Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
WERDUM German
Werdum is a municipality in the district of Wittmund, in Lower Saxony, Germany.
WERTHEIMER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from Wertheim.
WESELOH German
German habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
WESNER German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Wessen.
WESTER German
From Middle High German wëster ‘westerly’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived to the west of a settlement, or a regional name for one who had migrated from further west.
WETTSTEIN German (Rare)
North German: variant of Wetzstein, from Middle Low German wetsten "whetstone".
WICK English, German
English: topographic name for someone who lived in an outlying settlement dependent on a larger village, Old English wic (Latin vicus), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, of which there are examples in Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Somerset, and Worcestershire... [more]
WIDEMAN German
From the Germanic personal name Widiman, composed of witu ‘wood’ or wit ‘wide’, ‘broad’ + man ‘man’. Americanized form of German Weidmann ‘huntsman’.
WIDMAN German
Altered spelling of German Widmann.
WIDMANN German
Variant of Wiedmann ‘huntsman’ and Wideman.
WIEBE German
From a short form of any of various Germanic personal names beginning with wig ‘battle’, ‘war.’
WIEDEMANN German
Variation of Wideman.
WIEDMANN Upper German
North German variant of Widemann (see Wideman).
WIESEL German, Jewish
Means "weasel" in German.
WIESENTHAL German
Habitational name from any of various places called Wiesent(h)al.
WIESNER German
German: habitational name for someone from a place called Wiesen, or topographic name for someone who lived by a meadow, a derivative of Middle High German wise ‘meadow’.
WILD Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
WILL Scottish, English, German
Scottish and northern English from the medieval personal name Will, a short form of William, or from some other medieval personal names with this first element, for example Wilbert or Willard... [more]
WILLE German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names beginning Willi-, as for example, Willibrant, Willihart.
WILLS German
Patronymic from any of the Germanic personal names beginning with wil "will, desire".
WIND English, German, Danish
Nickname for a swift runner, from Middle English wind "wind", Middle High German wint "wind", also "greyhound".
WIND German
Variant of Wendt.
WINDENBURG German, Ancient Germanic
Means "Windy Castle" in German.
WINEHOUSE Jewish, German
Anglicized variant of German and Yiddish 'Weinhaus'. From German wein, 'vine, grapevine' and haus 'house, building, home', likely indicating a house with a vineyard. ... [more]
WINKEL German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
WINKELMANN German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner or kept a corner shop (see Winkel), with the addition of Middle High German man, German Mann ‘man’. ... [more]
WINTERBERG German
Habitational name from any of several places named with Middle High German winter "winter" and berg "mountain".
WINTERS English, German
Patronymic form of Winter.
WISSMACH German
I think it is German
WITTER German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements widu "wood" and hari "army".
WITZ German, Jewish
From the medieval personal name Witzo, a short form of any of several Germanic compound names beginning with wig ‘battle’. Also a variant of Witzig. ... [more]
WITZIG German
German: nickname from Middle High German witzic ‘clever’, ‘prudent’, ‘knowing’.
WOELK German
German variant spelling of Wölk (see Wolk).
WOELKE German
German variant spelling of Wölke, itself a variant of Wolk.
WOLFORD German
Means where the wolves cross the river/stream. Wolf meaning the animal and Ford meaning crossing a body of shallow water.... [more]
WOLFRAM English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
WOLK German, American
Surname derived from a northern German short form of the given name Walter.
WOLKEN German
Surname derived from a diminutive of the given name Wolter, a Low German form of Walter.... [more]
WOLLSCHLÄGER German
Occupational name for someone who prepared wool for spinning by washing and combing or carding it, from Middle High German wolle(n)slaher, -sleger, Middle Low German wullensleger (literally ‘wool beater’).
WOODLOCK Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
WOOLEVER German
Morphed from the German surname Wohleber which means well-liver
WOZZEK German
Germanized form of VOYTEK.
WRIEDT German, Dutch
Nickname from Middle Low German wrēt, wrede meaning "fierce", "evil", "angry".
WULFHART German
Could mean "brave wolf" from the German elements "wulf" (variant of "wolf") and "hard" (meaning "brave, hardy").
WÜRDEMANN German
From the German "Würde"-honour or dignity, and "Mann"-man or person. "Man of Honour" or "Person of Dignity".
WURDEMANN German (Rare)
This is a German surname, also spelled WÜRDEMANN (original) and often rendered as WUERDEMANN in English. It come from the German "würde", "dignity" or "honor" and "mann", meaning "man" or "person".... [more]
WURNIG German
German origin from the place name am Virgen originally meaning a person from the town of Virgen in Tyrol. Construed as a family name in 1501.
WURSTER German
Derived from German Wurst (Middle High German wurst) "sausage" and thus either denoted a butcher who specialized in the production of sausages, or was used as a nickname for a plump person or someone who was particularly fond of sausages.
WÜRTTEMBERG German
Württemberg is an historical German territory. Together with Baden and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg.
WURTZ German
A metonymic occupational name for a greengrocer or grower or seller of herbs, from Middle High German würz, meaning ‘herb’.
WYANDT German
Americanized form of German WIEGAND... [more]
XANDER German
From a short form of the personal name Alexander.
XANDERS German
Variant of Xander.
XAVIER English, French
Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries.
YAEGER German
Yaeger is a relatively uncommon American surname, most likely a transcription of the common German surname "Jaeger/Jäger" (hunter). The spelling was changed to become phonetic because standard English does not utilize the umlaut.
YAGER German
Americanized form of JÄGER, meaning "hunter."
YANTORNO Italian
Derived from the word torno which in Italian means "around".
YOCUM German (Anglicized), English
Americanized form of Jochum, a Low German form of the given name Joachim.
YUENGLING German
"youngling" or a "young person"
ZABEL German
The surname has multiple meanings. It may come from a Slavic given name, or the High German word zabel, meaning "board game" - given, perhaps, as a nickname to those who played many board games.
ZACKERT English, German
An Americanization of the German surnames Zacher and Zachert. It comes from a vernacular form of the personal name Zacharias.
ZAGER German
habitational name from ZAGER, a place near Wollin
ZAHN German
Zahn was a nickname given to a person with a peculiar tooth or a strange or defective set of teeth. It comes from the Middle High German Zan(t), which means "tooth".
ZÄHNE German
The German surname Zähne is derived from the Middle High German word "zan," which means "tooth." It is believed that the surname takes its origin from a nickname, most likely bestowed on the original bearer due to either a prominent tooth or a missing tooth.
ZAHNER German
Name given to people who lived in Zahna, near Wittenberg.
ZAHNISER German
Alteration of German Zahneisen and/or Zahnhäuser and/or Zahneiser. Refers to someone from a place called Zahnhausen. Also refers to those who made false teeth out of iron: Zan means "tooth" and iser means "iron" or "ironworker".
ZAMBONI Italian
Italian: from the personal name Zamboni, a northeastern variant of Giambono, composed of a reduced form of Gianni (from Giovanni) + Bono or buono ‘good’.
ZANDEGIACOMO Italian
Zandegiacomo's migrated to America and changed the name to Zandi.
ZANI Italian
Comes from the personal name Z(u)an(n)i, a northeastern (Venetian) form of Gianni (from Giovanni, Italian equivalent of John). Zani or Zanni is a comic figure in the Commedia del’Arte, and the surname may be a nickname derived from this use, which is also the origin of the English word zany.
ZANNI Italian
From the first name Gianni, which derives from Giovanni, which is the Italian version of John, which means "the grace/mercy of the Lord." ... [more]
ZANOTTI Italian
Comes from a pet form of Zani.
ZANTO German
Unknown origin and history.
ZAY French
Frenchified form of German See.
ZBÄREN German (Swiss)
Zbären means "Bear hunter".
ZEHNER German
(chiefly Bavaria, Austria, Switzerland, and Württemberg): occupational name for an official responsible for collecting, on behalf of the lord of the manor, tithes of agricultural produce owed as rent.... [more]
ZEHREN German (Swiss)
From a prepositional phrase from Middle High German ze hērren, an occupational name for someone was in service of a lord.
ZEILINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Zeiling in Bavaria.
ZEIMET German, Luxembourgish
Western German and Luxembourgeois: probably a variant spelling of Zeimert, a variant of Zeumer, an occupational name for a harness maker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German zoum ‘bridle’.
ZELLER German, Dutch, English, Jewish
Originally denoted someone from Celle, Germany or someone living near a hermit's cell from German zelle "cell". It is also occupational for someone employed at a zelle, for example a small workshop.
ZELLMER German
Variant of Selmer.
ZELMER German
Variant of ZELLMER.
ZENKER German
means light
ZENNER Upper German
South German: unflattering nickname for a surly, snarling person, from an agent derivative of Middle High German zannen 'to growl or howl' or 'to bare one's teeth'.
ZERFAS German
Derived from a Low German and Upper German form of the personal name Servatius.
ZERILLO Italian
From the Italian first name ZERO
ZIANI Italian (Rare, Archaic)
Habitual surname denoting someone from Ziano, a locality in Italy. Unrelated to the Maghrebi surname of the same spelling.
ZICARI Italian, Sicilian
Southern Italian and Sicilian from an unattested Arabic personal name Zikri or Zikari.
ZICKUHR German
Zickuhr is a German surname that means "zigzag." Although, some person believe that Zickuhr means "cuckoo clock."
ZIEGENHORN Upper German (Archaic)
Goat horn, either 1. the horn of a goat, 2. Goat mountain, or 3. From goat mountain.
ZIEGLER German (Modern)
"Brick-mason."
ZIELENBACH German
Literally translates to "aiming brook"
ZIELSDORF German
Habitational name from an unidentified place, perhaps Ziersdorf in Lower Austria.
ZILLIER Upper German
ancient form of selear
ZIMMER German
Shortening of Zimmermann
ZINGER German
The surname Zinger was first found in Saxony, where this family name became a prominent contributor to the development of the district from ancient times. ... In Old German the name meant "lively" and "spritely," or more literally, "a biting, sharp taste."
ZINN German
From the German for word for tin "tin." The name indicated someone who worked with the metal. A famous bearer is Johann Gottfried Zinn, a German botanist. Carl Linnaeus named the flower Zinnia in his honor.
ZOLDAN Italian
from the name place Zoldo. Zoldan indicates also the name of a little valley North from Venice.
ZOLLER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a customs officer, Middle High German zoller.
ZOPF German
Nickname for someone who wore his hair in a pigtail or plait, Middle High German zopf, zoph, or from a field name from same word in the sense ‘tail’, ‘end’, ‘narrow point’.
ZOPPI Italian
Nickname from zoppo "lame, unsteady".
ZORN German
From Middle High German zorn "wrath, anger". A notable bearer was Swedish painter Anders Zorn (1860-1920) whose father was German.
ZUBER German, German (Swiss)
German: Metonymic occupational name for a cooper or tubmaker, from Middle High German zuber ‘(two-handled) tub’, or a habitational name from a house distinguished by the sign of a tub. ... [more]
ZUBIANI Italian
It comes from the given name Eusebio.
ZUCCOLI Italian
The surname Zuccoli was first found in Udine, a town in Venetia and capital of the province of Udine. An old walled city it dates back to early Roman times. There is an old castle (1517) in the center of the town which is now used as a museum and art gallery... [more]
ZUCKERBERG German, Jewish
Means "sugar mountain" from German zucker meaning "sugar" and berg meaning "mountain, hill".
ZUMPANO Italian
Comes from the town Zumpano in the province Cosenza in Calabria, Italy. The meaning is unknown but it possibly comes from a Greek-Calabrese surname.
ZÜRCHER German
Habitational name for someone from the Swiss city of Zurich.
ZWEINSTRA German
Zweinstra is a German, relatively unknown surname which is also sometimes used in Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg and Liechtenstein.
ZWILLING German, Jewish
Means "a twin", as in a twin brother or twin sister. Often given to those who were twins.
ZWINGLI Swiss
Huldrych Zwingli had this last name. He was from Switzerland and he was a pastor.