Felie's Personal Name List

Aaju
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
From a childish pronunciation of the Greenlandic word angaju "older sibling of the same sex" (see Angaju).
Aajunnguaq
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "dear older sibling" in Greenlandic, from a combination of Aaju and the diminutive suffix nnguaq "sweet, dear, little".
Aamannguaq
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Derived from Greenlandic aama "glow, glowing coal" (cf. Aamaq) combined with the diminutive suffix nnguaq meaning "sweet, dear, little".
Aanarsi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic younger form of Ânarse.
Abukcheech
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Algonquin
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Means "mouse" in Algonquin.
Adsila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Cherokee
Personal remark: Cherokee
Means "blossom" in Cherokee.
Agpa
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "thick-billed Murre", which is a type of bird.
Agssile
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Aksel.
Ahiga
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From Navajo ahigą́ "they fight or combat each other; they kill each other" or ahígą́ "you fight or combat each other; you kill each other".
Aigssiarssuk
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "little Ptarmigan chick" in Greenlandic.
Akimiu
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "one who roams by the place under windows opposite the plank bed" in Greenlandic.
Alaappaat
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic younger form of Alãpât.
Alagsantere
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Alexander.
Ane
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
From Greenlandic ane meaning "big brother of a girl".
Angerlarneq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
South Greenlandic name meaning "she who has returned home", originally used as a nickname for someone named after a deceased family member, due to ritual name avoidance (taboos in mentioning names of deceased relatives, even when newborns had been named for them).
Anoki
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Sioux
Means "actor" in Sioux.
Antiman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Pronounced: an-tee-MAWN
Personal remark: Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche.
Aputsiaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Personal remark: Greenlandic
Means "snowflake" in Greenlandic.
Awinita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Cherokee
Personal remark: Cherokee
Means "fawn" in Cherokee.
Aylen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Personal remark: Mapuche
Possibly means either "happiness" or "clear" in Mapuche.
Balika
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Variant of Palikka.
Beatrine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
A blend of Beatrix and Trine.
Benjamini
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Benjamin.
Bibe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Phoebe.
Bitti
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Rare), Greenlandic
Variant form of Bitte or from the Swedish word bitti (short form of bittida) meaning "early" and Greenlandic younger spelling of Bíte.
Bolatta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Bolette.
Calfuray
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Pronounced: kəl-fi-RIE(Mapudungun) kal-foo-RIE(Spanish)
Personal remark: Mapuche
Means "violet (flower)" in Mapuche.
Citlali
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Personal remark: Nahuatl
Means "star" in Nahuatl.
Citlalli
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Personal remark: Nahuatl
Variant of Citlali.
Daavi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic (Rare)
Pronounced: DAH-vee
Greenlandic form of David.
Eelisi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic younger form of Êlise.
Eeriuffi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Herjulf.
Eikili
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic younger form of Eikile.
Ejnare
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Ejnar.
Eliaser
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Elieser.
Erneeraq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Derived from the Greenlandic word erneq meaning "son" and -eraq, a diminutive suffix.
Fare
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic, Ancient Germanic
Greenlandic short form of Farîtarik and Ancient Germanic variant of Faro.
Farîtaríka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Friederike and Frederika
Gaaba
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Variant of Kaapa.
Gaagii
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "raven" in Navajo.
Gad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Means "juniper tree" in Navajo.
Galilahi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Cherokee
Personal remark: Cherokee
Possibly means "attractive" in Cherokee.
Goyathlay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Apache
Personal remark: Apache
Means "one who yawns" in Apache. This was the real name of the Apache leader Geronimo (1829-1909), who fought against Mexican and American expansion into his territory.
Hansinguaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Variant of Hansinnguaq.
Hansinnguaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Possibly a combination of Hans and the Greenlandic word -nnguaq meaning "sweet; dear".
Hok'ee
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Means "abandoned" in Navajo.
Iara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Tupi
Personal remark: Tupi
Means "lady of the water", from Tupi y "water" and îara "lady, mistress". In Brazilian folklore this is the name of a beautiful river nymph who would lure men into the water. She may have been based upon earlier Tupi legends.
Igaliko
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "abandoned hearth, fireplace" in Greenlandic.
Iggiaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "throat" in Greenlandic.
Ijaakaaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic, Inuit Mythology
Means "moon" in Greenlandic. This name is also used in the Inuit Mythology.
Ikila
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Derived from the Greenlandic word iikkuluk meaning "how sweet you are".
Iluuna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Variant of Iluna.
Imajuik
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "she who is meek and quiet" in Greenlandic.
Imi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Presumably from Greenlandic imeq "water".
Inugpaluk
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Possibly a combination of Inuk with the Greenlandic suffix -paluk meaning "dear little".
Inuk
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "human being, man" in Greenlandic.
Inunnguaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic male name meaning ''sweet little person/man'', from inuk ''human being, man'' and nnguaq, a suffix meaning ''sweet, dear'',
Îsaiarse
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Isaiah.
Îsâja
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Short form of Îsaiarse.
Isaja
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic younger form of Isaia.
Isi
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Choctaw
Personal remark: Choctaw
Means "deer" in Choctaw.
Ivaana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic female form of Ivaaq. It was the number 1 female name in Greenland from 2001 to 2010.
Ivaasaq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "the one having been brooded" in Greenlandic.
Ivalu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "sinew; tendon; thread" in Greenlandic (Thule dialect).

It was used by Danish explorer and writer Peter Freuchen for the heroine of his novel 'Ivalu' (1930).

Ixchel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan Mythology, Indigenous American, Mayan
Pronounced: eesh-CHEHL(Mayan)
Personal remark: Maya
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
Means "rainbow lady" in Mayan. Ixchel was the Maya goddess of the earth, the moon, and medicine. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.
Jaci 2
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Tupi
Personal remark: Tupi
From Tupi îasy meaning "moon".
Jakkubiina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Jakobina.
Jatse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Variant of Jette.
Jenseraq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Possibly a combination of Jens and the Greenlandic suffix -raq meaning "young animal".
Juaannguaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Possibly a combination of Juât with the Greenlandic suffix -nnguaq meaning "sweet, dear".
Juât
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Ióan.
Justuse
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Justus.
Kaapa
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic younger form of Kâpa.
Kanik
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Derived from the Greenlandic words kanuk or kanik meaning "blood".
Kâpa
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Short form of Kâpriale.
Kâpriale
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic form of Gabriel.
Karala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "free woman" in Greenlandic.
Kimmernaq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "lingonberry" in Greenlandic.
Kisecawchuck
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Cree
Personal remark: Cree
Means "daystar" in Cree. This was the name of a 19th-century Cree chief.
Kulooq
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Diminutive of Taannakulooq.
Lalawethika
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Shawnee
Personal remark: Shawnee
Means "he makes noise" in Shawnee. This was another name of the Shawnee leader Tenskwatawa (1775-1836).
Mahpiya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Sioux
Personal remark: Sioux
Means "cloud, sky" in Dakota and Lakota. This is the first part of the names of the Dakota chief Mahpiya Wicasta (1780-1863), known as Cloud Man, and the Lakota chiefs Mahpiya Luta (1822-1909), known as Red Cloud, and Mahpiya Iyapato (1838-1905), known as Touch the Clouds.
Manumina
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "small piece of fur under the chin" in Greenlandic.
Miillaaraq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Possibly related to the Greenlandic word millalaarpoq "humming (of an insect)", combined with the diminutive suffix araq.
Miki
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of Miguel.
Minik
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Pronounced: meen-EEK
Greenlandic name meaning "blubber" (i.e., "viscid train oil which is being used as sealing for skin boats") or "earwax" (a mainstream interpretation). It seemed to rise in popularity in the late 20th century after several books were published about the controversy surrounding the Inughuit boy Minik (c.1890-1918), who was among a group brought by the explorer Robert E. Peary from their home in northwest Greenland to New York in 1897. This name is borne by Prince Vincent Frederik Minik Alexander of Denmark (2011-).
Moema
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Personal remark: Tupi
Means "lies" in Tupí. This name appears in the poem Caramuru (1781) by the Brazilian poet Santa Rita Durão.
Muktuk
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Inuit
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
An Inuit name. This is the name of a main character of the movie "The Journey Home".
Muscowequan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Cree
Personal remark: Cree
Means "hard quill" in Cree. This was the name of a 19th-century Cree chief.
Naaja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Younger form of Nauja.
Naajaraq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "gull hatchling" in Greenlandic, deriving from naaja meaning "gull; seagull" and raq meaning "cub; hatchling; baby animal".
Naalnish
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "he works" in Navajo.
Naasoq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Means "plant, flower" in Greenlandic.
Naasunnguaq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic female name meaning ''sweet little flower'', from naasoq meaning ''flower, plant'' and nnguaq a suffix meaning ''sweet, dear''.
Nahcomence
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cheyenne
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Means "bark" in Cheyenne.
Naira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Aymara
Personal remark: Aymara
Means "eye" in Aymara.
Nanuq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Inuit
Means "polar bear" in Inuktitut.
Nauja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Inuit, Greenlandic
Directly taken from Greenlandic nauja "gull, seagull".
Nayeli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Zapotec, Spanish (Mexican)
Personal remark: Zapotec
Possibly from Zapotec nadxiie lii meaning "I love you" or nayele' meaning "open".
Nina 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Quechua, Aymara
Personal remark: Quechua & Aymara
Means "fire" in Quechua and Aymara.
Nita 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Choctaw
Means "bear" in Choctaw.
Niyol
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "wind" in Navajo.
Nizhoni
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Navajo
Personal remark: Navajo
Means "beautiful" from Navajo nizhóní.
Nuvua
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Inuit
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
An Inuit name. This is the name of an Inuit woman in the movie: "The Journey Home".
Palíka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Variant of Farîtaríka.
Palikka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Greenlandic younger form of Palíka.
Pipaluk
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Means "nurse" in Greenlandic.
Quidel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "burning torch" in Mapuche.
Sacnicte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mayan
Means "white flower" in Mayan.
Sacnite
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mayan
Variant of Sacnicte.
Sani
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
Means "the old one" in Navajo.
Shikoba
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Choctaw
Means "feather" in Choctaw.
Shilah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Means "brother" in Navajo.
Shima
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 志麻, 志馬, 志真, 志万, 志茉, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SHEE-MAH
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From Japanese 志 (shi) meaning "purpose, will, determination, aspiration, ambition" combined with 麻 (ma) meaning "flax", 馬 (ma) meaning "horse", 真 (ma) meaning "real, genuine", 万 (ma) meaning "very many" or 茉 (ma) meaning "white jasmine". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Shiye
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "son" in Navajo.
Shizhe'e
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Means "father" in Navajo.
Sicheii
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "grandfather" in Navajo.
Sik'is
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Means "friend" in Navajo.
Taannakulooq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greenlandic
Other Scripts: Kulooq
Means "the rather huge one" in Greenlandic.
Takhi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Algonquin
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Means "cold" in Algonquin.
Tallulah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: tə-LOO-lə
Personal remark: Cree & Choctaw
Rating: 57% based on 6 votes
Popularly claimed to mean "leaping waters" in the Choctaw language, it may actually mean "town" in the Creek language. This is the name of waterfalls in Georgia. It was borne by American actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), who was named after her grandmother, who may have been named after the waterfalls.
Tamaya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Quechua
Personal remark: Quechua
Rating: 73% based on 7 votes
Means "in the center" in Quechua.
Tasunka
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Sioux
From Lakota tȟašuŋke meaning "his horse". This forms the first part of the name of Tasunka Witko (1840-1877), translated as Crazy Horse, a Lakota war leader.
Tasunke
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Sioux
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From Lakota Tȟašúŋke meaning "his horse". This is found in Tȟašúŋke Witkó, the original Lakota name of the Oglala leader known to the English-speaking world as Crazy Horse (c.1842-1877).
Tecumseh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Shawnee
Pronounced: tə-KUM-sə(English)
Means "panther passing across" in Shawnee. This was the name of a Shawnee leader who, with his brother Tenskwatawa, resisted European expansion in the early 19th century.
T'iis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Means "cottonwood" in Navajo.
Tlalli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "earth" in Nahuatl.
Tosahwi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "white knife" in Comanche. This name was borne by a 19th-century Penateka Comanche chief.
Tupaarnaq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Means "wild thyme" in Greenlandic.
Ubirajara
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Tupi
Pronounced: oo-bee-ra-ZHA-ru
Means "lord of the spear" in Tupi. This is the name of an 1874 novel by José de Alencar.
Uiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Tupi
Variant of Iara.
Waman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "eagle, falcon" in Quechua.
Wicapiwakan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sioux
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From Lakota wičháȟpi "star" and wakȟáŋ "sacred, holy".
Wickaninnish
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth
Pronounced: wik-ə-NIN-ish(English)
Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in the Nuu-chah-nulth (or Nootka) language. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.
Xiadani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Zapotec
Possibly means "the flower that arrived" in Zapotec.
Yazhi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Navajo
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Means "little" in Navajo.
Yoki
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hopi
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Means "rain" in Hopi.
Zafrina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Obscure
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Etymology uncertain.

It could be the feminine form of an Arabic name that sounds like Zafrin or a variant of Zeferina. The name can also be created by Stephenie Meyer for her book 'Breaking Dawn' (2008) where the character is an Indigenous American woman from Pantanal wetlands, Amazon, South America so there is a possibility that is actually an Indigenous name.

Zonda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Indigenous American
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Name of a specific type of fast, dry mountain wind in Argentina. The name comes from a valley in San Juan Province, Argentina. Both the valley and the wind are related to an Indigenous people Ullum-Zonda similar to the Huarpe people.
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