German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
KAUGerman
From Middle High German gehau "(mountain) clearing" hence a topographic name for a mountain dweller or possibly an occupational name for a logger.
KAUGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived by a mineshaft, from Middle High German kouw(e) "mining hut".
KAUFMANNGerman
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for a merchant or wholesaler (see Kaufer). Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant spelling of Kaufman.
KAULITZGerman (East Prussian)
Famous bearers of this surname are Bill Kaulitz (German singer, songwriter, voice actor, designer, and model) and his twin brother Tom Kaulitz (German singer, songwriter, voice actor, designer, and model) are both in the German pop-rock / alternative rock band, Tokio Hotel.
KAUSGerman
From a regional (Hessian) variant of the habitational name Kues, from a place on the Mosel river, probably so named from Late Latin covis "field barn", "rack" and earlier recorded as Couese, Cobesa.
KAUSCHGerman
Pet name derived from the Old High German personal name Gozwin, of uncertain origin.
KAUSCHGerman
From a medieval form of the Old High German personal name CHUZO.
KAUTGerman
Netonymic occupational name for a flax grower or dealer, from Middle High German kute, from Kaut(e) "male dove", hence a metonymic occupational name for the owner or keeper of a dovecote.
KAUTGerman
Topographic name from the Franconian dialect word Kaut(e) "hollow", "pit", "den".
KAUTZGerman
Nickname for a shy or strange person, from Middle High German kuz "screech owl".
KAUTZMANNGerman
Variant of KAUTZ, with the addition of Middle High German -man "man".
KAYLORScottish, German
Variant of Scottish Keillor.... [more]
KAYSERGerman
Variant of KAISER.
KEELEnglish (Anglicized), English, Irish, German (Swiss), German (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Keele in Staffordshire, named from Old English cy ‘cows’ + hyll ‘hill’, or from East and West Keal in Lincolnshire, which are named from Old Norse kjolr ‘ridge’... [more]
KEELGerman (Swiss)
Swiss German variant of Kehl.
KEELGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Kühl (see Kuhl), Kiehl, or Kiel.
KEGLERGerman
Nickname for a skilled or enthusiastic skittles player, from an agent derivative of Middle High German kegel meaning "skittle", "pin".
KEHLERGerman
Habitational name from various places called Kehl, notably the town across the Rhine from Strasbourg. In some cases it may be a variant of Köhler.
KEIMGerman
Unknown.
KEINATHGerman
Possibly a variant of Keinrath, from the personal name Konrad. ... [more]
KEIPERGerman
Similar to the origins of Kuiper (Dutch) and Cooper (English), Keiper was an occupation which means "cooper" or "barrelmaker".
KELCHGerman
nickname from Middle High German kelch "double chin", "goiter". from another meaning of Middle High German kelch "glass", "chalice", hence a metonymic occupational name for a chalice maker or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a chalice.
KELLENGerman
From the name of a place in Rhineland, which is derived from Middle Low German kel (a field name denoting swampy land) or from the dialect word kelle meaning "steep path, ravine".
KELMGerman
Germanized form of Polish Chelm ‘peak’, ‘hill’, a topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a pointed summit, or habitational name from a city in eastern Poland or any of various other places named with this word.
KELSCHGerman (Anglicized)
Partly Americanized form of German Koelsch.
KEMPERGerman, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
KERSTEINGerman
Derived from -kirsch "cherry" and -stein "stone", variant of Kirstein.
KESLERGerman, Dutch, Jewish
It is an occupational name that means coppersmith. In alpine countries the name derived from the definition: the one living in the basin of a valley.
KESSELGerman
From the Middle High German kezzel meaning "kettle, cauldron"; either an occupational surname for a maker of copper cooking vessels or a habitational/topographic name derived from the same word.
KESSLERGerman, Jewish
Denotes a coppersmith or maker of copper cooking vessels, derived from Middle High German kezzel meaning “kettle, cauldron”.
KEUCHGerman
Variation of Kuch.
KIELGerman
German surname of several possible origins and meanings.... [more]
KIENLIENGerman (East Prussian)
Julie Lienlien, Spouse Eduard Lehmann, Mother of Anna Katharina Lehmann (b. 1858)
KIESTLERGerman
Possibly a form of Kistler an occupation name for a joiner or cabinet maker.
KIFFGerman
Topographic name from a Westphalian dialect Kiff "outhouse, tied cottage, shack".
KILBURGGerman, Luxembourgish
"Kyll castle," from German burg (castle) near the Kyll river in Germany. Also "wedge mountain" in Swedish: kil (wedge) and berg (mountain).
KILLIANIrish (Anglicized, Modern), German
Meaning "little church". From cill (Irish for "church") and -ín, a Gaelic diminutive.
KILMESTERGerman
Kilmester is attested as a surname near Rostock in the 13th century.
KINDEnglish, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
KINDLEBERGERGerman
One who lights bergs
KINNEGerman, Dutch
German: From the female given name Kinne, a Silesian diminutive of Kunigunde.... [more]
KIPPENBERGERGerman, French, Scottish
Mainly means "Shepard".
KIPPINGGerman
German: habitational name from a place named with Middle High German kip ‘point’, ‘peak’ or from Kippingen in the Rhineland.
KIRCHGerman
German: from Middle High German kirche ‘church’, hence a topographic name for someone living by a church or a occupational nickname from someone employed by the church. ... [more]
KIRCHOFERGerman
German topographic name for someone living near a churchyard, or habitational name for the proprietor or tenant of a farm named as "Church Farm", from Middle High German kirche "church" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm".
KIRSCHGerman
Means 'cherry' in German, short form of Kirschstein or other surnames starting with Kirsch.
KIRSCHENBAUMGerman
From German means "cherry tree".
KIRSCHSTEINGerman
German surname meaning "cherry stone".
KIRSTEINGerman
Derivative of the Latin personal name Christianus, also an Americanized spelling of Kirschstein.
KLARERSTEINGerman
German surname meaning "Clear stone".
KLASSGerman
The name is patronymic and it comes from the German first name "Clausen" which is a variant of the name "Nicholas".
KLEFFNERGerman
Topographic name from Middle Low German clef, cleff "cliff", "precipice".
KLEFFNERGerman
Nickname for a prattler or gossip, from Middle High German, Middle Low German kleffer(er).
KLEINKNECHTGerman
A combining of the German word klein "small" and knecht "servant", originally an occupational name for a secondary hired hand. A famous historic figure who bore this surname was Jakob Friedrich Kleinknecht (8 April 1722 in Ulm - 11 August 1794 in Ansbach), a German composer of many works of chamber music and symphonies, flutist and Kapellmeister (chapel master).
KLIEBERTGerman
Occupational name for a woodsman or woodworker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German klieben meaning "to cleave or split".
KLIEWERGerman, German (West Prussian), Mennonite
Germanized form of Dutch Kluiver, an occupational name for a court official, originally a hangman or torturer.
KLINGBEILGerman
From Middle High German klingen "to ring or sound" and bīl "axe", literally "sound the axe", an occupational nickname for a journeyman, carpenter, shipwright (or any occupation involving the use of an axe)... [more]
KLINGERGerman
Klinger is a German surname meaning ravine or gorge in Old German. The English variant of Klinger is Clinger.
KLOPFENSTEINGerman
It means striking stones
KLORGerman (Austrian)
The Klor surname may have evolved from the feminine personal name Klara. Or it may have come from the Middle High German and Middle Low German "Klar," meaning "Pure" or "Beautiful".
KLOSTERMANNGerman
Combination of "kloster" meaning "monastery," and common German suffix Mann.
KNABGerman
Variant of Knabe.
KNABEGerman
German status name for a young man or a page, from Middle High German knabe (English knave). In aristocratic circles this term denoted a page or squire (a youth destined to become a knight), while among artisans it referred to a journeyman’s assistant or (as a short form of Lehrknabe) ‘apprentice’... [more]
KNAPEGerman
Variant of Knapp.
KNAPPGerman
Occupational name from the German word Knapp or Knappe, a variant of Knabe "young unmarried man". In the 15th century this spelling acquired the separate, specialized meanings "servant", "apprentice", or "miner"... [more]
KNAPPEGerman
German variant of Knapp.
KNAUERGerman (Silesian)
Nickname for a gnarled person, from Middle High German knur(e) 'knot', 'gnarl'. habitational name for someone from either of two places in Thuringia called Knau.
KNAUSGerman
Comes from Middle High German knuz ‘proud’, ‘arrogant’, ‘daring’, hence a nickname for a haughty person. In Württemberg knaus (and in Switzerland knus) also meant ‘gnarl’, hence a nickname for a short, fat, gnarled person; topographic name for someone living on a hillock, from knaus ‘hillock’ in the Swabian and Alemannic dialects of German
KNAUSSGerman
A variant of Knaus.
KNODELGerman
dweller near a hilltop; descendant of Knut (hill, or white-haired); a lumpish, thickset person.
KNOLLEnglish, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
KNORRGerman (Rare)
The name 'Knorr' was used by a collection of knights during the feudal period in Germanic History. Originally laborers to an existing feudal Lord, they gained their freedom and knight status after sucessfully protecting their master's land from invasion... [more]
KNUTZGerman
Variant of Kuntz
KOBOLDTGerman (Rare)
Derived from German Kobold (Middle High German kobolt) "kobold; hobgoblin; puck; imp".
KOCHENDORFERGerman
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Kochendorf, in Württemberg, Schleswig-Holstein, and Bohemia.
KÖCHERGerman
It literally means "quiver".
KOEHNLINEGerman
Believed to be a form of the German name Köhnlein used by people who moved to America from Germany sometime during the 1800s.
KOELLUpper German (Rare)
(Koell) named used when came1880s to 1905 in America changed to( Kohl)... [more]
KOELSCHGerman
German from the adjective kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (German Köln).
KOERNERGerman
Koerner is an occupational name for a grain merchant or possibly an administrator of a granary. ... [more]
KOHLHAASGerman
Apparently a nickname from Middle Low German kōlhase, literally "cabbage rabbit".
KÖHNGerman
From the given name KÖHN.
KOHRGerman
1. occupational name for a guard or watchman on a tower, Middle Low German kure.... [more]
KOLBGerman
Comes from Middle High German Kolbe.
KOLDENGerman, Norwegian
From Middle Low German kolt, kolde ‘cold’, a nickname for an unfriendly person; alternatively, it may be a habitational name, a shortened form of Koldenhof ‘cold farm’ in Mecklenburg (standardized form: Kaltenhof, a frequent place name in northern Germany, East Prussia, Bavaria, and Württemberg).Norwegian: habitational name from a farm called Kolden, from Old Norse kollr ‘rounded mountain top’.
KOLESARCzech (Modern, Rare), German (Modern, Rare), German (Austrian, Modern, Rare)
Means either 'wheelwright' or 'coleminer' depending on the region.
KOLKMANNGerman
Kolk is an old German word that means '' man who lives by the river'' and Mann is German for 'man'. The name Kolkmann comes from a man who lived by the North Rhine.
KOLLARGerman
Derived from the kolar "cartwright".
KÖLSCHGerman
From German kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (Köln in German).
KONITZERGerman
A German habitational name for someone who lives in various places called Konitz in places like Thuringia, Pomerania, Moravia, or West Prussia.
KONRADGerman
From the given name KONRAD.
KONZELMANGerman
Orginating from Konrad, which is a variant of Conrad, meaning "brave counsel." The second half of the name indicates one who was a councilman or advisor to someone of importance or power.
KOPPENGerman
Patronymic from a reduced pet form of the personal name JAKOB.
KOPPENGerman
Habitational name from any of several places named Koppen.
KORBECIGerman, Albanian
German name for Korb "basket" changed over time to Korbeci
KORBELGerman
Diminutive of Korb "basket".
KORNGerman
From Middle High German korn "grain", a metonymic occupational name for a factor or dealer in grain or a nickname for a peasant.
KORNFELDGerman, Jewish
Means "cornfield" in German.
KOTPolish, Slovak, Czech, Belorussian, Jewish, German
From a personal name or nickname based on Slavic kot "tom cat".
KOTENGerman
Derived from German Kate / Kote, originally from Middle Low German kote "small house; hut".... [more]
KÖTHGerman
From Middle High German, Middle Low German kote ‘cottage’, ‘hovel’, a status name for a day laborer who lived in a cottage and owned no farmland.
KOTTGerman, Polish, Czech
German: variant of Koth or Kotz.... [more]
KRÄFTGerman, Jewish
Nickname for a strong man, from Old High German kraft, German Kraft ‘strength’, ‘power’.
KRAHNGerman
German: nickname for a slim or long-legged person, from Middle Low German krane ‘crane’. Compare Kranich.
KRANEDutch, Low German
Dutch: nickname for a long-legged or tall thin man, from Middle Dutch crane ‘crane’. ... [more]
KRANICHGerman
German: nickname for a long-legged or tall and slender person, from Middle High German kranech ‘crane’.
KRAUCZUNGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "tailor; dressmaker".
KRAULEDATGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name referring to a barber-surgeon well versed in bloodletting, derived from Lithuanian kraujaleidys.
KRECHTERGerman
Possibly derived from Krämer
KREGERGerman
Mercenary or warrior for hire.
KREISELGerman, Jewish
Jewish family name and originally a nickname for an active or disorganized person, derived from German kreisel meaning "spinning top, top", ultimately from kreis "circle". Alternatively, it could've be used as a nickname for a person with curly hair in the context of "spiral" or "curl".
KREPPGerman
topographic name for someone living in a hollow
KRESSGerman
From Middle High German kresse "gudgeon", hence probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way or an occupational name for a fisherman.
KRESSGerman
From Old High German krassig, gratag "greedy".
KRESSGerman
From a much altered pet form of the personal name ERASMUS.
KRIEGGerman
German word meaning "war"
KRIEGERGerman
Noun to kriegen, kämpfen meaning "to fight (with words)". Describes a person who likes to argue. A wrangler, a quarreler, a brawler. Literal translation "warrior", from the German noun krieg "war" and the suffix -er.
KRIEGSHAUSERGerman
Probably a habitational name for someone from an unidentified place called Kriegshaus, literally "war house".
KRIERGerman, Luxembourgish
Occupational name from Middle High German krier "herald".
KRONECKERJewish, German (Austrian)
Derived from the place name Kroneck in Austria. A famous bearer of this surname was Leopold Kronecker(1823~1891),the German mathematician who worked on number theory.
KRONSTADTGerman
Means "crown state" (i.e., capital city) in German
KRUMHOLZJewish, German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Krumbholz ‘bent timber’, ‘mountain pine’, hence probably a metonymic occupational name for a cartwright or wheelwright. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
KRUMWIEDEGerman
Location-based name for people who lived by a gnarled old willow tree.... [more]
KUCHGerman
German metonymic occupational name for a pastry cook, from German kuchen ‘cake’, or simply a variant of Koch ‘cook’.
KUCHENMEISTERGerman
Occupational name for a master cook (literally "kitchen master"), a court official.
KUCHLERGerman (Rare)
Often confused with Küchler a name for a cookie baker, Kuchler is a noble name for an old german family. Kuchler is origined in a city named Kuchl at the border of todays german bavaria. Sometimes they are reffered to "Herrn von Kuchl" meaning "Ruler of Kuchl"... [more]
KUESGerman, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
KÜHLGerman, Low German
The spelling Kühl results from a folk-etymological association with High German kühl ‘cool’ (Middle High German küel(e), a nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’... [more]
KUHLMANGerman
Nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm.’
KUHLMANNGerman
German (also Kühlmann) nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’ (see Kuhl).
KULPGerman
anglicized version of Kolbe
KUMMEROWGerman
Habitational name from any of various places in Brandenburg and Mecklenburg called Kummerow.
KUNDERTGerman
Meaning: A German surname specific to the Canton of Glarus in Switzerland, the name means "skill with numbers" "Kund" is a German word/root meaning "skill, ability, knowledge" and the "ert" is the transformed spelling of the root "ratha"--meaning "number" This combination would mimic the etymology of the German word for 100, "hundert," which is composed of the roots "hund" =100 and "ratha" meaning "number."Note: Although I have seen one reference to "kundert" being a cognate of the German word "Konrad," I tend to doubt that connection for the specific reason that almost none of the other cognates have that "d" in the middle (other cognates being Kunrad, Kuhnert, Kunert, Kuhnhardt Kuhnt, and Kurth).
KUNISGerman, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name KONRAD.
KÜNNENGerman
Metronymic from the given name KUNIGUNDE.
KÜNZIGerman, Swiss, German (Austrian)
From a pet form of the personal name Kuntz.
KÜNZLERGerman
Nickname for a flatterer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German künzen "to flatter".
KUPFERGerman, Jewish
German (Küpfer) and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a worker or trader in copper, Middle High German kupfer, German Kupfer ‘copper’. As a Jewish name it is often an ornamental name.
KURPJUHNGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "shoemaker", derived from Old Prussian kurpjuns "shoemaker", ultimately from Old Prussian kurpe, kurpi "shoe".
KURSCHATGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "Curonian; a Kur".
KÜRSCHNERGerman
Occupational name for a furrier, Middle High German kürsenære, from Middle High German kürsen meaning "fur coat".
KURTZGerman
Variant of Kurz.
KURZGerman
Means short in German. Name for a person who was not very tall.
KURZHALSGerman
Short Neck
KÜSTERGerman
It literally means "sexton".
KUTCHGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized variant of German Kutsch.
KUTSCHGerman
Topographic name of Slavic origin, from Sorbian kut ‘corner’, ‘nook’. Variant of Kutsche, metonymic occupational name for a coachman or coachbuilder, from the Hungarian loanword kocsi (see Kocsis).
KUTTELWASCHERGerman
Surname given to those who had the occupation of cleaning tripe. Combines the words kuttel meaning "tripe" and washer meaning "washer". Bearers of the surname typically live in Austria.
KUTZGerman
From a pet form of the personal name Konrad.
KUTZLERGerman
This is the surname of my great-grandfather, of German ancestry.
LADSTETTERGerman
JEWS AND GREMAM
LAHNERGerman, Hungarian
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Lahn in Hungary and Germany. In southern Germany and Austria, Lahn denotes a place where there had been an avalanche or landslide, from Middle High German laen, lēne meaning "avalanche".
LAMBERGGerman
Habitational name from any of several places so called in Bavaria, Westphalia, and Schleswig-Holstein.
LAMPERTGerman, English
German & English variant of Lambert.... [more]
LANDEnglish, German
Topographic name from Old English land, Middle High German lant, "land, territory". This had more specialized senses in the Middle Ages, being used to denote the countryside as opposed to a town or an estate.
LANDISGerman, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German nickname for a highwayman or for someone who lays waste to the land, from Middle High German landoese.
LANGWIESNERGerman
Derived from location means 'Long field'
LANTZGerman
Habitational name from places called Lanz or derived from the given name Lanzo.
LAPPGerman
From Middle High German lap(pe) ‘cloth’, ‘patch’, ‘rag’; a metonymic occupational name for a mender of clothes or shoes, or a nickname for a simple-minded person.... [more]
LÄUFERGerman, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Lauf, also an occupational name for a messenger or a nickname for a fast runner, from an agent derivative of Middle High German loufen, German laufen ‘to run’.
LAUMANNGerman
Meaning unknown.
LAURSENGerman, Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian, Danish, and North German: patronymic from Laur, a short form of Lawrence.
LAUTERMILCHGerman (Modern)
Comes from German words Lauter, meaning 'pure', or 'nothing but', and Milch, meaning 'milk'. This could mean that the people who first used this name were farmers.
LEBKUCHENGerman
A German surname meaning "gingerbread".
LEDERERGerman
Leatherworker
LEFFLERGerman, Swedish
Occupational name for a spoonmaker. Derived from German Löffel "spoon".
LEHIGHGerman, Irish
Derived from a Native American word "Lechauwekink", meaning "where there are forks in the stream". Variant of Lechau .
LEHNHARTGerman
"Lean deer." From the German words lehn and Hart, "lean" and "deer" respectively.
LEHRGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived in a marshy area. There are a number of minor places, mostly in southern Germany, named with this element, and the surname may also come from any of them.
LEICHGerman
A coworker at my job has this surname and they told me that it’s German. I know nothing more about this surname.
LEIDIGGerman
From a short form of any of several Germanic personal names composed with the first element liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’. Also a nickname for a disagreeable, cantankerous person, from Middle High German leidic ‘disagreeable’, ‘tiresome’.
LEINBACHGerman
German topographic name from any of several streams called leinbach, from Middle High German lin ‘flax’ or Middle Low German leie (genitive leien) ‘rock’, ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’.
LEINENGerman
Name means LINEN in German. The first known Leinen was a tailor
LEITERGerman
From Leiter ‘leader’, status name for a foreman or for the leader of a military expedition, from Middle High German leiten ‘lead’.German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Leitner.
LEMBERGGerman
Habitational name from a place called Lemberg in Silesia, originally Löwenberg, from Middle High German lewe, löwe "lion" and berg "mountain".
LENKEITGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) surname.... [more]
LENTZGerman
Variant of LENZ.
LEONARDOItalian, Spanish, German
Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese from the Germanic personal name Leonhard, formed from the elements leo ‘lion’ + hard, ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’; this was an early medieval saint’s name (see Leonard).
LEONHARDTGerman, Dutch
From the Germanic personal name Leonhard, composed of the elements leo "lion" and hard "hardy, brave, strong".
LEPPGerman
Unflattering nickname from Middle High German lappe "coxcomb", "puppy" (modern German Laffe).... [more]
LESCHGerman
German variant of Loesch.
LESCHERGerman
German metonymic occupational name for a mediator or arbitrator, or possibly for a fireman, from Middle High German leschære ‘extinguisher’.
LESNARGerman
Variant spelling of German Lessner, a habitational name from any of various places in eastern Germany called Lessen, all named with Slavic les 'forest'.
LEVINJewish, Lithuanian, Belarusian, German, Russian, French (Quebec, Anglicized), Various
As a Lithuanian Jewish and Belarusian Jewish name, it is a Slavicized form of Levy. As a German and German Jewish name, it is derived from the given name Levin. As a Jewish name, it can also be related to Loewe... [more]
LEXGerman, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Alexius, Alexis.
LICHTERGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for someone who made candles or possibly for someone who tended a light, from an agent derivative of from Middle High German lieht, Yiddish likht "candle, light".
LICKERTGerman (East Prussian)
Derived from the German feminine name Luitgard, and thus ultimately from Old High German liut "people" and garto "garden; enclosure".
LIEBGerman, Jewish
Nickname for a pleasant or agreeable person, from Middle High German liep "dear, beloved"; Yiddish lib or German lieb. This word was also used as a personal name, both alone (German) and in compounds (German and Jewish).
LIEBGerman
From a short form of the various compound Slavic personal names formed with lubo- "love" as the first element.
LIEBHARTGerman
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements liub ‘beloved’, ‘dear’ + hard ‘brave’, ‘strong’.
LIEBHARTGerman
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements liub "beloved, dear" and hard "brave, strong".
LIEBRECHTGerman
From a Germanic personal name formed with liut "people, tribe" and berht "shining, famous".
LIETZENGerman
Lietzen is a municipality in the district Märkisch-Oderland, in Brandenburg, Germany.... [more]
LINDEGerman, Dutch, Jewish, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a conspicuous lime tree, from Middle High German, Dutch linde, Scandinavian lind. There are several places, especially in North Germany, named with this word... [more]
LINDLEYEnglish, German
English habitational name from either of two places in West Yorkshire called Lindley, or from Linley in Shropshire and Wiltshire, all named from Old English lin ‘flax’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘glade’, with epenthetic -d-, or from another Lindley in West Yorkshire (near Otley), named in Old English as ‘lime wood’, from lind ‘lime tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
LINDTGerman, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
LINEBAUGHGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Leinbach.
LINNScottish, Scots, English, Irish, German, Jewish, Finnish (Anglicized), Estonian
As a Scottish and Northern English surname, it is a variant of Lyne. Its usage as an English name is primarily by Scots living in Northern England.... [more]
LIPPSGerman
Derived from Lippe, a place in Westphalia, Germany. The name is a variant of the first name Philipp.
LITTMANGerman (East Prussian), German (West Prussian), German, Jewish
Derived from Germanized Czech personal names like Litomir (Czech: Ljutomir) and Litobor (Czech: Ljutobor) which ultimately go back to Old Slavic ljutu "grim; fierce; ferocious; wild". One theory suggests, however, that these given names might have been influenced by ljub- "love; dear".... [more]
LIVENGOODGerman
The surname LIVENGOOD is the Americanized version of Leibendgut. Leibengut is Swiss-German in origin. It has been written as Livengood and Levengood in America. Records show the family name back to 1550, in Aarwangen, Canton of Berne, Switzerland... [more]
LOCHGerman
From German Loch "hole", ultimately derived from Middle High German loch "hole, hollow, valley".
LOCKEnglish, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
LOCKEEnglish, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
LOCKHARTScottish, German
Scottish: of uncertain origin, probably from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements loc ‘lock’, ‘bolt’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. English: occupational name for a herdsman in charge of a sheep or cattlefold, from Old English loc ‘enclosure’, ‘fold’ + hierde ‘herd(er)’.
LOESCHGerman
German metonymic occupational name from Middle High German lösch ‘fine leather’.
LOESCHERGerman
German variant of Löscher, an occupational name for a fireman, from Middle High German leschen ‘to extinguish’. Als a variant of Loesch and Lescher or a derivative of Loesche.
LONGGerman
Famous bearer is Luz Long a former Olympic competitor.
LÖSCHLow German, Upper German
North German metonymic occupational name for a maker of fine leather, from Middle Low German losche ‘fine leather’. South German variant of Lesch (see Loesch).
LÖWENSTEINGerman
Habitational name from any of several places called Löwenstein.
LOWENSTEINGerman, Jewish, Swedish
German (Löwenstein): habitational name from any of several places called Löwenstein.... [more]
LÖWENTHALGerman
Habitational name from any of various places called Löwenthal.
LUBAHNGerman
Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- "love", "dear".
LUBBEGerman, Slavic, Prussian
Variant of Lubben. Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- ‘love’, ‘dear’ (see Luba).
LUBBENLow German, Dutch
Dutch and North German (Lübben) patronymic from German Lübbe, Dutch $Lubbe, short forms of the personal names Leopold and Lübbert (see Luebbert). Dutch from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Lodebert, a compound of hlod ‘famous’ + berht ‘bright’.
LUCHSGerman
meaning: lynx
LUCKHARDTGerman
Metronymic from the Germanic female personal name Liutgard, a compound of liut ‘people’ + gard ‘protective enclosure’, ‘yard’.
LUDEMANNLow German
Ludemann is a German name
LUDENBERGGerman
From Latin ludere meaning "to play" and German berg meaning "mountain".
LUKERGerman
Luker see also Lucher or Luchre, meaning money more specifically money obtained by nefarious means.
LÜLLGerman
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with liut- ‘people’ as the first element.
LUSTIGSwedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
LUTTERDutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
LUXGerman, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
LUXENBERGGerman, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
LYBOULTGerman
Famous Warrior... [more]
LYDAYGerman (Anglicized)
Probably an Americanized form of German Leidig.
LYMANEnglish, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
MACKScottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus). Shortened form of any of the many Scottish and Irish names beginning M(a)c-.... [more]
MACONFrench, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères. ... [more]
MAKOVOZABaltic (Latinized, Rare), German (Latinized, Rare), Russian (Rare)
There is no history of the name just a family name I on't know if some people have it as a first name too.
MALLOWGerman
Variant spelling of Malow, a habitational name from Malow in Mecklenburg.
MANHARTGerman (Modern)
From the Germanic personal name Manhard, composed of the Germanic elements man "man", "human" + hard "hardy", "brave", "strong". Americanized spelling of German Manhardt.
MANTEYGerman, Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Manthei in Schwerin province. This name is also established in Poland.
MANUELSpanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
MANZGerman (Austrian), German
In Austria it means manager, one who is in charge of men. In Germany it is a given name.
MARKEnglish, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
MARKELLDutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’. Americanized form of Slovenian Markelj, a derivative of the personal name Marko, Latin Marcus, + the suffix -elj.
MARKERGerman
Status name for someone who lived on an area of land that was marked off from the village land or woodland, Middle High German merkære.
MAROTZKEGerman
Germanized form of Polish Marocki, itself derived from the personal given name Marcin, the Polish form of Martin.
MARSTELLERGerman
Occupational name for a stable boy in or for the supervisor of the stables on a noble estate, from Middle High German mar(c) 'noble horse' stall 'stable' + the agent suffix -er.
MARTAINGerman (Rare)
Possibly a Germanized form of Dutch Martijn.
MARTELLEEnglish, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
MARXGerman
Derived from the name of the Roman god of war Mars; means "of Mars". A notable bearer is Karl Marx, a German philosopher and "The Father of Communism".
MASELGerman
German from a pet form of a short form of Thomas.
MASTGerman
Nickname from Middle High German mast "fat", "stout".
MATTHIASGerman, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
MAUERGerman
Variant of MAURER.
MAUERGerman, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a wall, Middle High German mure "wall".
MAUSTGerman
Possibly an altered form MAST.
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