Floom origin?
Does anyone know the ethnic origin of the last name Floom? Etymology would be great as well if anyone know. Thanks
Tags:  Floom
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I was doing a vanity search and I thought I would chime in here.My family is of eastern european Jewish background. My grandparents immigrated from the Polish Corridor to England sometime before my father's 1921 birth. They were illiterate, and the immigration people were, I am guessing, only slightly more literate. They spelled the name Flom, despite the pronunciation. My father later added the extra O to bring the spelling in line with the pronunciation. It is doubtful that my family would have ever lived anywhere where dutch was the primary language.I have been on the net for 15 years, and in the early ays when it was easier to find who had an account and where, there seemed to be a lot of email going around among Flooms, trying to find connections. I never found any connection with any (the primary question - is the name Floom from Jewish relatives - if not, probably no connection). I do not think many connections were found among the other Flooms. There was a retired General with the name Floom. I beleive he has since died.The drunken animal trainer in Babe 2 was named Fugly Floom. In the new Harry Potter book, the owner of Honeydukes is named Ambrosia Flume (we heard it on audio, and were very excited, but disappointed when we found the spelling). In a lesser known book by the Welsh author Richard LLewelyn (How Green was my Valley) there were a couple of characters named Ma and Pa Floom. I always wondered about the Welsh connection. (though I just looked it up on Wikipedia - turns out he lied about being Welsh). Hope this helps someone. If anyone wants to email me, I have a gmail ( a dot com) account, that uses my first initial followed by my last name.
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Yes, I'd have to agree that it seems of Dutch origin. I looked up Floom, Flume, ect in a Dutch/English dictionary, but I couldn't find any matches.
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Could it be an englicization of the german surname FLUME or FLUHME that are pronounced more or less like Floom?
Flume or Fluhme are very local and very rare in Germany.
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I've never encountered this name. I don't think it's English (language) in origin. So what other languages have that double-o spelling? I can only think of Dutch.
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I thought the same- Dutch. Sagani's explanation makes sense, though.
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If it's any help ...I would guess its an alternate of the English word "flume" which comes from a Middle English word "flum" which means a river, which in turn comes from Old French, and ultimately from Latin "flumen" and "fluere" probably "to flow" ...
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