FlakyMatt's Personal Name List

Wolfgang
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VAWLF-gang(German) WUWLF-gang(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang meaning "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
Wolfram
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: VAWL-fram
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn meaning "raven".
Jonathon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən(American English) JAWN-ə-thən(British English)
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Variant of Jonathan.
Margaret
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-grit, MAHR-gə-rit
Rating: 92% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.

As an English name it has been very popular since the Middle Ages. It was the top name for girls in England and Wales in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, but it declined in the latter half of the 20th century.

Other saints by this name include a queen of Scotland and a princess of Hungary. It was also borne by Queen Margaret I of Denmark, who united Denmark, Sweden, and Norway in the 14th century. Famous literary bearers include American writer Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949), the author of Gone with the Wind, and Canadian writer Margaret Atwood (1939-). Others include American anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) and British prime minister Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013).

Genya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Геня(Russian)
Pronounced: GYEH-nyə
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Gennadiy or Yevgeniy.
Vladimira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Rating: 90% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Vladimir.
Gabriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: გაბრიელ(Georgian) גַּבְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Γαβριήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) ga-BRYEHL(Spanish) ga-bree-EHL(European Portuguese, Romanian) ga-bree-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) GA-bree-ehl(German, Slovak, Latin) GAH-bri-ehl(Swedish) GAHB-ree-ehl(Finnish) gə-bree-EHL(Catalan) GAY-bree-əl(English) GAB-ryehl(Polish) GA-bri-yehl(Czech)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

Oliver
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
Other Scripts: Оливер(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AHL-i-vər(English) O-lee-vu(German) O-lee-vehr(Finnish) oo-lee-BEH(Catalan) O-li-vehr(Czech) AW-lee-vehr(Slovak)
Rating: 87% based on 6 votes
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as Alfher or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see Olaf). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.

In England Oliver was a common medieval name, however it became rare after the 17th century because of the military commander Oliver Cromwell, who ruled the country following the civil war. The name was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due in part to the title character in Charles Dickens' novel Oliver Twist (1838), which was about a poor orphan living on the streets of London. It became very popular at the beginning of the 21st century, reaching the top rank for boys in England and Wales in 2009 and entering the top ten in the United States in 2017.

Ian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Rating: 85% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Iain, itself from Latin Iohannes (see John). It became popular in the United Kingdom outside of Scotland in the first half of the 20th century, but did not begin catching on in America until the 1960s.
Linwood
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-wuwd
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
Konstantinos
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Κωνσταντίνος(Greek)
Pronounced: kon-stan-DEE-nos
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Greek form of Constantinus (see Constantine).
Lina 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, French, Lithuanian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Slovene
Pronounced: LEE-nə(English) LEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Short form of names ending in lina.
Pieter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: PEE-tər
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
Dutch form of Peter. This name was borne by the 16th-century Flemish painter Pieter Brueghel the Elder.
Clair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KLEHR
Rating: 82% based on 5 votes
French form of Clarus (see Clara).
Erick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHR-ik
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Variant of Eric.
Lynwood
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIN-wuwd
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Variant of Linwood.
Marcus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: MAR-koos(Latin) MAHR-kəs(English) MAR-kuys(Swedish)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Roman praenomen, or given name, that was probably derived from the name of the Roman god Mars. This was among the most popular of the Roman praenomina. Famous bearers include Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero), a 1st-century BC statesman and orator, Marcus Antonius (known as Mark Antony), a 1st-century BC politician, and Marcus Aurelius, a notable 2nd-century emperor. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This spelling has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world, though the traditional English form Mark has been more common.
Maria
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Armenian, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Μαρία(Greek) Մարիա(Armenian) Мария(Russian, Bulgarian) Марія(Ukrainian) Маріа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: ma-REE-a(Italian, German, Swedish, Dutch, Greek, Romanian, Basque) mu-REE-u(European Portuguese) ma-REE-u(Brazilian Portuguese) mə-REE-ə(Catalan, English) mah-REE-ah(Norwegian, Danish) MAR-ya(Polish) MAH-ree-ah(Finnish) mu-RYEE-yə(Russian) mu-RYEE-yu(Ukrainian)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see Mary). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.

This was the name of two ruling queens of Portugal. It was also borne by the Habsburg queen Maria Theresa (1717-1780), whose inheritance of the domains of her father, the Holy Roman emperor Charles VI, began the War of the Austrian Succession.

Matia
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Basque form of Matthew.
Wolf
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VAWLF(German) WUWLF(English)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Short form of Wolfgang, Wolfram and other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or (rarely) English word.
Zsuzsanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: ZHOO-zhawn-naw
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Hungarian form of Susanna.
Borya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Боря(Russian)
Rating: 77% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Boris.
Damion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of Damian.
Lucas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Latin)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see Luke), as well as the form used in several other languages.

This name became very popular in the second half of the 20th century. It reached the top ten names for boys in France (by 1997), Belgium (1998), Denmark (2003), Canada (2008), the Netherlands (2009), New Zealand (2009), Australia (2010), Scotland (2013), Spain (2015) and the United States (2018).

Sylvain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEEL-VEHN
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
French form of Silvanus.
Gregory
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GREHG-ə-ree
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγόριος (Gregorios), derived from γρήγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory the Illuminator (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.

Due to the renown of the saints by this name, Gregory (in various spellings) has remained common in the Christian world through the Middle Ages and to the present day. It has been used in England since the 12th century. A famous bearer from the modern era was American actor Gregory Peck (1916-2003).

Henry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEHN-ree
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
From the Germanic name Heimirich meaning "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was usually rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced the French form to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the later Middle Ages it was fairly popular, and was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947), and American actor Henry Fonda (1905-1982).

Johnathon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən(American English) JAWN-ə-thən(British English)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Variant of Jonathan influenced by John.
Rostislav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Czech, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Ростислав(Russian)
Pronounced: rəs-tyi-SLAF(Russian) ROS-kyi-slaf(Czech)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements rasti "growth" and slava "glory".
Vlad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Russian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Влад(Russian)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Old short form of Vladislav and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule". Vlad Dracula, a 15th-century prince of Wallachia, was Bram Stoker's inspiration for the name of his vampire, Count Dracula.
Robert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic [1]
Other Scripts: Роберт(Russian)
Pronounced: RAHB-ərt(American English) RAWB-ət(British English) RAW-BEHR(French) RO-beht(Swedish) RO-behrt(German, Finnish, Czech) RO-bərt(Dutch) RAW-behrt(Polish) RO-byirt(Russian) roo-BEHRT(Catalan)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).

This name has been borne by two early kings of France, two Dukes of Normandy, and three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning (1812-1889) and poets Robert Burns (1759-1796) and Robert Frost (1874-1963) are famous literary bearers of this name. Other bearers include Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War, and American actors Robert Redford (1936-), Robert De Niro (1943-) and Robert Downey Jr. (1965-).

Dean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEEN
Rating: 70% based on 5 votes
From a surname, see Dean 1 and Dean 2. The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
Falk
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FALK
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Means "falcon" in German.
Grisha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Гриша(Russian)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Grigoriy.
Heath
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEETH
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series The Big Valley [1].
Hosea
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: הוֹשֵׁעַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ho-ZAY-ə(English) ho-ZEE-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Variant English form of Hoshea, though the name is spelled the same in the Hebrew text. Hosea is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Hosea. Written in the northern kingdom, it draws parallels between his relationship with his unfaithful wife and the relationship between God and his people.
Ophir
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: אוֹפִיר(Hebrew)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From Hebrew אוֹפִיר ('Ofir), meaning unknown. This is the name of a son of Joktan in the Old Testament (where it is also used as a place name).
Patrick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: PAT-rik(English) PA-TREEK(French) PA-trik(German)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint. He is called Pádraig in Irish.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

Trenton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TREHN-tən
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the name of a New Jersey city established in the 17th century by William Trent. It means "Trent's town".
Diana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Диана(Russian, Bulgarian) Діана(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: die-AN-ə(English) DYA-na(Spanish, Italian, German, Polish) dee-U-nu(European Portuguese) jee-U-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) dee-A-nə(Catalan) dee-AH-nah(Dutch) dyee-AH-nu(Ukrainian) DI-ya-na(Czech) DEE-a-na(Slovak) dee-A-na(Latin)
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
Means "divine, goddesslike", a derivative of dia or diva meaning "goddess". It is ultimately related to the same Indo-European root *dyew- found in Zeus. Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Walter Scott's novel Rob Roy (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel Diana of the Crossways (1885). A notable bearer was the British royal Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

Dmitry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дмитрий(Russian)
Pronounced: DMEE-tree
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Дмитрий (see Dmitriy).
Séamus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHEH-məs
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Irish form of James.
Shaun
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAWN
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Seán. This is the more common spelling in the United Kingdom and Australia, while Shawn is preferred in the United States and Canada (though it got a boost in America after the singer Shaun Cassidy released his debut album in 1976).
Sheldon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL-dən
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley with steep sides" in Old English. Sheldon is the name of several locations in England.
Sindre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Norwegian form of Sindri.
Stephen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: STEE-vən(English) STEHF-ən(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
From the Greek name Στέφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown, wreath", more precisely "that which surrounds". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament. He is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.

This was the name of kings of England, Serbia, and Poland, as well as ten popes. It was also borne by the first Christian king of Hungary (11th century), who is regarded as the patron saint of that country. More recent bearers include British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018) and the American author Stephen King (1947-).

Everett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHV-ə-rit, EHV-rit
Rating: 66% based on 5 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Everard.
Hyacinthus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ὑάκινθος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ὑάκινθος (Hyakinthos), which was derived from the name of the hyacinth flower. In Greek legend Hyakinthos was accidentally killed by the god Apollo, who mournfully caused this flower to arise from his blood. The name was also borne by several early saints, notably a 3rd-century martyr who was killed with his brother Protus.
Steffen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Low German, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Pronounced: SHTEH-fən(Low German)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Low German and Danish form of Stephen.
Vanya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Ваня(Russian)
Pronounced: VA-nyə
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Ivan.
Evan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: EHV-ən(English)
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of Ifan, a Welsh form of John.
Allan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish, Danish, Swedish, Estonian
Pronounced: AL-ən(English)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Variant of Alan. The American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) got his middle name from the surname of the parents who adopted him.
Carl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: KARL(German) KAHL(Swedish, Danish) KAHRL(English)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
German form of Charles. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
Kenny
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: KEHN-ee(English)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Kenneth.
Klaas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Low German
Pronounced: KLAS(Dutch)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Dutch and Low German short form of Nicholas.
Wilhelm
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: VIL-helm(German) VYEEL-khelm(Polish)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
German cognate of William. This was the name of two German emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
Philip
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: FIL-ip(English) FEE-lip(Dutch)
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
From the Greek name Φίλιππος (Philippos) meaning "friend of horses", composed of the elements φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and ἵππος (hippos) meaning "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians, though it came to the West by the Middle Ages. It was borne by six kings of France and five kings of Spain. It was regularly used in England during the Middle Ages, although the Spanish king Philip II, who attempted an invasion of England, helped make it less common by the 17th century. It was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. Famous bearers include the Elizabethan courtier and poet Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) and the American science fiction novelist Philip K. Dick (1928-1982).

Cliff
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIF
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of Clifford or Clifton.
Faust
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FOWST(German)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From a German surname that was derived from the Latin name Faustus. This is the name of a character in German legends about a man who makes a deal with the devil. He is believed to be based on the character of Dr. Johann Faust (1480-1540). His story was adapted by writers such as Christopher Marlowe and Goethe.
Francis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: FRAN-sis(English) FRAHN-SEES(French)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus meaning "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name became widespread in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. However, it was not regularly used in Britain until the 16th century. Famous bearers include Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552), a missionary to East Asia, the philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon (1561-1626), and the explorer and admiral Sir Francis Drake (1540-1595).

In the English-speaking world this name is occasionally used for girls, as a variant of the homophone Frances.

Gemariah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: גְּמַרְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: gehm-ə-RIE-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "Yahweh has completed" in Hebrew. This is the name of a friend of Jeremiah in the Old Testament.
Gianfranco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jam-FRANG-ko
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Combination of Gianni and Franco.
Gil 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GIL
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of Gilbert and other names beginning with Gil.
Johann
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: YO-han
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
German form of Iohannes (see John). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).
Nigel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIE-jəl
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of Neil. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Walter Scott's novel The Fortunes of Nigel (1822).
Nkechi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of Nkechinyere.
Odysseus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὀδυσσεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: O-DUYS-SEWS(Classical Greek) o-DIS-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Perhaps derived from Greek ὀδύσσομαι (odyssomai) meaning "to hate". In Greek legend Odysseus was one of the Greek heroes who fought in the Trojan War. In the Odyssey Homer relates Odysseus's misadventures on his way back to his kingdom and his wife Penelope.
Randolf
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAN-dawlf
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the Germanic elements rand meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wulf meaning "wolf". The Normans brought this name to England, where there existed already an Old Norse cognate Randúlfr, which had been introduced by Scandinavian settlers. Randolf became rare after the Middle Ages, though it was revived in the 18th century (usually in the spelling Randolph).
Rocky
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHK-ee
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Rocco and other names beginning with a similar sound, or else a nickname referring to a tough person. This is the name of a boxer played by Sylvester Stallone in the movie Rocky (1976) and its five sequels.
Saoirse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic. It was first used as a given name in the 20th century.
Shelton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL-tən
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
Silvester
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovak, Slovene, Serbian, German, English, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Силвестер(Serbian)
Pronounced: zil-VEHS-tu(German) sil-VEHS-tər(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
Sylvester
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Danish
Pronounced: sil-VEHS-tər(English) zil-VEHS-tu(German)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Medieval variant of Silvester. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. A famous bearer is the American actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-).
Theodore
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: THEE-ə-dawr
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the Greek name Θεόδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεός (theos) meaning "god" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.

This was a common name in classical Greece, and, due to both the saints who carried it and the favourable meaning, it came into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was however rare in Britain before the 19th century. Famous bearers include three tsars of Russia (in the Russian form Fyodor) and American president Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).

Vladlen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Владлен(Russian)
Pronounced: vlu-DLYEHN
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Contraction of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, the name of the founder of the former Soviet state (see Vladimir and Lenin).
Vratislav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic [1]
Pronounced: VRA-kyi-slaf(Czech) VRA-kyee-slow(Slovak)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements vratiti "to return" and slava "glory". This was the name of two dukes of Bohemia. The city of Wrocław in Poland is named after the first.
Vyacheslav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Вячеслав(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: vyi-chi-SLAF(Russian) wyah-cheh-SLOW(Ukrainian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of Václav.
Walter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: WAWL-tər(English) VAL-tu(German) VAL-tehr(Swedish, Italian)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was the English courtier, poet and explorer Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618). It was also borne by Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote Ivanhoe and other notable works.
Yesha'yahu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יְשַׁעְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Biblical Hebrew form of Isaiah.
Zacharie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZA-KA-REE
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
French form of Zechariah.
Zsiga
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian (Rare)
Pronounced: ZHEE-gaw
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Zsigmond.
Zsigmond
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: ZHEEG-mond
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Hungarian form of Sigmund.
Zuri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "beautiful" in Swahili.
Azzurra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ad-DZOOR-ra
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
Alby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Anglicized masculine form of Ailbhe.
Barnaby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: BAHR-nə-bee
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
English form of Barnabas, originally a medieval vernacular form.
Jesse
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHS-ee(English) YEH-sə(Dutch) YEHS-seh(Finnish)
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai), which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
Ahmed
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish, Bosnian, Dhivehi, Bengali, Arabic, Urdu, Pashto
Other Scripts: އަޙްމަދު(Dhivehi) আহমেদ(Bengali) أحمد(Arabic) احمد(Urdu, Pashto)
Pronounced: AH-mad(Arabic)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Variant of Ahmad. This was the name of three Ottoman sultans.
Riley
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From a surname that comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of Reilly. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.

Before 1980, this was an uncommon masculine name in America. During the 1980s and 90s this name steadily increased in popularity for both boys and girls, and from 2003 onwards it has been more common for girls in the United States. Elsewhere in the English-speaking world, such as the United Kingdom and Australia, it has remained largely masculine.

Roosevelt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO-zə-velt
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From a Dutch surname meaning "rose field". This name is often given in honour of American presidents Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) or Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
Warren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAWR-ən
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy. This name was borne by the American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
Yrjänä
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: UYR-ya-na
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Finnish form of Jurian.
Aisling
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ASH-lyən
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish. This name was created in the 20th century.
Cyrus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κῦρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-rəs(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From Κῦρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κύριος (kyrios) meaning "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
Ffransis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Welsh form of Francis.
Gbemisola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Yoruba
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "carry me into wealth" in Yoruba.
Greer
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRIR
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Gregor.
Hank
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HANGK
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Originally a short form of Hankin, which was a medieval diminutive of John. Since the 17th century in the United States this name has also been used as a diminutive of Henry, probably under the influence of the Dutch diminutive Henk. A famous bearer is the American former baseball player Hank Aaron (1934-2021).
Ladislas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: LAD-is-laws(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Vladislav.
Ladislaus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: LAD-is-laws(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Vladislav.
Lyov
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Лёв(Russian)
Pronounced: LYUYF
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Lev 1.
Roc
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: RAWK
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Catalan form of Rocco.
Szilveszter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: SEEL-vehs-tehr
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Hungarian form of Silvester.
Trent
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRENT
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that originally denoted someone who lived by the River Trent. A famous bearer is the American musician Trent Reznor (1965-).

Trent is also a city in Italy, though the etymology is unrelated.

Cain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קָיִן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAYN(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
Christoffel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: kris-TAW-fəl
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Dutch form of Christopher.
Dewey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DYOO-ee, DOO-ee
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Probably a variant of Dewi 1.
Glenn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GLEHN
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". It was borne by the American actor Glenn Ford (1916-2006), whose birth name was Gwyllyn. A famous bearer of the surname was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016). The name peaked in popularity in 1962 when he became the first American to orbit the earth.

Though this name is borne by the American actress Glenn Close (1947-), it has never caught on as a feminine name.

Kirk
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KURK
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From an English and Scottish surname meaning "church" from Old Norse kirkja, ultimately from Greek κυριακόν (kyriakon). A famous bearer was American actor Kirk Douglas (1916-2020), whose birth name was Issur Danielovitch.
Carroll
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAR-əl(English)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of Cearbhall. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Clarence
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAR-əns, KLEHR-əns
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
From the Latin title Clarensis, which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.
Liam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French (Modern), Dutch (Modern), German (Modern), Swedish (Modern)
Pronounced: LEE-əm(English) LYAM(French)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Irish short form of William. It became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, and elsewhere in Europe and the Americas after that. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States beginning in 2017. Famous bearers include British actor Liam Neeson (1952-), British musician Liam Gallagher (1972-), and Australian actor Liam Hemsworth (1990-).
Dmitri
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Дмитрий(Russian)
Pronounced: DMEE-tree
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Дмитрий (see Dmitriy).
Ara
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian, Armenian Mythology
Other Scripts: Արա(Armenian)
Pronounced: ah-RAH(Armenian)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly of Sumerian origin. In Armenian legend this was the name of an Armenian king who was so handsome that the Assyrian queen Semiramis went to war to capture him. During the war Ara was slain.
Bronislovas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lithuanian
Pronounced: bro-NYI-slo-vus
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Lithuanian form of Bronisław.
Callahan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə-han
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Ó Ceallacháin, itself from the given name Cellachán.
Cecil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEE-səl, SEHS-əl
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From the Roman name Caecilius (see Cecilia). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of Sextus.
Ctirad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: TSKYI-rat
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements chisti meaning "honour" and rad meaning "happy, willing". In Czech legend this was the name of one of the men tricked by Šárka.
Damiano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: da-MYA-no
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Italian form of Damian.
Daren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-ən
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Darren.
Darren
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-ən
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It could be from a rare Irish surname or it could be an altered form of Darrell. It was first brought to public attention in the late 1950s by the American actor Darren McGavin (1922-2006). It was further popularized in the 1960s by the character Darrin Stephens from the television show Bewitched.
Deryck
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DEHR-ik
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Derek.
Emmerson
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHM-ər-sən
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Variant of Emerson.
Gregor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
Pronounced: GREH-go(German) GREH-gawr(Slovak)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of Gregorius (see Gregory). A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
Herbie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUR-bee
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Herbert.
Leon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Λέων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEE-ahn(English) LEH-awn(German, Polish, Slovene)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek λέων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
Masterman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAS-tər-mən
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that originally belonged to a person who worked as a servant.
Norwood
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NAWR-wuwd
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
Shawn
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAWN
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of Seán, occasionally used as a feminine form. This is the most common spelling of this name in the United States and Canada, with Shaun being more typical in the United Kingdom and Australia.
Sławomir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: swa-VAWN-myeer
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Slavic element slava meaning "glory" combined with meru meaning "great, famous" or miru meaning "peace, world".
Symon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Симон(Ukrainian)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Ukrainian form of Simon 1 (mostly ecclesiastical usage).
Tzidkiyahu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִדְקִיָּהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Hebrew form of Zedekiah.
Tzion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִיוֹן(Hebrew)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Hebrew form of Zion.
Wayna
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Quechua
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "young boy" in Quechua.
Žana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Slovene and Croatian form of Gianna.
Zayna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زينة(Arabic)
Pronounced: ZIE-nah
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Zayn.
Zbigniew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ZBYEEG-nyehf
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements zbyti "to dispel" and gnyevu "anger".
Collin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHL-in, KOL-in
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Variant of Colin 2.
Damien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DA-MYEHN
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
French form of Damian.
Clyde
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIED
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
From the name of the River Clyde in Scotland, from Cumbric Clud, which is of uncertain origin. It became a common given name in America in the middle of the 19th century, perhaps in honour of Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863) who was given the title Baron Clyde in 1858 [1].
Basile
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BA-ZEEL
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
French form of Basil 1.
Freddie
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FREHD-ee
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Frederick or Freda.
Morris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Medieval English
Pronounced: MAWR-is(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Usual medieval form of Maurice.
Ralphie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAL-fee
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Ralph.
Randal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAN-dəl
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Variant of Randall.
Ronaldo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Portuguese form of Ronald. A notable bearer is the retired Brazilian soccer player Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (1976-), who is commonly known only by his first name.
Colin 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: KAHL-in(English) KOL-in(English)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of Scottish Cailean.
Katie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY-tee
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of Kate.
Ala al-Din
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: علاء الدين(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘a-la-ad-DEEN
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic علاء الدين (see Ala ad-Din).
Bronislav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Russian, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Бронислав(Russian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: BRO-nyi-slaf(Czech) brə-nyi-SLAF(Russian)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Czech and Russian form of Bronisław.
Dakota
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the name of the Native American people of the northern Mississippi Valley, or from the two American states that were named for them: North and South Dakota (until 1889 unified as the Dakota Territory). The tribal name means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language.

It was rare as an American given name before 1975. In the mid-1980s it began growing in popularity for boys, and it peaked ranked 56th in 1995. It is now more common as a feminine name, probably due to the fame of the actress Dakota Fanning (1994-).

D'Artagnan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "from Artagnan" in French, Artagnan being a town in southwest France. This was the name of a character in the novel The Three Musketeers (1884) by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel D'Artagnan is an aspiring musketeer who first duels with the three title characters and then becomes their friend.
Douglas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUG-ləs
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From a Scottish surname that was from the name of a town in Lanarkshire, itself named after a tributary of the River Clyde called the Douglas Water. It means "dark river", derived from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). This was a Scottish Lowland clan, the leaders of which were powerful earls in the medieval period. The Gaelic form is Dùghlas or Dùbhghlas. It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.
Malachi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: מַלְאָכִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAL-ə-kie(English)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name מַלְאָכִי (Mal'akhi) meaning "my messenger" or "my angel". This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
Philo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φίλων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Φίλων (Philon), which was derived from φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This was the name of a 1st-century Hellenistic Jewish philosopher and theologian from Alexandria.
Rade
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Раде(Serbian)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Originally a diminutive of Milorad and other Slavic names containing the element rad meaning "happy, willing".
Sherwood
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHUR-wuwd
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From an English place name (or from a surname that was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.
Adrian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Other Scripts: Адриан(Russian)
Pronounced: AY-dree-ən(English) a-dree-AN(Romanian) A-dryan(Polish) A-dree-an(German) u-dryi-AN(Russian)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Form of Hadrianus (see Hadrian) used in several languages. Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
Sabrina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French, Spanish
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə(English) sa-BREE-na(Italian, Spanish) za-BREE-na(German) SA-BREE-NA(French)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque Comus (1634).

The name was brought to public attention by Samuel A. Taylor's play Sabrina Fair (1953) and the movie adaptation Sabrina that followed it the next year. This is also the name of a comic book character, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, first introduced 1962 and with television adaptations in 1970-1974 and 1996-2003, both causing minor jumps in popularity. Another jump occurred in 1976, when it was used for a main character on the television series Charlie's Angels.

Bret
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREHT
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Variant of Brett.
Burt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BURT
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Short form of Burton.
Carrol
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Variant of Carroll (masculine) or Carol 1 (feminine).
Caspar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Latin variant of Jasper.
Gid'on
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Biblical Hebrew form of Gideon.
Grant
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GRANT(English)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From an English and Scottish surname that was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
Grier
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRIR
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from the given name Gregor.
Neo 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From the prefix meaning "new", ultimately derived from Greek νέος (neos).
Paulette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: PAW-LEHT(French) paw-LEHT(English)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
French feminine diminutive of Paul.
Paulino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: pow-LEE-no(Spanish)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of the Roman family name Paulinus, which was itself derived from Paulus (see Paul). Saint Paulinus of Nola was a 5th-century nobleman from Gaul who gave up his wealthy lifestyle and became bishop of Nola. He was also noted for his poetry. Another saint by this name was a 7th-century missionary to England who became the first bishop of York.
Randel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Medieval diminutive of Randolf and other names beginning with the Germanic element rand meaning "rim (of a shield)".
Wayne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAYN
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
Arabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Rating: 43% based on 10 votes
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of Annabel. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable, yielding to prayer".
Casey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY-see
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh, a patronymic derived from the given name Cathassach. This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
Gray
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRAY
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
Addison
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AD-i-sən
Rating: 40% based on 13 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Adam". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
Ahmad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Bengali, Pashto, Indonesian, Malay, Avar
Other Scripts: أحمد(Arabic) احمد(Persian, Urdu, Pashto) আহমদ(Bengali) Ахӏмад(Avar)
Pronounced: AH-mad(Arabic, Indonesian, Malay)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "most commendable, most praiseworthy" in Arabic (a superlative form of Hamid 1).
Alexandr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Russian
Other Scripts: Александр(Russian)
Pronounced: A-lehk-san-dər(Czech) u-lyik-SANDR(Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Czech form of Alexander, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Александр (see Aleksandr).
Aron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Pronounced: A-rawn(Polish, Icelandic) A-ron(Croatian) AH-rawn(Swedish)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Polish, Croatian and Scandinavian form of Aaron.
Avery
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və-ree, AYV-ree
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
From an English surname that was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names Alberich or Alfred.

As a given name, it was used on the American sitcom Murphy Brown (1988-1998) for both the mother and son of the main character. By 1998 it was more popular as a name for girls in the United States, perhaps further inspired by a character from the movie Jerry Maguire (1996).

Carlisle
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kahr-LIEL
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of Lugus". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
Carlyle
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kahr-LIEL
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Variant of Carlisle.
Chavaqquq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: חֲבַקּוּק(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Biblical Hebrew form of Habakkuk.
Clark
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAHRK
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec originally meaning "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).
Damiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: da-MYA-na
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Italian feminine form of Damian.
Dane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAYN
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was either a variant of the surname Dean or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.
Darrell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, African American
Pronounced: DAR-il(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French d'Airelle, originally denoting one who came from Airelle in France. As a given name it was moderately popular from the 1930s to the 1970s, but it dropped off the American top 1000 rankings in 2018.
Ercwlff
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Welsh form of Hercules.
Errol
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHR-əl
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from village by this name in Perthshire. It was popularized as a given name by the Australian actor Errol Flynn (1909-1959).
Garey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ee, GEHR-ee
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Variant of Gary.
Gerfried
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: GEHR-freet
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and frid "peace".
Gerhardt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: GEW-hart
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
German variant form of Gerard.
Graeme
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-əm(English) GRAM(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Graham. This particular spelling for the given name has been most common in Scotland, New Zealand and Australia.
Greger
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Swedish form of Gregorius (see Gregory).
Gregers
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Danish and Norwegian form of Gregorius (see Gregory).
Gwallter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Welsh form of Walter.
Henri
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Finnish
Pronounced: AHN-REE(French) HEHN-ree(Finnish)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
French form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Kalev 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Estonian
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Estonian form of Kaleva. This was the name of a hero in Estonian mythology.
Kalev 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Hebrew form of Caleb.
Ladislav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian
Pronounced: LA-ji-slaf(Czech) LA-jee-slow(Slovak)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Czech, Slovak, Slovene and Croatian form of Vladislav.
Obadiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֹבַדְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: o-bə-DIE-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "serving Yahweh" in Hebrew, derived from עָבַד ('avad) meaning "to serve" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve minor prophets, the author of the Book of Obadiah, which predicts the downfall of the nation of Edom.
Olivia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: o-LIV-ee-ə(English) o-LEE-vya(Italian, German) o-LEE-bya(Spanish) AW-LEE-VYA(French) O-lee-vee-ah(Finnish)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time [1] that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.

Olivia has been used in the English-speaking world since the 18th century, though it did not become overly popular until the last half of the 20th century. Its rise in popularity in the 1970s may have been inspired by a character on the television series The Waltons (1972-1982) [2] or the singer Olivia Newton-John (1948-). In 1989 it was borne by a young character on The Cosby Show, which likely accelerated its growth. It reached the top rank in England and Wales by 2008 and in the United States by 2019.

A famous bearer was the British-American actress Olivia de Havilland (1916-1920).

Philipp
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: FEE-lip
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
German form of Philip.
Rolan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Ролан(Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Russian form of Roland.
Royce
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROIS
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of Rose.
Ruth 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Limburgish
Pronounced: RUYTH, RUTH
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Limburgish short form of Rutger.
Sergi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan, Georgian
Other Scripts: სერგი(Georgian)
Pronounced: SEHR-GEE(Georgian)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Catalan and Georgian form of Sergius.
Dale
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAYL
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
From an English surname that originally belonged to a person who lived near a dale or valley.
Gwendolyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Variant of Gwendolen. This is the usual spelling in the United States.
Bayard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Derived from Old French baiart meaning "bay coloured". In medieval French poetry Bayard was a bay horse owned by Renaud de Montauban and his brothers. The horse could magically adjust its size to carry multiple riders.
Everitt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHV-ə-rit, EHV-rit
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Variant of Everett.
Jaymes
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAYMZ
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Variant of James.
Pearle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PURL
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Variant of Pearl.
Aden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən
Rating: 37% based on 7 votes
Variant of Aidan.
Fannar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from Old Norse fǫnn meaning "snow drift".
Garrick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ik
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From an English surname, of French Huguenot origin, that was derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
Ray
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Short form of Raymond, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
Adrien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-DREE-YEHN
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
French form of Adrian.
Cara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-ə, KEHR-ə, KAR-ə
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
From an Italian word meaning "beloved" or an Irish word meaning "friend". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, though it did not become popular until after the 1950s.
Carol 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Romanian form of Carolus. This was the name of two Romanian kings.
Eva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, Danish, Icelandic, Faroese, Romanian, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Armenian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Εύα(Greek) Ева(Bulgarian, Russian, Church Slavic) ევა(Georgian) Էվա(Armenian)
Pronounced: EH-ba(Spanish) EH-va(Italian, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Swedish, Icelandic, Greek) EE-və(English) EH-fa(German) EH-vah(Danish) YEH-və(Russian) EH-VAH(Georgian) EH-wa(Latin)
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Form of Eve used in various languages. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. The name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

This is also an alternate transcription of Russian Ева (see Yeva).

Isabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch, Romanian
Pronounced: ee-za-BEHL-la(Italian) ee-za-BEH-la(German, Dutch) iz-ə-BEHL-ə(English) is-a-BEHL-la(Swedish) EE-sah-behl-lah(Finnish)
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Latinate form of Isabel. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).

In the United States this form was much less common than Isabel until the early 1990s, when it began rapidly rising in popularity. It reached a peak in 2009 and 2010, when it was the most popular name for girls in America, an astounding rise over only 20 years.

A famous bearer is the Italian actress Isabella Rossellini (1952-).

Ava 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
Variant of Eve. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990). This name became very popular throughout the English-speaking world in the early 21st century, entering the top ten for girls in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It began to rise sharply after 1997, possibly inspired by the actress Heather Locklear and musician Richie Sambora when they used it for their baby daughter that year.
Blair
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: BLEHR(English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic blàr meaning "plain, field, battlefield". In Scotland this name is typically masculine.

In the United States it became more common for girls in the early 1980s, shortly after the debut of the television sitcom The Facts of Life (1979-1988), which featured a character named Blair Warner. The name left the American top 1000 rankings two decades later, but was resurrected by another television character, this time Blair Waldorf from the series Gossip Girl (2007-2112).

Bronius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Lithuanian
Pronounced: BRO-nyuws
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Short form of Bronislovas.
Chester
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEHS-tər
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
Cináed
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Scottish, Old Irish [1]
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Possibly from Old Irish cin "respect, esteem, affection" or cinid "be born, come into being" combined with áed "fire", though it might actually be of Pictish origin. This was the name of the first king of the Scots and Picts (9th century). It is often Anglicized as Kenneth. The originally unrelated name Coinneach is sometimes used as the modern Scottish Gaelic form.
Ctibor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: TSKYI-bor
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Czech form of Czcibor.
Đức
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Vietnamese
Pronounced: DIK
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From Sino-Vietnamese (đức) meaning "virtue".
Eddy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: EHD-ee(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Edward, Edmund and other names beginning with Ed.
Emmet
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-it
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Variant of Emmett. It is used in Ireland in honour of the nationalist and rebel Robert Emmet (1778-1803).
Emmett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-it
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name Emma.
Farrell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAR-əl
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fearghail, derived from the given name Fearghal.
Geoffroy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHAW-FRWA
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
French form of Geoffrey.
Gerrard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Variant of Gerard.
Grga
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Short form of Grgur.
Hal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAL
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Medieval diminutive of Harry.
Hjörtur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Pronounced: KHUUR-tuyr
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "deer" in Icelandic.
Kay 3
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KIE(German, Swedish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Variant of Kai 1.
Ljerka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Љерка(Serbian)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from South Slavic lijer meaning "lily".
Marcell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: MAWR-tsehl
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Hungarian form of Marcellus.
Mikhael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל(Hebrew) Μιχαήλ(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Modern Hebrew form of Michael, as well as an alternate Greek transcription.
Pat
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAT
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Short form of Patrick or Patricia. A famous bearer of this name was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
Trixie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRIK-see
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Beatrix.
Hannah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hebrew, German, Dutch, Arabic, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַנָּה(Hebrew) حنّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HAN-ə(English) HA-na(German) HAH-na(Dutch) HAN-nah(Arabic)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour, grace", derived from the root חָנַן (chanan). In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

As an English name, Hannah was not regularly used until after the Protestant Reformation, unlike the vernacular forms Anne and Ann and the Latin form Anna, which were used from the late Middle Ages. In the last half of the 20th century Hannah surged in popularity and neared the top of the name rankings for both the United States and the United Kingdom.

Wanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, English, German, French
Pronounced: VAN-da(Polish, German) WAHN-də(English) WAHN-DA(French)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Possibly from a Germanic name meaning "a Wend", referring to the Slavic people who inhabited eastern Germany. In Polish legends this was the name of the daughter of King Krak, the legendary founder of Krakow. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by the author Ouida, who used it for the heroine in her novel Wanda (1883).
Benaiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: בְּנָיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: bi-NIE-ə(English) bi-NAY-ə(English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name בְּנָיָהוּ (Benayahu) meaning "Yahweh has built". This is the name of numerous Old Testament characters.
Cillian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Probably from Old Irish cell meaning "church" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who evangelized in Franconia. He was martyred in Würzburg.
Corey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-ee
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning. This name became popular in the 1960s due to the character Corey Baker on the television series Julia [1].
Gunnar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: GUYN-nar(Swedish, Icelandic) GOON-nahr(Norwegian)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Gunnarr, which was derived from the elements gunnr "war" and arr "warrior" (making it a cognate of Günther). In Norse legend Gunnar was the husband of Brynhildr. He had his brother-in-law Sigurd murdered based on his wife's false accusations that Sigurd had taken her virginity.
Haakon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Pronounced: HO-kuwn
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Variant of Håkon.
Merrick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHR-ik
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From a Welsh surname that was originally derived from the given name Meurig.
Orrell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "ore hill" in Old English.
Rigby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RIG-bee
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "ridge farm" in Old Norse.
Valter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Swedish, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian
Pronounced: VAL-tehr(Italian, Swedish)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Form of Walter used in several languages.
Zavier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZAY-vyər
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Variant of Xavier.
Adriaan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: AH-dree-an
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Dutch form of Adrian.
Emma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: EHM-ə(English) EH-MA(French) EH-ma(Spanish, German) EHM-mah(Finnish) EHM-maw(Hungarian)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of King Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of King Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman Conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's 1709 poem Henry and Emma [2]. It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel Emma (1816).

In the United States, it was third in rank in 1880 (behind only the ubiquitous Mary and Anna). It declined steadily over the next century, beginning another rise in the 1980s and eventually becoming the most popular name for girls in 2008. At this time it also experienced similar levels of popularity elsewhere, including the United Kingdom (where it began rising a decade earlier), Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and the Netherlands. Famous bearers include the actresses Emma Thompson (1959-), Emma Stone (1988-) and Emma Watson (1990-).

Fox
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FAHKS
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
Hana 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Sorbian
Pronounced: HA-na(Czech)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Form of Hannah in several languages.
Kai 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, English
Pronounced: KIE(German, Swedish, Finnish, English)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of Gerhard, Nicolaas, Cornelis or Gaius. It is borne by a boy captured by the Snow Queen in an 1844 fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. Spreading from Germany and Scandinavia, this name became popular in the English-speaking world and other places in Western Europe around the end of the 20th century.
Alyx
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AL-iks
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Feminine variant of Alex.
Austen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AWS-tin
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Variant of Austin.
Kody
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KO-dee
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Variant of Cody.
Beniamino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: beh-nya-MEE-no
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Italian form of Benjamin.
Burke
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BURK
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Old English burg meaning "fortress".
Daniella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian
Pronounced: dan-YEHL-ə(English) DAW-nee-ehl-law(Hungarian)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Daniel.
Darell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-il
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of Darrell.
Darrel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-il
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of Darrell.
Davey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-vee
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of David.
Dionysodoros
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Διονυσόδωρος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Means "gift of Dionysos" from the name of the god Dionysos combined with Greek δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift".
Finlay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: FIN-lee(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Fionnlagh. This spelling is more common in Scotland, though in England and Wales the variant Finley has been more popular since 2007.
Gary
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ee, GEHR-ee
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born. It was especially popular in the 1940s and 50s, breaking into the American top ten in 1950, though it has since waned.
Geffrey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHF-ree
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Variant of Geoffrey.
Gerry
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: JEHR-ee(English) KHEH-ree(Dutch)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Gerald, Gerard or Geraldine.
Guido
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, German
Pronounced: GWEE-do(Italian) GEE-do(German)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of Wido. This was the name of two 11th-century saints. Other notable bearers include 11th-century music theorist Guido d'Arezzo, 13th-century poet Guido Cavalcanti, and 17th-century painter Guido Reni.
Harri
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish, Estonian, Welsh
Pronounced: HAHR-ree(Finnish)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Finnish, Estonian and Welsh form of Harry.
Hrœrekr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norse [1]
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Old Norse cognate of Hroderich (see Roderick).
Illtyd
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From Old Welsh Eltut, derived from the intensive prefix el combined with tut "people, country". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded the abbey of Llanilltud in Glamorgan.
Jerrard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ji-RAHRD(American English) JEHR-əd(British English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of Gerard.
Karol
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Slovak, Slovene
Pronounced: KAR-awl(Polish)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Polish, Slovak and Slovene form of Karl.
Kaspar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Estonian
Pronounced: KAS-par(German)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
German and Estonian form of Jasper.
Keefe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KEEF
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh, derived from the given name or byname Caomh.
Kgosi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Southern African, Tswana
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "king, chief" in Tswana.
Krsto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Крсто(Serbian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From Serbo-Croatian крст (krst) meaning "cross" (a word that is more common in Serbian). It could also be a short form of Kristijan or Kristofor.
Kurt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: KUWRT(German) KURT(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
German contracted form of Conrad. A famous bearer was the American musician Kurt Cobain (1967-1994).
Lucky
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: लकी(Hindi)
Pronounced: LUK-ee(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From a nickname given to a lucky person. It is also sometimes used as a diminutive of Luke.
Mordecai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: מָרְדֳּכַי, מָרְדְּכַי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAWR-də-kie(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "servant of Marduk" in Persian. In the Old Testament Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther. He thwarted a plot to kill the Persian king, though he made an enemy of the king's chief advisor Haman.
Murphy
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MUR-fee
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
From a common Irish surname, the Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Murchadha, itself derived from the given name Murchadh. As a given name, it has been borne by female characters on the American television series Murphy Brown (1988-1998) and the movie Interstellar (2014).
Mwenya
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Southern African, Chewa
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From the Chewa word for a type of flowering tree (species Breonadia salicina).
Ndidi
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "patience" in Igbo.
Ngozi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "blessing" in Igbo.
Oonagh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: OO-nə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Úna.
Orville
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWR-vil
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane.
Patryk
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: PA-trik
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Polish form of Patricius (see Patrick).
Rodge
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHJ
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Short form of Rodger.
Bryce
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIES
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Variant of Brice.
Dylan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: DUL-an(Welsh) DIL-ən(English)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From the Welsh prefix dy meaning "to, toward" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". According to the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi [1], Dylan was a son of Arianrhod and the twin brother of Lleu Llaw Gyffes. Immediately after he was baptized he took to the sea, where he could swim as well as a fish. He was slain accidentally by his uncle Gofannon. According to some theories the character might be rooted in an earlier and otherwise unattested Celtic god of the sea.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series Beverly Hills 90210.

Nike
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Νίκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEE-KEH(Classical Greek) NIE-kee(English)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Means "victory" in Greek. Nike was the Greek goddess of victory.
Tiger
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TIE-gər
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From the name of the large striped cat, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek τίγρις (tigris), ultimately of Iranian origin. A famous bearer is American golfer Tiger Woods (1975-).
Beniamin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Polish, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Βενιαμίν(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: BEH-nya-meen(Romanian) beh-NYAN-myeen(Polish)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Romanian and Polish form of Benjamin, as well as the form used in the Greek and Latin Bibles.
Cal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Short form of Calvin and other names beginning with Cal.
Gunnarr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norse [1], Norse Mythology
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Old Norse form of Gunnar.
Jerry
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHR-ee
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Jeremy, Jerome, Gerald, Geraldine and other names beginning with the same sound. Notable bearers include the American comedians Jerry Lewis (1926-2017) and Jerry Seinfeld (1954-), as well as the American football player Jerry Rice (1962-).
Kilian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Spanish, Irish, French
Pronounced: KEE-lyan(German)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
German and Spanish form of Cillian, as well as an Irish and French variant.
Kirill
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Кирилл(Russian)
Pronounced: kyi-RYEEL
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Russian form of Cyril.
Michał
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: MYEE-khow
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Polish form of Michael.
Moriah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: mo-RIE-ə
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From Hebrew מֹרִיָה (Moriyah) possibly meaning "seen by Yahweh". This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple. They may be the same place. Since the 1980s it has occasionally been used as a feminine given name in America.
Noel
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NOL, NO-əl
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
English form of Noël or Noëlle (rarely). It was fairly popular in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand in the middle of the 20th century. It is occasionally written with a diaeresis, like in French. A famous bearer is British musician Noel Gallagher (1967-).
Phelan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Sidney
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID-nee
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From the English surname Sidney. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).

As a given name, it has traditionally been more masculine than feminine. In America however, after the variant Sydney became popular for girls, Sidney was used more for girls than boys between 1993 and 2019.

'Adinah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲדִינָא(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
Hebrew form of Adina 1.
Ailill
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Irish [1], Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AL-yil(Irish)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "elf" in Irish. This name was borne by several early Irish kings. It also occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of Queen Medb.
Ezar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Variant of Ezer.
Ezer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֵצֶר(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "help" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Seir, as well as several other minor characters.
Gavriil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, Russian
Other Scripts: Γαβριήλ(Greek) Гавриил(Russian)
Pronounced: gə-vryi-EEL(Russian)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Greek and Russian form of Gabriel.
Gerold
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: GEH-rawlt(German)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
German form of Gerald.
Haywood
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-wuwd
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
Katlego
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Tswana
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "success, prosperity" in Tswana.
Kristjan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Estonian, Slovene
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Estonian and Slovene form of Christian.
Lyle
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIEL
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Norman French l'isle meaning "island".
Marla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-lə
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Shortened form of Marlene.
Merrill
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-əl
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived either from the given name Muriel or from place names meaning "pleasant hill".
Merritt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHR-it
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "boundary gate" in Old English.
Parry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From a Welsh surname that was derived from ap Harry meaning "son of Harry".
Rearden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, a variant of Riordan.
Rhydderch
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Pronounced: HRUDH-ehrkh
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the Old Welsh name Riderch, probably derived from ri "king" combined with derch "exalted". Rhydderch Hael was a 6th-century king of Strathclyde. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Roderick.
Szczepan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: SHCHEH-pan
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Polish form of Stephen.
Mackenzie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-KEHN-zee
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
From a Scottish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coinnich, itself derived from the given name Coinneach. As a feminine given name it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-), especially after she began appearing on the television comedy One Day at a Time in 1975. In the United Kingdom it is more common as a masculine name.
Brandr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norse [1]
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Old Norse byname meaning "sword" or "fire".
Brant
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRANT
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the Old Norse given name Brandr. This is also the name for a variety of wild geese.
Cearbhall
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KYAR-ə-wəl
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From Old Irish Cerball, probably from cerb meaning "pointed, sharp, cutting". This was the name of a few medieval Irish kings.
Glen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GLEHN
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Variant of Glenn.
Killian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, French
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Cillian, also used in France.
Lee
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEE
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been used as a given name in the American South.
Muhammad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Pashto, Bengali, Tajik, Uzbek, Indonesian, Malay, Avar
Other Scripts: محمّد(Arabic, Urdu, Shahmukhi, Pashto) মুহাম্মদ(Bengali) Муҳаммад(Tajik) МухӀаммад(Avar)
Pronounced: moo-HAM-mad(Arabic) muw-HAM-əd(English) muw-HUM-məd(Urdu)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "praised, commendable" in Arabic, derived from the root حَمِدَ (hamida) meaning "to praise". This was the name of the prophet who founded the Islamic religion in the 7th century. According to Islamic belief, at age 40 Muhammad was visited by the angel Gabriel, who provided him with the first verses of the Quran. Approximately 20 years later he conquered Mecca, the city of his birth, and his followers controlled most of the Arabian Peninsula at the time of his death in 632.

Since the prophet's time his name has been very popular in the Muslim world. It was borne by several Abbasid caliphs and six sultans of the Ottoman Empire (though their names are usually given in the Turkish spelling Mehmet). It was also borne by Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi, a 9th-century Persian mathematician and scientist who devised algebra. Other famous bearers include the founder of Pakistan Muhammad Ali Jinnah (1876-1948) and the American boxer Muhammad Ali (1942-2016).

Petko
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Петко(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Derived from Bulgarian Петък (Petak) or Macedonian Петок (Petok) meaning "Friday". This is a vernacular form of Paraskeve.
Billy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BIL-ee
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Bill. A notable bearer was the American outlaw Billy the Kid (1859-1881), whose real name was William H. Bonney.
Brice
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BREES(French) BRIES(English)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
From the name Bricius, which was probably a Latinized form of a Gaulish name meaning "speckled". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Martin of Tours.
Frigg
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Pronounced: FRIG(English)
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Means "beloved" in Old Norse, ultimately derived from the Indo-European root *pri- "to love". In Norse mythology she was the wife of Odin and the mother of Balder. Some scholars believe that she and the goddess Freya share a common origin.
Anderson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-dər-sən
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
From a surname meaning "son of Andrew".
Booker
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUWK-ər
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From an English occupational surname meaning "maker of books". A famous bearer was Booker T. Washington (1856-1915), an African-American leader.
Braden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAY-dən
Rating: 20% based on 6 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Bradáin, which was in turn derived from the byname Bradán. Like other similar-sounding names such as Hayden and Aidan, it and its variant Brayden became popular in America at the end of the 20th century.
Cainan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קֵינָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-nən(English) kay-IE-nən(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of Kenan.
Craig
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: KRAYG(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag, rocks, outcrop", originally indicating a person who lived near a crag.
Darnell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, African American
Pronounced: dahr-NEHL(English)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Old French darnel, a type of grass. In some cases the surname may be from a place name, itself derived from Old English derne "hidden" and halh "nook".
Derry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Dermot.
Dwayne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DWAYN
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of Duane, with the spelling altered due to the influence of Wayne.
Elisha
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִישַׁע(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-shə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name אֱלִישַׁע ('Elisha'), a contracted form of אֱלִישׁוּעַ ('Elishu'a) meaning "my God is salvation". According to the Old Testament, Elisha was a prophet and miracle worker. He was the attendant of Elijah and succeeded him after his ascension to heaven.
Gareth
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GAR-əth(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Meaning uncertain. It appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends Le Morte d'Arthur, in which the knight Gareth (also named Beaumains) is a brother of Gawain. He goes with Lynet to rescue her sister Lyonesse from the Red Knight. Malory based the name on Gaheriet or Guerrehet, which was the name of a similar character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly from the name Gwrhyd meaning "valour" (found in the tale Culhwch and Olwen) or Gwairydd meaning "hay lord" (found in the chronicle Brut y Brenhinedd).
Geert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: GHEHRT
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Dutch form of Gerhard.
Gillian
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIL-ee-ən, GIL-ee-ən
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Medieval English feminine form of Julian. This spelling has been in use since the 13th century, though it was not declared a distinct name from Julian until the 17th century [1].
Guy 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: GIE(English) GEE(French)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Norman French form of Wido. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels Guy Mannering (1815) by Walter Scott and The Heir of Redclyffe (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
Hlengiwe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele, Swazi
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "helped, rescued, redeemed" in Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele and Swazi.
Jarrett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAR-it, JEHR-it
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Garrett.
Jarrod
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAR-əd
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of Jared.
Llew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: SHEW(Welsh)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of Lleu. It can also be a short form of Llewelyn. It coincides with the Welsh word llew meaning "lion".
Perry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEHR-ee
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From a surname that is either English or Welsh in origin. It can be derived from Middle English perrie meaning "pear tree", or else from Welsh ap Herry, meaning "son of Herry". A famous bearer of the surname was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
Raul
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Estonian
Pronounced: ru-OOL(European Portuguese) ha-OO(Brazilian Portuguese) ra-OOL(Italian) RA-ool(Italian)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Portuguese, Italian, Romanian and Estonian form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Ryszard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: RI-shart
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Polish form of Richard.
Trevor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: TREHV-ər(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From a Welsh surname, originally taken from the name of towns in Wales meaning "big village", derived from Middle Welsh tref "village" and maur "large". As a given name it became popular in the United Kingdom in the middle of the 20th century, then caught on in the United States in the 1960s.
Tsholofelo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Tswana
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "hope, expectation" in Tswana.
Van
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAN
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Short form of names containing van, such as Vance or Ivan.
Vaughn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAWN
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From a Welsh surname, a variant of Vaughan.
Yrian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Scandinavian
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Medieval Scandinavian form of Jurian.
Zaahir 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ظاهر(Arabic)
Pronounced: DHA-heer
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Derived from Arabic ظهر (zahara) meaning "clear, evident, manifest, outward". In Islamic tradition الظاهر (al-Zahir) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
Madison
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-i-sən
Rating: 18% based on 6 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Maud". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie Splash (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City. It was ranked second for girls in the United States by 2001. This rise from obscurity to prominence in only 18 years represents an unprecedented 550,000 percent increase in usage.

A famous bearer of the surname was James Madison (1751-1836), one of the authors of the American constitution who later served as president (and after whom Madison Avenue was named).

Kenzie
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-zee
Rating: 18% based on 5 votes
Short form of Mackenzie.
'Aziz
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عزيز(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘a-ZEEZ
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic عزيز (see Aziz).
Bailey
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From an English surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.

Already an uncommon masculine name, it slowly grew in popularity for American girls beginning in 1978 after the start of the sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati, which featured a character with this name. Though it remained more common as a feminine name, it got a boost for boys in 1994 from another television character on the drama Party of Five. In the United Kingdom and Australia it has always been more popular for boys.

Kaycee
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-see
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Feminine variant of Casey.
Lyndsay
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIN-zee
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Variant of Lindsay.
Randy
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAN-dee
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Randall, Randolf or Miranda.
Barry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BAR-ee(English) BEHR-ee(English)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Barra.
Fenton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FEHN-tən
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was originally taken from a place name meaning "marsh town" in Old English.
Gage
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GAYJ
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book Pet Sematary (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
Kev
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHV
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Short form of Kevin.
Oli
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHL-ee
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Short form of Oliver.
Vasco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: VASH-koo(European Portuguese) VAS-koo(Brazilian Portuguese) BAS-ko(Spanish)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From the medieval Spanish name Velasco, which possibly meant "crow" in Basque. A famous bearer was the 15th-century Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, the first person to sail from Europe around Africa to India.
Wat
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAHT
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Medieval short form of Walter.
Yousef
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Arabic
Other Scripts: یوسف(Persian) يوسف(Arabic)
Pronounced: YOO-soof(Arabic)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Persian form of Yusuf, as well as an alternate Arabic transcription.
Hailey
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAY-lee
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
Variant of Hayley. This is currently the most common spelling in the United States, surpassing Haley in 2001 and attaining a high rank of 19th in 2010.
Jaydon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAY-dən
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
Variant of Jaden.
Miley
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MIE-lee
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of Miles.
Cavan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Either from the name of the Irish county, which is derived from Irish cabhán "hollow", or else from the Irish surname Cavan.
Daley
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DAY-lee
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Dálaigh, itself derived from the given name Dálach.
Duane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DWAYN
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Dubháin, itself derived from the given name Dubhán. Usage in America began around the start of the 20th century. It last appeared on the top 1000 rankings in 2002, though the variant Dwayne lingered a few years longer.
Eckehard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: EH-keh-hart
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of Ekkehard.
Flo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLO
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Short form of Florence or Flora.
Ford
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWRD
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "ford" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
Gale 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAYL
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English gaile "jovial".
Garry
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ee, GEHR-ee
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of Gary.
Gry
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
Means "to dawn" in Norwegian, Danish and Swedish.
Károly
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: KA-roi
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Hungarian form of Karl.
Kolab
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Khmer (Rare)
Other Scripts: កុលាប(Khmer)
Pronounced: ko-LAP
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "rose" in Khmer, ultimately from Persian گلاب (golab).
Maurycy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: mow-RI-tsi
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Polish form of Maurice.
Mbali
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Zulu
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "flower" in Zulu.
Moritz
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: MO-rits
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
German form of Maurice.
Niles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIELZ
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Neil.
Reilly
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Raghailligh, derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
Roydon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ROI-dən
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye hill", from Old English ryge "rye" and dun "hill".
Shel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Short form of Sheldon.
Willis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-is
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Will, a diminutive of William.
Yeong
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Korean
Other Scripts: (Korean Hangul) 英, 榮, 永, 映, etc.(Korean Hanja)
Pronounced: YUNG
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From Sino-Korean (yeong) meaning "flower, petal, brave, hero", as well as other hanja characters that are pronounced similarly. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name. This name was borne by Jang Yeong-sil (where Jang is the surname), a 15th-century Korean scientist and inventor.
Chelsea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEHL-see
Rating: 14% based on 7 votes
From the name of a district in London, originally derived from Old English and meaning "landing place for chalk or limestone". It has been in general use as an English given name since the 1970s.
Caden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Rating: 14% based on 5 votes
Sometimes explained as deriving from the Irish surname Caden, which is an Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mac Cadáin, itself from the given name Cadán (of unknown meaning). In actuality, the popularity of this name in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound — it shares its fashionable den suffix sound with other trendy names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.
Ba'al
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: בַּעַל(Ancient Hebrew) 𐤁𐤏𐤋(Phoenician)
Pronounced: BAY-əl(English) BAYL(English)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Hebrew form of Semitic ba'l meaning "lord, master, possessor". This was the title of various deities, often associated with storms and fertility, who were worshipped by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, and other peoples of the ancient Near East. It was particularly applied to the god Hadad.
Brandt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRANT
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From a surname, a variant of Brant.
Brin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene
Pronounced: BREEN
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "juniper" in Slovene.
Brooks
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWKS
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From an English surname, a variant of Brook.
Can
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Pronounced: JAN
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "soul, life" or by extension "darling, sweetheart" in Turkish, from Persian جان (jan).
Daan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: DAN
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Short form of Daniël.
Dana 2
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-nə
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From a surname that is of unknown origin. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana Jr. (1815-1882), the author of the memoir Two Years Before the Mast.
Doyle
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Dubhghaill, itself derived from the given name Dubhghall. A famous bearer of the surname was Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
Gomer
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: גֹּמֶר(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: GO-mər(English)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "complete" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a grandson of Noah and the unfaithful wife of the prophet Hosea.
Gyles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JIELZ
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Variant of Giles.
Joyce
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOIS
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From the medieval masculine name Josse, which was derived from the earlier Iudocus, which was a Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name belonged to a 7th-century Breton saint, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. It became rare after the 14th century, but was later revived as a feminine name, perhaps because of similarity to the Middle English word joise "to rejoice". This given name also became a surname, as in the case of the Irish novelist James Joyce (1882-1941).
Karp
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Карп(Russian)
Pronounced: KARP
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Russian form of Karpos (see Carpus).
Korey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-ee
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Variant of Corey.
Máel Coluim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Scottish
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Medieval Scottish Gaelic form of Malcolm.
Moss
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic), Jewish
Pronounced: MAWS(English)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Medieval form of Moses.
Nace
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Variant of Ignac.
Nayden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Найден(Bulgarian)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "found" in Bulgarian.
Raanan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: רַעֲנָן(Hebrew)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "fresh, invigorating" in Hebrew.
Raiden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese Mythology
Other Scripts: 雷電(Japanese Kanji) らいでん(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: RA-EE-DEHN(Japanese)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (den) meaning "lightning". This is a regional epithet of the Japanese god Raijin.
Quin
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KWIN
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Variant of Quinn.
Bairre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Finbar or Bairrfhionn.
Bevin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Rating: 10% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of Bébinn.
Brand
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRAND
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From a surname, a variant of Brant.
Canute
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: kə-NOOT(English) kə-NYOOT(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Knut.
Clemens
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: KLEH-mehns(German)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Original Latin form of Clement, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
Clement
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHM-ənt
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
Colby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL-bee
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, originally from various place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town". As a given name, its popularity spiked in the United States and Canada in 2001 when Colby Donaldson (1974-) appeared on the reality television show Survivor.
Corrie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: KAWR-ee(English) KAWRH-ee(Dutch)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Corinna, Cora, Cornelia and other names starting with Cor. Since the 1970s it has also been used as a feminine form of Corey.
Cory
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-ee
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Corey.
Cy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIE
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Short form of Cyrus or Cyril.
Daly
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DAY-lee
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Daley.
Daryl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-il
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Darrell.
Deshawn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: də-SHAWN(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Combination of the popular name prefix de and Shawn. It can be spelled DeShawn or Deshawn.
Dillon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DIL-ən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Dylan based on the spelling of the surname Dillon, which has an unrelated origin.
Dwain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DWAYN
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Duane.
Dwight
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DWIET
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of Dionysius. In America it was sometimes given in honour of Yale president Timothy Dwight (1752-1817). A famous bearer was the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969).
Dyson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DIE-sən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that meant "son of Dye". As a given name it is likely inspired by similar-sounding names such as Bryson and Tyson.
Finley
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FIN-lee
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Finlay. This is by far the preferred spelling in the United States, where it has lately been more common as a feminine name.
Hallie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAL-ee
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Harriet.
Iggy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IG-ee
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Ignatius.
Jorrit
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Frisian form of Gerard.
Kayden
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Variant of Caden.
Kory
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-ee
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Corey.
Lamar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, African American
Pronounced: lə-MAHR(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a French and English surname, originally from a place name in Normandy, which was derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool". In the second half of the 20th century this name has been well-used in the African-American community, probably because of its popular phonetic components la and mar.
Lane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAYN
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, meaning "lane, path", which originally belonged to a person who lived near a lane.
Layne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAYN
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Lane.
Layton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-tən
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of English towns meaning "town with a leek garden" in Old English. Like similar-sounding names such as Peyton and Dayton, this name began rising in popularity in the 1990s.
Llywellyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Pronounced: loo-EHL-in(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Llywelyn.
Llywelyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: shə-WEH-lin(Welsh) loo-EHL-in(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Probably a Welsh form of an unattested old Celtic name *Lugubelinos, a combination of the names of the gods Lugus and Belenus, or a compound of Lugus and a Celtic root meaning "strong". Alternatively it may be derived from Welsh llyw "leader". This was the name of several Welsh rulers, notably the 13th-century Llywelyn the Great who fought against the English.
Major
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-jər
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from the given name Mauger, a Norman French form of the Germanic name Malger meaning "council spear". The name can also be given in reference to the English word major.
Manley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAN-lee
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From an English surname, originally a place name, meaning "common clearing" in Old English.
Marek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish, Czech, Slovak, Estonian
Pronounced: MA-rehk(Polish, Czech, Slovak)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of Mark.
Mitxel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Basque form of Michael.
Nevan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: NEHV-ən(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Naomhán.
Nsia
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Western African, Akan
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "sixth born child" in Akan.
Nthanda
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Tumbuka
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "star" in Tumbuka.
Pace
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PAYS
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the Middle English word pace meaning "peace".
Pacey
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PAY-see
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the French place name Pacy, itself derived from Gaulish given name of unknown meaning.
Page
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYJ
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Paige.
Rusty
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RUS-tee
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From a nickname that was originally given to someone with a rusty, or reddish-brown, hair colour.
Seymour
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEE-mawr
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a Norman surname that originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint Maurus").
Shaw
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SHAW
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From a surname. As an English surname it is derived from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket". As a Scottish surname it is derived from the Gaelic byname Sitheach meaning "wolf".
Smith
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SMITH
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
Tlaloc
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Pronounced: CHA-lok(Classical Nahuatl)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Possibly from Nahuatl tlālloh meaning "covered with earth" [1], derived from tlālli meaning "earth, land, soil". This was the name of the Aztec god of rain and fertility, the husband of Chalchiuhtlicue.
Trev
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: TREHV(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Short form of Trevor.
Trevelyan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: tri-VEHL-yən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from a Cornish place name meaning "homestead on the hill".
Tyrone
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, African American
Pronounced: tie-RON(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From the name of a county in Northern Ireland, which is derived from Irish Gaelic Tir Eoghain meaning "land of Eoghan". This name was popularized by American actor Tyrone Power (1914-1958), who was named after his great-grandfather, an Irish actor.
Tyson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIE-sən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, originally a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand". A famous bearer of the surname is boxer Mike Tyson (1966-). This was a rare given name in America before 1960, but it increased in popularity through the 1960s and 70s, maybe because of its similarities with names such as Tyler and Tyrone [1].
Waylon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WAY-lən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Wayland. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland [1].
Wright
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RIET
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an occupational surname meaning "craftsman", ultimately from Old English wyrhta. Famous bearers of the surname were the Wright brothers (Wilbur 1867-1912 and Orville 1871-1948), the inventors of the first successful airplane, and Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), an American architect.
Yorick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, English, Dutch
Pronounced: YAWR-ik(English) YAW-rik(Dutch) YO-rik(Dutch)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Altered form of Jørg. Shakespeare used this name for a deceased court jester in his play Hamlet (1600).
Zan
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Chinese) , etc.(Traditional Chinese)
Pronounced: TSAHN
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From Chinese (zàn) meaning "help, support", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
Zane 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAYN
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname of unknown meaning. It was introduced as a given name by American author Zane Grey (1872-1939). Zane was in fact his middle name — it had been his mother's maiden name.
Zayn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زين(Arabic)
Pronounced: ZIEN
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "beauty, grace" in Arabic. It is borne by the British singer Zayn Malik (1993-), formerly a member of the band One Direction. The name gained popularity in America and parts of Europe after One Direction became well-known in 2011.
Sextus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: SEHK-stoos
Rating: 8% based on 6 votes
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "sixth" in Latin. It was traditionally given to the sixth child.
Satan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Theology, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: שָׂטָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SAY-tən(English)
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Derived from Hebrew שָׂטָן (satan) meaning "adversary". This is the Hebrew name of the enemy of the Judeo-Christian god. In the New Testament he is also known by the title Devil (Diabolos in Greek).
'Azazyahu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲזַזְיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Hebrew form of Azaziah.
Djordje
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian
Other Scripts: Ђорђе(Serbian)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Alternate transcription of Serbian Ђорђе (see Đorđe).
Kaden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dən
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Variant of Caden.
Kyler
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KIE-lər
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Probably a blend of the sounds of Kyle and Tyler. It also coincides with the surname Kyler, an Anglicized form of Dutch Cuyler.
Hailee
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAY-lee
Rating: 6% based on 5 votes
Variant of Hayley.
Bevan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 5% based on 4 votes
From a Welsh surname that was derived from ap Evan meaning "son of Evan". As a given name, it is particularly common in New Zealand and Australia.
Emery
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-ree
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Norman form of Emmerich. The Normans introduced it to England, and though it was never popular, it survived until the end of the Middle Ages. As a modern given name, now typically feminine, it is likely inspired by the surname Emery, which was itself derived from the medieval given name. It can also be given in reference to the hard black substance called emery.
Niven
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Naomhán.
Pece
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Пеце(Macedonian)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Macedonian diminutive of Peter.
Rayner
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: RAY-nər
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
From the Germanic name Raganhar, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hari "army". The Normans brought this name to England where it came into general use, though it was rare by the end of the Middle Ages.
Rebeccanne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 5% based on 4 votes
Combination of Rebecca and Anne 1.
Sweeney
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Suibhne. In fiction, this name is borne by the murderous barber Sweeney Todd, first appearing in the British serial The String of Pearls: A Romance (1846-1847).
Terry 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHR-ee
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of Theodoric.
Zain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زين(Arabic)
Pronounced: ZIEN
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic زين (see Zayn).
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