Browse Surnames

This is a list of surnames in which the usage is English; and the order is random.
usage
Disney English
Means "from Isigny", referring to the town of Isigny in Normandy. This surname was borne by the American animator and filmmaker Walt Disney (1901-1966).
Wilton English
From any of the English towns named Wilton.
Colton English
From a place name meaning "Cola's town".
Austin English
Derived from the given name Austin.
Holland 2 Dutch, German, English
Indicated a person from the Dutch province of Holland 1.
Royle English
Originally derived from a place name meaning "rye hill" from Old English ryge "rye" and hyll "hill".
Alger English
From the given name Algar.
Gladwin English
Derived from the Old English given name Glædwine.
Jeffery English
Derived from the given name Jeffrey.
Rounds English
Patronymic derived from Middle English rond meaning "round, plump", ultimately from Latin rotundus.
Rush English
Indicated a person who lived near rushes, the grasslike plant that grows in a marsh, from Old English rysc.
Horsfall English
From a minor place in Yorkshire derived from Old English hors "horse" and fall "clearing".
Ainsworth English
Habitational name for a person from the village of Ainsworth near Manchester, itself from the Old English given name Ægen and worþ meaning "enclosure".
Tifft English
Variant of Toft.
Cannon English
From the ecclesiastical usage of canon, referring to a church official or servant who worked in a clergy house.
Stainthorpe English
Originally indicated a person from Staindrop, County Durham, England, derived from Old English stæner meaning "stony ground" and hop meaning "valley".
Wickham English
From any of various towns by this name in England, notably in Hampshire. They are derived from Old English wīc "village, town" (of Latin origin) and ham "home, settlement".
Batts English
Means "son of Bate".
Clarkson English
Patronymic form of Clark.
Tennyson English
Means "son of Denis".
Wheatley English
From any of the various places in England with this name, meaning "wheat clearing" in Old English.
Britton English
Originally given to a person who was a Briton (a Celt of England) or a Breton (an inhabitant of Brittany).
Tatum English
Variant of Tatham.
Strudwick English
From an English place name derived from Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood" and wīc meaning "village, town".
Hubert French, German, English
Derived from the given name Hubert.
Garnett 2 English
From a diminutive of the given name Guarin.
Ewart 1 English
From a Norman form of Edward.
Newton English
From the name of one of many English towns meaning "new town". A famous bearer was the English physicist Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727).
Speight English
English form of Specht, probably a loanword from German or Dutch.
Nigel English
Derived from the given name Neil.
Croft English
From Old English croft meaning "enclosed field".
Huddleson English
Means "son of Hudel", a diminutive of Hudde.
Cockburn Scottish, English
Originally indicated someone who came from Cockburn, a place in Berwickshire. The place name is derived from Old English cocc "rooster" and burna "stream".
Parkinson English
Means "son of Parkin", a medieval diminutive of Peter.
Morce English
Variant of Morriss.
Darwin English
From the given name Deorwine.
Glover English
Occupational name for a person who made or sold gloves, from Middle English glovere.
Merrill 1 English
Derived from the given name Muriel.
Ackerman English
Means "ploughman", derived from Middle English aker "field" and man.
Ogden English
From a place name derived from Old English ac "oak" and denu "valley".
Sadler English
Occupational name for a maker of saddles, from Old English sadol "saddle".
Robbins English
Derived from the given name Robin.
Low English
Variant of Law.
Abrams Jewish, English
Means "son of Abraham".
Gill English
Originally indicated someone who lived near a ravine, from Middle English gil (of Old Norse origin).
Purcell English
From Old French pourcel "piglet", from Latin porcellus, a derivative of porcus "pig". This was a nickname or an occupational name for a swineherd.
Sanderson English
Means "son of Alexander".
Cullen 1 English
From the name of the German city of Cologne, which was derived from Latin colonia "colony".
Hathaway English
Habitational name for someone who lived near a path across a heath, from Old English hæþ "heath" and weg "way".
Peel English
Nickname for a thin person, derived from Old French pel, Latin palus meaning "stake, post" (related to English pole).
Holt English, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
Joyce English, Irish
From the given name Joyce.
Tennison English
Means "son of Denis".
Draper English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of woolen cloth, from Anglo-Norman French draper (Old French drapier, an agent derivative of drap "cloth").
Jewell English
Derived from the Breton given name Judicaël.
Bray English
From a place name derived from Cornish bre "hill".
Bardsley English
From the name a village near Manchester, from the Old English given name Beornræd and leah "woodland, clearing".
Rake English
Originally a name for a dweller on a narrow pass or hillside, from Old English hrace meaning "throat".
Colby English
From various English place names, which were derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
Norman English
Referred to a person who was originally from Scandinavia or Normandy. Even before the Norman Conquest, Scandinavians were settling the north and east of England. The Normans who participated in the Conquest were originally from Scandinavia, but had been living in Normandy, France for over a century and spoke French.
Reeve English
Occupational name derived from Middle English reeve, Old English (ge)refa meaning "sheriff, prefect, local official".
Atkinson English
Means "son of Atkin", a medieval diminutive of Adam.
Hartell English
From various place names derived from Old English heort "hart, male deer" and hyll "hill".
Butcher English
Occupational name for a butcher, derived from Old French bouchier.
Sampson English
Derived from a medieval form of the given name Samson.
Walterson English
Means "son of Walter".
Chadwick English
From the name of English towns meaning "settlement belonging to Chad" in Old English.
Baines 2 English
From a nickname derived from Old English ban "bones", probably for a thin person.
Gibbs English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Hooper English
Occupational name for someone who put the metal hoops around wooden barrels.
York English
From the name of the English city of York, which was originally called Eburacon (Latinized as Eboracum), meaning "yew" in Brythonic. In the Anglo-Saxon period it was corrupted to Eoforwic, based on Old English eofor "boar" and wīc "village". This was rendered as Jórvík by the Vikings and eventually reduced to York.
Sanders English
Patronymic of the given name Sander, a medieval form of Alexander.
Causey English
Indicated a person who lived near a causeway, from Old French caucie.
Watkins English
Derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, which was a diminutive of the name Walter.
Bryan English
From the given name Brian.
Patrick English
From the given name Patrick.
Thorne English
Variant of Thorn.
Seymour 1 English
From Saint Maur, a French place name, which commemorates Saint Maurus.
Bonney English
From northern Middle English boni meaning "pretty, attractive".
Waterman 1 English
Means "servant of Walter".
Spears English
Patronymic form of Spear.
Isaacson English
Means "son of Isaac".
Macy English
Variant of Massey.
Lum English
From the name of towns in England called Lumb, probably from Old English lum "pool".
Chase English
Occupational name for a hunter, from Middle English chase "hunt".
Bunker English
Derived from Old French bon cuer meaning "good heart".
Grover English
From Old English graf meaning "grove of trees". A famous bearer was the American president Grover Cleveland (1837-1908).
Pope English
From a nickname that originally designated a person who played the part of the pope in a play or pageant. Otherwise the name could be used as a nickname for a man with a solemn, austere, or pious appearance. It is derived from Latin papa, ultimately from Greek πάππας (pappas) meaning "father".
Morrison English
Means "son of Morris".
Anson English
Means "son of Agnes".
Wilmer English
Derived from the given name Wilmǣr.
Matthewson English
Means "son of Matthew".
Bryce English
From the given name Brice.
Kendall English
Derived from the town of Kendal in England, so-called from the river Kent, on which it is situated, and Old English dæl meaning "valley, dale".
Hampson English
Means "son of Hamo".
Nowell English
Variant of Noel.
Mills English
Originally given to one who lived near a mill or who worked in a mill, from Middle English mille.
Dixon English
Means "son of Dick 1".
Broadbent English
From a place name derived from Old English brad "broad" and beonet "bent grass".
Ibbott English
Matronymic surname derived from the medieval name Ibota, a diminutive of Isabel.
Troy English
Originally denoted a person from the city of Troyes in France.
Payton English
From the name of the town of Peyton in Sussex. It means "Pæga's town".
Fleming English
Given to a person who was a Fleming, that is a person who was from Flanders in the Netherlands.
Hightower English
Possibly a variant of Hayter.
Winslow English
Derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to Wine".
Clayton English
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
Cross English
Locative name meaning "cross", ultimately from Latin crux. It denoted one who lived near a cross symbol or near a crossroads.
Coy English
Means "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
Kimball English
Derived from the Welsh given name Cynbel or the Old English given name Cynebald.
Ikin English
Derived from a diminutive of the medieval given name Ida.
Snell English
From Old English snel meaning "fast, quick, nimble".
Waters 2 English
Derived from the given name Walter.
Benbow English
From a nickname "bend the bow" given to an archer.
Attaway English
Means "at the way", originally denoting someone who lived close to a road.
Pemberton English
From the name of a town near Manchester, derived from Celtic penn meaning "hill" combined with Old English bere meaning "barley" and tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
Mathers English
Occupational name meaning "mower, cutter of hay" in Old English.
Leonardson English
Means "son of Leonard".
Mitchell 2 English
Originally a nickname for a large person, from Old English micel "big".
Kingsley English
From a place name meaning "king's clearing" in Old English.
Darnell 2 English
From the name of a town near Sheffield, derived from Old English derne "hidden" and halh "nook".
Yoxall English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Yoxall in Staffordshire, itself derived from Old English geoc "oxen yoke" and halh "nook, recess".
Harvey English
From the Breton given name Haerviu (see Harvey).
Hodgson English
Means "son of Hodge", a medieval diminutive of Roger.
Seward 1 English
Derived from the given name Sigeweard.
Palmer English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
Garrard English
From the given name Gerard.
Clement English
Derived from the given name Clement.
Rey 2 English
Means "female roe deer" from Old English ræge, probably denoting someone of a nervous temperament.
Wallace Scottish, English, Irish
Means "foreigner, stranger, Celt" from Norman French waleis (of Germanic origin). It was often used to denote native Welsh and Bretons. A famous bearer was the 13th-century Sir William Wallace of Scotland.
Aylmer English
Derived from the Old English name Æðelmær.
Thornton English
From any of the various places in England by this name, meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
Georgeson English
Means "son of George".
Darby English
From the name of the town Derby meaning "deer farm" in Old Norse.
Peck 2 English
Occupational name for a maker of pecks (vessels used as peck measures), derived from Middle English pekke.
Neville English, Irish
From the names of towns in Normandy, variously Neuville or Néville, meaning "new town" in French.
Southgate English
Name for a person who lived near the southern gate of a town or in a town named Southgate, from Old English suþ and gæt.
Eason English
Variant of Eads.
Aaron Jewish, English
From the given name Aaron.
Baker English
Occupational name meaning "baker", derived from Middle English bakere.
Ruggles English
From a medieval diminutive of the given name Roger.
Dane 2 English
Originally denoted a Dane, that is a person from Denmark.
Beasley English
From the name of a place in Lancashire, from Old English beos "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Willard English
From the given name Wilheard or Willihard.
Parish 1 English
Originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.
Wolf German, English
From Middle High German or Middle English wolf meaning "wolf", or else from a Germanic given name beginning with this element.
Arthur English, French
From the given name Arthur.
English English
Denoted a person who was of English heritage. It was used to distinguish people who lived in border areas (for example, near Wales or Scotland). It was also used to distinguish an Anglo-Saxon from a Norman.
Stoddard English
Occupational name for a horse keeper, from Old English stod "stallion, stud" and hierde "herder".
Bryson English
Means "son of Brice".
Jacobs English, Dutch
Derived from the given name Jacob.
Carman 2 English
From an Old Norse byname derived from karlmann meaning "male, man".
Sessions English
From the name of the city of Soissons in northern France, itself derived from the name of the Celtic tribe of the Suessiones.
Edison English
Means "son of Eda 2" or "son of Adam". The surname was borne by American inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
Teel English
From Middle English tele meaning "teal, duck".
Newport English
Given to one who came from the town of Newport (which means simply "new port"), which was the name of several English towns.
Hayter English
Name for a person who lived on a hill, from Middle English heyt meaning "height".
Stroud English
From Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood".
Courtenay 1 English
From the name of towns in France that were originally derivatives of the Gallo-Roman personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short".
Bourke English
Variant of Burke.
Fenn English
From a name for someone who dwelt near a marsh, from Old English fenn meaning "fen, swamp, bog".
Yap English
From a nickname for a clever or cunning person, from Middle English yap meaning "devious, deceitful, shrewd".
Thorn English, Danish
Originally applied to a person who lived in or near a thorn bush.
Barr English
Indicated a person who lived near a barrier, from Old French barre.
Quick English
Nickname for a quick or agile person, ultimately from Old English cwic meaning "alive".
Shelton English
From the name of various English towns, meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
Bailey English
From Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", which comes via Old French from Latin baiulus "porter".
William English
Derived from the given name William.
Shirley English
From an English place name, derived from Old English scir "bright" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Warren 1 English
Denoted a person who lived near a warren, from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" (of Germanic origin).
Moore 3 English
Nickname for a person of dark complexion, from Old French more, Latin maurus, meaning "Moorish".
Walker English
Occupational name for a person who walked on damp raw cloth in order to thicken it. It is derived from Middle English walkere, Old English wealcan meaning "to move".
Badcock English
From a diminutive of the medieval given name Bada.
Erickson English
Means "son of Eric".
Owston English
Denoted a person who came from any one of the places in Britain called Ouston or Owston.
Moss 2 English
From the given name Moses.
Pound English
Occupational name for a person who kept animals, from Old English pund "animal enclosure".
Mathews English
Derived from the given name Matthew.
Ayers 1 English
From Middle English eir meaning "heir".
Brandon English
From the name of various places in England meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English.
Bennett English
Derived from the medieval English given name Bennett.
Harper English
Originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps.
Mayes English
Patronymic form of May.
Henryson English
Means "son of Henry". A bearer of this surname was the poet Robert Henryson (1425-1500).
Marlow English
Originally a name for a person from Marlow in Buckinghamshire, England. The place name means "remnants of a lake" from Old English mere "lake" and lafe "remnants, remains". A notable bearer was the English playwright and poet Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
Traviss English
English variant of Travers.
Walsh English, Irish
From Old English wælisc meaning "foreigner, stranger, Celt".
Simms English
Derived from the medieval given name Sim, a short form of Simon 1.
Foster 3 English
Occupational name for a maker of saddle trees, derived from Old French fustier.
Sydney English
Variant of Sidney.
Samuelson English
Means "son of Samuel".
Emmet English
Variant of Emmett. This name was borne by the Irish nationalist Robert Emmet (1778-1803).
Norris 1 English, Scottish
Means "from the north" from Old French norreis. It either denoted someone who originated in the north or someone who lived in the northern part of a settlement.
Hawking English
From a diminutive of Hawk. A famous bearer was the British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018).
Hobson English
Means "son of Hob".
Thompsett English
From a diminutive of the given name Thomas.
Wood English, Scottish
Originally denoted one who lived in or worked in a forest, derived from Old English wudu "wood".
Robson English
Means "son of Rob".
Kersey English
From an English place name meaning derived from Old English cærse "watercress" and eg "island".
Alvin English
Variant of Elwyn.
Thurstan English
Derived from the Old Norse name Þórsteinn.
Daniell English
Derived from the given name Daniel.
Whitaker English
From a place name composed of Old English hwit "white" and æcer "field".
Cole English
From a medieval short form of Nicholas or from the byname Cola.
Green English
Descriptive name for someone who often wore the colour green or someone who lived near the village green.
Blakesley English
From the name of a town in Northamptonshire, itself meaning "Blæcwulf's meadow" in Old English. Blæcwulf is a byname meaning "black wolf".
Skeates English
From the Old Norse nickname or byname skjótr meaning "swift".
Weston English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English west "west" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Oliverson English
Means "son of Oliver".
Sands English
From Old English, indicated the original nearer lived on sandy ground.
Simmons English
Derived from the given name Simon 1.
Overton English
Denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in England called Overton, meaning "upper settlement" or "riverbank settlement" in Old English.
Slade English
Derived from Old English slæd meaning "valley".
Terrell English
Probably derived from the Norman French nickname tirel meaning "to pull", referring to a stubborn person.
Bennington English
From the English town name Benington, which can mean either "settlement belonging to Beonna's people" or "settlement by the River Beane".
Fox English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
White English
Originally a nickname for a person who had white hair or a pale complexion, from Old English hwit "white".
Key 1 English
Variant of Kay 1 or Kay 2.
Ford English
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it. A famous bearer was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
Dudley English
From a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
Rogers English
Derived from the given name Roger.
Donalds English
Derived from the given name Donald.
Francis English
Derived from the given name Francis.
Hobbes English
Derived from the medieval given name Hob. A famous bearer of this name was British political philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), the author of Leviathan.
Miller English
Occupational surname referring to a person who owned or worked in a grain mill, from Middle English mille "mill".
Goddard English
Derived from the Germanic given name Godehard.
Woodham English
Indicated a person who had a home near a wood, derived from Old English wudu "wood" and ham "home, settlement".
Alfredson English
Means "son of Alfred".
Philips English, Dutch
Means "son of Philip". Famous bearers of this surname were Frederick Philips (1830-1900) and his son Gerard (1858-1942), the Dutch founders of the company Philips.
Kay 2 English
Derived from Old French kay meaning "wharf, quay", indicating one who lived near or worked on a wharf.
Caulfield English
From a place name meaning "cold field", from Old English ceald "cold" and feld "pasture, field".
Brown English
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin. A notable bearer is Charlie Brown from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles Schulz.
Belmont French, English
French and English form of Belmonte.
Mallory English
From Old French maloret meaning "unfortunate, unlucky", a term introduced to England by the Normans.
Joyner English
Variant of Joiner.
Dallas 1 English
From Old English dæl meaning "valley" and hus meaning "house".
Tasker English
From Middle English taske meaning "task, assignment". A tasker was a person who had a fixed job to do, particularly a person who threshed grain with a flail.
Hilton English
From various English place names derived from Old English hyll "hill" and tun "enclosure, town". Famous bearers of this name include the Hilton family of hotel heirs.
Mullins 1 English
Derived from Norman French molin "mill".
Tollemache English
Means "knapsack" in Old French.
Avery English
Derived from a Norman French form of the given names Alberich or Alfred.
Lawson English
Means "son of Laurence 1".
Braxton English
From an English place name place name meaning "Bracca's town" in Old English.
Monk English
Nickname or occupational name for a person who worked for monks. This word is derived from Latin monachus, from Greek μοναχός (monachos) meaning "alone".
Fiddler English
English form of Fiedler.
Gary English
Variant of Geary.
Chandler English
Occupational name meaning "candle seller" or "candle maker" in Middle English, ultimately derived from Old French.
Tyson 1 English
Derived from a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand".
Dwerryhouse English
Indicated a person who worked or lived at a dyehouse, which is a place where dyeing was done.
Harford English
Habitational name from places called Harford in Gloucestershire and Devon, meaning "hart ford" or "army ford".
Hunt English
Variant of Hunter.
London English
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain.
Poindexter English
From the Jèrriais surname Poingdestre meaning "right fist".
Day English
From a diminutive form of David.
Swanson English
Patronymic form of Middle English swein meaning "servant" (of Old Norse origin). This word was also used as a byname, and this surname could be a patronymic form of that.
Caldwell English
From various English place names derived from Old English ceald "cold" and wille "spring, stream, well".
Mann German, English
From a nickname meaning "man". This may have originally been given in order to distinguish the bearer from a younger person with the same name.
Steffen Low German, English
Derived from the given name Stephen.
Honeysett English
Possibly a variant of Honeycutt.
Townsend English
Indicated a person who lived at the town's edge, from Old English tun "enclosure, yard, town" and ende "end, limit".
Richardson English
Means "son of Richard".
Dyer English
Occupational name meaning "cloth dyer", from Old English deah "dye".