Medieval Submitted Surnames

These names were used in medieval times.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ACAMPORA Italian, Medieval Italian, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Acampora is a variant of Acanfora, from the medieval personal name Canfora, from canfora ‘camphor’ (from Arabic kāfūr).
ACE English, Norman, Medieval French
The surname Ace's origin is from a Norman and Old French personal name, Ace, Asse, from Germanic Frankish origin Azzo, Atso, a pet form of personal names containing adal ‘noble’ as a first element.
AIMAR Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon, Spanish
1. From the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Aethelmaer", meaning "famous noble." ... [more]
ALEGHIERI Medieval Italian (Tuscan, Rare, Archaic)
It has a hard to trace meaning, but the research shows that the meaning might be "clurgyman's family" or "son of professers." People know this last name for the poet Dante Aligheri who wrote the Dievine Comedy.
ALLAIRE Medieval French, French (Quebec), French (Huguenot)
Allaire is the name of a village in Northwestern France(Brittany) near Vannes. The name may have Breton origins. At least two separate branches of the family came to the New World in the 17th Century... [more]
ANTUNYES Medieval Portuguese (Latinized, Modern)
Meaning Son of Anthony or Anton. There is a very old form of the latin which is Antonios or Antonius.
APPEL German, Dutch, Jewish, Low German, Medieval Dutch, Yiddish
1. German: from the personal name Appel, a pet form of Apprecht (common especially in Thuringia and Franconia), itself a variant of Albrecht. ... [more]
BACQUIER Medieval Basque
Meaning cowboy or rancher.
BALDRICK Medieval English
The name of Blackadder (Rowan Atkinson)'s much-hated slave in the comedy Blackadder.... [more]
BALFAGER Ancient Germanic (Gothic), Medieval Portuguese
Name of a Visigoth noble family (around the 10th century) from the Iberian Peninsula (current northern Portugal), meaning "bold spear"; they descent from the Balti dynasty.
BECC Medieval English
Variant spelling of Beck
BERRYANN Medieval English (Rare)
The name is pre 7th century Olde English and later Olde French. It derives from the word burri or berri, translating as a fortress or castle and means 'one who dwelt at the castle'. The suffix 'man' also indicates that it was job descriptive for a guard or keeper of the castle... [more]
BISBY Medieval Scottish, Medieval English, English (British), Scottish, English (Australian), Anglo-Norman
Either originating from the village Busby in historic county East Renfrewshire in Scotland, or Great Busby in Yorkshire. The place name is likely derived from the Norman buki, "shrub". See also Busby.
BLAKEWOOD Medieval English
Derived from the Old English words blaec, which means black, and wudu, which means wood, and indicates that the original bearer lived near a dark, wooded area.
BLISS Medieval English, Medieval English (Anglicized)
Originally a nickname for a cheerful person, derived from the Old English blisse, meaning "gladness" or "joy." Another origin of the surname is habitional, coming from from the village of Blay in Calvados (modern-day Normandy), spelled as Bleis in 1077, or from the village of Stoke Bliss in Worcestershire, first known as Stoke de Blez, named after the Norman family de Blez.... [more]
BONDE Swedish, Old Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse bóndi "farmer". Used as both a last name and a (rare) given name in Sweden (see BONDE for the given name and BONDESSON as an example of a patronymic derived from this name)... [more]
BOUZIGAT Medieval Occitan
Lengadocian (dialect of Occitan): meaning "fallow land" or "cleared, uncultivated land"
BOWE Medieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
BRAEGON Medieval Scottish (Americanized)
Meaning high noble, or he who shall rule.
BURE Old Swedish, Swedish
This was the name of an influential family in 16th century Sweden. The name originated from the village Bure (now known as Bureå) in Skellefteå parish in Northern Sweden. The village got its name from the nearby Bure River (Swedish: Bure älv, Bureälven) whose name was derived from the Swedish dialectal word burra "buzz, rumble".
CHENERY Medieval French, English (British, Anglicized, Modern)
Derived from the Old French "chesne" for oak tree, or "chesnai" for oak grove, from the medieval Latin "casnetum". As a topographical name, Cheyne denoted residence near a conspicuous oak tree, or in an oak forest.
CHERRO Medieval Spanish (Latinized)
Meaning villager or farmer of Salamanca, especially of the region which includes Alba, Vitigudino, Ciudad Rodrigo And Ledesma. Concerning the villager from Salamanca called Charro and its equivalent demonym or gentilic is salmantino, salmanticense, salamanqués, salamanquino.
COENS Medieval German
Variation of Coen. A diminutive of Konrad/Conrad, an old German Emperor's name (compare its Dutch form 'Coenraad'). The surname, thus, means "of, from, or belonging to Conrad/Konrad". The name Conrad comes from the Old High German word Kuonrat, meaning literally "bold in counsel".... [more]
COITO Medieval Italian (Tuscan, Latinized, ?)
That means a wedding or the nuptials.
COMINERO Medieval Spanish (Latinized, Rare)
Means "gatherer of cumin" from the spanisgh word "comino".
COURTIER French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
CRAWFORDJOHN Medieval Scottish
One who came from Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire; not to be confused with nearby Crawford, also in Lanarkshire.
DE ACUTIS Medieval Italian
acute, sharp, keen
DE DRUMON Medieval Scottish
This name appears carved on the tomb of "Jonnes de Drumon". This is said to be the earliest known written example of the Scottish surname Drummond. We believe that de Drumon could have been costal French or Belgium... [more]
DE METZ Medieval Jewish, Medieval French
A medieval Ashkenazic French habitational name originally meaning "of Metz", from the city of Metz (now known as Mettis) in Lorraine, which was originally known as Mediomatrica, after the Gaulish tribe of the Mediomatrici... [more]
DE ROMA Medieval Spanish (Spanish, Rare, Expatriate)
A Spanish locational surname meaning “Of Rome”, perhaps for a Spaniard who lived in Rome or an Italian expat who immigrated to Spain
DINGFELDER Medieval German (Rare, Archaic)
When surnames were finally adopted, family heads who originated from Thungfeld in the Steigerwald area of Mittelfranken, took the name of their traditional home area.
DOHMEN Medieval Dutch
Derived from dutch surname Damen
DOYENARTE Medieval Basque (Latinized, Rare, Archaic)
It means a place or site near the forest.
ELFORD Medieval English
From the Old English personal name Ella, from the word oelf meaning "elf" or from the Old English alor/elre, meaning "alder tree." The name in full would mean "alder tree by a ford" or "Ella who lives by a ford".... [more]
ELL Medieval
This name derives from the Medieval given name Elis first recorded in the 1220 Pipe Rolls of Middlesex "Elis de Adham". The ultimate origin of the name is the Hebrew, Elisha or Elijah (meaning "Jehovah is God")... [more]
EMOR Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
ESKELL Old Danish
Variant of Eskil, a form (found in Old Danish) of the Norse name Áskell, Ásketill.
EYMER Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
EYMOR Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
EZZO Medieval Italian
EZZO: " Derived from a Germanic name Azzo, based on the element z , which originates debated; between the various hypotheses are: ... [more]
FFROST Medieval Welsh
Devired from the old Welsh word "Ymffrostgar", meaning a brag or boastful person. Originally spelt as "Ffrost", later changed to "Frost".
FISH Medieval English, Jewish
From Middle English fische, fish ‘fish’, a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone thought to resemble a fish.... [more]
FITZEMPRESS History, Anglo-Norman
Means "son of the empress" in Anglo-Norman French. The three sons of Empress Matilda were known as Henry FitzEmpress (King Henry II of England), Geoffrey FitzEmpress, Count of Nantes, and William FitzEmpress, Count of Poitou.
FITZROBERT Anglo-Norman
Means "son of Robert" in Anglo-Norman French.
FITZWALTER Anglo-Norman
Means "son of Walter" in Anglo-Norman French.
FRATINI Medieval Italian (Tuscan, Modern)
My understanding is that the Fratini surname originated in the Arno River Valley somewhere between Arezzo and Florence.
FROSTENDEN Medieval English
"White hill" in Old English. Parish in Suffolk; later shortended to Frost.
FUSS Medieval Low German
German from Middle High German fus ‘foot’, hence most probably a nickname for someone with some peculiarity or deformity of the foot, but perhaps also a topographic name for someone who lived at the foot of a hill.
GIEL Medieval English
From a medieval personal name of which the original form was Latin Aegidius, from Greek aigidion ‘kid’, ‘young goat’. Compare English Giles.... [more]
GOODY Medieval English
From Middle English god dai ‘good day’, possibly applied as a nickname for someone who frequently used this greeting.... [more]
GROSVENOR English, Anglo-Norman
English surname of Norman origin meaning ‘the master huntsman’. Derived from Le Grand Veneur, this title was held by Hugh d'Avranches who accompanied William the Conqueror in the Norman invasion of England in 1066.
HITTENRAUCH Prussian
from the prussian word von hittenraoucht meaning "of royalty"
HOLLOWAY Anglo-Saxon, English, Medieval English
Variant of Halliwell, from Old English halig (holy) and well(a) (well or spring)... [more]
IMMERS Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
IMORE Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
JOURDEMAYNE Medieval English
Likely from Old French jor de main meaning "day labourer". This was borne by Margery Jourdemayne, an English woman known as the "Witch of Eye" who was burned at the stake in 1441 for conspiring to kill the king with witchcraft... [more]
JUTSUM Old Danish
Of Jutish extraction. From Jutland.
KIEHL Medieval Low German
From Middle Low German kil ‘wedge’, applied as a metonymic occupational name or as a pejorative nickname for a ruffian. Possibly a habitational name from Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein, from Dutch and Frisian kil ‘stagnant water’ (see Kiel)... [more]
KOHLSTEDT Medieval German (Modern)
Likely derived from the German word Kohl, meaning “Cabbage,” and a Variation of the word Stadt, meaning “City, town, and/or place.”
KOMISIN Cuman
Originally Comyshyn .. The prefix denotes its Cuman ancestry, and the afix -shyn means Ukraine. Hence, Cuman of Ukraine.
LADULÅS Old Swedish
Most likely from Swedish ladulås "barnlock", but it could also be derived from the Slavic name Ladislaus. Magnus Ladulås, sometimes known as Magnus Birgersson or Magnus III in English, was the king of Sweden between 1275 and 1290.
LAPSLEY Scottish, English, Medieval English
Combination of Old English læppa ”end of a parish” and leah ”woodland clearing”. Another meaning could be possible.
LEMKE Prussian
Prussian Pommerania
LESASSIER Medieval French
FALAISE FRANCE, LOUISIANA, HAITI
L'HERNAULT Medieval French
Originating in Northern France, Rouen River Valley, Normandie, L'Hernault is an Old French word for a "heralder", one who would act as an announcer, diplomat or town crier.... [more]
LIMB Medieval English
Rare name of medieval English origin. A dialectal variant of the locational name 'Lumb', from places so called in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, and derives from the Old English pre-7th Century 'lum(m)'... [more]
LUBBE German, Slavic, Prussian
Variant of Lubben. Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- ‘love’, ‘dear’ (see Luba).
LUGANO Medieval Italian
It meaning sacred forest.
MANSELL Anglo-Norman, French
A status name for a particular type of feudal tenant, Anglo-Norman French mansel, one who occupied a manse (Late Latin mansa ‘dwelling’), a measure of land sufficient to support one family... [more]
MC NUGGYEET Medieval Scottish
This is a real name!
MUNUA Medieval Spanish (Latinized, Archaic)
Its meaning is Son of Muno.
NATT OCH DAG Old Swedish, Swedish (Rare)
Means "night and day" in Swedish. This is the name of one of the oldest noble families in Sweden. The earliest known ancestor is Nils Sigridsson who lived in the 13th century. The name Natt and Dag was not mentioned until the 16th century, though, and the family members themselves didn't start using it until the 18th century... [more]
NOSTRADAMUS Medieval Dutch (?)
This surname was beared by the famous writer Michael de Nostradamus, also famous for predicting the apocalypse and the danger from the arab world.
OBALDIA Medieval Basque (Latinized, Archaic)
Obaldia comes from the Proto-Euskera or Proto-Basque (ancient Basque languaje) that is Dovaltia (also known as Dobaldia). Its meaning is pear tree or european wild pear.
ODSON Medieval French
Means 'son of Odo', Odo meaning 'possessor of wealth' many French Dukes and Counts had the name Odo. ' From the nickname 'Oddy' or 'Hoddy'.
ORANGE Medieval English, Medieval French, English
Derived from the medieval female name, or directly from the French place name. First used with the modern spelling in the 17th century, apparently due to William, Prince of Orange, who later became William III... [more]
ORRELS Medieval English
Means "Ore hill", likely for iron ore miners. From the Old English ora, meaning "ore" and hyll, meaning hill.... [more]
PACKARD English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PAINTER English, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
PAIP Medieval Scottish, Biblical Latin, Scottish Gaelic
An ancient Caithness surname, meaning father. The family changed their name from "Paip" to "Pope".
PARSLEY Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
PASSELEWE Medieval English
The medieval name is from Old French passe(r) ‘to pass or cross’ + l’ewe ‘the water’, hence a nickname, probably for a ferryman or a merchant who was in the habit of traveling overseas, or else someone who had been on a pilgrimage or crusade.
PEREIRIS Medieval Portuguese (Latinized, Rare, Archaic), Galician (Latinized, Rare, Archaic)
Pereiris (also known as Pereirus) is a last name of the Celtic roots (it's Galician and Portuguese). It meaning is will pear tree or pear tree and also european will pear tree. Pereiris comes from the translation of Welsh name and Cornish name Gellygen or Gellyg... [more]
PEREIRU Medieval Portuguese (Latinized, Rare, Archaic)
This is a Military Order (Knights Templar or the Order of Solomon's Temple) and it was founded by the Henrique de Borgonha, conde de Portucale (Henry, Count of Portugal) in the year 1090. It was then confirmed by Pope Alexandre III in the year 1177... [more]
PERERO Medieval Spanish (Latinized, Archaic)
It appeared in Extremadura and it means pear tree. It's a family name belonging to the Celtiberian culture (Celtic families).
PLANTAGENET Medieval English
Borne by the House of Plantagenet, it originated as a nickname for Geoffrey Plantagenet (1113-1151), Count of Anjou, father of King Henry II of England (1133-1189), who ascended the English throne in 1154... [more]
PRUDHOMME French, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
RENGEL Medieval Croatian
Used by several houses of Croatia few centuries ago, now, those of this name are but a shadows of once proud and prestigious house
SANCTO Medieval Italian (Latinized, Modern)
It comes from the Latin and it means hallowed or holiness.
SANCTUS Medieval Italian
Sanctus is a very old graphic form in Italy and it means santo (saint).
SANTIS Medieval Italian (Latinized, Archaic)
It means holliness, hallowed, saintly, sainted, sanctity. It is a surname that corresponds with Italian Celts families (Italo-Celtic family groups), more precisely in Piemonte or Piedmont (north of Italy).
SCOGINGS English, Old Danish
A surname of Scandinavian origin from the old Norse and old Danish by-name "Skeggi" or "skoggi", meaning 'the bearded one'. Common in areas invaded and settled by Scandinavians in the 8th and 9th Centuries.
SEELY Medieval English
Means "Blessed", "Happy", and/or "Lucky." By adding an Un- to Seely makes it "Unblessed", "Unhappy", and/or "Unholy." Used primarily in Northern England and Southern Scotland during the Middle English period but is derived from the Old English sǣl and gesǣlig... [more]
SENDULLA Medieval French
the name was originally from a town in the champagne valley that does not exist any more because of World War I the town's name is forgotten and all we have about it is the name sendulla a young girl whom live there as a child
SHACKLEFORD English, Medieval English
Locational surname deriving from the place called Shackleford in Surrey, near the town of Farnham. The origin of "shackle" is uncertain. It could be derived from Old English sceacan "to shake"... [more]
SIODINA Medieval Spanish
Use by some Filipinos/Spanish
SLYNGER Old Danish
user of a sling. ... [more]
SOULE English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
STEINAUER Medieval German
Dweller at or near a stone or rock, often a boundary mark; one who came from Stein, in Germany and Switzerland; descendant of Staino or Stein ("stone").... [more]
STOCK Medieval English
English: A topographic name for someone who lived near the trunk or stump of a large tree, Middle English Stocke (Old English Stocc). In some cases the reference may be to a primitive foot-bridge over a stream consisting of a felled tree trunk... [more]
STURE Old Swedish, Swedish (Rare)
Derived from Old Norse stura "to be contrary". This was the surname of two important families in the 15th and 16th century Sweden. Members of these families served as regents of Sweden during this time... [more]
SUBELZA Medieval Basque (Latinized, Archaic)
It means bushes weed or shrub tree. Subelza is also Oak or Carrasca tree.
TEGGIN Medieval Welsh
derived from tha ancient area of now Flintshire which was named Tegeingl
THRESTON Medieval English (Rare)
The surname of Threston is English in origin, and, means "to twist"** and, can be traced as far back as the 11th century where the name is found in the "Domesday Book." The name Threston is a variation of the name of the town of Threxton, Norfolk, UK, and, there are several variations of the name Threxton including:... [more]
TRIMBOLI Medieval Italian
Trimboli: Means: "prince of three valleys." Land or (spoils) were given to worthy soldiers for there efforts after conquest. Three valleys in Calabria were given to a soldier who will become known as Francesco Guytano Trimboli, the new perprieitor in an area near Plati, Italy, Calabria.
TROLLE Swedish, Old Swedish
Swedish noble family. According to legend, an early ancestor killed a troll and that's how the family got its name. The family's coat of arms depicts a headless troll. The earliest known ancestor is Birger Knutsson Trulle (died approx... [more]
TURNBO Prussian (Modern, Rare), German (East Prussian, Modern, Rare), American (Americanized, Modern, Rare), German (Modern, Rare)
Originally the name was spelled Dornbach, meaning "thorny creek". Derived from Old High German Dorn, Turn, or Torn "thorn" and Bach meaning creek. German ancestors of this family eventually came to Pennsylvania in 1725, the name slowly started to change to Turnbach around the 1850's, reasoning unknown, and later Turnbo... [more]
VASA Old Swedish, Swedish (Archaic)
Swedish noble and former royal family. Possibly from vase meaning "bundle" or "withy". The name is believed to be a reference to the family's coat of arms. The most notable member of the family was Gustav Eriksson Vasa (1496-1560), later known as Gustav I of Sweden (in modern times known exclusively as Gustav Vasa)... [more]
VERYARD Medieval Spanish (Rare)
Rumour has it that the surname De-Veryard represented a Spanish occupation, but unclear what that might be - have never been able to establish the origin.
WALDRON Medieval German, Old Norman, Scottish Gaelic, English (British)
Derived from the German compound wala-hran, literally "wall raven", but originally meaning "strong bird". Also derived from the Gaelic wealdærn, meaning "forest dwelling", thought to be derived from the Sussex village of Waldron... [more]
WALLING Anglo-Norman
From the Anglo-Norman personal name Walweyn, the Old German forename Waldwin, or the Old English personal name Wealdwine, which means "power-friend".
WEIDEMANN Medieval German, German (Austrian), Norwegian
Weidemann is a German family name and comes from the Middle High German terms for hunter or woad farmer.... [more]
WENDLER Medieval German
derived from a German word meaning to wander or wanderer
WILD Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
WYLIE Medieval English
It is of locational origin, and derives from the places called Willey in the counties of Cheshire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Devonshire and Surrey.
YMFFROSTGAR Medieval Welsh
A historic Welsh surname, meaning a brag or boastful person, later shortened to Ffrost and again to Frost.
YOHE Medieval English
The Yohe surname comes from the Old English word "ea," or "yo," in Somerset and Devon dialects, which meant "river" or "stream." It was likely originally a topographic name for someone who lived near a stream.
YULE Medieval English
Nickname for someone who was born on Christmas Day or had some other connection with this time of year, from Middle English yule ‘Christmastide’ (Old English geol, reinforced by the cognate Old Norse term jól).
ZUFALL Medieval German
A German name from the Middle High German "zuoval," meaning "benefit," "coincidence" or "windfall." It was a nickname for a lucky person, most likely a person to whom a plot of land had been given... [more]