Does ANYONE know the origin of "Palgon?"
My GGG-Grandfather's surname was Palgon (my GG-Grandfather changed it to Palgan, and it became Feldman when we came to America). My 5th(?) cousin Gary Palgon says that it might mean "little burn," but that that definition is doubtful.Help!
IMPEACH BUSHWe are now no longer the Knights Who Say "Ni!" We are now the Knights Who Say "Ekke, Ekke, Ekke, Ekke, Ptang, Zoo Boing!"
Tags:  Palgon
vote up1vote down

Replies

Jason,I don't remember giving you the 'little burn' definition, but contact me directly at gmpalgon@yahoo.com and I'll send you the complete details. 7th cousin Gary
vote up1vote down
it seems to be jewish.
vote up1vote down
Any clues as to ethnic, linguistic, regional or national origin?
The choice of Feldman looks arbitrary, probably a family name from the maternal side, rather than an attempt at translation. After all, why change to a German surname in an English-speaking country?
vote up1vote down
I believe it is a Sephardic surname. It is definitely a Spanish surname. Surprisingly or not, there were Sephardim in Poland.
vote up1vote down
Yes, it's Polish. That branch of my family lived in Ostrow Mazowiecka, Poland. The Feldman name was probably administered when they came to America; no relation to Palgon.IMPEACH BUSHWe are now no longer the Knights Who Say "Ni!" We are now the Knights Who Say "Ekke, Ekke, Ekke, Ekke, Ptang, Zoo Boing!"

This message was edited by the author 8/22/2005, 12:38 PM

vote up1vote down
According to a Polish website there were 865 Palgans in Poland in 1998, and only two Palgons. The script was not very clear but it looked like both versions were spelt with that peculiar Polish L that is pronounced like a W.
I've found nothing on the meaning, in a Polish dictionary or in a oouple of dictionaries of surnames. It remains a mystery.
vote up1vote down
Interesting. Thanks!!!
IMPEACH BUSHWe are now no longer the Knights Who Say "Ni!" We are now the Knights Who Say "Ekke, Ekke, Ekke, Ekke, Ptang, Zoo Boing!"
vote up1vote down