Ranchie's Personal Name List

Abdiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֲבְדִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Means "servant of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this is the name of a member of the tribe of Gad. In John Milton's Paradise Lost (1667), this is the name of a seraph who withstands Satan when he urges the angels to revolt.
Abriana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Variant of Aubriana or a combination of the prefix a and Briana.
Ace 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AYS
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
Ahmad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Bengali, Pashto, Indonesian, Malay, Avar
Other Scripts: أحمد(Arabic) احمد(Persian, Urdu, Pashto) আহমদ(Bengali) Ахӏмад(Avar)
Pronounced: AH-mad(Arabic, Indonesian, Malay)
Means "most commendable, most praiseworthy" in Arabic (a superlative form of Hamid 1).
Akash
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Other Scripts: आकाश(Hindi, Marathi) আকাশ(Bengali)
Pronounced: a-KASH(Hindi)
Means "open space, sky" in Sanskrit.
Alaric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik(English)
From the Gothic name Alareiks, which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
Alexandros
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλέξανδρος(Greek) Ἀλέξανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-LEH-ksan-dhraws(Greek) A-LEH-KSAN-DROS(Classical Greek)
Greek form of Alexander.
Alondra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: a-LON-dra
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
Amari
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African, Yoruba, Western African
Pronounced: Uh-mar-ee(Yoruba)
Personal remark: A'mari followed by Amarie (g)
A noted bearer was a Damel of Cayor, Amari Ngoné Ndella, who ruled from 1790 AD to 1809 AD. The Kingdom of Cayor was one of the largest of most powerful kingdoms in what is now Senegal, existing from 1549 AD to 1879 AD.
Amarion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: ah-MAR-ee-on
Probably from Amari with the popular suffix ion attached.
Amilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish (Rare), Swedish (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Variant of Amilia.
Amisadai
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical (All), American (Hispanic)
Other Scripts: עַמִּישַׁדָּי(Ancient Hebrew)
Meaning "the Almighty is my relative" or "people of the Almighty" in Hebrew. His son Ahiezer was chief of the Tribe of Dan at the time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:12; 2:25).
Anayeli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Zapotec (Hispanicized)
Variant of Nayeli.
Aniket
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Аникет(Bulgarian, Russian) Анікет(Ukrainian)
Bulgarian, Russian and Ukrainian form of Aniketos (see Anicetus).
Aniya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-NIE-ə(English) ə-NEE-ə(English)
Personal remark: A’Niya
Variant of Aniyah.
Antoinette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-TWA-NEHT
Feminine diminutive of Antoine. This name was borne by Marie Antoinette, the queen of France during the French Revolution. She was executed by guillotine.
Archange
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare), French (Belgian, Rare), French (African)
French cognate of Arcangelo.
Arjun
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Gujarati, Bengali, Nepali
Other Scripts: अर्जुन(Hindi, Marathi, Nepali) ಅರ್ಜುನ್(Kannada) అర్జున్(Telugu) அர்ஜுன்(Tamil) അർജുൻ(Malayalam) અર્જુન(Gujarati) অর্জুন(Bengali)
Modern form of Arjuna.
Arleth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Form of Arlette. The name was borne by Mexican actress Arleth Terán.
Armani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: Ahr-MAH-nee
Transferred use of the surname Armani, meaning "son of Armano". Popularized as a given name because of the high-end fashion company Armani Exchange, founded by Italian clothing designer Giorgio Armani.
Asiyah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay, Thai (Muslim)
Other Scripts: آسيا, آسية(Arabic) อาซียะห์, อซิย๊ะ(Thai)
Pronounced: A-see-ya(Arabic) A-see-yah(Arabic)
Arabic alternate transcription of Asiya as well as the Indonesian, Malay and Thai form.
Atavia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Aura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
Pronounced: AWR-ə(English) OW-ra(Spanish) OW-rah(Finnish)
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αὔρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
Aylin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "of the moon" in Turkish and Azerbaijani, from Turkic ay "moon".
Azaria
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: עֲזַרְיָה(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of Azariah (masculine), as well as a feminine variant in the English-speaking world.
Bayra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kalmyk
Other Scripts: Байра(Kalmyk Cyrillic)
Feminine form of Bayr.
Believe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare), English (Puritan)
Late Old English belȳfan, belēfan, alteration of gelēfan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch geloven and German glauben, also to lief.
Benedicte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian and Danish feminine form of Benedict.
Bernice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Βερνίκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: bər-NEES(English)
Contracted form of Berenice. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II.
Blessing
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (African)
Pronounced: BLEHS-ing
From the English word blessing, of Old English origin. This name is most common in Nigeria, Zimbabwe and other parts of Africa.
Briggs
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Transferred use of the surname Briggs, meaning "bridge".
Bristol
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIS-təl
From the name of the city in southwest England that means "the site of the bridge".
Caelan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KAY-lən
Anglicized form of Caolán or Caoilfhionn.
Calla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə
From the name of a type of lily, of Latin origin. Use of the name may also be inspired by Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty".
Camarion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Variant of Kamarion. This name can also be a modern elaboration of Cameron in some instances.
Caprice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kə-PREES
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.
Cataleya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Variant of cattleya, a genus of orchids native to Central and South America, which were named for the British horticulturist William Cattley. This name was popularized by the main character from the movie Colombiana (2011).
Celsa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Galician
Feminine form of Celso.
Chábeli
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Diminutive of Maria Isabel. A famous bearer is Chábeli Iglesias, a Spanish socialite.
Chandler
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAND-lər
From an occupational surname that meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
Chardonnay
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Derived from the name of the type of white wine, believed to be named after the village of Chardonnay in the Mâconnais region of France, where Pouilly-Fuissé is currently produced; it is possible that the variety was first bred there. The place name is derived from the Medieval Latin Cardonnacum meaning "a place with thistles", from the Latin carduus 'thistle'.
Charlone
Usage: Spanish
Chavita
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Diminutive of Salvador.
Chila
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish (Archaic)
Cleo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEE-o
Short form of Cleopatra, Cleon or Cleopas.
Cordell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEHL
From an English surname meaning "maker of cord" or "seller of cord" in Middle English.
Dakari
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African
Variant of Dakarai.
Damarion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
Personal remark: Da'Marion
Combination of the popular phonetic prefix da and Marion 2.
Darianna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish (Latin American)
Variant of Dariana 2.
Dario
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Croatian
Pronounced: DA-ryo(Italian) DA-ree-o(Croatian)
Italian form of Darius.
Dasia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Russian
Pronounced: DA-sha; da-SEE-ah
Variant of Dasha.
Davin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAV-in
Possibly a variant of Devin influenced by David.
Davina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: də-VEE-nə
Feminine form of David. It originated in Scotland.
Denecia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Denzel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: dehn-ZEHL
Possibly a variant of Denzil. This spelling of the name was popularized by American actor Denzel Washington (1954-), who was named after his father.
Deontae
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: Dee-on-tae
Variant of Deonte.
Deonte
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: dee-AWN-tay
Combination of Deon and the common phonetic suffix tay.
Dereon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Variant of Darian.
Desean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: Dee-shawn
Personal remark: De'Sean
Combination of the popular name prefix De and Sean.
Devonta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: de-VON-tay
Variant of Devonte.
Dhanya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian
Pronounced: Dan-e-a
Hindi, means THANKSFUL, HONOR, GRACE,
Diamond
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), African American (Modern)
Pronounced: DIE-mənd(English)
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the traditional birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
Dutch
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DUCH
From a nickname given to Americans of German descent. It is related to deutsch, the German word for "German".
Elodie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
English form of Élodie.
Elyjah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ee-LIE-jah
Variant of Elijah.
Emerita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Catalan (Rare), Latvian (Rare), German (Swiss), Hungarian
Derived from Latin emeritus "earned, completed one's service" (past participle form of emereo; see Emerentius). This was the name of a Roman-era saint, martyred with Saint Digna in 259.
Emiliano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: eh-mee-LYA-no
Spanish and Italian form of the Roman cognomen Aemilianus, which was itself derived from the family name Aemilius (see Emil). This was the name of a 6th-century Spanish saint.
Emilio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lyo
Italian and Spanish form of Aemilius (see Emil).
Erna 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Slovene
Pronounced: EHR-na(German) EH-nah(Swedish)
Feminine form of Ernest.
Esperança
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Catalan
Portuguese and Catalan form of Esperanza.
Eternity
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
From the English word "eternity" meaning "existence without end; infinite time", ultimately from Latin aeternitas.
Eunice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Εὐνίκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: YOO-nis(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Εὐνίκη (Eunike) meaning "good victory", derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and νίκη (nike) meaning "victory". The New Testament mentions her as the mother of Timothy. As an English name, it was first used after the Protestant Reformation.
Ezequiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: eh-theh-KYEHL(European Spanish) eh-seh-KYEHL(Latin American Spanish)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ezekiel.
Fernando
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: fehr-NAN-do(Spanish)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ferdinand.
Flore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FLAWR
French form of Flora.
Future
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Western African, Southern African
Pronounced: FYOO-chər(English)
This name is from the English word derived from Old French futur meaning "future, to come," which is then derived from Latin futurus meaning "going to be, yet to be, the future (as a noun)." The Latin word is an irregular suppletive future participle of esse meaning "to be," which comes from the Proto-Indo-European root *bheue- meaning "to be, exist, grow, come into being."

This name is also used in most countries of Western and Southern Africa where English is one of the official languages.

Ginette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHEE-NEHT
Diminutive of Geneviève.
Giovanni
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jo-VAN-nee
Italian form of Iohannes (see John). This name has been very common in Italy since the late Middle Ages, as with other equivalents of John in Europe. The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516) and the painter and sculptor Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) were two famous bearers of the name.
Grace
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

This name was very popular in the English-speaking world at the end of the 19th century. Though it declined in use over the next 100 years, it staged a successful comeback at the end of the 20th century. The American sitcom Will and Grace (1998-2006) may have helped, though the name was already strongly rising when it premiered. It was the top name for girls in England and Wales in 2006.

Hemanth
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam
Other Scripts: హేమంత్(Telugu) ಹೇಮಂತ್(Kannada) ஹேமந்த்(Tamil) ഹേമന്ത്(Malayalam)
Southern Indian form of Hemant.
Heriberto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese (Rare)
Pronounced: eh-ree-BEHR-to(Spanish)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Herbert.
Hillery
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Variant of Hilary.
Hogan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Transferred use of the surname Hogan.
Hortensia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish
Pronounced: or-TEHN-sya(Spanish)
Feminine form of the Roman family name Hortensius, possibly derived from Latin hortus meaning "garden".
Izelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Afrikaans, English (Rare)
Variant of Iselle.
Jacelyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare)
Variant of Jocelyn or combination of Jace and Lyn.
Jashawn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Combination of the prefix Ja- and Shawn.
Javion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-vee-ahn
Invented name, using the sounds found in names such as Javon and Davion.
Jayceon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-sən
Variant of Jason.
Jaylei
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Variant of Jaylee.
Jean-Marie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHAHN-MA-REE
Combination of Jean 1 and Marie.
Jones
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jones
Transferred use of the surname Jones.
Joshana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian (Rare)
Derived from Sanskrit जोषण (jośana) meaning "approval, satisfaction, liking".
Journee
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JUR-nee
Variant of Journey.
Jovie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American, Popular Culture
Pronounced: JO-vee
Possibly a diminutive for Jovan or Jovana or a variant of Jovi, or derived from the English word "jovial" meaning "merry; cheerful and good humored".

In the popular 2003 Christmas film 'Elf', actress Zooey Deschanel portrayed a protagonist named Jovie.

Joy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOI
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
Kairi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Kalayah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LEE-ə, kə-LAY-ə
Variant of Kaliyah.
Kanisha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, African American
Kannen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, American (Rare)
Pronounced: KAN-nun(Indian) KAN-ən(American)
As a Tamil word a variant of Kannan derived from an originally Sanskrit name for Krishna, the supreme god of the Hindi religion. In Tamil the name means "playful or merry." As an American name Kannen is a spelling variant of Cannon.
Katrinka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish (Rare), English (Rare), Literature
Pronounced: Ka-trin-ka(Polish, English) kah-treenk-a(Polish, English)
Personal remark: KT
Kelis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Possibly a combination of Kelly and Alexis. This name was born american singer Kelis (1979-).
Kenesha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: kehn-EE-shə
Variant of Kenisha.
Ketsia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical French, French (Modern), French (Belgian, Rare)
French variant of Kezia.
Kiel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Pronounced: Key-el(American English) KEEL(American English)
Sometimes a nickname for Ezekiel. Also is a German word meaning "keel (of a boat)", a surname, and the name of a city which is sometimes used as a given name.

The name Kiel came into more popular use to to the actor Kiel Martin.

King
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KING
From the English vocabulary word king, ultimately derived from Old English cyning. This was also a surname, derived from the same source, a famous bearer being the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968).
Kobe 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Flemish
Dutch (Flemish) diminutive of Jakob.
Konstantinos
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Κωνσταντίνος(Greek)
Pronounced: kon-stan-DEE-nos
Greek form of Constantinus (see Constantine).
Kymani
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ky-mani
Likely an invented name, possibly a combination of Kyle and Imani.
Kyria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Swiss
Personal remark: Kyria Lumiere
Variant of Cyria.
Lami'ah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: لامعة(Arabic)
Personal remark: La'Miah
Variant transcription of Lamia 1.
Lamont
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, African American
Pronounced: lə-MAWNT(English) LAM-unt(English)
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the medieval Gaelic given name Lagmann, itself from Old Norse lǫgmaðr meaning "law man". This name reached a peak in its American popularity in 1972, the same year that the sitcom Sanford and Son debuted, featuring the character Lamont Sanford (the titular son).
Laniece
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian, Modern, Rare), African American (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: la-nees(Australian English)
Personal remark: LaNiece
Laniya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: LA-NI-YA
Latanya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Combination of the popular prefix la with the name Tanya. It can be spelled LaTanya or Latanya.
Latricia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: lə-TRISH-ə, lə-TREE-shə
An invented name, most likely blending Latisha and Patricia. See also Latrice.
Laurette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LAW-REHT
French diminutive of Laura.
Leighton
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-tən
Variant of Layton. It jumped in popularity as a feminine name after 2007, when actress Leighton Meester (1986-) began appearing on the television series Gossip Girl.
Leilani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: lay-LA-nee
Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Leonna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal remark: Le'Onna
Variant of Leona.
Linkin
Usage: English
Variant of Lincoln.
Lord
Usage: English
A surname derived from someone of a lordly manner, or perhaps one who had earned the title in some contest of skill or had played the part of the ‘Lord of Misrule’ in the Yuletide festivities.

Also it is an occupational name for a servant in the household of the lord of the manor, or possibly a status name for a landlord or the lord of the manor himself.

The word itself derives from Old English hlāford, earlier hlāf-weard, literally ‘loaf-keeper’, since the lord or chief of a clan was responsible for providing food.

Loyalty
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Puritan)
The word loyalty is borrowed from the Old French loialté, based on loial or leial, both meaning and related to “legal.”
Lumière
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: LU-MYER
Personal remark: Kyria Lumiere
Means "light" in French. The name can be recalled from the character in the Disney animated movie "Beauty and the Beast" in which he is transformed into a candelabrum.
Lynley
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Transferred use of the surname Lynley.
Major
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-jər
From an English surname that was originally derived from the given name Mauger, a Norman French form of the Germanic name Malger meaning "council spear". The name can also be given in reference to the English word major.
Malaki
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie, mal-ə-KIE
Variant of Malachi.
Manasseh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מְנַשֶּׁה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mə-NAS-ə(English)
Personal remark: No h
Means "causing to forget" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the oldest son of Joseph and Asenath and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. It was also borne by a 7th-century BC king of Judah, condemned in the Bible for allowing the worship of other gods.
Manolo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-NO-lo
Spanish diminutive of Manuel.
Manuella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sardinian, French
Sardinian form of Emanuela.
Marchand
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: MAR-SHAHN(French)
Personal remark: male
Occupational name meaning "merchant", ultimately from Latin mercari "to trade".
Marion 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-ee-ən, MAR-ee-ən
From a French surname that was derived from Marion 1. This was the real name of American actor John Wayne (1907-1979), who was born Marion Robert Morrison.
Marquisha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Variant of Markisha.
Marquita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Feminine variant of Marquis.
Marvin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: MAHR-vin(English) MOW-vin(German)
Personal remark: MJ
From an English surname that was derived from the Welsh given name Merfyn or the Old English name Mærwine. As an American given name, it steadily rose in popularity through the beginnings of the 20th century and peaked in the early 1930s (closely mirroring the similar-sounding but unrelated name Melvin). A famous bearer was the American musician Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
Maxton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAKS-tən
Elaboration of Max using the popular name suffix ton.
Maylon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAY-lawn
Transferred use of the surname Maylon.
Maynor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Variant of Majnor.
Mazie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American
Possibly a variant of Mazzy via the variant Mazy.
Memphis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHM-fis
From the name of an important city of ancient Egypt, or the city in Tennessee that was named after it. It is derived from a Greek form of Egyptian mn-nfr meaning "enduring beauty".
Merveille
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (African, Rare), English (Rare)
Pronounced: mehr-vay(African French)
French cognate of Marvel.
Micco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Creek
Means "chief" in Creek.
Miracle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MIR-ə-kəl
From the English word miracle for an extraordinary event, ultimately deriving from Latin miraculum "wonder, marvel".
Mirah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: meer-a
Variant of Mira.
Mirian
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Judeo-Spanish, Judeo-Anglo-Norman
Judeo-Spanish and Judeo-Anglo-Norman variant of Miriam.
Monet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From a French surname that was derived from either Hamon or Edmond. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
Naima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Estonian
Pronounced: NIE-ma
Variant of Naema.
Nakisha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: nə-KISH-ə(English)
Combination of the name prefix na and the name Kisha.
Neva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Short form of Geneva.
Nevin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Naomhán.
Niana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Filipino
Pronounced: nie-AN-ə(English) nie-AHN-ə(English)
Variant of Nyana.
Nikolai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE(Russian)
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see Nikolay).
Noelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Spanish feminine form of Noël.
Obadiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֹבַדְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: o-bə-DIE-ə(English)
Means "serving Yahweh" in Hebrew, derived from עָבַד ('avad) meaning "to serve" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve minor prophets, the author of the Book of Obadiah, which predicts the downfall of the nation of Edom.
Octavius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ok-TA-wee-oos(Latin) ahk-TAY-vee-əs(English)
Roman family name derived from Latin octavus meaning "eighth". This was the original family name of the emperor Augustus (born Gaius Octavius). It was also rarely used as a Roman praenomen, or given name.
Orville
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWR-vil
This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane.
Osama
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أسامة(Arabic)
Pronounced: oo-SA-mah
Alternate transcription of Arabic أسامة (see Usama).
Ouida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Used by the English author Ouida (1839-1908), born Marie Louise Ramé to a French father. Ouida was a pseudonym that arose from her own childhood pronunciation of her middle name Louise.
Pandora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA(Classical Greek) pan-DAWR-ə(English)
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek πᾶν (pan) meaning "all" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
Paris 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πάρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PA-REES(Classical Greek) PAR-is(English) PEHR-is(English)
Meaning unknown, possibly of Luwian or Hittite origin. In Greek mythology he was the Trojan prince who kidnapped Helen and began the Trojan War. Though presented as a somewhat of a coward in the Iliad, he did manage to slay the great hero Achilles. He was himself eventually slain in battle by Philoctetes.
Persephanie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: pər-SEF-ə-nee
Variant of Persephone.
Persephone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
Pierre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Swedish
Pronounced: PYEHR(French)
French form of Peter. This name has been consistently popular in France since the 13th century, but fell out of the top 100 names in 2017. It was borne by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), a French impressionist painter, and Pierre Curie (1859-1906), a physicist who discovered radioactivity with his wife Marie.
Poonam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi
Other Scripts: पूनम(Hindi, Marathi) ਪੂਨਮ(Gurmukhi)
Pronounced: POO-nəm(Hindi)
Alternate transcription of Punam.
Preston
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PREHS-tən
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest town" (Old English preost and tun).
Prince
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PRINS
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
Promise
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (African)
Pronounced: PRAHM-is
From the English word promise, from Latin promissum. It is currently most common in parts of English-influenced Africa.
Quincy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KWIN-see
From an English surname that was derived (via the place name Cuinchy) from the personal name Quintus. A famous bearer was John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), sixth president of the United States, who was born in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts. Both the town and the president were named after his maternal great-grandfather John Quincy (1689-1767). Another notable bearer is the American musician Quincy Jones (1933-).
Raheem
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رحيم(Arabic)
Pronounced: ra-HEEM
Alternate transcription of Arabic رحيم (see Rahim).
Rana 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رنا(Arabic)
Pronounced: RA-na
Means "eye-catching object" from Arabic رنا (rana) meaning "to gaze".
Raphael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: RA-fa-ehl(German) RAF-ee-əl(English) RAF-ay-ehl(English) rah-fie-EHL(English)
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) meaning "God heals", from the roots רָפָא (rafa') meaning "to heal" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In Hebrew tradition Raphael is the name of an archangel. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.

This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), usually known simply as Raphael.

Rashad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Azerbaijani
Other Scripts: رشاد(Arabic)
Pronounced: ra-SHAD(Arabic)
Means "good sense, good guidance" in Arabic, from the root رَشَدَ (rashada) meaning "to be on the right path".
Rasheeda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, Indian (Muslim), Dhivehi
Other Scripts: رشيدة, راشدة(Arabic) رشیدہ, راشدہ(Urdu) रशीदा(Hindi) ރަޝީދާ(Dhivehi)
Arabic variant transcription of Rashida as well as the Urdu and Dhivehi form.
Rayshawn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: ray-SHAWN
Combination of Ray and Shawn.
Rhyan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Bearer includes Rhyan Grant, Australian footballer.
Richelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: rə-SHEHL
Variant of Rachel or Rochelle, probably influenced by Michelle.
Rocky
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHK-ee
Diminutive of Rocco and other names beginning with a similar sound, or else a nickname referring to a tough person. This is the name of a boxer played by Sylvester Stallone in the movie Rocky (1976) and its five sequels.
Rudy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-dee
Personal remark: short for Rudraksh
Diminutive of Rudolf.
Ryker
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-kər
Possibly a variant of the German surname Riker, a derivative of Low German rike "rich". As a modern English name, it has become popular because it shares the same trendy sounds found in other names such as Ryan and Ryder.
Sade
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African, Yoruba, English (American, Modern)
Pronounced: shah-DAY(Yoruba)
Short form of Folasade.

It became famous because of the Nigerian-born British singer Sade Adu (born Helen Folasade Adu) and her eponymous smooth jazz band Sade.

Samuella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Dutch (Rare), Mauritian Creole (Rare), Swedish (Archaic), Hungarian
Feminine form of Samuel and Sámuel.
Sana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: سناء(Arabic)
Pronounced: sa-NA
Alternate transcription of Arabic سناء (see Sanaa).
Seger
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish (Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: SEH-ger
Archaic North Swedish form of Sigurd. Means "victory" in modern Swedish.
Sejal
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian
Sevilla
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Spanish form of Sibylla, according to Dunkling & Gosling. 'Borne by an early saint and is occasionally used. Spanish place name Seville is also transferred to first-name use from time to time; in this case the original meaning is probably "lower, beneath".'
Shaquita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: shə-KWEE-tə
Variant of Chiquita. Also taken form the elements Sha and Quita.
Shareef
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: شريف(Arabic)
Pronounced: sha-REEF
Alternate transcription of Arabic شريف (see Sharif).
Sheliya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare)
Siddhi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Marathi
Other Scripts: सिद्धि(Marathi)
Means "accomplishment, success, attainment" in Sanskrit, referring to spiritual or psychic powers attained through meditation or yoga.
Sincere
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Puritan), Literature
Pronounced: sin-SEER(English (Puritan)) sin-SEE-ər(English (Puritan))
Simply means "sincere, open and genuine" from the English word, ultimately derived from Latin sincerus 'sound, pure, whole'.
Sparkle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Middle English frequentative (verb) or diminutive (noun) of spark.
Stanislas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Latinized form of Stanislav.
Symphony
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIM-fə-nee
Simply from the English word, ultimately deriving from Greek σύμφωνος (symphonos) meaning "concordant in sound".
Taeya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Tamia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: tə-MEE-ə(English)
An invented name, using the initial sound found in names such as Tamika. It was popularized by the Canadian singer Tamia Hill (1975-), who is known simply as Tamia.
Tamyra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Taniya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian (Rare)
Taraji
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Means "hope" in Swahili. It is not used as a name in Africa but was part of the Afrocentric African American naming culture of the 70s that borrowed from various African words.
Temperance
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHM-prəns, TEHM-pər-əns
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It experienced a modest revival in the United States during the run of the television series Bones (2005-2017), in which the main character bears this name.
Tenesha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: tə-NEE-shə
Variant of Tanisha.
Teva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Modern, Rare)
Other Scripts: טבע(Hebrew)
Pronounced: TEH-vah
Means "nature" in Hebrew.
Theresa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: tə-REE-sə(English) tə-REE-zə(English) teh-REH-za(German)
Personal remark: The'Resa
From the Spanish and Portuguese name Teresa. It was first recorded as Therasia, being borne by the Spanish wife of Saint Paulinus of Nola in the 4th century. The meaning is uncertain, but it could be derived from Greek θέρος (theros) meaning "summer", from Greek θερίζω (therizo) meaning "to harvest", or from the name of the Greek island of Therasia (the western island of Santorini).

The name was mainly confined to Spain and Portugal during the Middle Ages. After the 16th century it was spread to other parts of the Christian world, due to the fame of the Spanish nun and reformer Saint Teresa of Ávila. Another famous bearer was the Austrian Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), who inherited the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, beginning the War of the Austrian Succession.

Thiago
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: chee-A-goo
Variant of Tiago.
Tierra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: TYEH-ra(Spanish)
Means "earth" in Spanish.
Tierre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Topanga
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, Indigenous American
Pronounced: TOPAYNGAH(Indigenous American)
Personal remark: Tahpanga
Place name of an area in western Los Angeles County, California. The area was originally named by the Tongva people and may mean "a place above."

In the American television show 'Boy Meets World' (1993-2000), one of the protagonists is named Topanga.

Treanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Modern, Rare)
Tremaine
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American, Cornish
Pronounced: treh-MAYN
Historically a Cornish surname meaning "stone settlement", derived from the Cornish 'tre', meaning a homestead or settlement, and 'men', meaning stone.

Famous bearers include retired American basketball player Tremaine Fowlkes and popular American musician Trey Songz, born Tremaine 'Trey' Aldon Neverson.

Truitt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Variant of Truett.
Tyce
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Valentino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: va-lehn-TEE-no
Italian form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1).
Valter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Swedish, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian
Pronounced: VAL-tehr(Italian, Swedish)
Form of Walter used in several languages.
Vance
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VANS
From an English surname that was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
Vesta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: WEHS-ta(Latin) VEHS-tə(English)
Probably a Roman cognate of Hestia. Vesta was the Roman goddess of the hearth. A continuous fire, tended by the Vestal Virgins, was burned in the Temple of Vesta in Rome.
Vienna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: vee-EHN-ə
From the name of the capital city of Austria, Vienna.
Waylon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAY-lən
Variant of Wayland. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland [1].
Wendolyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Mexican
Wisteria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIS-tee- ree-a
Derived from the name of the flower, which in turn was named after the American anatomist Caspar Wistar. His last name allegedly derives from German Westländer "westerner".
Zahid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: زاهد(Arabic) زاہد(Urdu)
Pronounced: ZA-heed(Arabic)
Means "pious, devout" in Arabic.
Zakiyah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: زكية(Arabic)
Pronounced: za-KEE-yah(Arabic)
Personal remark: Za'Kiyah
Arabic alternate transcription of Zakiyya as well as the Indonesian and Malay form.
Zariyah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American
Variant of Zaria or Sariah.
Zemira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Yiddish, English
Other Scripts: זְמִירָה, זמירה(Ancient Hebrew, Yiddish)
Feminine form of Zimri.
Zeppelin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, English
Transferred use of the surname Zeppelin. From the surname of Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin (1838-1917), German aeronautical pioneer, designer and manufacturer of airships. The feminine Zeppelina was "given to one or two English girls during the First World War when Zeppelins arrived over England. The airships took their name from Count von Zeppelin, whose family name according to German scholars was 'of Slavic origin, but of unknown meaning' (Dunkling & Gosling, 1986).

The usage of the name may also be because of the legendary English rock band Led Zeppelin (formed 1968).

Zola 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZO-lə
Meaning unknown, perhaps an invented name. It has been in occasional use in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. It coincides with an Italian surname, a famous bearer being the French-Italian author Émile Zola (1840-1902).
Zoltán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian, Slovak
Pronounced: ZOL-tan(Hungarian) ZAWL-tan(Slovak)
Possibly related to the Turkish title sultan meaning "king, sultan". This was the name of a 10th-century ruler of Hungary, also known as Zsolt.
Zora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зора(Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ZO-ra(Czech) ZAW-ra(Slovak)
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
Zozo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various (Modern)
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