Browse Surnames

This is a list of surnames in which the usage is English; and the order is random.
usage
Way English
From Old English weg meaning "way, road, path".
Sinclair English
Derived from a Norman French town called "Saint Clair".
Whittemore English
From various English place names derived from Old English hwit "white" and mor "moor, heath, bog".
Ayers 3 English
Indicated a person from the town of Ayr in Scotland. The town was named for the river that flows through it, itself derived from an Indo-European root meaning "water".
Cokes English
Variant of Cook.
Walmsley English
Originally denoted a person from the English town of Walmersley.
Sackville English
From the name of the Norman French town of Saqueneville.
Snider English
Variant of Snyder.
Brooke English
Variant of Brook.
Benton English
Denoted someone who came from Benton, England, which is derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
Ibbott English
Matronymic surname derived from the medieval name Ibota, a diminutive of Isabel.
Matthewson English
Means "son of Matthew".
Avery English
Derived from a Norman French form of the given names Alberich or Alfred.
Jackman English
Means "servant of Jack".
Sands English
From Old English, indicated the original nearer lived on sandy ground.
North English
Name for a person who lived to the north.
Styles English
Locational name for one who lived near a steep hill, from Old English stigol "stile, set of steps".
Banks English
Originally indicated someone who lived near a hillside or a bank of land.
Rodney English
From a place name meaning "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame").
Nicholls English
Derived from the given name Nichol.
Coleman Irish, English
From the given name Colmán.
Everill English
Derived from the feminine given name Eoforhild.
Johnson English
Means "son of John". Famous bearers include American presidents Andrew Johnson (1808-1875) and Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).
Hopson English
Variant of Hobson.
Sherman 1 English
Means "shear man", referring to someone who used shears in his line of work, such as a sheep-shearer.
Tinker English
Occupational name for a mender of kettles, pots and pans. The name could derive from the tinking sound made by light hammering on metal. It is possible that the word comes from the word tin, the material with which the tinker worked.
Corwin English
Derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.
Stacks English
Variant of Stack.
Tyler English
Occupational name for a tiler of roofs, derived from Old English tigele "tile". A famous bearer of this name was American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
Abbey English
Indicated a person who lived near an abbey or worked in an abbey, from Middle English abbeye.
Allen English, Scottish
Derived from the given name Alan.
Langdon English
Derived from various places names, of Old English origin meaning "long hill" (effectively "ridge").
Seward 2 English
Means "swineherd" from Old English su "sow, female pig" and hierde "herdsman, guardian".
Teel English
From Middle English tele meaning "teal, duck".
Fabian German, English, Polish
Derived from the given name Fabian.
Bell 2 English
Derived from the given name Bel, a medieval short form of Isabel.
Geary English
Derived from a Norman given name that was a short form of Germanic names starting with the element ger "spear".
Bean English
English cognate of Bohn.
Aaron Jewish, English
From the given name Aaron.
Samson English, French
Derived from the given name Samson.
Michael English, German
From the given name Michael.
Grayson English
Means "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
Sherburn English
Denoted a person hailing from any of the various places called Sherborne or Sherburn in England, derived from Old English scir "bright" and burna "spring, fountain, stream".
Alger English
From the given name Algar.
Bowman English
Occupational name for an archer, derived from Middle English bowe, Old English boga meaning "bow".
Vernon English
Locational name in the Eure region of Normandy, from the Gaulish element vern "alder (tree)" with the genitive case maker onis.
Head English
From Middle English hed meaning "head", from Old English heafod. It may have referred to a person who had a peculiar head, who lived near the head of a river or valley, or who served as the village headman.
Wheeler English
Occupational name for a maker of wagon wheels, derived from Middle English whele "wheel".
Dorsey English
Means "from Orsay", referring to the town of Orsay near Paris, its name deriving from the Latin personal name Orcius.
Wilmer English
Derived from the given name Wilmǣr.
Shine 1 English
Means "beautiful, attractive" from Old English sciene.
Rodgers English
Derived from the given name Rodger.
Stringer English
Occupational name for a maker of string or bow strings, from Old English streng "string".
Derby English
Variant of Darby.
Allsopp English
From the name of the village of Alsop en la Dale in Derbyshire, England. It means "Ælli's valley" in Old English.
Beverley English
From the name of an English city, derived from Old English beofor "beaver" and (possibly) licc "stream".
Byrd English
Variant of Bird.
Hampton English
From the name of multiple towns in England, derived from Old English ham "home" or ham "water meadow, enclosure" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Porter English
Occupational name meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
Welch English
Variant of Walsh.
Keyes 1 English
Variant of Kay 1 or Kay 2.
Richards English
Derived from the given name Richard.
Earl English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
Meadows English
Referred to one who lived in a meadow, from Old English mædwe.
Collingwood English
From a place name, itself derived from Old French chalenge meaning "disputed" and Middle English wode meaning "woods".
Coke English
Variant of Cook.
May English
Derived from the given name Matthew.
Fry English
From Old English frig (a variant of freo) meaning "free".
Linville English
From an unknown place name.
Comstock English
Possibly from the name of the River Culm in Devon, England. This name is seen in the Domesday book as Culmstoke or Colmstoke.
Underwood English
Means "dweller at the edge of the woods", from Old English under and wudu.
Northrop English
Originally denoted one who came from a town of this name England, meaning "north farm".
Cox English
Patronymic form of Cock.
Cobb English
From a medieval English byname meaning "lump".
Fairburn English
From a place name meaning "fern stream", from Old English fearn "fern" and burna "stream".
Tolbert English
Possibly from a Germanic given name of unknown meaning, the second element of the name is derived from beraht meaning "bright, famous".
Baxter English
Variant (in origin a feminine form) of Baker.
Presley English
Variant of Priestley. This name was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
Simonson English
Means "son of Simon 1".
Seaver English
From the unattested Old English given name Sæfaru, derived from the Old English elements "sea, ocean" and faru "journey".
Evered English
From the given name Everard.
Law English
Derived from Old English hlaw "hill".
Ilbert English
Derived from a Norman French form of the Germanic given name Hildiberht.
Dane 1 English
Variant of Dean 1 or Dean 2.
Kingsley English
From a place name meaning "king's clearing" in Old English.
Sandford English
Indicated a person from Sandford, England, which means simply "sand ford".
Lyndon English
Originally from a place name meaning "linden tree hill" in Old English.
Garey English
Variant of Geary.
Key 1 English
Variant of Kay 1 or Kay 2.
Kingston English
From a place name meaning "king's town" in Old English.
Granger English, French
Means "farm bailiff" from Old French grangier, ultimately from Latin granum meaning "grain". It is borne in the Harry Potter novels by Harry's friend Hermione Granger.
Colt English
Occupational name for a keeper of horses, derived from Middle English colt.
Kidd English
From a nickname meaning "young goat, kid" in Middle English, of Old Norse origin.
Steed English
Occupational name for one who tended horses, derived from Middle English steed, in turn derived from Old English steda meaning "stallion".
Warren 1 English
Denoted a person who lived near a warren, from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" (of Germanic origin).
Wright 1 English
From Old English wyrhta meaning "wright, maker", an occupational name for someone who was a craftsman. Famous bearers were Orville and Wilbur Wright, the inventors of the first successful airplane.
Seymour 2 English
From an English place name, derived from Old English "sea" and mere "lake".
Langley 1 English
From any of the various places with this name, all derived from Old English lang "long" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Skinner English
Occupational name for a person who skinned animals, from Old Norse skinn.
Milton English
Derived from an English place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote "Paradise Lost".
Jamison English
Means "son of James".
Nixon English
Means "son of Nick". A famous bearer was the American president Richard Nixon (1913-1994).
Fairbairn Scottish, English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English and Scots.
Ericson English, Swedish
Means "son of Eric".
Wiley English
From any of the various English towns named Willey or from the River Wylye.
Clayton English
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
Ayton English
From the name of towns in Berwickshire and North Yorkshire. They are derived from Old English ea "river" or eg "island" combined with tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Monday 1 English
Derived from the Old Norse given name Mundi.
Spencer English
Occupational name for a person who dispensed provisions to those who worked at a manor, derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry".
Martel 2 French, English
Nickname for a smith, derived from Old French martel "hammer", ultimately from Late Latin martellus.
Godfrey English
From the Norman given name Godfrey.
Cooper English
Means "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
Harris English
Means "son of Harry".
Wilkie English
Double diminutive of the given name William.
Harley English
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Keys 1 English
Variant of Kay 1 or Kay 2.
Neville English, Irish
From the names of towns in Normandy, variously Neuville or Néville, meaning "new town" in French.
Adkins English
Variant of Atkins.
Darnell 2 English
From the name of a town near Sheffield, derived from Old English derne "hidden" and halh "nook".
Younge English
Variant of Young.
Wash English
Derived from the Norman name Wazo.
Brewer English
Occupational name for a maker of ale or beer.
Adams English, Jewish
Derived from the given name Adam.
Alberts English, Dutch
Means "son of Albert".
Appleton English
From the name of several English towns, meaning "orchard" in Old English (a compound of æppel "apple" and tun "enclosure, yard").
Lee 1 English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a leah, Old English meaning "woodland, clearing".
Outlaw English
Means simply "outlaw" from Middle English outlawe.
Eaton English
From any of the various English towns with this name, derived from Old English ea "river" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Macey English
Variant of Massey.
Hudson English
Means "son of Hudde".
Clarkson English
Patronymic form of Clark.
Peck 2 English
Occupational name for a maker of pecks (vessels used as peck measures), derived from Middle English pekke.
Whitehead English
Nickname for someone with white or light-coloured hair, from Old English hwit "white" and heafod "head".
Thompkins English
From a diminutive of the given name Thomas.
Badcock English
From a diminutive of the medieval given name Bada.
Reeves English
Variant of Reeve.
Lewis 1 English
Derived from the given name Lewis. The author C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a bearer of this surname.
Chester English
From the name of a city in England, derived from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
Spear English
From Old English spere "spear", an occupational name for a hunter or a maker of spears, or a nickname for a thin person.
Thacker English
Northern Middle English variant of Thatcher.
Goodwin English
Derived from the given name Godwine.
Jacobson English
Means "son of Jacob".
Newport English
Given to one who came from the town of Newport (which means simply "new port"), which was the name of several English towns.
Gray English
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
Smith English
Means "metalworker, blacksmith" from Old English smiþ, related to smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world. A famous bearer was the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).
Dobson English
Means "son of Dobbe", a medieval diminutive of Robert.
Jarvis English
Derived from the given name Gervais.
Alexander English
Derived from the given name Alexander.
Harland English
From various place names meaning "hare land" in Old English.
Proudfoot English
Nickname for a person with a proud step.
Hayden 1 English
From place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
Ely English
From the name of a town in eastern England meaning "eel district".
Randall English
Derived from the given name Randel.
Knight English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
Warwick English
From the name of an English town, itself derived from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wīc "village, town".
Broadbent English
From a place name derived from Old English brad "broad" and beonet "bent grass".
Martel 1 English, French
Derived from the given name Martel, a medieval diminutive of Martin.
Harden English
From a place name meaning "hare valley" in Old English.
Hodgson English
Means "son of Hodge", a medieval diminutive of Roger.
Poole English
From Old English pol meaning "pool", referring to a person who lived by a small body of water.
Street English
Habitational name for a person who lived in a place called Street, for example in Somerset. It is derived from Old English stræt meaning "Roman road", from Latin strata.
Rake English
Originally a name for a dweller on a narrow pass or hillside, from Old English hrace meaning "throat".
Williams English
Means "son of William".
Haley English
From the name of an English town meaning "hay clearing", from Old English heg "hay" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Lynn English
From the name of a town in Norfolk (King's Lynn), derived from Welsh llyn meaning "lake".
Harper English
Originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps.
Crisp English
English cognate of Crespo.
Dickman English
From Old English dic "ditch" combined with man "man". It was originally a name for a ditch digger or someone who lived near a ditch.
Winslow English
Derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to Wine".
Ellison English
Patronymic form of the English name Ellis, from the medieval given name Elis, a vernacular form of Elijah.
Denman English
From Middle English dene "valley" combined with man.
Long English
Originally a nickname for a person who had long limbs or who was tall.
Carlisle English
From the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of Lugus". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
Nelson 1 English
Means "son of Neil". This name was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805).
Wheelock English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Wheelock, England. It was named for the nearby River Wheelock, which is derived from Welsh chwylog meaning "winding".
Moss 2 English
From the given name Moses.
Leavitt English
From the name of various places called Livet in Normandy, France. They are possibly of Gaulish origin.
Mallory English
From Old French maloret meaning "unfortunate, unlucky", a term introduced to England by the Normans.
Cockburn Scottish, English
Originally indicated someone who came from Cockburn, a place in Berwickshire. The place name is derived from Old English cocc "rooster" and burna "stream".
Ott English, German
From the given name Otto.
Belanger English
From the given name Berengar.
Hardy English, French
From Old French and Middle English hardi meaning "bold, daring, hardy", of Germanic origin.
Kinsley English
From the name of a town in West Yorkshire, meaning "clearing belonging to Cyne". The Old English given name Cyne is a short form of longer names beginning with cyne meaning "royal".
Dyson English
Means "son of Dye".
Bradford English
Derived from the name of the city of Bradford in West Yorkshire, which meant "broad ford" in Old English. This is also the name of other smaller towns in England.
Barber English, Scottish
Indicated a barber, one who cut hair for a living.
Wild English, German
Means "wild, untamed, uncontrolled", derived from Old English wilde. This was either a nickname for a person who behaved in a wild manner or a topographic name for someone who lived on overgrown land.
Low English
Variant of Law.
Abraham Jewish, English, German, French, Spanish, Dutch
Derived from the given name Abraham.
Gibbs English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Booth English
Topographic name derived from Middle English both meaning "hut, stall".
St John English
From a place named for Saint John.
Toft English
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many places in Britain of that name, derived from Old Norse topt meaning "homestead".
Wardrobe English
From Old French warder "to guard" and robe "garment", an occupational name for a servant responsible for the clothing in a household.
Ness English, Scottish, Norwegian
From English ness and Norwegian nes meaning "headland, promontory", of Old Norse origin, originally referring to a person who lived there.
Foster 2 English
Occupational name for a scissor maker, derived from Old French forcetier.
Winterbottom English
From Old English winter meaning "winter" and botm meaning "ground, soil, bottom". This name probably referred to a winter pasture at the bottom of a lowland valley.
Bryant English
From the given name Brian.
Sadler English
Occupational name for a maker of saddles, from Old English sadol "saddle".
Merrill 1 English
Derived from the given name Muriel.
Bateson English
Means "son of Bate".
Silver English
From a nickname for a person with grey hair, from Old English seolfor "silver".
Draper English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of woolen cloth, from Anglo-Norman French draper (Old French drapier, an agent derivative of drap "cloth").
Ashton English
Denoted a person from one of the towns in England that bear this name, itself derived from Old English æsc "ash tree" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Midgley English
From the English village of Midgley in West Yorkshire, meaning "midge (insect) wood" in Old English.
Clifford English
Derived from various place names that meant "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
Herbert English, German, French
Derived from the male given name Herbert.
Cornett English
Derived from Old French cornet meaning "horn", referring to one who worked as a horn blower.
Rollins English
From a diminutive of the given name Roland.
Huxley English
From the name of a town in Cheshire. The final element is Old English leah "woodland, clearing", while the first element might be hux "insult, scorn". A famous bearer was the British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963).
Albert English, French, Catalan, Hungarian, Romanian, German
Derived from the given name Albert.
Pilgrim English
Nickname for a person who was a pilgrim, ultimately from Latin peregrinus.
Park 3 English
From the medieval name Perkin, a diminutive of Peter.
Hayley English
Variant of Haley.
Bagley English
From various English place names, all derived from Old English bagga "bag, badger" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
Shepherd English
Occupational name meaning "shepherd, sheep herder", from Old English sceaphyrde.
Stafford English
From the name of the English city of Stafford, Staffordshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ford meaning "ford, river crossing".
Parks English
Patronymic form of Park 3.
Short English
From a nickname for a short person, from Middle English schort.
Jinks English
Means "son of Jenk", a short form of Jenkin, a diminutive of Jen, itself a Middle English form of John.
Simms English
Derived from the medieval given name Sim, a short form of Simon 1.
Babcock English
Derived from the medieval name Bab, possibly a diminutive of Bartholomew or Barbara.
Kay 1 English
Derived from the given name Kay 2.
Jackson English
Means "son of Jack". Famous bearers of this name are the American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) and the singer Michael Jackson (1958-2009).
Townsend English
Indicated a person who lived at the town's edge, from Old English tun "enclosure, yard, town" and ende "end, limit".
Atkins English
Means "son of Atkin", a medieval diminutive of Adam.
Nicholson English
Means "son of Nicholas". A famous bearer of this surname is the American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).
Anderson English
Means "son of Andrew".
Reeve English
Occupational name derived from Middle English reeve, Old English (ge)refa meaning "sheriff, prefect, local official".
Bloxham English
From a place name meaning "Blocca's homestead". The Old English byname Blocca is of uncertain origin.
Benn English
From a short form of Benedict.
Reed English
Variant of Read 1.
Gold English, German, Jewish
From Old English and Old High German gold meaning "gold", an occupational name for someone who worked with gold or a nickname for someone with yellow hair. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
Cookson English
Patronymic form of Cook.
Truman English
Means "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972).
Brent English
Originally derived from the name of a hill (or the village nearby) in Somerset, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
Earls English
Patronymic form of Earl.
Harford English
Habitational name from places called Harford in Gloucestershire and Devon, meaning "hart ford" or "army ford".
Foster 4 English
Nickname given to a person who was a foster child or foster parent.
Leyton English
Variant of Layton.
Emmett English
Derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name Emma.
Haig English, Scottish
From Old English haga or Old Norse hagi meaning "enclosure, pasture".
Joiner English
Occupational name for a carpenter (that is, a person who joins wood together to make furniture).
Chandler English
Occupational name meaning "candle seller" or "candle maker" in Middle English, ultimately derived from Old French.
Honeycutt English
Derived from the name of the English town of Hunnacott, derived from Old English hunig "honey" or the given name Huna combined with cot "cottage".
Eldridge English
Derived from the given name Aldric.
Lowe 2 English
Variant of Law.
Gore English
From the Old English word gara meaning "triangular plot of land".
Kendall English
Derived from the town of Kendal in England, so-called from the river Kent, on which it is situated, and Old English dæl meaning "valley, dale".
Aston 1 English
From a place name meaning "east town" in Old English.
Simpson English
Means "son of Sim", Sim being a medieval short form of Simon 1. This is the name of a fictional American family on the animated television series The Simpsons, starting 1989.
Poindexter English
From the Jèrriais surname Poingdestre meaning "right fist".
Evelyn English
Derived from the given name Aveline.
Verity English
From a nickname meaning "truth", perhaps given originally to a truthful person.
Madison English
Means "son of Maud". A famous bearer of this surname was the fourth American president James Madison (1751-1836).
Howard 2 English
Occupational name meaning "ewe herder", from Old English eowu "ewe" and hierde "herdsman, guardian".
Lynton English
Variant of Linton.
Harrison English
Means "son of Harry".
Trent English
Denoted one who lived near the River Trent in England.
Walsh English, Irish
From Old English wælisc meaning "foreigner, stranger, Celt".
Penn 1 English
Derived from various place names that were named using the Brythonic word penn meaning "hilltop, head".
Gibb English
Derived from the given name Gib.
Gladwin English
Derived from the Old English given name Glædwine.
Garnett 2 English
From a diminutive of the given name Guarin.
Bryan English
From the given name Brian.
Frost English, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning "frost", a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
Devin 2 English
Nickname for a person who acted divinely, from Old French devin "divine", ultimately from Latin.
Travis English
English variant of Travers.
Power 1 English, Irish
From Old French Poier, indicating a person who came from the town of Poix in Picardy, France.