Browse Surnames

This is a list of surnames in which the usage is English; and the name does not appear on the United States popularity list.
usage
Arthurson English
Means "son of Arthur".
Badcock English
From a diminutive of the medieval given name Bada.
Beake English
Variant of Beck 3.
Botterill English
Probably indicated someone from the town of Les Bottereaux in Normandy, itself derived from Old French bot "toad".
Christophers English
Derived from the given name Christopher.
Denzil English
From the place name Denzell, a manor in Cornwall, which is of unknown meaning.
Dwerryhouse English
Indicated a person who worked or lived at a dyehouse, which is a place where dyeing was done.
Elwes English
Derived from the given name Eloise.
Gatsby English (Rare), Literature
Rare variant of Gadsby. This name was used by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald for the central character in his novel The Great Gatsby (1925). In the book, James Gatz renames himself as Jay Gatsby at age 17 because he believes it sounds more sophisticated.
Giffard English
Derived from the Germanic given name Gebhard.
Gorbold English
From the given name Gerbold.
Henryson English
Means "son of Henry". A bearer of this surname was the poet Robert Henryson (1425-1500).
Hunnisett English
Possibly a variant of Honeycutt.
Ibbot English
Variant of Ibbott.
Ibbott English
Matronymic surname derived from the medieval name Ibota, a diminutive of Isabel.
Ikin English
Derived from a diminutive of the medieval given name Ida.
Ilbert English
Derived from a Norman French form of the Germanic given name Hildiberht.
Jekyll English
Derived from the Breton given name Judicaël. This name was used by Robert Louis Stevenson for the character of Dr Henry Jekyll in the book Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886).
Lukeson English (Rare)
Means "son of Luke".
Morce English
Variant of Morriss.
Nigel English
Derived from the given name Neil.
Outterridge English
Derived from the Old English given name Uhtric.
Patrickson English
Means "son of Patrick".
Romilly English, French
Originally denoted a person who came from any of the various places in northern France called Romilly or from Romiley in England.
Roydon English
Originally derived from a place name meaning "rye hill", from Old English ryge "rye" and dun "hill".
Sackville English
From the name of the Norman French town of Saqueneville.
Sempers English
From the name of various towns named Saint Pierre in Normandy, all of which commemorate Saint Peter.
Skeates English
From the Old Norse nickname or byname skjótr meaning "swift".
Stainthorpe English
Originally indicated a person from Staindrop, County Durham, England, derived from Old English stæner meaning "stony ground" and hop meaning "valley".
Stidolph English
From the Old English given name Stithulf.
Sudworth English
From an English place name composed of Old English suþ "south" and worþ "enclosure".
Thompsett English
From a diminutive of the given name Thomas.
Thrussell English
From Old English þrostle meaning "song thrush", referring to a cheerful person.
Thurstan English
Derived from the Old Norse name Þórsteinn.
Thwaite English
Indicated a dweller in a forest clearing or pasture, from Old Norse þveit "clearing, pasture".
Tittensor English
Indicated a person from Tittensor, England, which means "Titten's ridge".
Tollemache English
Means "knapsack" in Old French.
Trengove English
Originally indicated a person from Trengove in Cornwall, England.
Victors English
Derived from the given name Victor.
Wardrobe English
From Old French warder "to guard" and robe "garment", an occupational name for a servant responsible for the clothing in a household.
Wembley English
From the name of a town, now part of Greater London, meaning "Wemba's clearing" in Old English.