welshrocker1's Personal Name List

ABBEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AB-ee
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ABILENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AB-i-leen, ab-i-LEE-nee
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From a place name mentioned briefly in the New Testament. It is probably from Hebrew אָבֵל ('avel) meaning "meadow, grassy area". It has occasionally been used as a given name in modern times.
ADELAIDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: A-də-layd(English) a-deh-LIE-deh(Italian) a-di-LIE-di(European Portuguese) a-di-LIED(European Portuguese) a-deh-LIE-dee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "noble type", from the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman emperor Otto the Great. In Britain the parallel form Alice, derived via Old French, has historically been more common, though this form did gain some currency in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADÈLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-DEHL
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
French form of ADELA.
ADRIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Polish
Pronounced: ay-dree-AN-ə(English) a-DRYAN-na(Polish)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ADRIAN.
AINGEAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Irish cognate of ANGELA.
AISHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, American
Other Scripts: عائشة(Arabic) عائشہ(Urdu)
Pronounced: ‘A-ee-shah(Arabic) ie-EE-shə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "alive" in Arabic. This was the name of Muhammad's third wife, the daughter of Abu Bakr. Some time after Muhammad's death she went to war against Ali, the fourth caliph, but was defeated. This name is used more by Sunni Muslims and less by Shias.

This name began to be used in America in the 1970s, possibly inspired by Princess Aisha of Jordan (1968-), the daughter of King Hussein and his British-born wife. It received a boost in popularity after Stevie Wonder used it for his first daughter in 1975.

ALANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Breton
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ALAN.
ALAYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LAYN-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of ALAINA.
ALECIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LEE-shə, ə-LEE-see-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of ALICIA.
ALESIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Possibly a variant of ALICIA.
ALEXIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English (Modern)
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SEE-A(French) ə-LEHK-see-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of ALEXIS.
ALEXIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αλεξης(Greek) Αλεξις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: a-LEH-ksis(German) A-LEHK-SEE(French) ə-LEHK-sis(English)
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis) meaning "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ə
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of ALYSSA.
ALIVIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LIV-ee-ə
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of OLIVIA.
ALLY (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-ee
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA and other names beginning with the same sound.
ALYSHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LISH-ə, ə-LEE-shə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of ALICIA.
ALYSSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ə
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Variant of ALICIA. The spelling has probably been influenced by that of the alyssum flower, the name of which is derived from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with λυσσα (lyssa) meaning "madness, rabies", since it was believed to cure madness.
ALYSSIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LIS-ee-ə
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of ALICIA.
AMBER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: AM-bər(English) AHM-bər(Dutch)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel Forever Amber (1944).
AMÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MEH-LEE
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
French form of AMELIA.
AMELIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: a-meh-LEE
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
German variant of AMELIA.
ANAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲנָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "answer" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name belongs to one female character and two male characters.
ANASTACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of ANASTASIA.
ANGELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Other Scripts: Ангела(Russian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AN-jəl-ə(English) ANG-jeh-la(Italian) ANG-geh-la(German) AN-gyi-lə(Russian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ANGELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: an-JEHL-ee-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of ANGELA.
ANGELICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: an-JEHL-i-kə(English) an-JEH-lee-ka(Italian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their Orlando poems (1483 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANGHARAD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "more love" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, Angharad Golden-hand is the lover of Peredur.
ANNMARIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-mə-ree
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of ANN and MARIE.
ANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "very beautiful" in Welsh.
AOIBHEANN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EE-van
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "beautiful, pleasant, radiant" in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of the mother of Saint Enda. It was also borne by Irish royalty.
APRIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-prəl
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the month, probably originally derived from Latin aperire "to open", referring to the opening of flowers. It has only been commonly used as a given name since the 1940s.
ARABELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ar-ə-BEHL-ə
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Medieval Scottish name, probably a variant of ANNABEL. It has long been associated with Latin orabilis meaning "invokable".
ARAN (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland.
ARIADNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αριαδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) meaning "most" and αδνος (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARLEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ahr-LEEN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of ARLINE.
AURORE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-RAWR
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
French form of AURORA.
AUTUMN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AW-təm
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.
BABS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BABZ
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of BARBARA.
BÁIRBRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: BAR-bryə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Irish form of BARBARA.
BARBIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAHR-bee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of BARBARA.
BÉATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BEH-A-TREES
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of BEATRIX.
BEATRICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish
Pronounced: beh-a-TREE-cheh(Italian) BEE-ə-tris(English) BEET-ris(English) BEH-ah-trees(Swedish) beh-ah-TREES(Swedish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the Divine Comedy (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BECCI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BEHK-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of REBECCA.
BECKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHK-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of REBECCA.
BELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHL-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of ISABELLA and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful".
BELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of ISABELLA or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful". A famous bearer was Belle Starr (1848-1889), an outlaw of the American west, whose real given name was Maybelle.
BETHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BETH-an
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Welsh diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BETRYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BEHT-rees
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Welsh form of BEATRICE.
BIENVENIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: byehm-beh-NEE-dha
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Derived from Spanish bienvenido meaning "welcome".
BLANCHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BLAHNSH(French) BLANCH(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BLOSSOM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BLAH-səm
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word blossom, ultimately from Old English blóstm. It came into use as a rare given name in the 19th century.
BREANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bree-AN-ə, bree-AHN-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bree-AN-ə, bree-AHN-ə, brie-AN-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of BRIAN. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in The Faerie Queene (1590). The name was not commonly used until the 1970s, when it rapidly became popular in the United States.
BRIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: bree-AN-ə, bree-AHN-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized diminutive of BRÍD.
BRIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: bree-EHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of GABRIELLE. This is also the name of towns in the Netherlands and New Jersey, though their names derive from a different source.
BRITTANY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIT-ə-nee, BRIT-nee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons.

As a given name, it first came into common use in America in the early 1970s, reaching the third ranked spot for girls by 1989. This was an extraordinary increase over only two decades, though it has since fallen almost as dramatically as it climbed.

BRYANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: bree-AN-ə, bree-AHN-ə, brie-AN-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of BRIANA.
CAITLIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KAT-lyeen(Irish) KAYT-lin(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
CALLISTO (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιστω(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-to(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of KALLISTO. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.
CAMILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ka-MEE-la(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLA.
CAMMIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAM-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of CAMILLA.
CANDIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAN-dis
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of CANDACE.
CANDYCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAN-dis
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of CANDACE.
CAREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-ən, KEHR-ən
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KAREN (1).
CAROLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KA-RAWL
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Pronounced: ka-ro-LEE-na(Italian, Spanish) ka-roo-LEE-nu(European Portuguese) ka-ro-LEE-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) kar-ə-LIE-nə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CARYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-ən, KEHR-ən
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Variant of KAREN (1).
CASSIDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAS-i-dee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CECILIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Romanian, Finnish, German
Pronounced: seh-SEE-lee-ə(English) seh-SEEL-yə(English) cheh-CHEE-lya(Italian) theh-THEE-lya(European Spanish) seh-SEE-lya(Latin American Spanish) seh-SEEL-yah(Danish, Norwegian)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus meaning "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.

Due to the popularity of the saint, the name became common in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans brought it to England, where it was commonly spelled Cecily - the Latinate form Cecilia came into use in the 18th century.

CELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish
Pronounced: SEEL-yə(English) SEE-lee-ə(English) THEHL-ya(European Spanish) SEHL-ya(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name CAELIUS. Shakespeare used it in his play As You Like It (1599), which introduced the name to the English-speaking public at large. It is sometimes used as a short form of CECILIA.
CERIDWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: keh-RID-wehn
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly from Welsh cyrrid "bent" or cerdd "poetry" combined with ven "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to medieval Welsh legend this was the name of a sorceress or goddess who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.
CERISE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SU-REEZ
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "cherry" in French.
CHANEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: shə-NEHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a French surname that meant "pipe". It has been used as an American given name since 1970s, influenced by the Chanel brand name (a line of women's clothing and perfume), which was named for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
CHANELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: shə-NEHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of CHANEL.
CHANTÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "sung" in French.
CHARLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHAHR-lə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SHAR-LEEN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLIZE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Afrikaans
Pronounced: shar-LEEZ
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of CHARLES using the popular Afrikaans name suffix ize. This name was popularized by South African actress Charlize Theron (1975-), who was named after her father Charles.
CHARLOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: SHAR-LAWT(French) SHAHR-lət(English) shar-LAW-tə(German) sha-LOT(Swedish) shahr-LAW-tə(Dutch)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. It was the name of a German-born 18th-century queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Another notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of Jane Eyre and Villette.

This name was fairly common in France, England and the United States in the early 20th century. It became quite popular in France and England at the end of the 20th century, just when it was at a low point in the United States. It quickly climbed the American charts and entered the top ten in 2014.

CHARO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: CHA-ro
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish diminutive of ROSARIO.
CHASTITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAS-ti-tee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word chastity, which is ultimately from Latin castus "pure". It was borne by the daughter of Sonny Bono and Cher, which probably led to the name's increase in popularity during the 1970s.
CHELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of MICHELLE.
CHERISH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHEHR-ish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word meaning "to treasure".
CHERYL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHR-əl
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Elaboration of CHERIE, perhaps influenced by BERYL. This name was not used before the 20th century.
CHEYANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: shie-AN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of CHEYENNE probably influenced by the name ANNE (1).
CHLOÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KLO-EH
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of CHLOE.
CHRISTELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KREES-TEHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Late Roman
Pronounced: kris-tee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: KREES-TEEN(French) kris-TEEN(English) kris-TEE-nə(German, Dutch)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CHYNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of CHINA.
CIARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEER-a
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of CIAR. Saint Ciara was an Irish nun who established a monastery at Kilkeary in the 7th century.
CICELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIS-ə-lee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Medieval variant of CECILY.
CIERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHR-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of SIERRA.
CLARIBEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHR-ə-behl, KLAR-ə-behl
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Combination of CLARA and the popular name suffix bel. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in his poem The Faerie Queene (in the form Claribell) and by Shakespeare in his play The Tempest (1611). Alfred Lord Tennyson also wrote a poem entitled Claribel (1830).
CLEO
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEE-o
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Short form of CLEOPATRA, CLEON or CLEOPAS.
CLYTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κλυτιη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of KLYTIË.
COLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-LEHT
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).
COSETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Literature
Pronounced: KAW-ZEHT(French)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
CRYSTAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-təl
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρυσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
CRYSTIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Welsh form of CHRISTINE.
CUSTODIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: koos-TO-dhya
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of CUSTODIO.
DAKOTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: də-KO-tə
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DANAË
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δαναη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-NA-EH(Classical Greek) DAN-ay-ee(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Δαναοι (Danaoi), a word used by Homer to designate the Greeks. In Greek mythology Danaë was the daughter of the Argive king Acrisius. It had been prophesized to her father that he would one day be killed by Danaë's son, so he attempted to keep his daughter childless. However, Zeus came to her in the form of a shower of gold, and she became the mother of Perseus. Eventually the prophecy was fulfilled and Perseus killed Acrisius, albeit accidentally.
DANIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, German, Czech, Slovak, Romanian, Portuguese, Spanish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Даниела(Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: da-NYEH-la(Italian, German, Spanish) DA-ni-yeh-la(Czech) DA-nee-eh-la(Slovak) da-nee-EH-la(Romanian) dan-YEHL-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of DANIEL.
DANIÈLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DA-NYEHL
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
French feminine form of DANIEL.
DANIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: dan-YEHL-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of DANIEL.
DAVENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Variant of DAVINA.
DEANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: dee-AN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of DEANNA.
DEBBI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHB-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEBI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHB-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of DEBORAH.
DEEANN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: dee-AN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of DEANNA.
DERYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly from Welsh aderyn meaning "bird".
DIAMOND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DIE-mənd
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word diamond for the clear colourless precious stone, the birthstone of April. It is derived from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, which is of Greek origin meaning "invincible, untamed".
DIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Диана(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: die-AN-ə(English) DYA-na(Spanish, Italian, German, Polish) dee-U-nu(European Portuguese) jee-U-nu(Brazilian Portuguese) dee-A-nə(Catalan) dee-AH-nah(Dutch) DI-ya-na(Czech) DEE-a-na(Slovak) dee-A-na(Classical Latin)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

As a given name, Diana has been regularly used since the Renaissance. It became more common in the English-speaking world following Sir Walter Scott's novel Rob Roy (1817), which featured a character named Diana Vernon. It also appeared in George Meredith's novel Diana of the Crossways (1885). A notable bearer was Diana Spencer (1961-1997), the Princess of Wales.

DIANNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: DYAN(French) die-AN(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of DIANE.
DOTTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHT-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of DOROTHY.
EASTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EE-stər
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English name of the Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus. It was ultimately named for the Germanic spring goddess Eostre. It was traditionally given to children born on Easter, though it is rare in modern times.
EIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "snow" in Welsh.
EITHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: EH-nyə
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "kernel, grain" in Irish. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint, sister of Saint Fidelma and follower of Saint Patrick.
ELEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: EHL-ehn
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Welsh form of HELEN. This was the name of a 4th-century Welsh saint. It also appears in the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, belonging to a woman who built the roads in Wales.
ELISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Finnish, English
Pronounced: eh-LEE-za(Italian, German) eh-LEE-sa(Spanish) EH-lee-sah(Finnish) ə-LEE-sə(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHL
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
ELLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of ELEANOR, ELLEN (1), and other names beginning with El.
ELSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHL-see
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
EM
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of EMILY or EMMA.
EMILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-lee
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
English feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL). In the English-speaking world it was not common until after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century; the princess Amelia Sophia (1711-1786) was commonly known as Emily in English, even though Amelia is an unrelated name.

This name was moderately popular through most of the 20th century, and became very popular around the turn of the 21st century. It was the highest ranked name for girls in the United States from 1996 to 2007, attaining similar levels in other English-speaking countries around the same time.

Famous bearers include the British author Emily Brontë (1818-1848), known for the novel Wuthering Heights, and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886).

EMMALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ə-leen, EHM-ə-lien
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of EMMELINE.
ENA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ENYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EHN-yə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ESMERALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
EULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: YOO-lə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of EULALIA.
EVANGELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: eh-ban-kheh-LEE-na(Spanish) i-VAN-jə-lee-nə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinate form of EVANGELINE.
EVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: חַוָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EEV(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חָוָה (chawah) meaning "to breathe" or the related word חָיָה (chayah) meaning "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.

Despite this potentially negative association, the name was occasionally used by Christians during the Middle Ages. In the English-speaking world both Eve and the Latin form Eva were revived in the 19th century, with the latter being more common.

EVELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Dutch
Pronounced: EHV-ə-leen(English) EHV-ə-lien(English) EHV-LEEN(French) eh-və-LEE-nə(Dutch) eh-və-LEEN(Dutch)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of EVELINA.
FAUSTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of Faustinus (see FAUSTINO).
FAYE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of FAY.
FIDELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: fee-DHEH-la
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of FIDEL.
FLEUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLUUR(French, Dutch) FLUR(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922).
FLORINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of FLORINUS.
FLOSSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLAHS-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of FLORENCE.
GABRIELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, German, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Габриела(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: gab-RYEH-la(Polish) ga-BRYEH-la(Spanish) ga-bree-EH-la(German) GA-bri-yeh-la(Czech) GA-bree-eh-la(Slovak)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GAYNOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: GAY-nawr
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Medieval form of GUINEVERE.
GIADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-da
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Italian form of JADE.
GINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: JEE-na(Italian) JEE-nə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of VIRGINIA or EUGENIA. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
GRACE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.
GWENYTH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GWEHN-ith
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of GWYNETH.
HALLE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAL-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
In the case of American actress Halle Berry (1966-), it is from the name of a department store in Cleveland where she was born (the store was founded by brothers bearing the German surname Halle, a cognate of HALL).
HANNA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, German, Dutch, Icelandic, Hungarian, Hebrew
Other Scripts: Ганна(Ukrainian, Belarusian) חַנָּה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAN-nah(Danish) HAHN-nah(Finnish, Ukrainian) KHAN-na(Polish) HA-na(German) HAN-na(Icelandic) HAWN-naw(Hungarian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) in several languages.
HARMONY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-mə-nee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word harmony, ultimately deriving from Greek ‘αρμονια (harmonia).
HAYLEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HAY-lee
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous [1].
HEATHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEDH-ər
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers, which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.
HEAVEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HEHV-ən
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
HÉLOÏSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-LO-EEZ
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of ELOISE.
HERMIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: ‘Ερμιονη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHR-MEE-O-NEH(Classical Greek) hər-MIE-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play The Winter's Tale (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
HETTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEHT-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of HENRIETTA or HESTER.
HOLLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of HOLLY.
IBBIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IB-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of ISABEL.
INDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IN-dee-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
IPHIGENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ιφιγενεια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of IPHIGENEIA.
ISABELL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: ee-za-BEHL
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
German variant of ISABEL.
JACLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-lin
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Contracted variant of JACQUELINE.
JAE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JAY
Variant of JAY (1).
JASMINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAZ-min(English) ZHAS-MEEN(French)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers that is used for making perfumes. It is derived via Arabic from Persian یاسمین (yasamin), which is also a Persian name.
JAZLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAZ-lin
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Modern name, a combination of the popular name elements Jaz and lyn.
JEANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEE-nee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of JEAN (2).
JEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of JENNIFER.
JENELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jə-NEHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of JEN and the popular name suffix elle.
JENN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of JENNIFER.
JENNIFER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
Pronounced: JEHN-i-fər(English) JEH-ni-fu(German)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play The Doctor's Dilemma (1906). It barely ranked in the United until the late 1930s, when it began steadily growing in popularity, accelerating into the early 1970s. It was the most popular name for girls in America between 1970 and 1984, though it was not as common in the United Kingdom.

Famous bearers include actress Jennifer Aniston (1969-) and singer/actress Jennifer Lopez (1969-).

JEWEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOO-əl, JOOL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JINNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIN-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of VIRGINIA.
JO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Norwegian
Pronounced: JO(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German, Dutch and Norwegian, short for JOHANNES or JOSEF.
JOELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jo-EHL-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of JOEL.
JOETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of JO.
JOLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-lee(English) ZHAW-LEE(French)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "pretty" in French. This name was popularized by American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-), whose surname was originally her middle name. It is not used as a given name in France.
JONIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-nee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of JOAN (1).
JORJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JAWR-jə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of GEORGIA.
JOSEFINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish
Pronounced: kho-seh-FEE-na(Spanish) zhoo-zə-FEE-nə(Portuguese) yoo-seh-FEE-nah(Swedish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish, Portuguese and Swedish feminine form of JOSEPH.
JUDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOO-dee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of JUDITH.
JULIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: joo-lee-EHT, JOOL-yət
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
KAITLYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Variant of CAITLIN.
KALYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Variant of KAYLYN.
KARLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian
Pronounced: KAR-la(German, Czech)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German, Scandinavian, Czech and Croatian feminine form of CHARLES.
KARLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHR-lee
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Variant of CARLY.
KARYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAR-ən, KEHR-ən
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Variant of KAREN (1).
KATELIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Variant of CAITLIN.
KATELYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAYT-lin
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Variant of CAITLIN.
KATHARYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin, KATH-rin
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Variant of KATHERINE.
KATHLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-lin
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
KATINKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch
Pronounced: ka-TING-ka(German) KAW-teeng-kaw(Hungarian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German diminutive of KATHARINA, a Hungarian diminutive of KATALIN and a Dutch diminutive of CATHARINA.
KATJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Slovene
Pronounced: KAT-ya(German) KAHT-yah(Dutch)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Form of KATYA in various languages.
KATRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Dutch
Pronounced: kə-TREE-nə(English) kaht-REE-nah(Dutch)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.
KAYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAY-lə
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix la. Use of the name was greatly increased in the 1980s after the character Kayla Brady began appearing on the American soap opera Days of Our Lives [1].
KAYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lee.
KAYLYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lin
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KAYLYN.
KEELEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEE-lee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KEELY.
KEELIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEE-lin
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of CAOILFHIONN.
KEEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KEE-va
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of CAOIMHE.
KEILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-lə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KAYLA.
KENINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of KENNETH.
KESHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Probably a variant of KEISHA.
KEZIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
KHLOE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KLO-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of CHLOE.
KIARRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: kee-AHR-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KIARA.
KIERSTEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KIRSTEN.
KIKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Greek
Other Scripts: Κικη(Greek)
Pronounced: KEE-kee(English) kee-KEE(Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of names beginning with or containing the sound K.
KIRSTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of KIRSTIN.
KORTNEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAWRT-nee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of COURTNEY.
KRISTI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-tee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KRISTY.
KRISTIANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: kris-TYA-nə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German form of CHRISTINA.
KYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lə
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of KYLE.
KYLEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KIE-lee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of KYLIE.
LACI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAY-see
Variant of LACY.
LAKISHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: lə-KISH-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name KISHA.
LANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Russian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Лана(Russian, Serbian)
Pronounced: LAH-nə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Short form of ALANA (English) or SVETLANA (Russian). In the English-speaking world, it was popularized by actress Lana Turner (1921-1995).
LARISSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese (Brazilian), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λαρισα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lə-RIS-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of LARISA. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.
LATANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TANYA.
LAUREL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əl
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
LAURYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of LAUREN.
LEANN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lee-AN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of LEE and ANN.
LELA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of LEILA.
LETITIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: li-TISH-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the Late Latin name Laetitia meaning "joy, happiness". This was the name of an obscure saint, who is revered mainly in Spain. It was in use in England during the Middle Ages, usually in the spelling Lettice, and it was revived in the 18th century.
LEXI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHK-see
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.
LEXIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHK-see-ə
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Short form of ALEXIA.
LIESA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LEE-za
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German diminutive of ELISABETH.
LIESE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: LEE-zə(German) LEE-sə(Dutch)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH.
LIESEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LEE-zəl
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German diminutive of ELISABETH.
LILI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French, Hungarian
Pronounced: LI-lee(German) LEE-LEE(French)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German, French and Hungarian diminutive of ELISABETH, also sometimes connected to the German word lilie meaning "lily". In Hungarian, it can also be diminutive of KAROLINA or JÚLIA.
LILLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of LILLIAN or an elaborated form of LILY.
LILLIAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee-ən
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Probably originally a diminutive of ELIZABETH. It may also be considered an elaborated form of LILY, from the Latin word for "lily" lilium. This name has been used in England since the 16th century.
LILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIL-ee
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From the name of the flower, a symbol of purity. The word is ultimately derived from Latin lilium.
LISELOTTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
Pronounced: LEE-zeh-law-tə(German)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of LISE and CHARLOTTE.
LIV (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIV
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Short form of OLIVIA.
LIVVY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIV-ee
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of OLIVIA.
LIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Russian
Other Scripts: Лиза(Russian)
Pronounced: LIE-zə(English) LEE-zə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of ELIZABETH or YELIZAVETA.
LIZZY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIZ-ee
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LLEUCU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SHAY-ki
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from LLEU. This name appears in the 14th-century poem Marwnad Lleucu Llwyd, written by Llywelyn Goch ap Meurig Hen for his deceased lover Lleucu Llwyd.
LLEWELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of LLYWELYN.
LLÚCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: LYOO-see-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Catalan form of LUCIA.
LOLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: LO-la(Spanish) LO-lə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of DOLORES.
LONDON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LUN-dən
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
LOREEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-een
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Elaboration of LORA.
LOTTIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish
Pronounced: LAHT-ee(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of CHARLOTTE or LISELOTTE.
LOVE (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LUV
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Simply from the English word love, derived from Old English lufu.
LUCILE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: LUY-SEEL(French) loo-SEEL(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of LUCILLE.
LUISINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: lwee-SEE-na
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of LUISA.
LULU (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LOO-loo
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of names that begin with Lu, especially LUISE.
LUNED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: LIN-ehd(Welsh)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of ELUNED. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is a servant of the Lady of the Fountain who rescues the knight Owain.
LUZIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, German
Portuguese and German form of LUCIA.
LYDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Czech
Pronounced: LEE-DEE(French)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French and Czech form of LYDIA.
LYNDSEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIN-zee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of LINDSAY.
LYNNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: li-NEHT
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of LYNETTE.
LYRIC
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIR-ik
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).
LYSSA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LIS-ə
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Short form of ALYSSA.
MACY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY-see
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From an English surname that was from various towns named Massy in France. The towns themselves were originally named from a Gallo-Roman personal name that was Latinized as Maccius. This is the name of a chain of American department stores founded by Rowland Hussey Macy (1822-1877).
MADALYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of MADELINE.
MADONNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mə-DAHN-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From a title of the Virgin Mary meaning "my lady" in Italian. A famous bearer of the name is American singer Madonna Ciccone (1958-), known simply as Madonna.
MAEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian, French
Pronounced: MA-EH-VA(French)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Means "welcome" in Tahitian. It gained popularity in France during the 1980s.
MAISIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English (British)
Pronounced: MAY-zee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Scottish diminutive of MAIREAD.
MALINA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of MALCOLM.
MANDI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAN-dee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of AMANDA.
MAREIKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Frisian, German
Pronounced: ma-RIE-kə(German)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Frisian and German diminutive of MARIA.
MARIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-RYEHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French diminutive of MARIE.
MARILÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of MARIE and HÉLÈNE.
MARILOU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: mar-ee-LOO(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of MARIA and LOUISE.
MARISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Pronounced: ma-REE-za(Italian) ma-REE-sa(Spanish) mə-RIS-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.
MARISELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-ree-SEH-la
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of MARISA.
MARJE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAHRJ
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of MARJORIE.
MARTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Μαρθα(Greek) Марѳа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: MAHR-thə(English) MAR-ta(German)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Aramaic מַרְתָּא (marta') meaning "the lady, the mistress", feminine form of מַר (mar) meaning "master". In the New Testament this is the name of the sister of Lazarus and Mary of Bethany (who is sometimes identified with Mary Magdalene). She was a witness to Jesus restoring her dead brother to life.

The name was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation. A notable bearer was Martha Washington (1731-1802), the wife of the first American president George Washington. It is also borne by the media personality Martha Stewart (1941-).

MARTITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: mar-TEE-ta
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish diminutive of MARTA.
MAYA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIE-ə, MAY-ə
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Variant of MAIA (1). This name can also be given in reference to the Maya peoples, a Native American culture who built a great civilization in southern Mexico and Latin America.
MEADOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHD-o
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MEAGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHG-ən
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of MEGAN.
MEG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHG
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Medieval diminutive of MARGARET. It is now also used as a short form of the related name MEGAN.
MEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: MEHG-ən(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Welsh diminutive of MARGARET. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
MEGHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHG-ən
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of MEGAN.
MELETE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μελετη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "practice, exercise" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of meditation.
MÉLISANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
French form of MILLICENT used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play Pelléas et Mélisande (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).
MELODY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-dee
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the English word melody, which is derived (via Old French and Late Latin) from Greek μελος (melos) meaning "song" combined with αειδω (aeido) meaning "to sing".
MIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: MEE-ah(Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch) MEE-a(German) MEE-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MILLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, English
Pronounced: MIL-ee(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MISSY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIS-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of MELISSA. This is also a slang term meaning "young woman".
MISTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIS-tee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word misty, ultimately derived from Old English. The jazz song Misty (1954) by Erroll Garner may have helped popularize the name.
MONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: MAHN-i-kə(English) MAW-nee-ka(Italian) mo-NEE-ka(Romanian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
MONIQUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch
Pronounced: MAW-NEEK(French) mə-NEEK(English) mo-NEEK(Dutch)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of MONICA.
MUIRGEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "born of the sea" in Irish. In Irish legend this was the name of a woman (originally named Líban) who was transformed into a mermaid. After 300 years she was brought to shore, baptized, and transformed back into a woman.
MYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MIE-ə
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Variant of MAYA (2).
NATHÁLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Portuguese form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NEASA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYAS-a(Irish) NAS-a(Irish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning uncertain. In Irish legend she was the mother of Conchobhar, king of Ulster. According to some versions of the legend she was originally named Assa meaning "gentle", but was renamed Ni-assa "not gentle" after she sought to avenge the murders of her foster fathers.
NERYS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Perhaps an elaboration of Welsh ner "lord", with the intended meaning of "lady".
NEVAEH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: nə-VAY-ə
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000. Over the next few years it rapidly climbed the rankings in America, peaking at the 25th rank for girls in 2010.
NIAMH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYEE-əv(Irish) NYEEV(Irish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.
NIKOLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque, English
Pronounced: ni-KOL(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Basque form of NICOLE, as well as an English variant.
NIOBE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νιοβη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEE-O-BEH(Classical Greek) NIE-o-bee(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Niobe was the daughter of Tantalos, a king of Asia Minor. Because she boasted that she was superior to Leto, Leto's children Apollo and Artemis killed her 14 children with poison arrows. In grief, Niobe was turned to stone by Zeus.
NITA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of ANITA (1) and other names ending in nita.
NOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NO-və
Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.
ONEIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: o-NIE-də
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of a Native American tribe, perhaps meaning "standing rock".
ONÓRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Irish form of HONORA.
OPHELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Literature
Pronounced: o-FEEL-ee-ə(English) o-FEEL-yə(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek οφελος (ophelos) meaning "help, advantage". This name was probably created by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this, the name has been used since the 19th century.
PAIGE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAYJ
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PAMELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAM-ə-lə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of PAMELA.
PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφονη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονη (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
PORTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAWR-shə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name PORCIUS, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearean character.
PRINCESS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PRIN-sehs, prin-SEHS
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine equivalent of PRINCE.
PRISCILLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Pronounced: pri-SIL-ə(English) preesh-SHEEL-la(Italian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem The Courtship of Miles Standish (1858).
PRU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PROO
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of PRUDENCE.
RÁICHÉAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: RA-hehl
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Irish form of RACHEL.
RAPHAËLLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RA-FA-EHL
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of RAPHAEL.
REANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of RHIANNA.
RENAE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: rə-NAY
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
English variant of RENÉE.
RONALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: rah-NAWL-da
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of RONALD.
ROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSEANN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ro-ZAN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of ROSANNE.
ROSHEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of RÓISÍN.
SABRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə(English) sa-BREE-na(Italian) za-BREE-na(German) SA-BREE-NA(French)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque Comus (1634). It was popularized as a given name by Samuel A. Taylor's play Sabrina Fair (1953) and the movie adaptation that followed it the next year.
SADB
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: SAYV(Irish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "sweet, goodly" in Irish. In Irish mythology Sadb was the mother of Oisín.
SALACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Derived from Latin sal meaning "salt". This was the name of the Roman goddess of salt water.
SAMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from the name of the city of Samarra (in Iraq) or Samara (in Russia). The former appears in the title of the novel Appointment in Samarra (1934) by John O'Hara, which refers to an ancient Babylonian legend about a man trying to evade death. Alternatively, this name could be derived from the word for the winged seeds that grow on trees such as maples and elms.

The name received a boost in popularity after it was borne by the antagonist in the horror movie The Ring (2002).

SANDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAN-dee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of SANDY.
SAOIRSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic.
SAVANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the large grassy plain, ultimately deriving from the Taino (Native American) word zabana. It came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. It was revived in the 1980s by the movie Savannah Smiles (1982).
SELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Селена(Russian) Σεληνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: seh-LEH-na(Spanish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of SELENE. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
SELENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Σεληνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SEH-LEH-NEH(Classical Greek) si-LEE-nee(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, a Titan. She was sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
SERENITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: sə-REHN-ə-tee
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From the English word meaning "serenity, tranquility", ultimately from Latin serenus meaning "clear, calm".
SHAVONNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: shə-VAHN(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHEENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: SHEE-nə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of SÌNE. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).
SHERAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שֶׁאֱרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHEE-rə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "kinswoman" in Hebrew. This is the name of a daughter of Ephraim in the Old Testament.
SHERRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHR-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of SHERRY.
SHERRY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHR-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Before the 20th century this was probably from the Irish surname Ó Searraigh meaning "descendant of Searrach" (a name meaning "foal" in Gaelic). Later it may have been reinforced by the French word chérie meaning "darling", or the English word sherry, a type of fortified wine named from the Spanish town of Jerez. This name came into popular use during the 1920s, inspired by other similar-sounding names and by Collette's novels Chéri (1920, English translation 1929) and The Last of Chéri (1926, English translation 1932), in which it is a masculine name.
SHONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of SEONAG or SEÒNAID. Though unconnected, this is also the name of an ethnic group who live in southern Africa, mainly Zimbabwe.
SIÂN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SHAN
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Welsh form of JEANNE.
SISSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIS-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of SISSY.
SIVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SIEV
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of SADB.
SONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: SON-yə(English) SAWN-yə(English) SO-nya(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of SONYA.
SPRING
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPRING
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English springan "to leap, to burst forth".
STACEY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAY-see
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of STACY.
STACY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAY-see
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Either a diminutive of ANASTASIA, or else from a surname that was derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE. As a feminine name, it came into general use during the 1950s, though it had earlier been in use as a rare masculine name.
STAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.
STARLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR-lə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of STAR.
STEPHANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: STEHF-ə-nee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of STEPHANIE.
SUMMER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SUM-ər
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
SUSANITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: soo-sa-NEE-ta
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Spanish diminutive of SUSANNA.
SUSANNAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שׁוֹשַׁנָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: soo-ZAN-ə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Form of SUSANNA found in some versions of the Old Testament.
TABBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAB-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of TABITHA.
TAMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Hungarian, English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Тамара(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Macedonian) თამარა(Georgian)
Pronounced: tu-MA-rə(Russian) TA-ma-ra(Czech, Slovak) ta-MA-ra(Polish, Spanish, Italian) TAW-maw-raw(Hungarian) tə-MAR-ə(English) tə-MAHR-ə(English) TAM-ə-rə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Russian form of TAMAR. Russian performers such as Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978), Tamara Drasin (1905-1943), Tamara Geva (1907-1997) and Tamara Toumanova (1919-1996) introduced it to the English-speaking world. It was also borne by the Polish cubist painter Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980).
TAMELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Probably a blend of TAMARA and PAMELA. It first arose in the 1950s.
TAMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAM-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Elaborated form of the popular name syllable Tam, from names such as TAMARA or TAMIKA. It was popularized by Canadian singer Tamia Hill (1975-), who is known simply as Tamia.
TAMMI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAM-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of TAMMY.
TAMMY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TAM-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of TAMARA and other names beginning with Tam.
TANIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: tə-NEE-kə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Invented name, probably modeled on TAMIKA and influenced by TANYA.
TANYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Таня(Russian)
Pronounced: TAHN-yə(English) TAN-yə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Russian diminutive of TATIANA. It began to be used in the English-speaking world during the 1930s.
TASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, English
Other Scripts: Таша(Russian)
Pronounced: TAHSH-ə(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Short form of NATASHA.
TATIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Τατιανα(Greek) ტატიანა(Georgian) Татьяна(Russian) Татяна(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ta-TYA-na(Italian, Spanish, Polish, German) TAH-tee-ah-nah(Finnish) ta-TYAHN-ə(English) tu-TYA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TATIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
French form of TATIANA.
TAWNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TAW-nee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word, ultimately deriving from Old French tané, which means "light brown".
TEAGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TEE-gən
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
TEGAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Derived from Welsh teg meaning "fair".
TIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEE-ə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of names ending with tia. It has been suggested that its use since the 1950s is the result of the brand name for the coffee liqueur Tia Maria [1]. In the brand name, Tia is not a given name; rather, it means "aunt" in Spanish or Portuguese.
TIBBY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIB-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of TABITHA or THEOBALD.
TRACEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRAY-see
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine variant of TRACY.
TREASURE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: TREZH-ər
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word, ultimately from Greek θησαυρος (thesauros) meaning "treasure, collection".
TRINITY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRIN-i-tee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word Trinity, given in honour of the Christian belief that God has one essence, but three distinct expressions of being: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It has only been in use as a given name since the 20th century.
TRIXIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TRIK-see
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of BEATRIX.
TRUDIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: TROO-dee(English) TRUY-dee(Dutch)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of GERTRUDE.
TWILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TWIE-lə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown. Perhaps based on the English word twilight, or maybe from a Cajun pronunciation of French étoile "star" [1]. It came into use as an American given name in the late 19th century.
URSEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
German diminutive of URSULA.
VELVET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VEHL-vət
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the English word for the soft fabric. It became used as a given name after the main character in Enid Bagnold's book National Velvet (1935) and the movie (1944) and television (1960) adaptations.
VENETIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Originally this was probably a Latinized form of GWYNEDD or GWYNETH. It also coincides with the name of the city in Italy, called Venice in English. This name was borne by the celebrated beauty Venetia Stanley (1600-1633). Benjamin Disraeli used it in his novel entitled Venetia (1837).
VÉRÈNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of VERENA.
VEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly a diminutive of GENEVIEVE.
VI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of VIOLET.
VICKIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIK-ee
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of VICTORIA.
VIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: VYEHN
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From the French name of the capital city of Austria, known in English as Vienna.
VIOLET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VIE-lit, VIE-ə-lit
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
From the English word violet for the purple flower, ultimately derived from Latin viola. It was common in Scotland from the 16th century, and it came into general use as an English given name during the 19th century.
VIOLETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VYAW-LEHT
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
French form of VIOLET.
VIVIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEE-VYEHN
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
French form of VIVIANA.
WIEBKE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Frisian, German
Pronounced: VEEP-kə(German)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of WIEBE.
WINTER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
YADIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from an Arabic name. It has been used in Mexico since at least the 1940s [1], perhaps inspired by the Colombian actress Yadira Jiménez (1928-?), who performed in Mexican films beginning in 1946.
YAZMIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: YAZ-min
Personal note: I love this name I think it is a very lively and youthful name.
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of JASMINE.
YOLANDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: YAW-LAHND
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of YOLANDA. A notable bearer of the 15th century was Yolande of Aragon, who acted as regent for the French king Charles VII, her son-in-law. She was a supporter of Joan of Arc.
ZANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAN-drə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Short form of ALEXANDRA.
ZARA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: ZAHR-ə
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
English form of ZAÏRE. In England it came to public attention when Princess Anne gave it to her daughter in 1981. Use of the name may also be influenced by the trendy Spanish clothing retailer Zara.
ZOÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Hungarian
Pronounced: ZAW-EH(French)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
French and Hungarian form of ZOE.
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