FlakyMatt's Personal Name List

Aabraham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish (Rare)
Pronounced: AHB-rah-hahm
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
Finnish form of Abraham.
Aaron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אַהֲרֹן(Hebrew) Ἀαρών(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-ən(English) AR-ən(English)
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon), which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses. He acted as a spokesman for his brother when they appealed to the pharaoh to release the Israelites from slavery. Aaron's rod produced miracles and plagues to intimidate the pharaoh. After the departure from Egypt and arrival at Mount Sinai, God installed Aaron as the first high priest of the Israelites and promised that his descendants would form the priesthood.

As an English name, Aaron has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. This name was borne by the American politician Aaron Burr (1756-1836), notable for killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel.

Aden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən
Rating: 17% based on 6 votes
Variant of Aidan.
Aidan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən(English)
Rating: 35% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of Aodhán. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable den suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
Aleksandar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian
Other Scripts: Александър(Bulgarian) Александар(Macedonian, Serbian)
Rating: 44% based on 7 votes
Form of Alexander in several languages.
Aleksandr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Armenian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Александр(Russian, Ukrainian) Ալեքսանդր(Armenian)
Pronounced: u-lyik-SANDR(Russian) ah-lehk-SAHN-dər(Armenian)
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Russian and Armenian form of Alexander. This name was borne by the 19th-century Russian poet Aleksandr Pushkin.
Alex
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Czech, Russian
Other Scripts: Άλεξ(Greek) Алекс(Russian)
Pronounced: AL-iks(English) A-lehks(Dutch, Italian, Romanian, Czech) A-LEHKS(French) A-lekhs(Icelandic) AW-lehks(Hungarian)
Rating: 67% based on 6 votes
Short form of Alexander, Alexandra and other names beginning with Alex.
Algernon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-jər-nən
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy). This name was borne by a character (a mouse) in the short story Flowers for Algernon (1958) and novel of the same title (1966) by the American author Daniel Keyes.
Alphonse
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AL-FAWNS
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
French form of Alfonso.
Andy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-dee
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of Andrew or sometimes Andrea 2. American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
Annemarie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, Danish
Pronounced: ahn-nə-mah-REE(Dutch) A-nə-ma-ree(German)
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Combination of Anna and Marie.
Antwan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: an-TWAHN(English)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Variant of Antoine, in use since the 1960s.
Balthazar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: BAL-thə-zahr(English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Variant of Belshazzar. Balthazar is the name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who visited the newborn Jesus. He was said to have come from Arabia.
Bartholomew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: bahr-THAHL-ə-myoo(English)
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
English form of Βαρθολομαῖος (Bartholomaios), which was the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "son of Talmai". In the New Testament Bartholomew is the byname of an apostle, possibly the same person as the apostle Nathanael. According to tradition he was a missionary to India before returning westward to Armenia, where he was martyred by flaying. Due to the popularity of this saint the name became common in England during the Middle Ages.
Beau
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch (Modern)
Pronounced: BO(English)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind (1936) this is the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.

Although this is a grammatically masculine adjective in French, it is given to girls as well as boys in Britain and the Netherlands. In America it is more exclusively masculine. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.

Ben 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: BEHN
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
Short form of Benjamin or Benedict. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.
Beryl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHR-əl
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
From the English word for the clear or pale green precious stone, ultimately deriving from Sanskrit. As a given name, it first came into use in the 19th century.
Biff
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BIF
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
From a nickname that was based on the English word biff, which means "punch, hit, strike".
Blake
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAYK
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
From a surname that was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
Bob
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: BAHB(American English) BAWB(British English, Dutch)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Short form of Robert. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel A Christmas Carol (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
Brandon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAN-dən
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of Brendan.
Brandt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRANT
Rating: 15% based on 4 votes
From a surname, a variant of Brant.
Brett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREHT
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
Brock
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAHK
Rating: 20% based on 5 votes
From a surname that was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
Bryn
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: BRIN(English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
Buddy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUD-ee
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 50% based on 7 votes
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
Burke
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BURK
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Old English burg meaning "fortress".
Cai 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Variant of Kai 1.
Cal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Short form of Calvin and other names beginning with Cal.
Caleb
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

Candace
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: KAN-dis(English) KAN-də-see(English)
Rating: 18% based on 5 votes
From the hereditary title of the queens of Ethiopia, as mentioned in Acts in the New Testament. It is apparently derived from Cushitic kdke meaning "queen mother". In some versions of the Bible it is spelled Kandake, reflecting the Greek spelling Κανδάκη. It was used as a given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 20th century by a character in the 1942 movie Meet the Stewarts [1].
Carroll
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAR-əl(English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of Cearbhall. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Cary
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHR-ee
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Variant of Carey. A famous bearer was the British-American actor Cary Grant (1904-1986).
Casey
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: KAY-see(English)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of Cathasach". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
Chester
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEHS-tər
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From a surname that originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
Chip
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHIP
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Diminutive of Charles or Christopher. It can also be from a nickname given in reference to the phrase a chip off the old block, used of a son who is similar to his father.
Chris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Danish
Pronounced: KRIS(English, Dutch, German)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Short form of Christopher, Christian, Christine and other names that begin with Chris.
Christian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KRIS-chən(English) KRISH-chən(English) KREES-TYAHN(French) KRIS-tyan(German) KRIS-ti-an(Swedish, Norwegian) KREHS-dyan(Danish)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see Christos 1). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as The Ugly Duckling and The Emperor's New Clothes.
Christopher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tə-fər
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
From the Late Greek name Χριστόφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing Christ", derived from Χριστός (Christos) combined with φέρω (phero) meaning "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.

As an English given name, Christopher has been in general use since the 15th century. It became very popular in the second half of the 20th century, reaching the top of the charts for England and Wales in the 1980s, and nearing it in the United States.

In Denmark this name was borne by three kings (their names are usually spelled Christoffer), including the 15th-century Christopher of Bavaria who also ruled Norway and Sweden. Other famous bearers include Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506), English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), English architect Christopher Wren (1632-1723) and the fictional character Christopher Robin from A. A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh books.

Cliff
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIF
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Short form of Clifford or Clifton.
Clint
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLINT
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Short form of Clinton. A notable bearer is American actor Clint Eastwood (1930-), who became famous early in his career for his western movies.
Cody
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KO-dee
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From the Irish surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of Cuidightheach". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
Colby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL-bee
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
Connor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHN-ər(English)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Variant of Conor.
Cooper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOO-pər
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From a surname meaning "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
Cosmo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: KAHZ-mo(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Italian variant of Cosimo. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
Courtney
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWRT-nee
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
From an aristocratic English surname that was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
Daan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: DAN
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Short form of Daniël.
Damian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, Romanian, Dutch (Modern)
Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən(English) DAN-myan(Polish)
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
From the Greek name Δαμιανός (Damianos), which was derived from Greek δαμάζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmas in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
Damon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Δάμων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAY-mən(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Derived from Greek δαμάζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". According to Greek legend, Damon and Pythias were friends who lived on Syracuse in the 4th century BC. When Pythias was sentenced to death, he was allowed to temporarily go free on the condition that Damon take his place in prison. Pythias returned just before Damon was to be executed in his place, and the king was so impressed with their loyalty to one another that he pardoned Pythias. As an English given name, it has only been regularly used since the 20th century.
Dane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAYN
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
From an English surname that was either a variant of the surname Dean or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.
Daryl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-il
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Variant of Darrell.
Dean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEEN
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From a surname, see Dean 1 and Dean 2. The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
Deborah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: דְּבוֹרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: DEHB-ə-rə(English) DEHB-rə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name דְּבוֹרָה (Devorah) meaning "bee". In the Old Testament Book of Judges, Deborah is a heroine and prophetess who leads the Israelites when they are threatened by the Canaanites. She forms an army under the command of Barak, and together they destroy the army of the Canaanite commander Sisera. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of the nurse of Rebecca.

Long a common Jewish name, Deborah was first used by English Christians after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.

Derek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHR-ik
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
From the older English name Dederick, which was in origin a Low German form of Theodoric. It was imported to England from the Low Countries in the 15th century.
Derrick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHR-ik
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Variant of Derek.
Digby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DIG-bee
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from the name of an English town, itself derived from a combination of Old English dic "dyke, ditch" and Old Norse byr "farm, town".
Drake
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DRAYK
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δράκων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
Elliott
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee-ət
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name Elias.
Ellis 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-is
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Elijah.
Erik
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: EH-rik(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, German, Dutch) EH-reek(Finnish, Slovak, Slovene, Hungarian) EHR-ik(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Scandinavian form of Eric. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
Faas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: FAS
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Dutch short form of Bonifaas or Servaas.
Faithe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FAYTH
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
Variant of Faith.
Faye
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Personal remark: A name I like
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Variant of Fay.
Felix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Latin)
Rating: 75% based on 4 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

Finn 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Older Irish form of Fionn. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Flannery
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLAN-ə-ree
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Flannghaile meaning "descendant of Flannghal". The given name Flannghal means "red valour". A famous bearer was American author Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964).
Floyd
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLOID
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Variant of Lloyd.
Fraser
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FRAY-zər(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From a Scottish surname that is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was Simon Fraser (1776-1862), a Canadian explorer.
Frazier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: FRAY-zhər(English)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Variant of Fraser.
Garrick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ik
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
Gary
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAR-ee, GEHR-ee
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.
George
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: JAWRJ(English) JYOR-jeh(Romanian)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Γεώργιος (Georgios), which was derived from the Greek word γεωργός (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γῆ (ge) meaning "earth" and ἔργον (ergon) meaning "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

Glenn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GLEHN(English)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
Gregg
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GREHG
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Short form of Gregory.
Gregory
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GREHG-ə-ree
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
English form of Latin Gregorius, which was from the Late Greek name Γρηγόριος (Gregorios), derived from γρήγορος (gregoros) meaning "watchful, alert". This name was popular among early Christians, being borne by a number of important saints including Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus (3rd century), Saint Gregory the Illuminator (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nyssa (4th century), Saint Gregory of Nazianzus (4th century), and Saint Gregory of Tours (6th century). It was also borne by the 6th-century pope Saint Gregory I the Great, a reformer and Doctor of the Church, as well as 15 subsequent popes.

Due to the renown of the saints by this name, Gregory (in various spellings) has remained common in the Christian world through the Middle Ages and to the present day. It has been used in England since the 12th century. A famous bearer from the modern era was American actor Gregory Peck (1916-2003).

Guy 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: GIE(English) GEE(French)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Norman French form of Wido. The Normans introduced it to England, where it was common until the time of Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a revolutionary who attempted to blow up the British parliament. The name was revived in the 19th century, due in part to characters in the novels Guy Mannering (1815) by Sir Walter Scott and The Heir of Redclyffe (1854) by C. M. Yonge.
Hanna 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, German, Dutch, Icelandic, Hungarian, Hebrew
Other Scripts: Ганна(Ukrainian, Belarusian) חַנָּה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAN-nah(Danish) HAHN-nah(Finnish, Ukrainian) KHAN-na(Polish) HA-na(German) HAN-na(Icelandic) HAWN-naw(Hungarian)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Form of Channah (see Hannah) in several languages.
Hazel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAY-zəl
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the English word hazel for the tree or the light brown colour, derived ultimately from Old English hæsel. It was coined as a given name in the 19th century.
Heath
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEETH
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series The Big Valley [1].
Jeff
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHF
Personal remark: A name I like
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Short form of Jeffrey.
Jeffery
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHF-ree
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of Jeffrey.
Jen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Short form of Jennifer.
Jenifer
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Cornish
Pronounced: JEHN-i-fər(English)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Variant of Jennifer.
Jennifer
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHN-i-fər(English) JEH-ni-fu(German)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see Guinevere). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play The Doctor's Dilemma (1906). It barely ranked in the United until the late 1930s, when it began steadily growing in popularity, accelerating into the early 1970s. It was the most popular name for girls in America between 1970 and 1984, though it was not as common in the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include actress Jennifer Aniston (1969-) and singer/actress Jennifer Lopez (1969-).

Joe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of Joseph. Five famous sports figures who have had this name are boxers Joe Louis (1914-1981) and Joe Frazier (1944-), baseball player Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999), and football quarterbacks Joe Namath (1943-) and Joe Montana (1956-).
Joel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Estonian, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl(English) JOL(English) kho-EHL(Spanish) zhoo-EHL(Portuguese) YO-ehl(Swedish, Finnish)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "Yahweh is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
John
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: JAHN(American English) JAWN(British English, Dutch) YAWN(Swedish, Norwegian)
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰωάννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "Yahweh is gracious", from the roots יוֹ (yo) referring to the Hebrew God and חָנַן (chanan) meaning "to be gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular, typically being the most common male name from the 13th to the 20th century (but sometimes outpaced by William). During the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys. In the United States it was the most common name for boys until 1923.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

The forms Ian (Scottish), Sean (Irish) and Evan (Welsh) have also been frequently used in the English-speaking world, as has the medieval diminutive Jack.

Joseph
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹסֵף(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-səf(English) ZHO-ZEHF(French) YO-zehf(German)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ἰωσήφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add", from the root יָסַף (yasaf). In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.

In the Middle Ages, Joseph was a common Jewish name, being less frequent among Christians. In the late Middle Ages Saint Joseph became more highly revered, and the name became popular in Spain and Italy. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation. In the United States it has stayed within the top 25 names for boys since 1880, making it one of the most enduringly popular names of this era.

This name was borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Portugal. Other notable bearers include the founder of Mormonism Joseph Smith (1805-1844), Polish-British author Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) and the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin (1878-1953).

Julie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ZHUY-LEE(French) YOO-lyə(Danish, German) YOO-li-yeh(Czech) JOO-lee(English)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 68% based on 6 votes
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of Julia. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
Kaapo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KAH-po
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Finnish variant of Gabriel.
Kelly
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEHL-ee(English)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish given name Ceallach or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
Kevin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, French (Modern), Spanish (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Pronounced: KEHV-in(English) KEH-VEEN(French) KEH-vin(German)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín meaning "handsome birth", derived from the older Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
Kiefer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEE-fər
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From a German surname meaning either "pine tree" or "barrel maker".
Killian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, French
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Anglicized variant of Cillian, also used in France.
Kimberly
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIM-bər-lee
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord Kimberley (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
Kip
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIP
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
From a nickname, probably from the English word kipper meaning "male salmon".
Kirby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KUR-bee
Personal remark: What my friends sometimes call me
Rating: 86% based on 5 votes
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "church settlement" in Old Norse. This name briefly spiked in popularity for American girls in 1982 after the character Kirby Anders Colby was introduced to the soap opera Dynasty.
Klaas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Low German
Pronounced: KLAS(Dutch)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Dutch and Low German short form of Nicholas.
Kristoffer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Scandinavian form of Christopher.
Krzysztof
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: KSHI-shtawf
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Polish form of Christopher.
Kyle
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIEL
Personal remark: Kyl
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
Lee
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEE
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
Leo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LEH-o(German, Danish, Finnish) LEH-yo(Dutch) LEE-o(English)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of Leon. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
Leonard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, Polish, Romanian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: LEHN-ərd(English) LAY-o-nahrt(Dutch) LEH-o-nart(German) leh-AW-nart(Polish)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements lewo "lion" (of Latin origin) and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, where it was used steadily through the Middle Ages, becoming even more common in the 20th century.
Leslie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHZ-lee, LEHS-lee
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
Levi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, English, Dutch, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: לֵוִי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: LEE-vie(English) LEH:-vee(Dutch)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Possibly means "joined, attached" in Hebrew. As told in the Old Testament, Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of the Israelites, known as the Levites. This was the tribe that formed the priestly class of the Israelites. The brothers Moses and Aaron were members. This name also occurs in the New Testament, where it is another name for the apostle Matthew.

As an English Christian name, Levi came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

Lindsay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: LIN-zee(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From an English and Scottish surname that was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "Lincoln island" in Old English. As a given name it was typically masculine until the 1960s (in Britain) and 1970s (in America) when it became popular for girls, probably due to its similarity to Linda and because of American actress Lindsay Wagner (1949-) [1].
Linus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Other Scripts: Λίνος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LIE-nəs(English) LEE-nuys(Swedish) LEE-nuws(German)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Λίνος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip Peanuts.
Lisa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Pronounced: LEE-sə(English) LEE-za(German, Italian) LEE-sah(Dutch)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Short form of Elizabeth and its cognates in other languages. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the Mona Lisa, the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.

In the United States this form was more popular than the full form Elizabeth from 1958 to 1978, and was in fact the top ranked American name between 1962 and 1969.

Llewelyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Llywelyn influenced by the Welsh word llew "lion".
Lloyd
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LOID
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from Welsh llwyd meaning "grey". The composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-) is a famous bearer of this name.
Lysander
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λύσανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύσανδρος (Lysandros), derived from Greek λύσις (lysis) meaning "a release" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). This was the name of a notable 5th-century BC Spartan general and naval commander.
Maas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: MAS
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Dutch short form of Thomas.
Mack 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAK
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally a shortened form of various Gaelic surnames beginning with Mac or Mc (from Gaelic mac meaning "son"). It is also used as a generic slang term for a man.
Mackenzie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-KEHN-zee
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of Coinneach". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-). In the United Kingdom it is more common as a masculine name.
Maddox
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAD-əks
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of Madoc". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.
Madog
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Madoc.
Magdalena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian, Spanish, Catalan, Occitan, Slovene, Czech, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian, English
Other Scripts: Магдалена(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: mag-da-LEH-na(Polish) mak-da-LEH-na(German) magh-dha-LEH-na(Spanish) məg-də-LEH-nə(Catalan) MAG-da-leh-na(Czech) mag-də-LAY-nə(English)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Latinate form of Magdalene.
Mandy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAN-dee
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Amanda.
Manny
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAN-ee
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Short form of Emmanuel.
Marcel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Pronounced: MAR-SEHL(French) mər-SEHL(Catalan) mar-CHEHL(Romanian) MAR-tsehl(Polish, Czech, Slovak) mahr-SEHL(Dutch) mar-SEHL(German)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Form of Marcellus used in several languages. Notable bearers include the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922) and the French artist Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968).
Margo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHR-go
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Variant of Margot.
Mark
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Russian, Belarusian, Dutch, Danish, Biblical
Other Scripts: Марк(Russian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: MAHRK(English, Dutch) MARK(Russian)
Personal remark: A name I like
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
Form of Latin Marcus used in several languages. Saint Mark was the author of the second gospel in the New Testament. Though the author's identity is not certain, some traditions hold him to be the same person as the John Mark who appears in the Book of Acts. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Though in use during the Middle Ages, Mark was not common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century, when it began to be used alongside the classical form Marcus.

In the Celtic legend of Tristan and Isolde this was the name of a king of Cornwall. It was also borne by the American author Mark Twain (1835-1910), real name Samuel Clemens, the author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He took his pen name from a call used by riverboat workers on the Mississippi River to indicate a depth of two fathoms. This is also the usual English spelling of the name of the 1st-century BC Roman triumvir Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony).

Matteo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mat-TEH-o
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Italian form of Matthew.
Matthew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: MATH-yoo(English)
Personal remark: My name
Rating: 75% based on 8 votes
English form of Ματθαῖος (Matthaios), which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name מַתִּתְיָהוּ (Mattityahu) meaning "gift of Yahweh", from the roots מַתָּן (mattan) meaning "gift" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax collector, and supposedly the author of the first gospel in the New Testament. He is considered a saint in many Christian traditions. The variant Matthias also occurs in the New Testament belonging to a separate apostle. The name appears in the Old Testament as Mattithiah.

As an English name, Matthew has been in use since the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was the American naval officer Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858), who led a delegation to Japan. A famous modern bearer is American actor Matthew McConaughey (1969-).

Max
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Czech, Russian, Catalan
Other Scripts: Макс(Russian)
Pronounced: MAKS(German, English, Czech, Russian, Catalan) MAHKS(Dutch)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Short form of Maximilian (or sometimes of Maxwell in English). It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Макс (see Maks).
Maximiliaan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: MAHKS-ee-mee-lee-ah:n
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Dutch form of Maximilianus (see Maximilian).
Maximilian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Pronounced: mak-see-MEE-lyan(German) mak-sə-MIL-yən(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from Maximus. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see Emiliano), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.
Meredith
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHR-ə-dith(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
Micah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: מִיכָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIE-kə(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Contracted form of Micaiah. Micah is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Micah, which alternates between prophesies of doom and prophesies of restoration. This is also the name of a separate person in the Book of Judges, the keeper of an idol. It was occasionally used as an English given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation, but it did not become common until the end of the 20th century.
Mikkel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: MEEG-gehl(Danish) MEEK-kehl(Norwegian)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Danish form of Michael. It can also derive from the Scandinavian root mikill meaning "enormous".
Miles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIELZ
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".

In Scotland this name was historically used as an Anglicized form of Maoilios.

Mnason
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Μνάσων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "reminding" in Greek. In Acts in the New Testament Paul stays in Jerusalem with a man named Mnason, a Jew who was originally from Cyprus.
Mordecai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: מָרְדֳּכַי, מָרְדְּכַי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAWR-də-kie(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Means "servant of Marduk" in Persian. In the Old Testament Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther. He thwarted a plot to kill the Persian king, though he made an enemy of the king's chief advisor Haman.
Mordechai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מָרְדֳּכַי, מָרְדְּכַי(Hebrew)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew מָרְדֳּכַי or מָרְדְּכַי (see Mordecai).
Naamah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: נַעֲמָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NAY-ə-mə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "pleasant" in Hebrew. This name is borne in the Old Testament by both a daughter of Lamech and a wife of Solomon. Some later Jewish texts give Naamah as the name of Noah's wife, even though she is not named in the Old Testament.
Natalie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: NAT-ə-lee(English) NA-ta-lee(German)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
Neal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NEEL
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Variant of Neil.
Neil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: NEEL(English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.

In the early Middle Ages the name was adopted by Viking raiders and settlers in Ireland in the form Njal. The Vikings transmitted it to England and Scotland, as well as bringing it back to Scandinavia. It was also in use among the Normans, who were of Scandinavian origin. A famous bearer of this name was American astronaut Neil Armstrong (1930-2012), the first person to walk on the moon.

Neo 1
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Southern African, Tswana
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "gift" in Tswana, a derivative of naya "to give".
Nicholas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 83% based on 6 votes
From the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos) meaning "victory of the people", derived from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and λαός (laos) meaning "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

Nick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: NIK
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 82% based on 5 votes
Short form of Nicholas.
Nickolas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs, NIK-ləs
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
Variant of Nicholas.
Nicolaas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: NEE-ko-las
Rating: 85% based on 4 votes
Dutch form of Nicholas.
Nigel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NIE-jəl
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of Neil. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Sir Walter Scott's novel The Fortunes of Nigel (1822).
Pat
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAT
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Short form of Patrick or Patricia. A famous bearer of this name was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
Patrick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, French, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Pronounced: PAT-rik(English) PA-TREEK(French) PA-trik(German)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

Paul
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Romanian, Biblical
Pronounced: PAWL(English, French) POWL(German, Dutch)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 82% based on 6 votes
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

Phil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FIL
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Short form of Philip and various other names beginning with Phil, often a Greek element meaning "friend, dear, beloved".
Phillip
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FIL-ip
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Variant of Philip, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.
Pierce
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PEERS
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Piers.
Preston
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PREHS-tən
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest town" (Old English preost and tun).
Raakel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: RAH-kehl
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Finnish form of Rachel.
Rachael
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-chəl
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Variant of Rachel, the spelling probably influenced by that of Michael.
Rafael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ra-fa-EHL(Spanish, European Portuguese) ha-fa-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) RA-fa-ehl(German) RAW-faw-ehl(Hungarian)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Form of Raphael in various languages.
Ralph
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Swedish
Pronounced: RALF(English, German) RAYF(British English)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Contracted form of the Old Norse name Ráðúlfr (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman Conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
Raphael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל, רְפָאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: RA-fa-ehl(German) RAF-ee-əl(English) RAF-ay-ehl(English) rah-fie-EHL(English)
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) meaning "God heals", from the roots רָפָא (rafa') meaning "to heal" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In Hebrew tradition Raphael is the name of an archangel. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.

This name has never been common in the English-speaking world, though it has been well-used elsewhere in Europe. A famous bearer was the 16th-century Renaissance master Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), usually known simply as Raphael.

Ray
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 58% based on 4 votes
Short form of Raymond, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
Read
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REED
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was a variant of Reed.
Reece
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Rhys.
Reed
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REED
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Old English read meaning "red", originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.
Reilly
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
Rex
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REHKS
Personal remark: A name I like
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From Latin rex meaning "king". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
Rhett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REHT
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
Rigby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RIG-bee
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "ridge farm" in Old Norse.
Rio 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "river" in Spanish or Portuguese. A city in Brazil bears this name. Its full name is Rio de Janeiro, which means "river of January", so named because the first explorers came to the harbour in January and mistakenly thought it was a river mouth.
Roland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish, Medieval French
Pronounced: RO-lənd(English) RAW-LAHN(French) RO-lant(German) RO-lahnt(Dutch) RO-lawnd(Hungarian) RAW-lant(Polish)
Rating: 88% based on 4 votes
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic La Chanson de Roland, in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
Roy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English, Dutch
Pronounced: ROI
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Ruadh. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
Ryley
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of Riley.
Sal
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAL
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Short form of Sally, Salvador and other names beginning with Sal.
Sawyer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876).
Scot
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: SKAHT(American English) SKAWT(British English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Variant form of Scott.
Sean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHAHN(Irish) SHAWN(English)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of Seán.
Sebastian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian, Czech
Pronounced: zeh-BAS-tyan(German) sə-BAS-chən(English) seh-BAS-dyan(Danish) seh-BAS-tyan(Polish) SEH-bahs-tee-ahn(Finnish) seh-bas-tee-AN(Romanian) SEH-bas-ti-yan(Czech)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From the Latin name Sebastianus, which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστός (sebastos) meaning "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.

Due to the saint's popularity, the name came into general use in medieval Europe, especially in Spain and France. It was also borne by a 16th-century king of Portugal who died in a crusade against Morocco.

Seth 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: שֵׁת(Ancient Hebrew) Σήθ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SETH(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve, and the ancestor of Noah and all humankind. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
Shane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: SHAYN
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Seán. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie Shane (1953).
Shannon
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAN-ən
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha an tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient" [1]. As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
Sid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SID
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Short form of Sidney.
Simon 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Симон(Macedonian) სიმონ(Georgian) Σίμων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-mən(English) SEE-MAWN(French) SEE-mawn(Danish, Dutch) ZEE-mawn(German) SHEE-mon(Hungarian)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
From Σίμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) meaning "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεών, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name Simon 2.

In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).

Because of the apostle, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became more rare after the Protestant Reformation.

Sinclair
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sin-KLEHR
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from a Norman French town called "Saint Clair". A notable bearer was the American author Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951).
Skylar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Variant of Skyler.
Skyler
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SKIE-lər
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Variant of Schuyler. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.
Tanner
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAN-ər
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname meaning "one who tans hides".
Ted
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHD
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Short form of Edward or Theodore. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Ted Williams (1918-2002), who was born as Theodore.
Thom
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAHM(American English) TAWM(British English)
Personal remark: A name I like
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Short form of Thomas.
Thomas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Θωμάς(Greek) Θωμᾶς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAHM-əs(American English) TAWM-əs(British English) TAW-MA(French) TO-mas(German) TO-mahs(Dutch) tho-MAHS(Greek)
Personal remark: A name i like
Rating: 93% based on 6 votes
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') meaning "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. It was reliably among the top five most common English names for boys from the 13th to the 19th century, and it has remained consistently popular to this day.

Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

Timothy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: TIM-ə-thee(English)
Personal remark: A name I like
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
English form of the Greek name Τιμόθεος (Timotheos) meaning "honouring God", derived from τιμάω (timao) meaning "to honour" and θεός (theos) meaning "god". Saint Timothy was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys and was the recipient of two of Paul's epistles that appear in the New Testament. He was of both Jewish and Greek ancestry. According to tradition, he was martyred at Ephesus after protesting the worship of Artemis. As an English name, Timothy was not used until after the Protestant Reformation.
Vance
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VANS
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
Vaughn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: VAWN
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From a Welsh surname that was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".
Viktor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Greek
Other Scripts: Виктор(Bulgarian, Russian, Serbian, Macedonian) Віктор(Ukrainian) Βίκτωρ(Greek)
Pronounced: VIK-to(German) VEEK-tor(Hungarian) VIK-tor(Czech) VEEK-tawr(Slovak) VYEEK-tər(Russian)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Form of Victor used in various languages.
Vulfgang
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Old Germanic form of Wolfgang.
Will
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Short form of William and other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
Willoughby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIL-ə-bee
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "willow town" in Old English.
Wyatt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIE-ət
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Wyard or Wyot, from the Old English name Wigheard. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
Zachariah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: zak-ə-RIE-ə(English)
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
Variant of Zechariah. This spelling is used in the King James Version of the Old Testament to refer to one of the kings of Israel (called Zechariah in other versions).
Zachary
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Usual English form of Zacharias, used in some English versions of the New Testament. This form has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. It was borne by American military commander and president Zachary Taylor (1784-1850).
Zachery
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of Zachary.
Zack
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAK
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Short form of Zachary.
Zackary
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAK-ə-ree
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Variant of Zachary.
Zoltán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian, Slovak
Pronounced: ZOL-tan(Hungarian) ZAWL-tan(Slovak)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Possibly related to the Turkish title sultan meaning "king, sultan". This was the name of a 10th-century ruler of Hungary, also known as Zsolt.
Zsigmond
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: ZHEEG-mond
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Hungarian form of Sigmund.
behindthename.com   ·   Copyright © 1996-2022