a short form of the personal name Valentin (see Valentine).
FENNERGerman
This is the name of my great-great grandmother born in Germany, married to Andreas Lutz, also born in Germany.
FENRICH DE GJURGJENOVACGerman
Fenrich is a German family name, derived from a military title 'fenrich'/'fähn(d)rich' meaning "ensign" or "standard bearer" (bannerman), from early New High German fenrich. The term was formed and came into use around 1500, replacing Middle High German form vener, an agent derivative of Alemannic substantive van (flag).... [more]
FERNOWGerman
Habitational name from a place called Fernau or Fernow.
FETTGerman
Nickname for a fat man, from Middle Low German vett meaning "fat".
FEUERGerman
Metonymic occupational name for a stoker in a smithy or public baths, or nickname for someone with red hair or a fiery temper, from Middle High German viur "fire".
FEUERBACHERGerman
Habitational name for someone from any of the places called Feuerbach.
FEUERHAHNGerman
Feuerhahn comes from the Old High German words (fivr) meaning "fire" & (hano) meaning "cock".
FEUERSTEINGerman
This name comes from the German feuer meaning fire, and stein meaning stone. This was a name commonly given to a blacksmith.
FEYGerman, English, French, Danish
English: variant of Fay. ... [more]
FICHTERGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived near pine trees (originally bei den Fichten, Feichten, or Feuchten), from Old High German fiohta. The vowel of the first syllable underwent a variety of changes in different dialects.
FICHTERGerman (Austrian)
Habitational name deriving from places named with this word in Württemberg, Bavaria, Saxony, or Austria.
FICHTNERGerman
The Fichtner family name first began to be used in the German state of Bavaria. After the 12th century, hereditary surnames were adopted according to fairly general rules, and names that were derived from locations became particularly common
FIENEGerman, Low German
A nickname for an elegant person, from Middle Low German fin, meaning ‘fine’. Can also be a locational name from several fields and places named Fiene.
FIFERGerman, American, Slovene
Americanized and Slovenian spelling of German Pfeiffer.
FINCKEnglish, German
From the German word for "finch" a type of bird
FINGEREnglish, German, Jewish
Probably applied as a nickname for a man who had some peculiarity of the fingers, such as possessing a supernumerary one or having lost one or more of them through injury, or for someone who was small in stature or considered insignificant... [more]
FINKGerman, Slovene, English, Jewish
Nickname for a lively or cheerful person, Jewish ornamental name derived from the Germanic word for "finch", and German translation of Slovene Šinkovec which is from šcinkovec or šcinkavec meaning "finch".
FISCHBACHGerman
From a place called Fischbach, or a topographic name from German meaning fisch 'fish' + bach 'stream'.
FISCHKUSGerman
tax collector (fiscal)
FLEISCHMANGerman (Austrian)
Fleischman translates in English to Meat Man, or Butcher It is most often used with a single "n" for those who were persecuted as Jews. Other Germanic spellings for Christians and others not deemed Jewish are Fleischmann, or Fleishmann... [more]
FLEISIGGerman
"industrious"
FLERCHINGERGerman
Flerchinger is a name with origins from the city of Flörschingen or Flörange in the Saarland region on the French and German border.
FLINTEnglish, German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a significant outcrop of flint, Old English, Low German flint, or a nickname for a hard-hearted or physically tough individual.
FLOERCHINGERGerman
Habitational name for someone from Flörchingen in the Saar region.
FLOERKEGerman
Floerke Name Meaning German (Flörke): from a pet form of the personal names Florian or Florentinus, from Latin Florus (from florere ‘to bloom’).Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4... [more]
FOGELGerman
Variant of VOGEL
FOGLEGerman
Variant of Vogel.
FOLTZGerman
It is from Germany and it is based on the personal name Volz, which was popular in former times. It means son or descendant of a Volz or Folz
FORSTEREnglish (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see Forrest). ... [more]
FOUTGerman
[Foust} maybe german. The Fout name can be traced back to Denmark.
FRANKENSTEINGerman
In German means "stone of the Franks". The name appeared mostly in the regions of Westphalia and Rhineland. In Mary Shelley (1797-1851)'s "Frankenstein", the main character, Victor Frankenstein (1770-1793) and his family bore this name... [more]
FRANZGerman
Derived from "Francis".
FREIERGerman
Status name of the feudal system denoting a free man, as opposed to a bondsman, from an inflected form of Middle High German vri "free".
FREIERGerman
Archaic occupational name, from Middle High German, Middle Low German vrier, vriger, denoting a man who had the ceremonial duty of asking guests to a wedding.
FREYGerman
Status name for a free man, as opposed to a bondsman or serf, in the feudal system, from Middle High German vri "free", "independent".
FREYERGerman
Variant of FREIER.
FRIEDMANUpper German (Modern), German (Swiss), Jewish
Respelling of South German and Swiss Friedmann. ... [more]
FRIEDMANNGerman, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German from a derivative of Friedrich. ... [more]
FRISCHGerman
Nickname for someone who was handsome, cheerful, or energetic, from Middle High German vrisch.
FRITZGerman
From the given name Fritz.
FRÖHLICHGerman
It literally means "happy".
FRUTHGerman
nickname from Middle High German vruot ‘clever’, ‘astute’
FULBRIGHTGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German surname Vollbrecht, composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’
FULTZGerman
All I know is that it's a german name
FUNKGerman
Derived from Middle High German vunke "spark". ... [more]
FUNKEGerman
German: variant of Funk.
FURMANPolish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish, Slovene, English, German (Anglicized)
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic), and Slovenian: occupational name for a carter or drayman, the driver of a horse-drawn delivery vehicle, from Polish, Yiddish, and Slovenian furman, a loanword from German (see Fuhrmann)... [more]
FURRERGerman (Swiss)
Topographic name from the regional term furre ‘cleft in the ground’.
GAAGerman
Bavarian dialect variant of Gau.
GALISHOFFUpper German, German (Austrian)
Derived from the ancient Roman name "Gallus", meaning "rooster" in Latin. "Hoff" meaning house combines the growing or tending to poultry on a farm house, hence the name "Galishoff" which has been modified over the millennia... [more]
GANGELHOFFGerman
Gangelhoff - German
GANZGerman, German (Swiss)
Variant of Gans 'goose'. German: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Ganso, a cognate of modern German ganz 'whole', 'all'.
GASSERGerman (Swiss)
Occupational name for a goat herd from Middle High German geiz meaning "Goat" and (n)er an agent suffix.
GATLINGerman
Possibly an altered spelling of German Göttling, from a Germanic personal name formed with god ‘god’ or god ‘good’ + -ling suffix of affiliation, or, like Gättling (of which this may also be an altered form), a nickname from Middle High German getlinc ‘companion’, ‘kinsman’.
GATLINGEnglish, German (Anglicized)
English variant of Gatlin. Possibly a respelling of German Gättling (see also Gatlin).
GAUGerman
Habitational name from any of various places named with Middle High German gau, göu ‘area of fertile agricultural land’.
GAULScottish (Latinized, Rare), Irish, German
Scottish and Irish: variant of Gall ... [more]
GAYERGerman
Derived from Slavic gaj "grove", this name denoted a forest warden.
GEBHARDTGerman
From a Germanic given name composed of the elements geb "gift" and hard "hardy", "brave", "strong".
GELLERYiddish, German, Russian
The name may derive from the German word "gellen" (to yell) and mean "one who yells." It may derive from the Yiddish word "gel" (yellow) and mean the "yellow man" or from the Yiddish word "geler," an expression for a redheaded man... [more]
GEORGEEnglish, French, German
Derived from the given name George.
GERDESGerman
Patronymic name, coming from "son of Gerhard.
GERLINGGerman
German patronymic from a short form of a Germanic personal name beginning with the element gar, ger ‘spear’, ‘lance’.
GERMANEnglish, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
GERTHGerman (Swiss)
From a reduced form of Gerhardt. Habitational name for someone from Gerthe near Bochum.
GERTSCHGerman (Swiss)
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with gēr meaning ‘spear’, ‘lance’.
GERWULFGerman
This is an old Germanic name meaning "spear wolf" (ger "spear" and wulf "wolf.")
GIERSCHGerman
German from the female personal name Gerusch or Gerisch, pet forms of Gertrud (see Trude), with the Slavic suffix -usch or -isch.
GIMPELGerman, Jewish
German: from a pet form of the personal name Gumprecht (see Gombert). ... [more]
GINDTGerman, Alsatian
From the Germanic personal name Gundo, from gund meaning "war", "battle".
GISHGerman
From a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gisulf, literally "hostage wolf". It was borne by American actress Lillian Gish (?1893-1993), original name Lillian de Guiche.
GLAESSELGerman (Anglicized)
Anglicized spelling of German Gläßel.
GLANDTGerman
Nickname from Middle High Geman glander meaning "gleam", "sparkle", "shine", for someone with such a temperament.
GLOCKGerman
Meant "person who lives by a church bell-tower or in a house with the sign of a bell", "bell-ringer" or "town crier" (German Glocke "bell"). It was borne by Sir William Glock (1908-2000), a British music administrator.
GÖDELGerman
From an Old German personal name, Godilo, Godila.German (Gödel): from a pet form of a compound personal name beginning with the element god ‘good’ or god, got ‘god’.Variant of Godl or Gödl, South German variants of Gote, from Middle High German got(t)e, gö(t)te ‘godfather’.
GOEBBELSGerman, History
Originally an occupational name for a brewer. Paul Joseph Goebbels was a German politician and Reich Minister of Propaganda in Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945.
GOEDEKELow German
Low German surname composed of the element gode and the diminutive suffix -ke. Gode can mean either "good", "God" or "a Goth".
GOEMANGerman
Patronym from a Germanic name: good or god + man.
GOERTZEGerman
Probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
GOERTZENGerman
German: probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
GOETTNERGerman (East Prussian, Anglicized)
Rare German surname originating in East Prussia. Has a root in Gott, meaning "God."
GOLDEnglish, German
From Old English, Old High German gold "gold", applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked in gold, i.e. a refiner, jeweler, or gilder, or as a nickname for someone who either had many gold possessions or bright yellow hair.
GOLDBERGGerman, Hebrew
German Jewish, meaning Gold Mountain.
GOLDBERGGerman, Jewish, Danish
From German gold 'gold' and -berg, meaning 'gold-mountain'.
GOLDMANGerman, Jewish
Possibly meaning goldsmith in German, from Gold and Mann.... [more]
GOLDWATERGerman (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
This name is an Anglicized form of the German or Ashkenazic ornamental surname 'Goldwasser', or 'Goldvasser'. The name derives from the German or Yiddish gold', gold, with 'wasser', water, and is one of the very many such compound ornamental names formed with 'gold', such as 'Goldbaum', golden tree, 'Goldbert', golden hill, 'Goldkind', golden child, 'Goldrosen', golden roses, and 'Goldstern', golden star.
GOMBERTFrench, German
French and German: from Gundbert, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements gund ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The name was relatively popular in both France and Germany during the Middle Ages, and was also adopted by Ashkenazic Jews... [more]
GOOSGerman
See: http://www.houseofnames.com/goos-family-crest... [more]
GÖRLITZGerman
The name of a small town in Saxony. Derived from old Sorbian word "Zgorelc" meaning "settlement on a burned-out forest."
GÖSCHENGerman, North German
Patronymic from the German given name Gottschalk.
GRABEGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike or ditch, or habitational name from either of two places in Thuringia named with this word: Grabe and Graba.
GRABENSTEINGerman
Habitational name from Grafenstein near Wohlau, Silesia.
GRABLEGerman
Means "digger of ditches or graves" (from a derivative of Middle High German graben "ditch"). A famous bearer was US actress, dancer and singer Betty Grable (1916-1973).
GRAEFDutch, German
Name used to denote the chairman of a town council. Compare Graf.
GRAFGerman, German (Swiss)
Status name from Middle High German grave, grabe, which was used as a title denoting various more or less aristocratic dignitaries and officials. In later times it became established as a title of nobility equivalent to the Romance count... [more]
GRAPELow German
Metonymic occupational name for a maker of metal or earthenware vessels, from Middle Low German grope "pot".
GRASSEnglish, German
Topographic name for someone who owned or lived by a meadow, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold hay, from Middle English gras, Middle High German gras "grass, pasture, grazing".
GRAUGerman, Jewish
Nickname for someone with gray hair or a gray beard, from German grau "gray".
GRAUEGerman
Habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
GRAUEGerman
Variant of Grau.
GRAVEGerman
Either from the northern form of Graf, but more commonly a topographic name from Middle Low German grave "ditch", "moat", "channel", or a habitational name from any of several places in northern Germany named with this word.
GRAVESEnglish, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
GRAWERTLow German, German (East Prussian)
As a Low German name, Grawert is derived from Middle High German grā and Old High German grāo "gray" (originally "shimmery, gleaming"). As a surname, it was a nickname given to someone with gray hair.... [more]
GREBENSTEINGerman
Means "stone from the cliff or ridge" from German greben, (cliff or ridge) and stein (stone).... [more]
GREENBERGERGerman, Jewish
Anglicized form of the German surname Grünberger, which is formed from the words grün "green", Berg "mountain", and the habitational suffix -er. This name indicated a person who lived on or near a forest-covered mountain.
GRELLGerman
Nickname for an irritable or irascible person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German grellen "to be angry".
GRELLGerman
Habitational name from a place named Grelle.
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