Irish Submitted Surnames

Irish names are used on the island of Ireland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Irish diaspora. See also about Irish names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
O'HANLONIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAnluain (see HANLON).
O'HARRAIrish
A variant of O'Hara.
Ó HARTGHAILEIrish
It literally means "Artghal’s descendant".
ÓHEARCÁINIrish
The surname ÓhEarcáin (Harkins) is derived from the Irish nickname of Erc or Earc meaning freckled. The diminutive of Erc or Earc is Ercáin or Earcáin. When the Irish alphabet added the aspirate “h” the name became hErcáin or hEarcáin with the hereditary surname prefixes Uí hErcáin, UahErcáin, ÓhEarcáin and (female)Ní Earcáin that was anglicized as Harkin, Harkan, or Harkins... [more]
Ó HEARGHAILLIrish
Variation of Gaelic Ó Fearghail ‘descendant of Fearghal’, a personal name composed of the elements fear ‘man’ + gal ‘valor’.
O'HURLEYIrish
The name Hurley itslef come from the stick used in the game of Hurling, first played in Ireland. The name might have origanated due to a player of the game being dubbed hurley. O' would signify being a decendent of Hurley, thus O'Hurley.
O'KELLYIrish
Variant of KELLY.
Ó LACHTNÁINIrish
It literally means "Lachtnán’s descendant".
O'LENNONIrish
Original form of Lennon. Probably a variant of O'Leannain (from a by-name meaning "lover"), but may also be derived from O'Lonain (from lon, "blackbird").
Ó LIONÁINIrish
It literally means "Lonán’s descendant".
O'LONAINIrish
Derived from lon ("blackbird") and a diminutive combined with O ("grandson; male descendant").
Ó MACÁINIrish
Means "descendant of MAICÍN".
O'MAHERIrish (Rare)
This name comes from the Irish surname 'Meachair' which means hospitality. ... [more]
Ó MAICÍNIrish
Means "descendant of MAICÍN".
Ó MAOILÉIDIGHIrish
Meaning, ‘descendant of Maoléidigh’, a byname composed of the elements maol ‘chief’ + éidigh ‘ugly’.
O'MARAIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Meadhra "descendant of Meadhair" a personal name derived from meadhair "mirth".
O'MARRIrish (Anglicized, Rare)
This surname originated from the name 'Maher'. The O' means 'grandson of'. ... [more]
Ó MIADHAIGHIrish
Meaning ‘descendant of Miadhach’, a byname meaning ‘honorable’.
O'MILLIGANIrish
Form of Milligan.
Ó MUIMHNEACHÁINIrish
It literally mean’s "Munsterman’s descendant".
O'MULLAWILLIrish
Anglicized form Gaelic Ó Maol Fábhail meaning "descendent of MAOLFÁBHAIL".
O'NEILIrish
Variant of O'Neal.
O'PREYIrish
From the Irish Gaelic Á Preith or Ó Preith meaning "of the cattle spoil".
O'RIORDANIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Ríoghbhárdáin meaning "descendant of Ríoghbhardán". The name Ríoghbhardán means "little poet king" (see Rórdán).
ORLAIGHIrish
The name orlaigh means golden lady/princess. Usually spelt Orla or Orlaith and rarely spelt orlaigh. its a first name, not a surname
O'ROURKEIrish
Means "descendant of Ruairc", a pre-9th-century Norse personal name. A famous bearer was child actress Heather O'Rourke (1975-1988).
Ó RUAIRCIrish
Meaning, ‘descendant of Ruarc.’
Ó SEACHNASAIGHIrish
Means "descendant of Seachnasach", a personal name of uncertain origin, perhaps derived from seachnach "elusive". The Ó Seachnasaigh or O'Shaughnessy family are believed to be descendants of Daithi, the last pagan king of Ireland.
Ó SEANACHAINIrish
Means "grandson of Seanachan". Alternatively, may be derived from Gaelic seanachaidh, meaning "skilled storyteller".
O'SHAUGHNESSYIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Seachnasaigh "descendant of Seachnasach", a personal name of uncertain origin, perhaps derived from seachnach "elusive".
Ó SÍOCHÁNAIrish
Proper, non-Anglicized form of Sheehan.
O' TOLANIrish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Ó TORÁINIrish
Meaning, ‘descendant of Torán’, a personal name formed from a diminutive of tor ‘lord’, ‘hero’, ‘champion’.
O’TORANIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Toráin ‘descendant of Torán’, a personal name formed from a diminutive of tor ‘lord’, ‘hero’, ‘champion’.
O' TUATHALAINIrish
May translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
O' TWOLANIrish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
PARHAMIrish, English
This name has been used amongst the Irish and English. This user's great grandmother came from Ireland and her maiden name was Parham. However, in English (London) it is a habitational name from places in Suffolk and Sussex, named in Old English with pere ‘pear’ + ham ‘homestead’.
PAYTONIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Peatáin "descendant of PEATÁN.
PERDUEEnglish, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
PIKEEnglish, Irish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a sharp point, from Old English pic ‘point’, ‘hill’, which was a relatively common place name element.... [more]
PILKINGTONEnglish (British), Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, England.
POGUEIrish, American
An Irish surname meaning "kiss"
POLANDEnglish, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
PRATHERIrish
The name Prather derives from the word Praetor which means leader or each of two ancient Roman magistrates ranking below consul.
PRENDERGASTIrish
means "good priest's glen" in Irish
PRIORIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mac an Phríora meaning "son of the prior".
QUADEIrish, German
As an Irish surname, it is a variant of Quaid.... [more]
QUAIDIrish
Reduced form of McQuaid.
QUAYLEEnglish, Irish, Scottish, Manx
Meaning, "son of Paul." When the name originates from Ireland, the Isle of Man and Scotland it is an Anglicisation of the Gaelic Mac Phàil (Scottish) Mac Phóil (Irish) Mac Phaayl (Manx) meaning "son of Pàil / Póil / Paayl"... [more]
QUILLIrish
Quill or Quille is an anglicised version of the Irish surnames Ó Cuill, Coll, Coill, and O'Coill (Ó Coill), all of which mean wood, forest or shrub Hazel Tree. The Coill clan are believed to be a bardic family from Munster, particularly Kerry and Cork... [more]
QUILLEIrish
Variation of Quill.
QUINLEYEnglish, Scottish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Apparently an altered form of Scottish McKinley or a reduced form of Irish McQuinnelly, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coingheallaigh or Ó Coingheallaigh ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach’, a personal name meaning ‘faithful to pledges’.
RAFTERYIrish
Corrupted version of "Rafferty"
RANKINScottish, Irish
Composed of the medieval given name Rankin, a diminutive of either Ronald or Rand and the name suffix kin.
RATIGANIrish (Anglicized, Rare)
Anglicized form of Ó Reachtagán, meaning "descendant of Reachtagán", a personal name from a diminutive of "reachtaire" ("steward", "administrator") or "reacht" ("law"). Was used in the Disney film Basil The Great Mouse Detective as the name of the villain, Professor Ratigan.
REDMONDIrish
From the given name Redmond.
REITHScottish (Anglicized), Irish
A Scottish surname of uncertain origin.... [more]
RENEHANIrish
Derived from Irish Gaelic, meaning "sharp- or star-pointed."
RHINEGerman, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RIANIrish (Anglicized, Rare, ?)
An alternate spelling and pronunciation of Ó Riain, due to French influences after the progenitors of the family moved to France from Ireland.
RIORDANIrish
meaning, "royal bard"
ROANEIrish
Variant spelling of Rowan or possibly a variant of Ruane.
ROGANIrish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruadhagáin ‘son of Ruadhagán’, a personal name from a diminutive of ruadh ‘red’.
RONEYIrish (Anglicized, Modern, Archaic)
The most common Irish variant of Rooney primarily concentrated in the Ulster counties of Down, Louth, Armagh, Fermanagh, Monaghan, and Sligo. From the Gaelic O'Ruanaidh and O'Ruanadha which means the descendant of the champion of ulster... [more]
ROONEYIrish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruanaidh "descendant of Ruanadh", a byname meaning "champion".
ROURKEIrish
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruairc ‘descendant of Ruarc’, Old Gaelic Ruadhrac, a personal name from Norse Hrothrekr (see Roderick). This is the name of chieftain family in counties Leitrim and Cavan.... [more]
RUADHAGINIrish
Meaning, ‘son of Ruadhagán.’
RUSHIrish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruis "descendant of Ros", a personal name perhaps derived from ros "wood". In Connacht it has also been used as a translation of Ó Luachra (see Loughrey).
SANKEYEnglish, Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, which derived from the name of an ancient British river, perhaps meaning "sacred, holy." ... [more]
SCANNELLIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Scannail, meaning "Descendant of Scannal," a name meaning "contention"
SCURLOCKWelsh, Irish
Obscure, probably derived from 'ystog', a Welsh word meaning 'fortress'
SETHScottish, Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Sithigh or Ó Síthigh (see Sheehy).
SHADYEngish, Irish
Origin unidentified. Possibly Irish or English.
SHANAHANIrish
Anglicised form of Ó Seanachain.
SHAYIrish
Variant of Shea.
SHEEHANIrish (Anglicized, Archaic)
From irish "O Siodhachain" meaning "descendant of Siodhach" - peaceful or gentle, courteous.
SHIVERSIrish
Irish variant of Chivers.
SILKEnglish, Irish
English: metonymic occupational name for a silk merchant, from Middle English selk(e), silk(e) ‘silk’. ... [more]
SINEATHEnglish, Irish
Variant of Sinnott. Not to be confused with the Irish first name Sinéad.
SINNOTTEnglish, Irish
From the medieval personal name Sinod (from Old English Sigenōth, literally "victory-brave").... [more]
SIONÓIDIrish
Gaelicization of Sinnott.
SLATTERYIrish (Anglicized, Modern)
Irish (Munster): reduced form of O’Slattery, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Slat(ar)ra ‘descendant of Slatra’, a byname meaning "robust", "strong", "bold".
SMULLENIrish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Smolláin, according to Patrick Woulfe, a variant of Ó Spealáin (see Spillane).
SOMERVILLEScottish, Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Scottish (of Norman origin) habitational name, probably from Graveron Sémerville in Nord, named with the Germanic personal name Sigimar (see Siemer) + Old French ville ‘settlement’. ... [more]
SPILLANEIrish
Irish: reduced form O’Spillane, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Spealáin or ‘descendant of Spealán’, a personal name representing a diminutive of "speal" "‘scythe’". Compare Smullen... [more]
SPLAINIrish
Irish: reduced form of Spillane.
ST LEGERIrish, English
Anglo-Irish surname, from one of the places in France called Saint-Léger, which were named in honour of St. Leodegar.
STOHOKEIrish
Gaelic name that originated in Ireland.
SUMMERLYIrish
From Irish Gaelic Ó Somacháin "descendant of Somachán", a nickname meaning literally "gentle" or "innocent".
SWAINScottish, Irish, English
Northern English occupational name for a servant or attendant, from Middle English swein "young man attendant upon a knight", which was derived from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant"... [more]
SWEENYIrish
Irish variant spelling of Sweeney.
SWIFTEnglish, Irish
As an English surname, it is originated as a nickname for a swift, fast runner (from Old English swift meaning "swift, fleet, quick.")... [more]
SYLVERSIrish
Variant of Silvers.
TALLANTEnglish (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
TALLONEnglish, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
THULISIrish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
TOLANIrish
Recorded as O' Tolan, O' Twolan, Toland, Toolan, Toolin, apparently Thulis, possibly on some occasions O' Toole, and probably others, this is an ancient Irish surname of very confusing origins... [more]
TOLANDIrish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
TONERIrish (Anglicized, Modern)
An anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic surname, O'Tomhrair. Still used in the modern day Republic of Ireland, and relatively common in Atlantic Canada.
TOOLANIrish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
TOOLINIrish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
TOOMEYIrish
from ancient Gaelic personal name 'Tuama', probably derived from 'tuaim', meaning a hill or a small mountain
TORANGalician, Irish
Galician (Torán): habitational name from the village of Santa María de Torán in Ourense province.... [more]
TORRENCEScottish, Irish
Scottish and northern Irish habitational name from either of two places called Torrance (one near East Kilbride, the other north of Glasgow under the Campsie Fells), named with Gaelic torran ‘hillock’, ‘mound’, with the later addition of the English plural -s.... [more]
TOTUMIrish (Rare)
from the word "totem" meaning sign. Or from Irish 'titim' meaning 'fall'.
TRAINORIrish
Reduced form of McTraynor, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Thréinfhir "son of Tréinfhear", a byname meaning "champion, strong man" (from tréan "strong" and fear "man").
TROYIrish, English, German, Jewish, French, Dutch
As an Irish surname, it is a reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Troighthigh, meaning ‘descendant of Troightheach’.... [more]
TROYIrish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Troighthigh "descendant of Troightheach", a byname meaning "foot soldier".
TUÍNEÁNIrish
Meaning, "watercourse."
TULLYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Taithligh "descendant of Taithleach", a byname meaning "quiet", "peaceable".
TULLYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Maol Tuile "descendant of the devotee of the will of God" (from toil "will of God").
TUTTLEEnglish, English (American), Irish
Derived from the Old Norse given name Þorkell, derived from the elements þórr (see Thor) and ketill "cauldron". The name evolved into Thurkill and Thirkill in England and came into use as a given name in the Middle Ages... [more]
UNIONEnglish, Irish
A bearer: Gabrielle Union, an actress.
URIEScottish, English, Irish
From the Scottish Fetteresso parish, Kincardineshire. May mean someone who is brave and loud.
VALIANTEnglish, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Old French vaillant meaning "heroic, courageous".
WALCHIrish
Variant of Walsh.
WALSHEIrish
Variant spelling of Walsh.
WATHERSIrish
The surname originated in Donegal, Ireland. MacConuisce was an Anglicized form of o'hUisce. Uisce translates to water in English. Wathers is a rather uncommon name because it is an untraditional way of spelling Waters... [more]
WEIRIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Mhaoir "son of the steward or keeper".
WEIRIrish
Anglicized form, based on an erroneous translation (as if from Gaelic cora "weir", "stepping stones"), of various Gaelic names such as Ó Corra (see CORR) and Ó Comhraidhe (see CURRY).
WELSHIrish
Variant of Walsh.
WINDHAMEnglish, Irish (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Wyndham in West Sussex, near West Grinstead, probably named from an unattested Old English personal name Winda + Old English hamm ‘water meadow’; or from Wymondham in Leicestershire and Norfolk, named from the Old English personal name Wigmund (see Wyman) + Old English ham ‘homestead’... [more]
WOGANIrish
From the Old Welsh personal name Gwgan or Gwgon, originally probably a nickname meaning literally "little scowler". (Cf. the second element in Cadogan.) This surname is borne by Irish radio and television presenter Terry Wogan (1938-).
WOODLOCKIrish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
WOULFEEnglish, Irish
English: variant spelling of Wolf. ... [more]
WRINNIrish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Ó Rinn "descendant of Rinn", a personal name perhaps based on reann "spear".
WYNDScottish, Irish
Scotland or Ireland not sure of original origin. There was a childe Wynd some type of royal who slayed a dragon type thing worm or something and a Henery Wynd who was a mercenary in a battle at north inch in Scotland
YEAGEREnglish, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of German JÄGER.