Medieval English Submitted Surnames

These names were used by medieval English peoples.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AIMAR     Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon, Spanish
1. From the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Aethelmaer", meaning "famous noble." ... [more]
BALDRICK     Medieval English
The name of Blackadder (Rowan Atkinson)'s much-hated slave in the comedy Blackadder.... [more]
BAMBOROUGH     Medieval English
Bamborough name origin from early Northumberland early times other name know from the Bamborough is bamburgh as in bamburgh castle, ... [more]
BERRYANN     Medieval English (Rare)
The name is pre 7th century Olde English and later Olde French. It derives from the word burri or berri, translating as a fortress or castle and means 'one who dwelt at the castle'. The suffix 'man' also indicates that it was job descriptive for a guard or keeper of the castle... [more]
BOWE     Medieval English, English, Irish (Anglicized)
There are three possible sources of this surname, the first being that it is a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of bows, a vital trade in medieval times before the invention of gunpowder, and a derivative of the Old English pre 7th Century 'boga', bow, from 'bugan' to bend... [more]
COURTIER     French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
EDGELL     Medieval English
It derives from the early word for a sword ecg, to which was sometimes added a suffix such as wolf.
EMOR     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
EYMER     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
EYMOR     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
FISH     Medieval English, Jewish
From Middle English fische, fish ‘fish’, a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone thought to resemble a fish.... [more]
GIBBONS     Medieval English
Early medieval English origin, a patronymic form of Gibbon, which is a diminutive of Gibb, a pet form of the given name Gilbert. Gilbert derives from Gislebert, a Norman personal name composed of the Germanic elements gisil, "hostage", "noble youth", and berht, "bright", "famous".
GIEL     Medieval English
From a medieval personal name of which the original form was Latin Aegidius, from Greek aigidion ‘kid’, ‘young goat’. Compare English Giles.... [more]
GOODY     Medieval English
From Middle English god dai ‘good day’, possibly applied as a nickname for someone who frequently used this greeting.... [more]
HOLLOWAY     Anglo-Saxon, English, Medieval English
Variant of Halliwell, from Old English halig (holy) and well(a) (well or spring)... [more]
IMMERS     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
IMORE     Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
This unusual surname has two origins. ... [more]
LAVELY     Medieval English
[Lavelly} May have been used my early English, in Medieval times. May have been used during the puritans. really little is know about the name by me.
PACKARD     English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PASSELEWE     Medieval English
The medieval name is from Old French passe(r) ‘to pass or cross’ + l’ewe ‘the water’, hence a nickname, probably for a ferryman or a merchant who was in the habit of traveling overseas, or else someone who had been on a pilgrimage or crusade.
RATHBONE     English (Archaic), Medieval English (Rare)
Of unknown origin, but might denote a person with short legs. From Olde English rhath, meaning "short, and bon, "legs".
SCARBROUGH     Medieval English (Rare, ?)
The Name originated from Yorkshire, England and is a form of Scarborough.... [more]
SEELY     Medieval English
Means "Blessed", "Happy", and/or "Lucky." By adding an Un- to Seely makes it "Unblessed", "Unhappy", and/or "Unholy." Used primarily in Northern England and Southern Scotland during the Middle English period but is derived from the Old English sǣl and gesǣlig... [more]
SHACKLEFORD     English, Medieval English
Locational surname deriving from the place called Shackleford in Surrey, near the town of Farnham. The origin of "shackle" is uncertain. It could be derived from Old English sceacan "to shake"... [more]
SOAMES     Medieval English
First recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 with that of Warin de Saham, lord of the manor. It is therefore one earliest of all surnames recorded anywhere, being locational from a village called Soham in the county of Cambridgeshire... [more]
SOULE     English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
STOCK     Medieval English
English: A topographic name for someone who lived near the trunk or stump of a large tree, Middle English Stocke (Old English Stocc). In some cases the reference may be to a primitive foot-bridge over a stream consisting of a felled tree trunk... [more]
THRESTON     Medieval English (Rare)
The surname of Threston is English in origin, and, means "to twist"** and, can be traced as far back as the 11th century where the name is found in the "Domesday Book." The name Threston is a variation of the name of the town of Threxton, Norfolk, UK, and, there are several variations of the name Threxton including:... [more]
TROLLOPE     English, Medieval English
Derived from the place name Troughburn in Northumberland, England, originally Trolhop, meaning "troll valley". Derived from Old Norse troll "troll, supernatural being" and hop "enclosed valley, enclosed land"
WANNELL     Medieval English
Recorded in several forms including Wan, which appears now to be totally obselete, Wann, Wanne, the very rare Whan, the patronymic Wannes and Wanes, the diminutives Wanell, Wannell, Wanniel, and Wonnell, this interesting name is of English origins... [more]
WILD     Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
WYLIE     Medieval English
It is of locational origin, and derives from the places called Willey in the counties of Cheshire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Devonshire and Surrey.
YOHE     Medieval English
The Yohe surname comes from the Old English word "ea," or "yo," in Somerset and Devon dialects, which meant "river" or "stream." It was likely originally a topographic name for someone who lived near a stream.
YULE     Medieval English
Nickname for someone who was born on Christmas Day or had some other connection with this time of year, from Middle English yule ‘Christmastide’ (Old English geol, reinforced by the cognate Old Norse term jól).
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