German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
Filter Results       more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
MEISTERGerman
Means "Master" in German.
MELLENTHINGerman
Habitational name from places so called near Berlin and on the island of Usedom.
MENKEGerman
Derived as a diminutive of several Germanic given names whose first element was derived from Germanic *magin- and *megin- "strength; force; power".
MENTZERGerman
Habitational name with the agent suffix -er, either from Mainz, earlier Mentz, derived from the medieval Latin name Mogontia (Latin Mogontiacum, probably from the Celtic personal name Mogontios), or from Menz in Brandenburg and Saxony.
MENZELGerman, English
Derived from a short form of MENZ, CLEMENS or HERMANN.
MESMERGerman
The surname of Franz Mesmer, a German physician who discovered animal-magnetism (mesmerism / hypnotism). The English word "mesmerism" is derived from this surname.
MESSERGerman
Occupational name for an official in charge of measuring the dues paid in kind by tenants, from an agent derivative of Middle High German mezzen "to measure".
METTEGerman, Dutch
From a pet form of the female personal name MECHTHILD.
METZGerman
From a short form of the female personal name MECHTHILD.
MEUSBURGERGerman (Austrian)
The history of this last name is that it means "Mountain Dweller." Being as part of the Austrian surnames, it's a widely used one in it's home country. A few brothers had gone to various countries, as of now there is Meusburgers in Columbia, as well as the United States and throughout Europe... [more]
MICHELSGerman, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
MICKGerman, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name MIKOLAJ or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread". The name was reportedly taken from Germany to Ireland in the 18th century.
MIDDENDORFGerman
"middle of the village"
MINOREnglish, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
MITTELGerman
Literally "middle", probably a topographic name from a farm occupying a middle position in a settlement. Compare Mitter.
MITTELMANNGerman
From a byname from Middle High German mittelman "mediator, arbitrator".
MITTERGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned a property that was in the middle between two or more others, especially if the others were both held by men with the same personal name (for example, Mitter Hans), from the strong form of Middle High German mitte "mid, middle".
MITTERMEIERGerman (Austrian)
Literal meaning "middle farmer" its thought to have been given to farmers living between two there farms in the mountains.
MÖBIUSGerman
Patronymic surname derived from the given name Bartholomäus, the German form of Bartholomew.
MOGASENGerman
meaning unknown
MOHLERGerman, English
The Mohler surname is derived from the Low German word möhl which means mill. Thus the name originally denoted someone who live or worked near a mill. Variant of Müller.
MONTAGGerman
It means Monday in German.
MOOKGerman
This surname means 'flying insect' from a German word that is mauke. (I think it is mauke, I am SO not sure.)
MOORINGLow German (Modern)
habitational name from möringen or möhringen of northern germany.
MOSBRUCKERGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bridge over a swamp, from Middle High German mos meaning "bog", "swamp" + brucke meaning "bridge".
MOSELEItalian, German (Austrian)
This surname is to be found in north-eastern Italy, more specifically in the Vicenza and Verona provinces. Families with this name are certain to be originally from the mountain town of Asiago, situated on a plateau north of Vicenza and now a well-known skiing resort... [more]
MOZARTGerman
The surname was first recorded in the 14th century as Mozahrt, and later as Motzhardt in Germany. It is a compound word, the first part of which is Middle High German mos, also spelt mosz, and meaning “bog, marsh” in southern dialects (compare modern German Moos)... [more]
MÜSCHGerman
Either a habitational name from a place named Müsch in Germany, or a topographic name meaning "bog", perhaps given to someone living near a bog.
MUSCHDutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
MUTTERGerman
(also Mütter): occupational name for an official employed to measure grain, from Middle High German mutte, mütte 'bushel', 'grain measure' (Latin modius) + the agent suffix -er.
NABROTZKYGerman
Supposedly means "lived near water". Originated from Prussia.
NACHTIGALLGerman, Jewish
Nickname from Middle High German nachtegal "nightingale" from Old High German galan "to sing". Cognate to NIGHTINGALE.
NACHTRIEBGerman
It possibly comes from the German name of a nachtrab, which is a "night bird like the owl". Another possible meaning is "night tribe".
NADELGerman, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker of needles, or in some cases for a tailor, from Middle High German nadel(e), German Nadel "needle".
NAEGELEGerman
Variant of Nagel.
NARRGerman
Nickname for a foolish or silly person, from Middle High German narr ‘fool’, ‘jester’.
NASERSGerman
Habitational, derived from any of several places called Nesse in Oldenburg and Friesland.
NASTGerman
Topographic name for someone who lived in a thickly wooded area, or a metonymic occupational name for a woodcutter, from Middle High German nast meaning "branch", a regional variant of ast, resulting from the misdivision of forms such as ein ast meaning "a branch".
NAUGerman
A variant of Neu; meaning "ship" or "boat."
NEESONIrish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as McNeese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen. Surname made famous by the actor Liam Neeson
NEGLEYGerman (Swiss)
Altered spelling of Swiss German Nägele, Naegeli, or Nägeli, variants of Nagel.
NEHERGerman
An occupational name for a tailor from a deritive of Middle Low German, 'nehen' which means 'to sew' or 'to embroider'
NEINGerman
Unexplained. Perhaps from a short form of a Germanic personal name formed with an element cognate with Old High German niuwi meaning "new".
NERGERGerman (Silesian)
My family name, Nerger, is listed in the "Deutsches Namenlexicon" by Hans Bahlow. The meaning, given in the lexicon, is "ernahrer" or provider.
NERZGerman
From the German word Nerz meaning "Mink".
NEUGerman (Modern)
The name Neu is a common German last name.
NEUBERGERGerman
German surname meaning 'new mountaineer'
NEUENFELDTGerman
Habitational name for someone from places so named in Brandenburg and Pomerania, or from places in Lower Saxony or Westphalia called Neuenfelde.
NEUGERGerman, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
NEUJAHRGerman
nickname for someone who owed feudal dues at the New Year, or sometimes a name given to someone born on that day
NEUSERGerman (Rare)
Person who had ancestors that lived in Germany near Dusseldorf in the town called Neuss.
NEUWIRTHGerman
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a new innkeeper, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + wirt and German neu + Wirt ‘master of a house’, ‘innkeeper’.
NEYGerman, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
NIBBEGerman
Nickname meaning ‘beak’, or from a short form of a Germanic personal name Nippo, composed of Old High German nit ‘hostility’, ‘eagerness’ + boto ‘messenger’.
NICKSEnglish, German
From the nickname of Nicholas.
NIEDUpper German
South German: habitational name from Nied in Hesse.
NIEDERHÄUSERGerman, Swiss
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Niederhaus or Niederhausen, denoting the lower of two dwellings or settlements or one in a low-lying position.
NIEHAUSGerman
North German: topographic name from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + hus ‘house’; or a habitational name from a common North German and Westphalian farm name with the same meaning.
NIEMEYERLow German
North German nickname for a newly arrived steward or tenant farmer, from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + Meyer.
NIESGerman
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dionys (see Dennis), which was stressed on the last syllable; this was a popular personal name as a result of the influence of the French Saint Denis... [more]
NIESENDutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis). ... [more]
NIGGGerman, German (Swiss)
From a short form of the personal name Niklaus, a German form of Nicholas.
NIKKELGerman, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
NONNENMACHERGerman
Occupational name for a gelder of hogs, from Middle High German nunne, nonne meaning "nun", and by transfer "castrated hog" + an agent derivative of machen meaning "to make".
NORAItalian, German
Italian and German: from a short form of the feminine personal names Eleonora or Leonora.
NORRELLEnglish, German (?)
A locational surname from the Germanic (Old English/Old Norse) term for the north. It either refers to someone who lived in a location called Northwell, lived north of a well, spring or stream (Old English weall)... [more]
NOTBOHMGerman, Low German
Low German cognate of High German Nussbaum.
NÜRNBERGERGerman, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from the city of Nürnberg in Bavaria.
NUSSGerman
from Middle High German nuz ‘nut’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a gatherer and seller of nuts, or a nickname for a man thought to resemble a nut in some way
OBENAUFGerman
Surname used to refer to someone who lived 'up there' (on a mountain, hill, etc.).
OBERLINGerman, English
From Oberst and the suffix Lynn.... [more]
OCHSNERGerman (Swiss)
Means "Oxen Herder" in Swiss. It is pronounced as OCKSNER, and it is just as popular in Switzerland as Smith is in the US.
OFFUTTGerman
Possibly a respelling of German Auffahrt ‘ascension’.
OHNMACHTGerman
Means "powerlessness; helplessness; without power" in German. This was often used to describe someone very weak.
OLEVIANGerman (Latinized)
Olevian is a latinised word meaning "from Olewig" (a town today incorporated into Trier, Germany). ... [more]
OPELGerman
Derived from the given name ALBERT.
OPPGerman
Generally considered a (very) contracted form of given names that contained the Old High German element od "fortune; wealth" (or a variant thereof) and a second element that began with or contained the letter B, for example Audobald.
OROWITZJewish, German
The name comes from a famous Rabbinical dynasty.... [more]
ÖSTERREICHERGerman, German (Austrian)
Means "One from Austria", "the Austrian".
OVERHOLSERGerman (Swiss)
The Oberholtzer family originated in the Swiss village of Oberholtz, south of Zurich, before the 15th century. However, in 1661, one family left Switzerland for the Palatinate in Germany.
PACKARDEnglish, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PAGEGerman
Metonymic occupational name for a horse dealer, from Middle Low German page "horse".
PAINTEREnglish, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
PALLMANNGerman
The name Pallmann originates from the Landsuhl area of Bavaria, Germany (nor in Rhineland-Palatinate). The meaning of the name is unknown. Some Pallmanns came to America and Americanized the spelling, by dropping the second "n", while others retained the "n".
PALMTAGGerman
Means "Palm Sunday" in German.
PARDUHNGerman
Variant Of Pardon From Middle English Pardun, Pardon "Pardon" A Metonymic occupational name for a pardoner, a person licensed to sell papal pardons or indulgences. German: either a cognate of 1 (also for a sexton), from Old French pardon ‘pardon’, or perhaps a nickname from Middle Low German bardun, Middle High German purdune ‘pipe’ (instrument), ‘tenor’ (voice).
PARTENHEIMERGerman
Habitational name for someone from Partenheim in Rheinhessen.
PASCHGerman
Topographic name for a field or meadow which was used at Easter as a playground; etymologically two sources seem to be combined: Latin pascuum ‘pasture’ and Middle Low German pāsche(n) ‘Easter’.
PAULEYEnglish, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
PAULICKGerman
German (of Slavic origin) spelling of Pavlik, a Slavic derivative of Paul.
PAUSTENBACHGerman
Thomas Paustenbach, family name associated with the town Paustenbach, Germany
PAYSENGerman, Frisian
Patronymic from the personal name Pay, the Frisian form of Paul.
PAYSONGerman, Frisian
German and Frisian variant spelling of Paysen, a patronymic from the personal name Paul.
PECHMANGerman
"Pechman" means "man with bad luck" in many European languages (Polish, German, and Dutch predominantly), though in German, it originally referred to one who prepared, sold, or used pitch.
PEIKGerman
From Middle Low German pek ‘sharp, pointed tool or weapon’.
PEIKERTGerman
Probably an occupational name for a drummer.
PEIPERGerman (Austrian)
Occupational name for a piper, from Middle High German piper. In some cases it may be derived from Sorbian pipar "pepper", thus being an occupational name for a spicer or a nickname for one with a fiery temper.
PELLEDanish, German
From the personal name Pelle, a vernacular form of PETER.
PELLEGerman
From Middle Low German pelle "precious purple silk cloth", presumably an occupational name for a maker or seller of such cloth or for a maker of official and church vestments.
PELTZGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from Middle High German bellez, (modern German pelz) "fur", "animal skin".
PELZGerman, Jewish
Variant of PELTZ.
PELZERGerman
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative Middle High German bellez "fur".
PENNINGEnglish, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
PENNINGUpper German
Shortened form of Panno, which is a personal given name.
PETKEGerman
German surname derived from a diminutive form for Peter.
PETZOLDGerman
German. Derives from a pet form of a Slavic version of the given name Peter.
PFEFFERGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for a spicer, or a nickname for a person with a fiery temper, for a small man, or for a dark-haired person. Derived from German Pfeffer "pepper".
PFEIFFERGerman
Occupational name for a pipe player. From German Pfeife "whistle, pipe".
PFEILGerman
From Middle High German pfil ‘arrow’ (from Latin pilum ‘spike’, ‘javelin’), either a metonymic occupational name for an arrowsmith or possibly a nickname for a tall thin man.
PFUHLGerman
a topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp or pond, Middle High German phuol.... [more]
PFUNDGerman
metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights, or for a wholesale merchant, from Middle High German pfunt ‘pound’ (as a measure of weight and a unit of currency).
PIEPERGerman
Occupational name for a piper.
PILGRIMEnglish, German
From Middle English pilegrim, pelgrim or Middle High German bilgerin, pilgerin (from Latin pelegrinus "traveler"; see Pellegrino). This originated as a nickname for a person who had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land or to some seat of devotion nearer home, such as Santiago de Compostella, Rome, or Canterbury... [more]
PINKEnglish, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
PIONKEGerman, Polish
Germanized form of Slavic Pinoek, which is a nickname from pionek ‘puppet’.
PLAHNAGerman (Austrian)
It is a name from the Gratkorn, Graz, Styria area of Austria
PLÁŇSKERCzech (Rare, Archaic), Slovak (Rare, Archaic), German (Rare, Archaic)
Originating from Bohemia, a region between The Czech Republic and Germany. The name means "forest clearing", Pláň: forest, sker: clearing. It is a very rare last name with only about 20 holders of it.
PLUMEnglish, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
PLUMERGerman, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
POBANZGerman
Nickname for a braggart or bogeyman, of uncertain Slavic origin.
POEHLERGerman
German (Westphalian): topographic name for someone who lived by a muddy pool, from an agent noun derived from Middle Low pol ‘(muddy) pool’.
POELZERGerman
pronounced,Pfowelser,it means person skilled with bird's,as in Hawk's or Eagle's(bird's of prey).From Palatine,or Austria(a Royal house).
PÖGEGerman
German cognate of Page.
POHGerman
From a dialect word for standard German Pfau ‘peacok’, a nickname for a vain person or for someone with a strutting gait.
POHLGerman
1 topographic name from Middle Low German pol "(muddy) pool" (Low German Pohl).... [more]
POLANDEnglish, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
POLEYFrench, German, Jewish
French: variant of Polet, Paulet, pet forms of Paul.... [more]
POLKGerman
Ethnic name for a Pole.
POMERANTZGerman
Occupational name for an importer or seller of bitter (Seville) oranges, Middle High German pomeranz (medieval Latin pomarancia, composed of the elements arancia, the name imported with the fruit.
POPPGerman, English
From a Germanic personal name Poppo, Boppo, of uncertain origin and meaning, perhaps originally a nursery word or a short form of for example Bodobert, a Germanic personal name meaning ‘famous leader’... [more]
POPPEGerman
German form of "Pope", meaning father.
PÖPPELSouth German, German
Comes from a pet form of the personal name Popp.
POSTLow German, Danish, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived near a post or pole (Middle Low German, Middle Dutch post, from Latin postis), presumably one of some significance, e.g. serving as a landmark or boundary, or a habitational name from any of several places in northern Germany called Post, probably from this word.
POSTHUMUSDutch, Low German
From a personal name which was given to a posthumous child, i.e., one born after the death of his father, derived from Latin postumus "last, last-born" (superlative of posterus "coming after, subsequent") via Late Latin posthumus, which was altered by association with Latin humare "to bury", suggesting death (i.e., thought to consist of post "after" and humus "grave", hence "after death"); the one born after the father's death obviously being the last.
PRADLHungarian, German (Austrian)
Meaning unknown. Possibly originating somewhere in Hungary.
PRECHTGerman
Variant of BRECHT.
PREGLERGerman
Nickname for a chatterer or grumbler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German breglen ‘to chatter’, ‘complain’, ‘yell’, ‘roar’.
PREÜSGerman
Variant spelling of Preüss.
PREÜSSGerman (East Prussian)
Origin: From the New Latin 'Prussia', the Latin form used by Peter of Dusburg for the name of the region in the now-extinct language of its Baltic inhabitants, 'Prūsa'. Prussia (German: About this sound Preußen; Latin: Borussia, Prutenia; Latvian: Prūsija; Lithuanian: Prūsija; Polish: Prusy; Old Prussian: Prūsa; Danish: Prøjsen; Russian: Пру́ссия) was a German kingdom and historic state originating out of the Duchy of Prussia and the Margraviate of Brandenburg... [more]
PRIOREnglish, Scottish, Dutch, German
Derived from Latin prior meaning "superior". It was used as an occupational surname for a prior, which is a head of a religious house, below an abbot.
PROPHETEnglish, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
PROTZMANGerman
A habitational name for someone from any of various places in Lower Saxony, Brandenburg, and Luxembourg called Protz.
PRUSSEITGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "a Prussian".
PUDWILLGerman
Of Slavic origin, habitational name from Podewils in Pomerania.
PULLMANGerman
Variant of Puhlmann, itself a variant of Puhl.... [more]
PULVERLow German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
PUSCHATGerman (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) surname derived from Lithuanian pušaite "(young) pine tree", which - allegedly - used to be a term of endearment for a young girl.
PÜTTGerman
Habitational name from any of several places so named in Rhineland, Westphalia, and Pomerania, but in most cases a topographic name from Middle Low German putte ‘pit’, ‘well’, ‘puddle’, ‘pond’.
PUTZGerman
German for "plaster". Likely used to denote someone who manufactured plaster
QUAASGerman
Nickname for a big eater, from Middle Low German quās meaning "guzzling", "feasting".
QUADEIrish, German
As an Irish surname, it is a variant of Quaid.... [more]
QUADERERGerman
Nickname for someone stocky, from Middle High German quader meaning "building stone".
QUANDTGerman, History
From Middle Low German quant "prankster, joker". ... [more]
QUARTZGerman
The name refers to the common mineral "quartz"
QUASTGerman
habitational name from any of several places so named in northern Germany. metonymic occupational name for a barber or nickname for someone who wore a conspicuous tassel or feather, from Middle Low German, Middle High German quast(e) "tuft", "tassel", "brush", also "fool".
QUETZGerman
German family name originating from the town of Quetz (today Quetzdölsdorf).... [more]
RAABGerman
Derived from German rabe "raven". As a surname, it was given to a person with black hair.
RAABEGerman
Cognate of Rabe.
RAASCHGerman
Variant of Rasch.
RABEGerman
German surname meaning "raven, crow".
RABENSTEINGerman
Habitational name from any of numerous places called Rabenstein.
RACHELEnglish, German
From the English female given name RACHEL or derived from German rau "rough".
RADERGerman
Variation of Rademacher, meaning "maker of wheels" in German ("rat" meaning wheel), later shortened to Rader and other variations such as Redder, Raeder, Redler, etc.
RADLOFFLow German
North German: From the Old Norse Radulf.... [more]
RAFFENSPERGERGerman
Altered spelling of Ravensburger or Ravensberger, a habitational name for someone from Ravensburg in Württemberg, but there are a number of similar surnames, for example Raffenberg, a farm name near Hamm, and Raffsberger.
RAGATZGerman (Swiss)
Habitational name from Ragaz in Grison canton.
RAHEGerman
Nickname for a rough individual, from a North German variant of Rauh.
RAISCHGerman, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German rīsch, rūsch ‘reed’, ‘rush’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near a reed bed, or perhaps a metonymic occupational name for someone who used or harvested reeds... [more]
RAITERGerman
Occupational name for a taxman or accountant, from an agent derivative of Middle High German reiten ‘to reckon’, ‘to calculate’.
RAMPGerman (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: variant of Rampf, from Middle High German ramft, ranft ‘edge’, ‘wall’, ‘crust (of bread)’; applied as a topographic name for someone who lived at the limit or outer edge of some feature, for example a field, or possibly, in the sense ‘crust’, a nickname for a poor person.
RANDELFrench, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Rando, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element. Compare Randall.... [more]
RANDOLPHEnglish, German
Classicized spelling of Randolf, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements rand "rim (of a shield), shield" and wolf "wolf". This was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Rannúlfr, and was reinforced after the Norman Conquest by the Norman form Randolf.
RANGGerman
Variant of Range.... [more]
RANGEGerman, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
RANGELGerman, Spanish, Portuguese
A variant of Rengel. This name is also found in Portugal.
RANGEREnglish, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
RAPPOLDGerman
From a personal name composed of the Germanic elements rad "counsel", "advice" + bald "bold", "brave".
RASCHGerman, Jewish
Nickname for a quick or rash person from Middle High German, German rasch ‘quick’, ‘hot-headed’, ‘hasty’.
RATHERGerman, Jewish
1. Occupational name for a counsellor or nickname for a wise person, from Middle High German rater ‘adviser’. ... [more]
RATHGEBERGerman
From Middle High German ratgebe or Middle Low German ratgever "giver of advice, counselor", an occupational name for an adviser or wise man.
RAUGerman
Nickname for a ruffian, earlier for a hairy person, from Middle High German ruch, ruhe, rouch "hairy", "shaggy", "rough".
RÄUBERGerman, German (Swiss)
German, Swiss German: derogatory nickname, from Middle High German roubære ‘robber’, ‘bandit’, ‘highwayman’ (from roub, roup ‘booty’, ‘spoils’).
RAUCHGerman
Perhaps an occupational nickname for a blacksmith or charcoal burner, from Middle High German rouch, German Rauch ‘smoke’, or, in the case of the German name, a status name or nickname relating to a hearth tax (i.e. a tax that was calculated according to the number of fireplaces in each individual home).
RECHTGerman
Probably a habitational name from a place so named in the Rhineland.
RECHTGerman, Jewish
Nickname for an upright person, from Middle High German reht, German recht "straight". As a Jewish name it is mainly of ornamental origin.
RECKGerman
Nickname from Middle High German recke ‘outlaw’ or ‘fighter’. North German and Westphalian: from Middle Low German recke ‘marsh’, ‘waterlogged ground’, hence a topographic name, or a habitational name from a place named with this term.
RECKTENWALDGerman
habitational name from Recktenwald, near Saarbrücken.
REDDINGEnglish, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
REDIGDutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of Redding.
REDNERGerman
German: possibly a variant of Redmer, or an occupational name for a spokesman, Middle High German rednære.
REESELow German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
REEVERGerman
Possibly an altered form of German Riefer, a patronymic from the personal name Rüef, a reduced form of Rudolf.
REICHSTEINGerman
Habitational name from places named Reichstein (in Saxony) or Reichenstein (in Rhineland, Schleswig-Holstein, and Württemberg).
REIMERGerman
From a Germanic personal name, a reduced form of Reinmar, composed of the elements ragin "counsel" + mari, meri "fame".
REIMERSGerman
North German variant of REIMER.
REINBOLDGerman
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave."
REINKINGGerman
Reinking is a German-derived surname meaning "one who is neat and tidy"
REISEGerman, Jewish
German (Westphalia) topographic name, from Middle Low German ris, res ‘swamp’. ... [more]
REISERGerman, Upper German
Habitational name for someone from Reis or Reissen in Bavaria (see Reis). An occupational name from Middle High German reisære ‘warrior’, ‘traveler’. ... [more]
REISNERGerman
A habitational name for someone from a place called Reisen (for example in Bavaria), Reissen in Thuringia, or Reussen on the Saale river. A variant of Reiser Also from an agent derivative of Middle High German, Middle Low German rise ‘veil’; perhaps an occupational name for someone who made veils.
REISSGerman, Jewish, French (Huguenot)
German: variant of Reis or from any of several Germanic personal names composed with ric ‘power(ful)’. Also from the French Huguenot forename Ris, rendered as Reis and Reiss.... [more]
REISSERUpper German
An occupational name for a woodcutter, Middle High German risser.
REMISGreek, Dutch, German, Asturian
Greek from a medieval Greek personal name, Remis, a vernacular form of the personal name Remigius (see French Remy). ... [more]
RENGELGerman (Swiss)
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name formed with rang "curved", "bending"; "slender".
REPASSGerman (Swiss)
An Americanization of the Swiss Rippas. The first recorded person with this surname was from Ziefen, Switzerland.
REQUAGerman
Variant of Ricward, from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + ward ‘guardian’.
RESENGerman
Unknown source.
REUSSERSwiss, German, Upper German
In Switzerland, an occupational name for a fisherman or maker of fish traps, from an agent derivative of Middle High German riuse ‘fish trap’, ‘weir basket’. A nickname from an agent noun based on Middle High German riusen ‘to moan or complain’... [more]
REXEnglish, German (Latinized)
English: variant of Ricks. ... [more]
REZNORGerman
May be a variant of the German surname Reisner, a habitational name for someone from a place called Reisen (for example in Bavaria), Reissen in Thuringia, or Reussen on the Saale river.
RHEINGerman
From the German name for the River Rhine, denoting somebody whom lived within close proximity to the river. The river name itself comes from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'run, flow').
RHINEGerman, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RIBBECKGerman (East Prussian)
Possibly translates roughly to fish in some dialects.
RICHERSEnglish, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common Richard... [more]
RICKELSGerman
Patronymic form of Rickel or possibly Richel. May have been derived from any of a number of Old German personal names including Richild (or the feminine form Richeldis) or Richold.
RICKENGerman
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names composed with rīc "power(ful)".
RIECHERSGerman
German patronymic from Richard.
RIECKGerman
South German: from a pet form of the personal name Ru(o)diger, a compound of Old High German hrod ‘renown’ + ger ‘spear’, ‘lance’ (see Roger). ... [more]
RIEGELGerman
From Middle High German rigel "bar, crossbeam, mountain incline", hence a topographic name or a habitational name from any of numerous places named with this word in Baden, Brandenburg, and Silesia; in some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbars, locks, etc.
RIEKGerman
German: variant spelling of RIECK.
RIESERSwiss, German
Alemannic form of Reiser. A habitational name for someone from Ries near Passau. Alemannic variant of Rüsser and Rüser, a variant of Reusser. Altered spelling of Riesser, a habitational name for someone from Ries(s), a region of Bavaria.
RIETHGerman
"reed" -- a tall, slender-leaved plant of the grass family that grows in water or on marshy ground.
RINDGerman
Probably a metonymic occupational name for a cattle dealer or butcher, from Middle High German rint meaning "cow".
RINDTGerman
Variant of Rind.
RINGELBERGGerman
From the mountain on which sat Castle Ringel.
RINGGOLDGerman
Comes from Germanic ring "ring" or "assembly" and wald "rule"
RIPPASGerman (Swiss)
The first recorded person with this surname was from Ziefen, Switzerland.
RITCHEnglish, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
RITCHINGSFrench, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
RITSCHELGerman, History
Derived from Old High German hruod "fame". This was the maiden name of Magda Goebbels who was the wife of Paul Joseph Goebbels. Her husband was Nazi Germany's propaganda minister between the years 1933 and 1945... [more]
RITTENHOUSEGerman
Means "Knight House."
RITTMANGerman, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
RITZGerman
From a short form of the personal name Rizo, itself derived in part from Richard and in part from Heinrich (see Henry).
RIXGerman
given to a person who resided near a hill, stream, church, or tree
ROBERGerman
Variant of Röber (see Roeber).
ROBINScottish, English, French, German
From the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert, composed of the short form Rob and the hypocoristic suffix -in.
ROCKEFELLERGerman
Means "from Rockenfeld." Some famous bearers include founder of the Standard Oil Company and philanthropist John Davison Rockefeller (1839-1937), and 41st Vice President of the U.S.A. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (1908-1979).
ROCKMANGerman
Possibly a habitational name for someone from Rockau in Thuringia.
ROCKMANGerman, Jewish
Possibly an altered spelling of ROCHMAN.
ROEBERLow German
Habitational name from a place named Roben, for example in Thuringia or Schleswig. From a Germanic personal name based on hrod ‘renown’, ‘victory’. Low German variant of Räuber and Rauber.
Previous Page      1  2  3  4  5  6  7      Next Page         2,085 results (this is page 5 of 7)