Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
HAMER English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
HAMMER German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
HAMMERSCHMIDT German, Jewish
Occupational name for a blacksmith, from German hamer, 'hammer' and schmidt, 'smith. See HAMMERSMITH.
HAMMERSMITH German, English
Normally an anglicization of German HAMMERSCHMIDT. Perhaps also from Norwegian HAMMERSMED.... [more]
HAMP English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
HÄNDEL German
Derived from HANS or HEINRICH.
HÄNER German
Variant of HANNER.
HANER German
Altered spelling or variant of HAHNER.
HÄNNER German
Pet form of HEINRICH.
HANNER German
From a pet form of Hann, short form of JOHANN.
HARBACH German
Habitational name from any of several places named Harbach.
HARDEKOP German (Rare)
Derived from Middle High German hart "hard" and kopf "head". As a surname, it was given to a hard-headed, stubborn person.
HARGIER French
Known back to the 15th or 16th century in France.... [more]
HARLACHER German
Habitational name for someone from Ober- or Unter-Harlachen, near Überlingen.
HARLESS English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
HAROLD English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name HEREWEALD, its Old Norse equivalent HARALDR, or the Continental form HEROLD introduced to Britain by the Normans. These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari ‘army’ + wald ‘rule’, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian TACITUS records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of the Batavi, as early as the 1st century ad... [more]
HARRETT French
France, England
HASELBAUER German
Translates to 'hazel farmer'
HASSDENTEUFEL German
A German Satzname, from the expression "Hass den Teufel" meaning "hate the devil".
HASSELBACH German
Habitational name from any of the places in various parts of Germany called Hasselbach.
HASSLACHER German
hass=hate; lacher=laughter... [more]
HÄSSLI German (Swiss), French (Rare)
Swiss German diminutive form of HAAS. This is a French surname via Alsace-Lorraine. A notable bearer is French footballer (soccer player) Eric Hassli (1981-).
HATTENDORF German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from places called Hattendorf, near Alsfeld and near Hannover. The element hatt, had means ‘bog’
HAUCK German
Derived from the first name HUGO.
HAUEIS German
Derived from Middle High German houwen "to beat" and isen "iron". This surname denoted a smith.
HAUPTMAN German
Variant spelling of Hauptmann.
HAUPTMANN German
Derived from the word "Hauptmann", a German military rank meaning "Captain".
HAUS German
Topographic and occupational name for someone who lived and worked in a great house, from Middle High German, Middle Low German hus "house" (see HOUSE).
HAUSCH German
From the Germanic personal name Huso, a short form of a compound name composed with hus ‘house’, ‘dwelling’ as the first element.
HAUSER German, Jewish
From Middle High German hus "house", German haus, + the suffix -er, denoting someone who gives shelter or protection.
HAUSMANN German
From Middle High German hus "house" (see HAUS) + man "man".
HAUSWIRTH German
From Middle High German haus 'house' and wirt 'owner' or 'master'.
HAVNER German
Variant of HAFNER.
HAY English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAYDN German
Meaning "heathen". Famous bearer is Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
HAYDT German
Varient of HEID.
HAZARD English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
HEBER German
Occupational name for a carrier (someone who loaded or transported goods), from an agent derivative of Middle High German heben "to lift".
HEBERT German
Variant of HEBER.
HECHT German, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
HEFLER German
Derived from the Old German and German word hof, which means settlement, farm or court.
HEFNER German, Jewish
Recorded in several spellings including HAFNER, Haffner, and Hevner, this is as surname of early Germanic origins. ... [more]
HEID German, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German heide, German Heide ‘heath’, ‘moor’. Compare Heath.... [more]
HEIDENREICH German
From the medieval personal name Heidenrich, ostensibly composed of the elements heiden 'heathen', 'infidel' (see Heiden 2) + ric 'power', 'rule', but probably in fact a variant by folk etymology of Heidrich.
HEIGL German
Derived from the given name HUGO.
HEILAND German
South German: from Middle High German heilant ‘savior’, ‘Christ’, presumably either a name given to someone who had played the part of Christ in a mystery play or an occupational name for a healer, from Middle High German heilen ‘to heal’, ‘save’.
HEILIGER German
Heiliger means "Holy" or "Holy One" in German.
HEIMBACH German
Town / City in Germany
HEIMBURG German
German for "home". Originates in the German village of Heimburg (not to be confused with Hamburg) and the nearby castle of the same name.
HEIN German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name HEINRICH.
HEINBOKEL German
(Hein) is a short form of the name HEINRICH, (the German form of the name Henry) & Bokel is a place name in Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein & North Rhine-Westphalia.
HEINE German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from a short form of HEINRICH.
HEINEMANN German, Jewish
Combination of HEINE, a short form of HEINRICH, and Mann "man".
HEINER German
From the given name HEINER.
HEINISCH German
From a pet form of the personal name Heinrich.
HEINL German
South German variant of HEINLE.
HEINLE German
This surname is derived from what may be a pet form of HEINRICH.
HEINTZELMAN German
From a pet form of Heinrich, with the addition of -mann ‘man’.
HEITMEYER German
German: distinguishing nickname for a farmer whose land included heathland, from Middle Low German heide ‘heath’, ‘wasteland’ + Meyer.
HELBER German
Occupational name for a thresher, from Middle High German helwe 'chaff' + the agent suffix -er; alternatively, it could be a habitational name from a place called Helba near Meiningen.
HELBLING German
Meaning "half penny" or a cheap /stingy man Know surname in Germany andSwitzerland. Helblings were French Huguenot
HELD German
The German word for "hero", ultimately derived from Middle High German helt.... [more]
HELFER German
Metonymic occupational name for an assistant of some kind, or nickname for a helpful person, from Middle High German hëlfære, German Helfer 'helper', 'assistant'.
HELLENBRAND German
Derived from germanic: hildtja = battle, brandt = sword, or prandt = burning wood/torch. Other view: Hilda is the Nordic Queen of the Underworld, Goddes of Death, so Sword/Torch of Hilda.... [more]
HELLER German
Nickname from the small medieval coin known as the häller or heller because it was first minted (in 1208) at the Swabian town of (Schwäbisch) Hall.
HELLWIG German, Dutch
Curiously it started out life in ancient history as the baptismal name, Hell-wig. "luck" & "war;" this name literally translates to, "battle-battle."
HELMEIER German, Dutch, Danish
Variant spelling of Helmeyer.
HELMEYER German, Dutch, Danish
From Hel in Norse mythology and Meyer meaning "higher, superior". It means ´blessed´ or ´holy´. The name is mostly found in Germany, but also in the Netherlands and some parts of Denmark.
HELMKE German
from a pet form of Helm
HENCE German, English, Welsh
An American spelling variant of HENTZ derived from a German nickname for HANS or HEINRICH or from an English habitation name found in Staffordshire or Shropshire and meaning "road or path" in Welsh.
HENDRICKSON German
Derivative of the Old German personnel “Heimric” meaning “home rule”.
HENKER German
Occupational name for an Executioner, from the German word "Henker" meaning Hangman.
HENLEY English, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
HENNEN German, Dutch
Patronymic of HENNE.
HENRI French
From the first name HENRI.
HENSCHEL German, Jewish
From a pet form of the personal name JOHANNES (see JOHN), or in some cases from a pet form of HEINRICH.
HENTZ German
From a nickname for HANS or HEINRICH.
HERBARTH German, Norman
References Old Norse Deity "Odin" being one of the "Son's of Odin". Remember that the Geats became the Ostrogoths through the Denmark pass--referenced in Beowulf. Or, it means "Warrior of the Bearded One", perhaps a King... [more]
HERBOLSHEIMER German
Habitational name for someone from either of two places called Herbolzheim, in Baden and Bavaria.
HERDER German
An occupational surname in reference to herding animals. The anglicized pronounciation is "Her-der", but is Germanically pronounced, "Herr-der".
HERGENÖTHER German
Habitational name for someone from Hergenroth near Limburg or from Hergenrode near Darmstadt, both in Hessen.
HERMIDILLA Filipino (Latinized, Rare, Archaic), Italian (Latinized, Modern, Rare)
Hermidilla is originated from Batangas province in Southern Tagalog region in the Philippines during the Spanish colony.... [more]
HEROLD English, Dutch, German
From the given name HEROLD. This was the surname of David Herold, one of the conspirators in the Abraham Lincoln assassination plot.
HERTIG German
Hertig is associated with the popular German personal name HARTWIG, meaning "hard-battle."
HERTZEL German
The ancestral home of the Hertzel family is in the German province of Bavaria. Hertzel is a German nickname surname. Such names came from eke-names, or added names, that described their initial bearer through reference to a physical characteristic or other attribute... [more]
HERVE French
From the given name HERVÉ.
HESS German (?)
It is arguably both tribal and residential, originating from the pre 10th century A.D. It is believed to have originally described people who came from the region known as Hesse. The translation of this name is the 'hooded people'
HEUSER German
Deriving from one of several places named Hausen.
HEYDLAUFF German (Americanized, Modern)
people lived in the Black Forest region of Germany. Many migrated to Michigan, USA
HEYER English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
HICK German
From a derivative of a Slavic pet form of HEINRICH.
HICK German
From Hiko, a pet form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with hild "strife", "battle" as the first element.
HIERONYMUS Dutch, German
From the Greek given name ‘Ιερωνυμος (HIERONYMOS) meaning "sacred name". (See JEROME.)
HIGHLAND English, German
English, Scottish, and Irish: variant spelling of Hyland.... [more]
HILAIRE Haitian Creole, French
From the given name HILAIRE.
HILBERT English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HILFIKER German (Swiss)
Altered spelling of Hilfinger, patronymic derivative of the personal name Hilfo, Helfo, a short form of a Germanic personal name based on helfe 'helper'.
HILLEGAS German
German: Variant of Hillegass from a variant of the Germanic personal name Hildegaud, composed of hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + got, of uncertain meaning (perhaps the same word as Goth).
HILTZ German
Variant of HILZ.
HIMMEL German
German word for "sky"
HIMMLER German, History
Derived from German Himmel "heaven, sky". This was a topographic name for someone living at a high altitude. ... [more]
HINKEBEIN Dutch, German
Nickname for someone with a limp, from Middle Low German hinken meaning "to limp" + bein meaning "leg".
HINKEL German
Nickname for a timid, fearful person, from dialect hinkel ‘chicken’
HINKELMAN German
Elaborated variant of Hinkel, with the addition of Middle High German 'man'.
HINSON German
It means "son of HINRICH"
HINTZELL German (German, Modern, Rare)
Variant from name Hintz which was popular in Saxony and Hessen. Name later used in German Prussia. The name Hintz originates as a short form of the personal name Heinrich.
HINZ German, Danish (Rare)
Derived from the given name HINZ, a diminutive of HEINRICH.
HIRSEKORN German
Hirsekorn - millet grain - seems to be of Jewish origin
HIRT Upper German (Anglicized)
From the word Hirten meaning sheep herder.
HITTLE German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German Hüttl (see HUETTL).
HOCHFELD German
Means "high field".
HOCK German
Topographic name for someone living by a hedge, from a dialect variant of Heck.
HOCKTON German
In relation to Hock a wine producing region and probably being adopted into Britain via Anglo Saxon settlers.
HODDSON French
Variation of the surname, HODSON.
HOERMAN English, German
Variant of HERMAN. Variant of HÖRMANN.
HOFBAUER German
Means - King farmer
HOFFER German
The name Hoffer is derived from the Old German and German word hof, which means settlement, farm or court.
HOHENSEE German
Habitational name from any of several places so named in Pomerania and East Prussia, or perhaps from Hohenseeden near Magdeburg.
HOHN German
Derived from Middle High German hon "chicken". As a surname, it was given to someone who either bred or traded in chickens.... [more]
HOLBROOK English, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Derbyshire, Dorset, and Suffolk, so called from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’ + broc ‘stream’. ... [more]
HOLL German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
HOLLANDER German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
HOLLIER English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
HOLLINGER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from places called Holling or Hollingen.
HOLTER English, German, Norwegian
Derived from English holt meaning "small wood". A topographic name for someone who lived near a small wooden area, as well as a habitational name from a place named with that element.
HOLTEY German
Old German name meaning "Wood Island". Holt means wood and ey means island. Family can be traced back to around 650 A.D. and is located in the Ruhr and Essen area of Germany.
HOLTHAUS German
North German: topographic name for someone who lived by a copse (a small group of trees), from Middle Low German holt ‘small wood’ + haus ‘house’.
HOLTZCLAW German (Anglicized, Modern)
Americanized spelling of German Holzklau, which translates into modern German as "wood thief", but is probably a nickname for someone who gathered wood, from Middle High German holz "wood" + a derivative of kluben "to pick up", "gather", "steal".
HOLTZMANN Upper German, German
Derived from the Upper German word "holz," which means "forest." Thus many of the names that evolved from this root work have to do with living in the woods
HOLZHEIM German
The meaning of Holzheim is " wood home". Holz=wood and heim=home. ... [more]
HOLZINGER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Holzing or Holzingen.
HOLZSCHUH German
Occupational - from German holz "wood", and schuh "shoe".
HOMBERG German
The surname Hamberg could be derived from it.
HONIG German, Jewish
Metonymic name for a gatherer or seller of honey, from Middle High German honec, honic "honey", German Honig.
HOOT Dutch, German
The Dutch form is a habitation name for someone who lived in the hout or "woods" while the German form hoth is from an occupational name for a maker of hats.
HÖRMANN German
The distinguished surname Hormann is of very ancient German origin. It is derived from a Germanic personal name made up of the elements "heri," meaning "army," and "man," meaning "man."
HORNEY German (Anglicized)
German: Eastphalian or Americanized form of a personal name composed of the Germanic elements hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’ + nit ‘battle fury’, ‘eagerness to fight’, or a habitational name from a place so called in Brandenburg or in the Rhineland... [more]
HORNSETH German
Name of a German farm.
HÖRSCHELMANN German
This denotes familial origin in the former village of Hörschel (annexed to Eisenach in 1994).
HORSCHWALD German
Surname probably of German origin. Most people with this surname live in Poland today.
HOSNER German
Occupational name for a knitter of hose (garments for the legs), from the plural form of Middle High German hose + the agent suffix -er (see Hose 3).
HOSTETLER German
The name itself comes from the word Hostet or Hochstatt meaning "high place". Thus Hostetler is someone living in a high place or on high ground.
HOUCK German
Nickname from Middle Dutch houck, a marine fish, or from Middle Dutch hoec, houck ‘buck’. variant of Hoek.
HOUSEAL French (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
French (Lorraine) spelling of German Häusel, a topographic name meaning ‘small house’, a diminutive of HAUS. ... [more]
HOWDYSHELL American, German
Americanized (i.e., Anglicized) form of the Swiss German Haudenschild, which originated as a nickname for a ferocious soldier, literally meaning "hack the shield" from Middle High German houwen "to chop or hack" (imperative houw) combined with den (accusative form of the definite article) and schilt "shield".
HUBERT German, Dutch, English, French, Jewish
Derived from the given name HUBERT.
HÜBSCH German
Nickname from Middle High German hübesch 'courtly', 'polite', 'refined', 'agreeable', German hübsch.
HUETTL Upper German
South German (Hüttl) diminutive of Hütt (see Huett).
HUFF German
From the Germanic personal name Hufo, a short form of a compound name formed with hug "heart, mind, spirit" as the first element.
HUGO French
Victor Hugo was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. He was also the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HULSE German
derived from HOLTZ, means "a wood"
HUMBERT German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hun "Hun, giant" or hun "bear cub" and berht "bright, famous". This was particularly popular in the Netherlands and North Germany during the Middle Ages as a result of the fame of a 7th-century St... [more]
HUMBOLDT German (?)
Derived from the Germanic given name HUNIBALD. Notable bearers of this surname were Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), a Prussian naturalist, geographer, explorer and polymath, and his brother Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835), a linguist, philosopher and diplomat.
HUMPERDINCK German (?), Literature
From the German surname Humperdinck. As a surname it was born by the composer Engelbert Humperdinck. As a first name it was used for the villain Prince Humperdinck in William Goldman's novel The Princess Bride.
HUNDERTMARK German
A nickname for a wealthy man, from Middle High German hundert meaning "hundred" + mark, a denomination of coin.
HUNSBERGER German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Hunsberg or Huntsberg.
HUNTZINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Hintschingen, earlier Huntzingen.
HURST German
Topographic name from Middle High German hurst "woodland, thicket".
HUSEMANN German
Epithet for a servant or an administrator who worked at a great house, from Middle Low German hus ‘house’ (see House 1, Huse) + man ‘man’.
HUSTED German
The name was originally spelled "Hustedt" and means "homestead." The family name originated in northern Germany. One branch of the family migrated to England, and a branch of that family to the United States.
HUTZEL German
from a Germanic personal name, Huzo
HUX German
Probably from a topographic name Huck or Hucks, of uncertain origin. It occurs in many place and field names.
IADANZA Italian
Of Italian origin, and a (currently) unknown meaning.... [more]
IAVARONE Italian
Possibly from a shortened form of the personal name Ianni + varone, a variant of barone ‘baron’; literally ‘baron John’.
ICKES German, English
In German the meaning is unknown.... [more]
IENCA Italian (Rare)
Allegedly derived from Italian giovenca "heifer". A heifer is a young cow that has not yet had a calf. Mount Jenca and Jenca Valley are located near Gran Sasso d'Italia in the Abruzzo region in Italy.
ILARDI Italian
Possibly from the given name Ilardo, which was possibly a derivative of the Germanic name ADALHARD. Alternatively, perhaps this is a southern variant of Gilardi.
ILES English (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
ILGENFRITZ German
Compound patronymic, meaning "Fritz, the son of Ilg".
IMBERT French
From the medieval French personal name Imbert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "vast-bright".
IMMER German, Anglo-Saxon
German: habitational name for someone from a place named Immer near Oldenburg in Lower Saxony. ... [more]
IMMERMANN German
Habitational name for someone from a place named Immer near Oldenburg in Lower Saxony.
INFANTE Italian
Nickname for someone with a childlike disposition, from infante "child" (Latin infans, literally "one who cannot speak").
INGA Italian
Italian name, however probably Germanic origins
INQUIETI Italian (Rare)
would like to know if any one out there has heard of this name and what part of italy it comes from gt grand father corneluse inquiete/i came to england from parma italy in 1872/4 age 37/8 married in 1875... [more]
INSALACO Italian
A surname in Sicily. Believed to come from the word Salaco an occupational name for a tanner in Arabic.
ISAAC Jewish, English, Welsh, French
Derived from the given name ISAAC.
ISABETH French
A matronym derived from the given name ÉLISABETH/ELISABETH.
ISELLE French
Frenchified forms of Iseli, a Swiss German variant of EISELE.... [more]
ISENBARGER German, Jewish
Respelling of German or Jewish EISENBERGER.
ISENHOUR German
Variant spelling of Eisenhauer.
ITELSON Yiddish, German
Yiddish "Son of Itel"
ITZSTEIN German
Topographic surname that originated from broad regions around the river Itz in Thuringia, Germany. The word "Stein" (German word for stone) historically was also used to describe castles on a hill or at a river, thus a possible meaning of the name is "castle at the river Itz".
JACARUSO Italian
An Italian surname from a compound of Ia- (from the personal name Ianni) and the southern Italian word caruso, which means ‘lad’ or ‘boy’.
JACOBI Jewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
JACOBSMEYER German
Habitational name from an estate so named.
JACQUEMAN French
Alsace-Lorraine
JACQUEMIN French
From a pet form of the given name JACQUES.
JADE English, French
From the given name JADE. It could also indicate someone with jade green eyes.
JÄGERMEISTERSSEN German
Means son of the "Master-Hunter". Originally given to the son of the master-hunter in hunting camps.
JAHN German
Unknown meaning.
JAHNS German
Patronymic from the personal name JAHN.
JÄNICKE German
From a pet form of the personal name Johann.
JANISSE French
Possibly a respelling of French Janisset, from a pet form of Jan, a variant spelling of Jean, French equivalent of John.
JANNUSCH German
From a pet form of the personal name JAN.
JAPP German
Derived from a diminutive of JACOB.
JARSDEL German
Are you near extinct or possibly extend last name, referring to the opening part of a jar.
JARY French
France-England-USA
JAY English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French jay(e), gai "jay (the bird)", probably referring to an idle chatterer or a showy person, although the jay was also noted for its thieving habits.
JEAN-BAPTISTE Haitian Creole, French
From the French given name JEAN-BAPTISTE.
JEANNOT French
From the given name JEANNOT, a French diminutive of (1)Jean.
JEANPETIT French
Means "little Jean" from Old French petit "small" and the given name Jean, originally a nickname for a small man called Jean (or applied ironically to a large man), or a distinguishing epithet for the younger of two men named Jean.... [more]
JEAUME French (Rare)
Variant form of the patronymic surname of Jaume.
JENDRE German (Anglicized, Rare), Czech (Anglicized, Rare), Slovak (Anglicized, Rare), Danish (Anglicized, Rare)
Jendre is an anglicized version of many surnames throughout Europe that start with 'Jendre'.... [more]
JENNER German
Derived from the name JANUARIUS.
JETER French (Huguenot), German
Jeter is a French and German surname. It is the last name of former New York Yankees baseball player, Derek Jeter. It's also the last name of Carmelita Jeter, an American sprinter who specializes in the 100 meter sprint.
JOB English, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name IYOV or JOB, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
JODIET German
Unknown
JOHANNESON German, Dutch
Variant of JOHANNESSEN which means "son of JOHANNES
JOHANNING German
North German patronymic from Johann, German form of JOHN.
JOHANNKNECHT German
John The Servant
JOLIET French
From French Jolie "pretty one" and the popular suffix -et "little" meaning "pretty little one."
JONAS Danish, German, Dutch, Norwegian
From the given name Jonas
JORGENSON German, English
Respelling of JØRGENSEN or Jörgensen (see Jorgensen) or the Swedish cognate Jörgens(s)on.
JOST Dutch, German
Dutch and German: from a personal name, a derivative of the Breton personal name IODOC (see JOYCE), or from the personal name JUST.
JOURDINE French, English
English and French variant of Jordan.
JOY French (Latinized)
Joy \joy\ as a girl's name is pronounced joy. It is of Old French and Latin origin, and the meaning of Joy is "joy". Used in the Middle Ages, and made popular in the 17th century under the influence of the Puritans, to whom being "joyful in the Lord" was an important duty... [more]
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