Dollarhide, Doxtator, & Jadelot...What do they mean, & what are their origins ?
Does anyone know the meanings of Dollarhide, Doxtator, & Jadelot ? I'd also like to know their origins & meanings.
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There are two theories about the origin of Doxtator. Either it comes from the German 'Dachstatter /Dachstetter', or from Iroquaian 'ODatsheckta'. See http://www.angelfire.com/on3/oneida/page5b.html for details.
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Not sure, but for what it's worth, I know in Scandinavia they still use an ending -ditter or -datter, that means 'daughter of' ...perhaps a cognitive of the -tator ending in German.
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If Sean is correct about the ending -tator, the name might mean "Daughter of a Doxie".

Doxies are sprites that look like Pixies. I think in some Celtic stories, they are horse-like in shape and can change shape into strange humans with horse-ears, but I may be confusing them with Nixies or Kelpies.

On the other hand, the name could be from the same root as the Old English word "Dohter", meaning daughter. Often times surnames pick up strange elaborations over the years, so it can be hard to tell.
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I don't understand. The first Doxtator is a historic person, we know he was a '(semi-)native' American Indian living in New York in the early 18th century. Or do you think it's a made-up story then, on the page I linked to? It is not often that we know so much about the first person EVER to have a name as we do in this case.
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PS I don't mean its not worth it to try and find a different origin, only that you're going about it the wrong way in this case. It's not much use to find combinations of gaelic words or whatever, no matter how much they resemble 'doxtator', because the first Doxtator is most unlikely ever to have heard of them. Instead it's enough to show there was even a single person living in the area at the time with a name that SOUNDS like doxtator (Nobody says he actually knew ODatsheckta!).
Kind Regards :)
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It could be that Jadelot is a variation of Hardelot, D'Hardelot. (Jardelot also exists). Hardelot is the name of a French town as well. It comes from a Saxon word and is translated as 'fortified town'.
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In fact I am not sure. The surname exists in Northern France: see the French site. You should look at the site of JEAN TOSTI www.jtosti.com/noms.
You could find similar surnames derived from Gérard
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The -ot ending is often read as a diminutive in French names. (Carlot for Little Charles e.g.) So that would make it 'little Gerard'. At least we agree that the J is not original.
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JADELOT is very rare both in USA and in FRANCE where the surname is spread, especially in Northern FRANCE.
It could be an hypocoristic or shortened form of the first name Gérard, like Jadin or Jadoul.
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How's about trying www.dollarhide.org :D
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It comes from Dollarhyde, anyway. Hyde referred to a trapper who sold pelts, or hides. Perhaps "dollar" is a type of animal in Old English that could be trapped, or else it is probably and adjective describing the trapper (like "good trapper" or "tough trapper" or whatever).

I don't have my Old English studies with me now, or I'd look it up.
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'Dollarhide comes form Delahyde or De la Hyde, meaning "of the land" and likely came to the British Isles from Normandy with William the Conqueror.' -from the Dollarhide family page on http://www.murrah.com/gen/dolrhide.htm
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