Ellen McLullick's Personal Name List

ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) meaning "thorn, point".
ADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AY-də(English) A-da(Polish) AH-dah(Finnish)
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as ADELAIDE or ADELINA that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) a-di-LIE-di(European Portuguese) a-di-LIED(European Portuguese) a-deh-LIE-dee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Means "noble type", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. In Britain the parallel form Alice, derived via Old French, has historically been more common, though this form did gain some currency in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADELE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Italian
Pronounced: a-DEH-lə(German) ə-DEHL(English) a-DEH-leh(Italian)
Form of ADELA used in several languages.
ADELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: A-DU-LEEN(French) AD-ə-lien(English)
French and English form of ADELINA.
AGATHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αγαθη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AG-ə-thə(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αγαθη (Agathe), derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
AGNES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ‘Αγνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AG-nis(English) AK-nəs(German) AHKH-nehs(Dutch) AHNG-nehs(Swedish)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
ALBERTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: al-BUR-tə(English) al-BEHR-ta(Italian)
Feminine form of ALBERT. This is the name of a Canadian province, which was named in honour of a daughter of Queen Victoria.
ALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian, Czech
Pronounced: AL-is(English) A-LEES(French) u-LEE-si(European Portuguese) a-LEE-see(Brazilian Portuguese) a-LEE-cheh(Italian) A-li-tseh(Czech)
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was among the most common names in England until the 16th century, when it began to decline. It was revived in the 19th century.

This name was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and Through the Looking Glass (1871).

AMABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS.
ANITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Pronounced: a-NEE-ta(Spanish, German) ə-NEET-ə(English) ah-NEE-tah(Dutch) AH-nee-tah(Finnish) a-NYEE-ta(Polish)
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANNABELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AN-ə-behl(English)
Variant of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLE.
ANNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: AN-ee(English) A-NEE(French)
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
ANNORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Medieval English variant of HONORA.
AUDREY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWD-ree
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990).
BEATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: beh-a-TREE-cheh(Italian) BEE-ə-tris(English) BEET-ris(English) BEH-ah-trees(Swedish) beh-ah-TREES(Swedish)
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the Divine Comedy (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BERTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: BEHR-ta(German) BUR-thə(English)
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
BETTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHT-ee
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BEULAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: בְּעוּלָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: BYOO-lə(English)
Means "married" in Hebrew. The name is used in the Old Testament to refer to the land of Israel (Isaiah 62:4). As an English given name, Beulah has been used since the Protestant Reformation.
BONNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAHN-ee
Means "pretty" from the Scottish word bonnie, which was itself derived from Middle French bon "good". It has been in use as an American given name since the 19th century, and it became especially popular after the movie Gone with the Wind (1939), in which it was the nickname of Scarlett's daughter.
BRIDGET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BRIJ-it(English)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRYONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ə-nee
From the name of a type of Eurasian vine, formerly used as medicine. It ultimately derives from Greek βρυω (bryo) meaning "to swell".
CALANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλος (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
CALANTHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee-ə
Elaborated form of CALANTHE.
CARLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-lee
Feminine form of CARL.
CAROL (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-əl
Short form of CAROLINE. It was formerly a masculine name, derived from CAROLUS. The name can also be given in reference to the English vocabulary word, which means "song" or "hymn".
CAROLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-ə-lin
Variant of CAROLINE.
CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CHARLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: shahr-LEEN, chahr-LEEN
Feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAHR-lee
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz.
CHRISTIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Late Roman
Pronounced: kris-tee-AN-ə(English)
Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CLARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian
Pronounced: klə-RIS-ə(English)
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLÉMENTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KLEH-MAHN-TEEN
French feminine form of CLEMENT. This is also the name of a variety of orange (fruit).
CONNIE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHN-ee
Diminutive of CONSTANCE and other names beginning with Con. It is occasionally a masculine name, a diminutive of CORNELIUS or CONRAD.
CONSTANCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: KAHN-stəns(English) KAWNS-TAHNS(French)
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κορη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAWR-ə(English) KO-ra(German)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel The Last of the Mohicans (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kaw-REHT-ə
Diminutive of CORA. It was borne by Coretta Scott King (1927-2006), the wife of Martin Luther King.
CORINNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KAW-REEN(French) kə-REEN(English) kə-RIN(English)
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel Corinne (1807).
DALE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAYL
From an English surname that originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
DARCY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHR-see
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice (1813).
DEBBIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHB-ee
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DELL
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL
From an English surname that originally denoted a person who lived in a dell or valley.
DELORES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: də-LAWR-is
Variant of DOLORES.
DELPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DEHL-FEEN
French form of DELPHINA.
DINAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דִּינָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: DIE-nə(English)
Means "judged" in Hebrew. She is the daughter of Jacob and Leah in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English given name since after the Protestant Reformation.
DONNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHN-ə
From Italian donna meaning "lady". It is also used as a feminine form of DONALD.
DOROTHY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAWR-ə-thee, DAWR-thee
Usual English form of DOROTHEA. It has been in use since the 16th century. The author L. Frank Baum used it for the central character in his fantasy novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900).
DOTTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHT-ee
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
DULCIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DUL-see
From Latin dulcis meaning "sweet". It was used in the Middle Ages in the spellings Dowse and Duce, and was recoined in the 19th century.
EARLENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: UR-leen
Feminine form of EARL.
EARNESTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: UR-nis-teen
Variant of ERNESTINE.
EDITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: EE-dith(English) EH-dit(German, Swedish)
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EFFIE (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHF-ee
Diminutive of EUPHEMIA.
ELINOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ə-nawr
Variant of ELEANOR.
ELISABETH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: eh-LEE-za-beht(German) eh-LEE-sa-beht(Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian) eh-LEE-sa-behd(Danish) i-LIZ-ə-bəth(English)
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELLEN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ən
Medieval English form of HELEN. This was the usual spelling of the name until the 17th century, when Helen became more common.
ELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El.
ELNORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Contracted form of ELEANORA.
ELSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Icelandic, Finnish, Italian
Pronounced: EHL-sə(English) EHL-za(German) EHL-sah(Finnish)
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-see
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
EMILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Емилия(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: eh-MEE-lya(Italian, Spanish) EH-mee-lee-ah(Finnish) eh-MYEE-lya(Polish) eh-MEE-lee-ah(Swedish) i-MEE-lee-ə(English)
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Variant of EMMELINE.
ETHEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ETH-əl
Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived. It was popularized by the novels The Newcomes (1855) by William Makepeace Thackeray and The Daisy Chain (1856) by C. M. Yonge. A famous bearer was American actress and singer Ethel Merman (1908-1984).
ETTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHT-ee
Diminutive of HENRIETTA and other names ending with etta or ette.
EULALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ευλαλια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ew-LA-lya(Spanish) yoo-LAY-lee-ə(English)
Derived from Greek ευλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from ευ (eu) meaning "good" and λαλεω (laleo) meaning "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EULALIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: UU-LA-LEE
French form of EULALIA.
EUPHEMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Ευφημια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEE-mee-ə(English)
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek () meaning "good" and φημι (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
EVELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: EHV-ə-lin(English) EEV-lin(British English) EEV-ə-lin(British English) EH-və-leen(German)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
FRANCES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRAN-sis
Feminine form of FRANCIS. The distinction between Francis as a masculine name and Frances as a feminine name did not arise until the 17th century. A notable bearer was Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), a social worker and the first American to be canonized.
FRANKIE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FRANGK-ee
Diminutive of FRANK (1) or FRANCES.
GINGER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIN-jər
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GLENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GLEHN-ə(English)
Feminine form of GLENN.
GLORIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, German
Pronounced: GLAWR-ee-ə(English) GLO-rya(Spanish) GLAW-rya(Italian)
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.

The name was introduced to the English-speaking world by E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel Gloria (1891) and George Bernard Shaw's play You Never Can Tell (1898), which both feature characters with a Portuguese background. It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).

GLORIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: glawr-ee-AN-ə
Elaborated form of Latin gloria meaning "glory". In Edmund Spenser's poem The Faerie Queene (1590) this was the name of the title character, a representation of Queen Elizabeth I.
HANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה(Hebrew) حنّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HAN-ə(English) HA-na(German) HAN-nah(Arabic)
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation. The Greek and Latin version Anna, which is used in the New Testament, has traditionally been more common as a Christian name.

HARRIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAR-ee-it, HEHR-ee-it
English form of HENRIETTE, and thus a feminine form of HARRY. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. A famous bearer was Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the American author who wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin.
HAZEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
HELEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHL-ən(English)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.

The name was originally used among early Christians in honour of the saint, as opposed to the classical character. In England it was commonly spelled Ellen during the Middle Ages, and the spelling Helen was not regularly used until after the Renaissance. A famous bearer was Helen Keller (1880-1968), an American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.

HENRIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch
Pronounced: hehn-ree-EHT-ə(English) HEHN-ree-eht-taw(Hungarian) HEHN-ree-eht-tah(Finnish)
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form that was initially more popular.
HESTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: HEHS-tər(English)
Latin form of ESTHER. Like Esther, it has been used in England since the Protestant Reformation. Nathaniel Hawthorne used it for the heroine of his novel The Scarlet Letter (1850), Hester Prynne, a Puritan woman forced to wear a red letter A on her chest after giving birth to a child out of wedlock.
HETTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEHT-ee
Diminutive of HENRIETTA or HESTER.
IDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: IED-ə(English) EE-da(German, Norwegian, Italian) EE-dah(Swedish, Danish, Dutch)
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem The Princess (1847), which was later adapted into the play Princess Ida (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.

Though the etymology is unrelated, this is the name of a mountain on the island of Crete where, according to Greek myth, the god Zeus was born.

IDELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ie-DEHL
Elaboration of IDA.
IOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Probably a variant of IOLE.
IONA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: ie-O-nə(English)
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
IRIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Greek
Other Scripts: Ιρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan) EE-REES(French)
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
JEAN (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: JEEN
Medieval English variant of Jehanne (see JANE). It was common in England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, but eventually became rare in England. It was reintroduced to the English-speaking world from Scotland in the 19th century.
JESSAMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHS-ə-min
From a variant spelling of the English word jasmine (see JASMINE), used also to refer to flowering plants in the cestrum family.
JOAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JON
Medieval English form of Johanne, an Old French form of Iohanna (see JOANNA). This was the usual English feminine form of John in the Middle Ages, but it was surpassed in popularity by Jane in the 17th century.

This name (in various spellings) has been common among European royalty, being borne by ruling queens of Naples, Navarre and Castile. Another famous bearer was Joan of Arc, a patron saint of France (where she is known as Jeanne d'Arc). She was a 15th-century peasant girl who, after claiming she heard messages from God, was given leadership of the French army. She defeated the English in the battle of Orléans but was eventually captured and burned at the stake.

Other notable bearers include the actress Joan Crawford (1904-1977) and the comedian Joan Rivers (1933-2014), both Americans.

JOANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish, Biblical
Pronounced: jo-AN-ə(English) yaw-AN-na(Polish)
English and Polish form of Latin Iohanna, which was derived from Greek Ιωαννα (Ioanna), the feminine form of Ioannes (see JOHN). This is the spelling used in the English New Testament, where it belongs to a follower of Jesus who is regarded as a saint. In the Middle Ages in England it was used as a Latinized form of Joan (the usual feminine form of John) and it became common as a given name in the 19th century.
JOELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Feminine form of JOEL.
JOSEPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: JO-sə-feen(English) yo-zeh-FEE-nə(German)
English, German and Dutch form of JOSÉPHINE.
JOYCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOIS
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also formed the basis for a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
JUANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: KHWA-na
Spanish form of Iohanna (see JOANNA), making it the feminine form of JUAN (1). This name was borne by Juana the Mad, a 16th-century queen of Castile.
JUANITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khwa-NEE-ta
Diminutive of JUANA.
JUDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOO-dee
Diminutive of JUDITH. A well-known bearer of this name was the American singer and actress Judy Garland (1922-1969).
JULIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: yuy-lee-YA-na(Dutch) yoo-LYA-na(German) joo-lee-AN-ə(English) joo-lee-AHN-ə(English) khoo-LYA-na(Spanish)
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JUNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOON
From the name of the month, which was originally derived from the name of the Roman goddess Juno. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KATE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Croatian
Pronounced: KAYT(English)
Diminutive of KATHERINE, often used independently. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages. This was the name of the woman who Petruchio marries and tries to tame in Shakespeare's comedy Taming of the Shrew (1593). A famous bearer is the British actress Kate Winslet (1975-).
KATHRYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-rin
Contracted form of KATHERINE.
KATY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY-tee
Diminutive of KATE.
KAY (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY
Short form of KATHERINE and other names beginning with K.
KELLY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEHL-ee(English)
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KIRSTEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian, English
Pronounced: KEER-stehn(Danish) KHEESH-tehn(Norwegian) KUR-stən(English)
Danish and Norwegian form of CHRISTINA.
KIT
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIT
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
LAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LAWR-ə(English) LOW-ra(Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch) LOW-ru(Portuguese) LOW-rə(Catalan) LOW-rah(Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) LAW-oo-raw(Hungarian)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. Famous bearers include Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812, and Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957), an American author who wrote the Little House on the Prairie series of novels.

LAURIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: LAWR-ee(English) LOW-ree(Dutch)
Diminutive of LAURA or LAURENCE (1).
LAVERNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-VURN
From a surname that was derived from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder". It is sometimes associated with the Roman goddess Laverna or the Latin word vernus "of spring".
LENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Лена(Russian) Λενα(Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-na(Swedish, German, Polish, Italian) LYEH-nə(Russian) LEE-nə(English)
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LENORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Short form of ELENORA.
LENORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-NAWR
Short form of ELEANOR. This was the name of the departed love of the narrator in Edgar Allan Poe's poem The Raven (1845).
LEONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Czech
Pronounced: lee-O-nə(English) LEH-o-na(German, Czech)
Feminine form of LEON.
LESLIE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHZ-lee, LEHS-lee
From a Scottish surname that was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
LETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: li-TISH-ə
From the Late Latin name Laetitia meaning "joy, happiness". This was the name of an obscure saint, who is revered mainly in Spain. It was in use in England during the Middle Ages, usually in the spelling Lettice, and it was revived in the 18th century.
LETTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHT-ee
Diminutive of LETTICE.
LINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: LIN-də(English) LIN-da(German, Dutch, Czech) LEEN-da(Italian) LEEN-DA(French) LEEN-dah(Finnish)
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINNAEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: li-NAY-ə, li-NEE-ə
From the word for the type of flower, also called the twinflower (see LINNÉA).
LINNÉA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: lin-NEH-a
From the name of a flower, also known as the twinflower. The Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus named it after himself, it being his favourite flower.
LOTTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish
Pronounced: LAHT-ee(English)
Diminutive of CHARLOTTE or LISELOTTE.
LOUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: loo-EEZ-ə(English) loo-EE-za(German)
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of Little Women.
LUCY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOO-see
English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.
LYNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: li-NEHT
Form of LUNED used by Alfred Lord Tennyson in his poem Gareth and Lynette (1872). In modern times it is also regarded as a diminutive of LYNN.
MABEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-bəl
Medieval feminine form of AMABILIS. This spelling and Amabel were common during the Middle Ages, though they became rare after the 15th century. It was revived in the 19th century after the publication of C. M. Yonge's novel The Heir of Redclyffe (1854), which featured a character named Mabel (as well as one named Amabel).
MABLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-bəl
Variant of MABEL.
MADELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin
Variant of MADELINE.
MAGDALEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAG-də-lən
Variant of MAGDALENE.
MAGGIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAG-ee
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MAGNOLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mag-NO-lee-ə
From the English word magnolia for the flower, which was named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol.
MARCELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of MARCELINE.
MARGARET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of Gone with the Wind, and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-).

MARGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHRJ
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGERY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-jə-ree
Medieval English form of MARGARET.
MARGIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-jee
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARGO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-go
Variant of MARGOT.
MARIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Pronounced: MA-RYAN(French) mar-ee-AN(English) ma-RYA-nə(German) MAH-ree-ahn-neh(Finnish)
Originally a French diminutive of MARIE. It is also considered a combination of MARIE and ANNE (1). Shortly after the formation of the French Republic in 1792, a female figure by this name was adopted as the symbol of the state.
MARIGOLD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAR-i-gold, MEHR-i-gold
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of MARY and the English word gold.
MARILYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAR-ə-lin, MAR-lin
Combination of MARY and lyn. It has been used since the start of the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-RIS-ə
Variant of MARISA.
MARJORIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-jə-ree
Medieval variant of MARGERY, influenced by the name of the herb marjoram. After the Middle Ages this name was rare, but it was revived at the end of the 19th century.
MARTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Μαρθα(Greek) Марѳа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: MAHR-thə(English) MAR-ta(German)
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) meaning "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.

The name was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Martha Washington (1731-1802), the wife of the first American president George Washington. It is also borne by the media personality Martha Stewart (1941-).

MARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: MEHR-ee(English) MAR-ee(English)
Usual English form of Maria, the Latin form of the New Testament Greek names Μαριαμ (Mariam) and Μαρια (Maria) - the spellings are interchangeable - which were from Hebrew מִרְיָם (Miryam), a name borne by the sister of Moses in the Old Testament. The meaning is not known for certain, but there are several theories including "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", and "wished for child". However it was most likely originally an Egyptian name, perhaps derived in part from mry "beloved" or mr "love".

This is the name of several New Testament characters, most importantly Mary the mother of Jesus. According to the gospels, Jesus was conceived in her by the Holy Spirit while she remained a virgin. This name was also borne by Mary Magdalene, a woman cured of demons by Jesus. She became one of his followers and later witnessed his crucifixion and resurrection.

Due to the Virgin Mary this name has been very popular in the Christian world, though at certain times in some cultures it has been considered too holy for everyday use. In England it has been used since the 12th century, and it has been among the most common feminine names since the 16th century. The Latinized form Maria is also used in English as well as in several other languages.

This name has been borne by two queens of England, as well as a queen of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots. Another notable bearer was Mary Shelley (1797-1851), the author of Frankenstein. A famous fictional character by this name is Mary Poppins from the children's books by P. L. Travers, first published in 1934.

MATILDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: mə-TIL-də(English) MAH-teel-dah(Finnish)
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.

The name was popular until the 15th century in England, usually in the vernacular form Maud. Both forms were revived by the 19th century. This name appears in the popular Australian folk song Waltzing Matilda, written in 1895.

MAUDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAWD
Variant of MAUD.
MAUDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAWD-ee
Diminutive of MAUD.
MAXENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mak-SEEN
Variant of MAXINE.
MAY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Derived from the name of the month of May, which derives from Maia, the name of a Roman goddess. May is also another name of the hawthorn flower. It is also used as a diminutive of MARY, MARGARET or MABEL.
MELISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μελισσα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: mə-LIS-ə(English) MEH-LEES-SA(Classical Greek)
Means "bee" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a daughter of Procles, as well as an epithet of various Greek nymphs and priestesses. According to the early Christian writer Lactantius this was the name of the sister of the nymph Amalthea, with whom she cared for the young Zeus. Later it appears in Ludovico Ariosto's poem Orlando Furios (1516) belonging to the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina. As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.
MILLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, English
Pronounced: MIL-ee(English)
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MOLLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHL-ee
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel Ulysses (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
NETTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEHT-ee
Diminutive of names ending in nette, such as ANNETTE or JEANETTE.
NITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Short form of ANITA (1) and other names ending in nita.
ORA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Perhaps based on Latin oro "to pray". It was first used in America in the 19th century.
PATSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: PAT-see(English)
Variant of PATTY, also used as a diminutive of PATRICK.
PEARL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEARLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
Variant of PEARL.
PEGGY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEHG-ee
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of MARGARET. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
PENNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEHN-ee
Diminutive of PENELOPE.
PHILIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), German
Pronounced: FI-li-pə(English)
Latinate feminine form of PHILIP.
PHOEBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Φοιβη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEE-bee(English)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHYLLIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German
Other Scripts: Φυλλις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FIL-is(English)
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
REGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ri-JEE-nə(English) ri-JIE-nə(English) reh-GEE-na(German) reh-JEE-na(Italian) reh-KHEE-na(Spanish) reh-GYEE-na(Polish) REH-gi-na(Czech) REH-gee-naw(Hungarian)
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
ROBERTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: rə-BUR-tə(English) ro-BEHR-ta(Italian, Spanish)
Feminine form of ROBERT.
ROBIN
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish
Pronounced: RAHB-in(American English) RAWB-in(British English) RAW-bin(Dutch)
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROSA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: RO-sa(Spanish, Dutch) RAW-za(Italian) RAW-zu(European Portuguese) HAW-zu(Brazilian Portuguese) RAW-zə(Catalan) RO-za(German) RO-zə(English)
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSAMOND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zə-mənd, RAHZ-ə-mənd
Variant of ROSAMUND, in use since the Middle Ages.
ROSAMUND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RO-zə-mənd, RAHZ-ə-mənd
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSEMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zee
Diminutive of ROSE.
ROXANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ρωξανη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə(English) rok-SA-na(Spanish)
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel Roxana (1724).
ROXANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ρωξανη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RAWK-SAN(French) rahk-SAN(English)
French and English form of ROXANA. This is the name of Cyrano's love interest in the play Cyrano de Bergerac (1897).
RUTH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רוּת(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROOTH(English) ROOT(German, Spanish)
From a Hebrew name that was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.

As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

RUTHIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-thee
Diminutive of RUTH (1).
SADIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Diminutive of SARAH.
SALLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAL-ee
Diminutive of SARAH.
SAMANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch
Pronounced: sə-MAN-thə(English) sa-MAN-ta(Italian)
Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of SAMUEL, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show Bewitched.
SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SELMA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Pronounced: SEHL-mə(English) ZEHL-ma(German)
Meaning unknown, possibly a short form of ANSELMA. It could also have been inspired by James Macpherson's 18th-century poems, in which it is the name of Ossian's castle.
SHOSHANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Biblical Hebrew form of SUSANNA.
SILVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: SEEL-vya(Italian) SEEL-bya(Spanish) SIL-vee-ə(English) ZIL-vya(German)
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SOPHIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: SAW-FEE(French) SO-fee(English) zo-FEE(German)
French form of SOPHIA.
STACY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAY-see
Either a diminutive of ANASTASIA, or else from a surname that was derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE. As a feminine name, it came into general use during the 1950s, though it had earlier been in use as a rare masculine name.
STARLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR-lə
Elaborated form of STAR.
SUELLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: soo-EHL-ən
Contraction of SUSAN and ELLEN (1). Margaret Mitchell used this name in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936), where it belongs to Scarlett's sister.
SUSANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan, Swedish, Finnish, Russian, Dutch, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Сусанна(Russian) שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew) Сѹсанна(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-na(Italian) suy-SAN-na(Swedish) SOO-sahn-nah(Finnish) suw-SAN-nə(Russian) suy-SAH-na(Dutch) soo-ZAN-ə(English)
From Σουσαννα (Sousanna), the Greek form of the Hebrew name שׁוֹשַׁנָּה (Shoshannah). This was derived from the Hebrew word שׁוֹשָׁן (shoshan) meaning "lily" (in modern Hebrew this also means "rose"), perhaps ultimately from Egyptian sšn "lotus". In the Old Testament Apocrypha this is the name of a woman falsely accused of adultery. The prophet Daniel clears her name by tricking her accusers, who end up being condemned themselves. It also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a woman who ministers to Jesus.

As an English name, it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Old Testament heroine. It did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation, at which time it was often spelled Susan.

SUSANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-ə(English)
Form of SUSANNA found in some versions of the Old Testament.
SUSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SOO-zee
Diminutive of SUSAN.
SYDNEY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
From a surname that was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788. Since the 1990s this name has been mainly feminine.
SYLVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German
Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə(English) SUYL-vee-ah(Finnish)
Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.
TACEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Derived from Latin tace meaning "be silent". It was in use from the 16th century, though it died out two centuries later.
TAMSEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of TAMSIN.
TAMSIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: TAM-zin
Contracted form of THOMASINA. It was traditionally used in Cornwall.
TANSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TAN-zee
From the name of the flower, which is derived via Old French from Late Latin tanacita.
VIRGINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: vər-JIN-yə(English) veer-JEE-nya(Italian) beer-KHEE-nya(Spanish)
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius, which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.

This was the name of the first English baby born in the New World: Virginia Dare in 1587 on Roanoke Island. Perhaps because of this, the name has generally been more popular in America than elsewhere in the English-speaking world, though in both Britain and America it was not often used until the 19th century. The baby was named after the Colony of Virginia, which was itself named for Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. A more recent bearer was the English novelist Virginia Woolf (1882-1941).

WENDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHN-dee
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.
WINIFRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: WIN-ə-frid(English)
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
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