German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
Filter Results       more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
GRELLGerman
Nickname for an irritable or irascible person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German grellen "to be angry".
GRELLGerman
Habitational name from a place named Grelle.
GRELLGerman
Nickname for an irritable, irascible person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German grellen "to be angry".
GRELLEGerman
Variant of Grell.
GREWEGerman, Low German
Low German form of Graf via Middle Low German grave / greve.
GRIEZMANNGerman (Rare)
This is the surname of French professional footballer Antoine Griezmann.
GRILLGerman
From a nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle High German grille "cricket" (Old High German grillo, from Late Latin grillus, Greek gryllos). The insect is widely supposed to be of a cheerful disposition, no doubt because of its habit of infesting hearths and warm places... [more]
GRIMMEnglish, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From a nickname for a stern and forbidding individual, derived from the Old High German word grim "stern, severe". Or possibly from the given name GRÍMR derived from Old Norse gríma "mask, helmet"... [more]
GROBGerman
A nickname for a strong, heavy man, or for a lout, from Middle High German g(e)rop "coarse".
GROENDutch, Low German
Dutch nickname for someone who habitually dressed in green, from Middle Dutch groene ‘green’. ... [more]
GROßKREUTZGerman
From German "groß" meaning big and "kreutz" meaning cross.
GROVEGerman
Variation of Graf.
GROVEGerman
Name from any of several places named Grove or Groven, which derive their name from Middle Low Germany grove ‘ditch’, ‘channel’. In some cases the name is a Dutch or Low German form of Grube.
GRUBEGerman
Name for someone who lived in a depression or hollow, from Middle High German gruobe "pit", "hollow". See also Gruber.
GRUBEGerman
From the personal name Grubo.
GRUNWALDGerman, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German (Grünwald): habitational name from any of various places named Grün(e)wald, from Middle High German gruene ‘green’ + walt ‘wood’, ‘forest’. ... [more]
GSCHWENDTNERGerman (Austrian)
From the German word "schwenden", which means "swidden agriculture" in English
GUBLERGerman (Swiss)
Means "Of the Mountains"... [more]
GUENTHERGerman
German: from a Germanic personal name composed of gund ‘battle’ + hari, heri ‘army’.
GUMPGerman
Occupational name or nickname from Middle High German gumpen, gumpeln ‘to clown’. from a short form of a Germanic personal name formed with gund ‘battle’, ‘war’. Compare Gombert.
GUNZENHAUSERGerman, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from either of two places named Gunzenhausen, one in Württemberg and the other in Bavaria.
GUSTGerman
German: from a short form of the personal name Jodocus, which is either a Latinized form of a Breton name, Iodoc, borne by a 7th-century Breton saint (compare Jost and Joyce) or from a reduced form of the personal name Augustus.... [more]
GUTHRIEScottish, Irish, German
Scottish: habitational name from a place near Forfar, named in Gaelic with gaothair ‘windy place’ (a derivative of gaoth ‘wind’) + the locative suffix -ach. Possibly an Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mag Uchtre ‘son of Uchtre’, a personal name of uncertain origin, perhaps akin to uchtlach ‘child’.... [more]
GUTTENBERGGerman, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Bavaria, called Guttenberg, from the weak dative case (originally used after a preposition and article) of Old High German guot ‘good’ + berg ‘mountain’, ‘hill’... [more]
GUTTINGGerman
Of uncertain origin. Probably from a Germanic personal name formed with god "good" or god, got "god".
HABERLANDGerman
Topographic name from Middle High German haber(e) "oats" and land "land", or a habitational name from any of various places so called.
HABERMANNGerman
Derived from Late Middle High German haber and Middle High German and Middle Low German haver(e) "oat" and man "man", this surname denoted someone who dealt in oat or who produced and dealt in oat groats, porridge or grits.
HABERMANNGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for a grower or seller of oats, composed of the elements Haber and the agent suffix -mann.
HABSBURGGerman
This surname may have been used by someone whose descendants originated from the House of Habsburg, which was one of the most important royal houses in Europe. It is assumed that the surname is derived from High German Habichtsburg meaning "hawk castle," but some historians and linguists believe that it may actually be derived from Middle High German hab/hap meaning "ford", as there is a river with a ford nearby.
HACKMANNGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for a butcher or a woodcutter.
HAFERGerman, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a grower of or dealer in oats, from German Hafer "oats". Compare Haber. As a Jewish surname, it is in many cases ornamental.
HAGELBERGGerman, Polish
Hagel means 'mountain' and berg means 'hail' or 'ice'.
HAGEMANNGerman, Danish
1. German: topographic name for someone who lived by a hedge or enclosure, from Middle High German hac ‘enclosure’, ‘hedge’, Middle Low German hage + mann ‘man’. ... [more]
HAHMGerman
Metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights and measures, from Middle High German hāme ‘(standard) measure’.
HAHNERGerman
Occupational name for a poultry farmer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German hane "rooster".
HAHNERGerman
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Hahn or Hag.
HALBERSTADTGerman
Habitational name from any of various places so named, notably the city near Magdeburg and Halberstadt near Königstein in Saxony.
HAMEnglish, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
HAMBERGGerman, Danish, Jewish
German, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburg.
HAMBERGERGerman, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from any of various places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburger.
HAMBURGGerman, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from the great city and port at the mouth of the river Elbe, named with the Germanic elements ham ‘water meadow’ + burg ‘fortress’, ‘fortified town’.
HAMBURGERGerman, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from Hamburg.
HAMELYiddish, Dutch, German
The name Hamel has three origins.... [more]
HAMEREnglish, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
HAMMERGerman, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
HAMMERSCHMIDTGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for a blacksmith, from German hamer, 'hammer' and schmidt, 'smith. See Hammersmith.
HAMMERSMITHGerman, English
Normally an anglicization of German Hammerschmidt. Perhaps also from Norwegian Hammersmed.... [more]
HAMPEnglish, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
HÄNDELGerman
Derived from HANS or HEINRICH.
HÄNERGerman
Variant of HANNER.
HANERGerman
Altered spelling or variant of HAHNER.
HANNERGerman
From a pet form of Hann, short form of JOHANN.
HARBACHGerman
Habitational name from any of several places named Harbach.
HARDEKOPGerman (Rare)
Derived from Middle High German hart "hard" and kopf "head". As a surname, it was given to a hard-headed, stubborn person.
HARLACHERGerman
Habitational name for someone from Ober- or Unter-Harlachen, near Überlingen.
HARLESSEnglish, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
HARMSEDutch, Low German
The surname Harmse is derived from Harms or Harm, a Low-German / Niederdeutsch surname or name. In Plattdeutsch/Low Saxon the word sine is used as a possessive construction, hence Harmse indicates that it is the child of Harms, Harm, or Harmensze... [more]
HAROLDEnglish, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans. These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari ‘army’ + wald ‘rule’, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian Tacitus records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of the Batavi, as early as the 1st century ad... [more]
HASELBAUERGerman
Translates to 'hazel farmer'
HASSELBACHGerman
Habitational name from any of the places in various parts of Germany called Hasselbach.
HASSLACHERGerman
hass=hate; lacher=laughter... [more]
HÄSSLIGerman (Swiss), French (Rare)
Swiss German diminutive form of Haas. This is a French surname via Alsace-Lorraine. A notable bearer is French footballer (soccer player) Eric Hassli (1981-).
HATTENDORFGerman, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from places called Hattendorf, near Alsfeld and near Hannover. The element hatt, had means ‘bog’
HAUCKGerman
Derived from the first name Hugo.
HAUEISGerman
Derived from Middle High German houwen "to beat" and isen "iron". This surname denoted a smith.
HAUSGerman
Topographic and occupational name for someone who lived and worked in a great house, from Middle High German, Middle Low German hus "house" (see House).
HAUSCHGerman
From the Germanic personal name Huso, a short form of a compound name composed with hus ‘house’, ‘dwelling’ as the first element.
HAUSERGerman, Jewish
From Middle High German hus "house", German haus, + the suffix -er, denoting someone who gives shelter or protection.
HAUSLEGerman (Austrian)
Topographical name for someone who's House was near the Woods, from German "Häus" House "le" Woods
HAUSMANNGerman
From Middle High German hus "house" (see HAUS) + man "man".
HAUSWIRTHGerman
From Middle High German haus 'house' and wirt 'owner' or 'master'.
HAVNERGerman
Variant of Hafner.
HAYEnglish, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAYDNGerman
Meaning "heathen". Famous bearer is Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
HAYDTGerman
Varient of Heid.
HEBERGerman
Occupational name for a carrier (someone who loaded or transported goods), from an agent derivative of Middle High German heben "to lift".
HEBERTGerman
Variant of Heber.
HECHTGerman, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
HEFNERGerman, Jewish
Recorded in several spellings including Hafner, Haffner, and Hevner, this is as surname of early Germanic origins. ... [more]
HEIDGerman, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German heide, German Heide ‘heath’, ‘moor’. Compare Heath.... [more]
HEIDENREICHGerman
From the medieval personal name Heidenrich, ostensibly composed of the elements heiden 'heathen', 'infidel' (see Heiden 2) + ric 'power', 'rule', but probably in fact a variant by folk etymology of Heidrich.
HEIGLGerman
Derived from the given name Hugo.
HEILANDGerman
South German: from Middle High German heilant ‘savior’, ‘Christ’, presumably either a name given to someone who had played the part of Christ in a mystery play or an occupational name for a healer, from Middle High German heilen ‘to heal’, ‘save’.
HEILIGERGerman
Heiliger means "Holy" or "Holy One" in German.
HEIMBACHGerman
Town / City in Germany
HEIMBURGGerman
German for "home". Originates in the German village of Heimburg (not to be confused with Hamburg) and the nearby castle of the same name.
HEINGerman, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
HEINBOKELGerman
(Hein) is a short form of the name Heinrich, (the German form of the name Henry) & Bokel is a place name in Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein & North Rhine-Westphalia.
HEINEGerman, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from a short form of Heinrich.
HEINEMANNGerman, Jewish
Combination of Heine, a short form of Heinrich, and Mann "man".
HEINERGerman
From the given name HEINER.
HEINLGerman
South German variant of Heinle.
HEINLEGerman
This surname is derived from what may be a pet form of Heinrich.
HELDGerman
The German word for "hero", ultimately derived from Middle High German helt.... [more]
HELLENBRANDGerman
Derived from germanic: hildtja = battle, brandt = sword, or prandt = burning wood/torch. Other view: Hilda is the Nordic Queen of the Underworld, Goddes of Death, so Sword/Torch of Hilda.... [more]
HELLWIGGerman, Dutch
Curiously it started out life in ancient history as the baptismal name, Hell-wig. "luck" & "war;" this name literally translates to, "battle-battle."
HELMEYERGerman, Dutch, Danish
From Hel in Norse mythology and Meyer meaning "higher, superior". It means ´blessed´ or ´holy´. The name is mostly found in Germany, but also in the Netherlands and some parts of Denmark.
HELMKEGerman
from a pet form of Helm
HENCEGerman, English, Welsh
An American spelling variant of Hentz derived from a German nickname for Hans or Heinrich or from an English habitation name found in Staffordshire or Shropshire and meaning "road or path" in Welsh.
HENKERGerman
Occupational name for an Executioner, from the German word "Henker" meaning Hangman.
HENLEYEnglish, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
HENNENGerman, Dutch
Patronymic of Henne.
HENTZGerman
From a nickname for Hans or Heinrich.
HERBARTHGerman, Norman
References Old Norse Deity "Odin" being one of the "Son's of Odin". Remember that the Geats became the Ostrogoths through the Denmark pass--referenced in Beowulf. Or, it means "Warrior of the Bearded One", perhaps a King... [more]
HERBOLSHEIMERGerman
Habitational name for someone from either of two places called Herbolzheim, in Baden and Bavaria.
HERDERGerman
An occupational surname in reference to herding animals. The anglicized pronounciation is "Her-der", but is Germanically pronounced, "Herr-der".
HERGENÖTHERGerman
Habitational name for someone from Hergenroth near Limburg or from Hergenrode near Darmstadt, both in Hessen.
HERTZELGerman
The ancestral home of the Hertzel family is in the German province of Bavaria. Hertzel is a German nickname surname. Such names came from eke-names, or added names, that described their initial bearer through reference to a physical characteristic or other attribute... [more]
HESSGerman (?)
It is arguably both tribal and residential, originating from the pre 10th century A.D. It is believed to have originally described people who came from the region known as Hesse. The translation of this name is the 'hooded people'
HEYEREnglish, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
HICKGerman
From a derivative of a Slavic pet form of HEINRICH.
HICKGerman
From Hiko, a pet form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with hild "strife", "battle" as the first element.
HIEDLERGerman
Topographic name for someone living near a hiedl “subterranean river”.
HIERONYMUSDutch, German
From the Greek given name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name". (See JEROME.)
HIGHLANDEnglish, German
English, Scottish, and Irish: variant spelling of Hyland.... [more]
HILBERTEnglish, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HILLEGASGerman
German: Variant of Hillegass from a variant of the Germanic personal name Hildegaud, composed of hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + got, of uncertain meaning (perhaps the same word as Goth).
HILTZGerman
Variant of HILZ.
HIMMELGerman
German word for "sky"
HIMMLERGerman, History
Derived from German Himmel "heaven, sky". This was a topographic name for someone living at a high altitude. ... [more]
HINKEBEINDutch, German
Nickname for someone with a limp, from Middle Low German hinken meaning "to limp" + bein meaning "leg".
HINKELGerman
Nickname for a timid, fearful person, from dialect hinkel ‘chicken’
HINKELMANGerman
Elaborated variant of Hinkel, with the addition of Middle High German 'man'.
HINSONGerman
It means "son of Hinrich"
HIRSEKORNGerman
Hirsekorn - millet grain - seems to be of Jewish origin
HIRTUpper German (Anglicized)
From the word Hirten meaning sheep herder. {Hirt}
HITTLEGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German Hüttl (see Huettl).
HOCHFELDGerman
Means "high field".
HOCKGerman
Topographic name for someone living by a hedge, from a dialect variant of Heck.
HOCKTONGerman
In relation to Hock a wine producing region and probably being adopted into Britain via Anglo Saxon settlers.
HOERMANEnglish, German
Variant of Herman. Variant of Hörmann.
HOFBAUERGerman
Means - King farmer
HOFERLEGerman (Austrian)
Means "Yard Clearing" from a Combination of the Austrian word Höfer meaning "yard" or "court" with the ancient suffix "le" meaning woodland or clearing.
HOFMANNGerman, Jewish
Variant of Hoffmann. The surname in this spelling is also found in Denmark.
HOHENSEEGerman
Habitational name from any of several places so named in Pomerania and East Prussia, or perhaps from Hohenseeden near Magdeburg.
HOHNGerman
Derived from Middle High German hon "chicken". As a surname, it was given to someone who either bred or traded in chickens.... [more]
HOKELow German
Occupational name from Middle Low German meaning "small trader". Americanized form of Hauck. It has been used in the House of Nassau-Ter Haar.
HOLBROOKEnglish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Derbyshire, Dorset, and Suffolk, so called from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’ + broc ‘stream’. ... [more]
HOLLGerman, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
HOLLANDERGerman, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
HOLTEREnglish, German, Norwegian
Derived from English holt meaning "small wood". A topographic name for someone who lived near a small wooden area, as well as a habitational name from a place named with that element.
HOLTEYGerman
Old German name meaning "Wood Island". Holt means wood and ey means island. Family can be traced back to around 650 A.D. and is located in the Ruhr and Essen area of Germany.
HOLTHAUSGerman
North German: topographic name for someone who lived by a copse (a small group of trees), from Middle Low German holt ‘small wood’ + haus ‘house’.
HOLTZCLAWGerman (Anglicized, Modern)
Americanized spelling of German Holzklau, which translates into modern German as "wood thief", but is probably a nickname for someone who gathered wood, from Middle High German holz "wood" + a derivative of kluben "to pick up", "gather", "steal".
HOLZHEIMGerman
The meaning of Holzheim is " wood home". Holz=wood and heim=home. ... [more]
HOLZINGERGerman, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Holzing or Holzingen.
HOLZSCHUHGerman
Occupational - from German holz "wood", and schuh "shoe".
HOMBERGGerman
The surname Hamberg could be derived from it.
HONIGGerman, Jewish
Metonymic name for a gatherer or seller of honey, from Middle High German honec, honic "honey", German Honig.
HOOTDutch, German
The Dutch form is a habitation name for someone who lived in the hout or "woods" while the German form hoth is from an occupational name for a maker of hats.
HORNEYGerman (Anglicized)
German: Eastphalian or Americanized form of a personal name composed of the Germanic elements hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’ + nit ‘battle fury’, ‘eagerness to fight’, or a habitational name from a place so called in Brandenburg or in the Rhineland... [more]
HORNSETHGerman
Name of a German farm.
HÖRSCHELMANNGerman
This denotes familial origin in the former village of Hörschel (annexed to Eisenach in 1994).
HOSPGerman (Austrian)
Means "odd bird" or "strange man"
HOUCKGerman
Nickname from Middle Dutch houck, a marine fish, or from Middle Dutch hoec, houck ‘buck’. variant of Hoek.
HOUSEALFrench (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
French (Lorraine) spelling of German Häusel, a topographic name meaning ‘small house’, a diminutive of Haus. ... [more]
HOWDYSHELLAmerican, German
Americanized (i.e., Anglicized) form of the Swiss German Haudenschild, which originated as a nickname for a ferocious soldier, literally meaning "hack the shield" from Middle High German houwen "to chop or hack" (imperative houw) combined with den (accusative form of the definite article) and schilt "shield".
HRACHGerman (Austrian, Rare), Czech (Rare)
Originated in the Czech-speaking region of Bohemia in Austria, pre-1900. From Czech hrách, meaning "pea." Given either to a very short man or to a gardener.
HUBERTGerman, Dutch, English, French, Jewish
From a Germanic given name composed of the elements hug "heart", "mind", "spirit" and berht "bright", "famous".
HUETTLUpper German
South German (Hüttl) diminutive of Hütt (see Huett).
HUFFGerman
From the Germanic personal name Hufo, a short form of a compound name formed with hug "heart, mind, spirit" as the first element.
HULSEGerman
derived from Holtz, means "a wood"
HUMBERTGerman, Dutch, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hun "Hun, giant" or hun "bear cub" and berht "bright, famous". This was particularly popular in the Netherlands and North Germany during the Middle Ages as a result of the fame of a 7th-century St... [more]
HUMBOLDTGerman
German surname, composed of the elements hun "bear cub, giant, Hun" and bold "brave, commanding," hence "giant command."
HUNDERTMARKGerman
A nickname for a wealthy man, from Middle High German hundert meaning "hundred" + mark, a denomination of coin.
HUNSBERGERGerman
Habitational name for someone from a place called Hunsberg or Huntsberg.
HUNTZINGERGerman
Habitational name for someone from Hintschingen, earlier Huntzingen.
HURSTGerman
Topographic name from Middle High German hurst "woodland, thicket".
HUSTEDGerman
The name was originally spelled "Hustedt" and means "homestead." The family name originated in northern Germany. One branch of the family migrated to England, and a branch of that family to the United States.
HUTZELGerman
from a Germanic personal name, Huzo
HUXGerman
Probably from a topographic name Huck or Hucks, of uncertain origin. It occurs in many place and field names.
ICKESGerman, English
In German the meaning is unknown.... [more]
ILGENFRITZGerman
Compound patronymic, meaning "Fritz, the son of Ilg".
IMMERGerman, Anglo-Saxon
German: habitational name for someone from a place named Immer near Oldenburg in Lower Saxony. ... [more]
IMMERMANNGerman
Habitational name for someone from a place named Immer near Oldenburg in Lower Saxony.
ISENBARGERGerman, Jewish
Respelling of German or Jewish Eisenberger.
ITELSONYiddish, German
Yiddish "Son of Itel"
ITZSTEINGerman
Name that originated from broad regions around the river Itz in Thuringia, Germany. The word "Stein" (German word for stone) historically was also used to describe castles on a hill or at a river, thus a possible meaning of the name is "castle at the river Itz".
JACOBIJewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
JACOBSMEYERGerman
Habitational name from an estate so named.
JÄGERMEISTERSSENGerman
Means son of the "Master-Hunter". Originally given to the son of the master-hunter in hunting camps.
JAHNGerman
Unknown meaning.
JAHNSGerman
Patronymic from the personal name Jahn.
JÄNICKEGerman
From a pet form of the personal name Johann.
JANNUSCHGerman
From a pet form of the personal name Jan.
JARSDELGerman
Are you near extinct or possibly extend last name, referring to the opening part of a jar.
JAUKGerman (Austrian)
The meaning of the name Jauk is similar to the word "acre" in English. It is a measure word for how much land an ox can plough in one day. People with the surname Jauk are likely to have descended from farmers... [more]
JENDREGerman (Anglicized, Rare), Czech (Anglicized, Rare), Slovak (Anglicized, Rare), Danish (Anglicized, Rare)
Jendre is an anglicized version of many surnames throughout Europe that start with 'Jendre'.... [more]
JENNERGerman
Derived from the name Januarius.
JETERFrench (Huguenot), German
Jeter is a French and German surname. It is the last name of former New York Yankees baseball player, Derek Jeter. It's also the last name of Carmelita Jeter, an American sprinter who specializes in the 100 meter sprint.
JOBEnglish, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name Iyov or Job, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
JOHANNINGGerman
North German patronymic from Johann, German form of John.
JOHANNKNECHTGerman
John The Servant
JORGENSONGerman, English
Respelling of Jørgensen or Jörgensen (see Jorgensen) or the Swedish cognate Jörgens(s)on.
JOSTDutch, German
Dutch and German: from a personal name, a derivative of the Breton personal name Iodoc (see Joyce), or from the personal name Just.
JÜNGERGerman, Jewish
German (Jünger) distinguishing name, from Middle High German jünger ‘younger’, for the younger of two bearers of the same personal name, usually a son who bore the same name as his father... [more]
JUNKGerman
Variant of Jung.
KACHELGerman
Occupational name for a potter, from Middle High German kachel "pot", "earthenware vessel".
KACKLEYGerman
Probably an Americanized spelling of German Kächele (see KACHEL).
KADENGerman
Habitational name for someone from Kaaden in North Bohemia, or any of several other places called Kaden.
KAHNGerman
Kahn is the German word that means, in informal contexts, "small boat." It is also a Germanized form of the Jewish surname Cohen
KALANDERGerman
Status name for the chairman or a member fraternity that held meetings on the first of each month, from Latin ad calendas.
KALLWEITGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "smith; blacksmith; farrier", derived from Old Prussian kalt "to forge; to hammer" and Old Prussian kalweitis "the village smith".
KALPGerman, Jewish
From Middle High German kalp ‘calf’, German Kalb, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who reared calves.
KALTHOFFGerman
German (Westphalian): habitational name from a place named as 'the cold farm', from Middle High German kalt "cold" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm’, "court".
KAMMGerman
It's origins are of German descent, meaning "comb"
KANDTGerman
Probably from Middle High German kant meaning "jug" (from Latin olla cannata meaning "pot with one spout") and hence an occupational name for a maker or seller of jugs.
KARIFinnish, German (Austrian), Slovene (?), Hungarian, Indian, Marathi
As a Finnish name, it is a topographic and ornamental name from kari "small island", "stony rapids", "sandbar", or "rocky place in a field". This name is found throughout Finland.... [more]
KÄRLINGerman, South Slavic
German and Southern Slavic from the personal name Karl (Slavic Karlo). Also an altered spelling of German Gerling.
KARLINGGerman
A habitational name from Karling in Bavaria.
KARLSBERGGerman
Means "Carl's Mountain" in German language, it is also used in other Germanic languages