Origin of name - Radenbaugh
Does anyone know of the origin of the Radenbaughs? Or what does BAUGH mean at the end of a surname?
Also anyone know of the origin of the name Turczi?
vote up1vote down

Replies

There is a Hungarian placename called Turcz (Turt) and Turcisce.
vote up1vote down
I can't find the name in any of my books. Ancestry.com says, it's of German origin:
http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?nf=&nl=&fid=5&ln=Radenbaugh&fn=&o_xid=0040803744&o_lid=0040803744But it doesn't give the meaning. It does have "BAUGH" though, German BACH, meaning "someone living by a stream". (The Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press) Now to the RADEN part: "Rad" means "wheel" in German, so maybe there once was a mill by the stream. But this is just guessing.Another idea (even wilder): The BAUGH part could be short for "bauer", "builder", and Radenbaugh would be someone building carriages. RADEMACHER ("wheelmaker") is a traditional occupational name for a cartwright. Menke, where are you?! I'm sure, he can dig up better information.You may find this helpful, too:
http://www.genealogytoday.com/surname/finder.mv?Surname=Radenbaugh
vote up1vote down
Baugh is an Americanisation of the German bach, and seems to occur fairly regularly in German-American surnames.
Turczi looks Hungarian, possibly from a place-name. The CZ combination is no longer used in Hungarian so the place-name, if it exists, would be Turcs.
vote up1vote down
Could the name,Turczi, be Romanian?
vote up1vote down
Forget the wheel!Thank you, Jim, for mentioning the word "place-name"! I was so blind! Most likely Radenbach/baugh refers to a place called Radenbach. Its two parts are "rod" (clearing) and "bach" (stream), and that's all there is to it. Sorry for misleading your imagination. I haven't been able to find a place called Radenbach in Germany, but there is Rodenbach an Radenbeck ("beck" being a northern variant of "bach"). But I did find a stream called Radenbach in the Lüneburger Heide near Hannover.
vote up1vote down