m4yb3_daijirou's Personal Name List

Dorian
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French, Romanian
Pronounced: DAWR-ee-ən(English) DAW-RYAHN(French)
Rating: 74% based on 39 votes
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians.
Briar
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər
Rating: 73% based on 41 votes
From the English word for the thorny plant.
Charles
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: CHAHRLZ(English) SHARL(French)
Rating: 71% based on 44 votes
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. His grandfather Charles Martel had also been a noted leader of the Franks. It was subsequently the name of several Holy Roman emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary (in various spellings). After Charlemagne, his name was adopted as a word meaning "king" in many Eastern European languages, for example Czech král, Hungarian király, Russian король (korol), and Turkish kral.

The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was borne by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as Great Expectations and A Tale of Two Cities, French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the Peanuts comic strip.

Niamh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYEE-əv(Irish) NYEEV(Irish)
Rating: 69% based on 35 votes
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, son of Fionn.
Everett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHV-ə-rit, EHV-rit
Rating: 68% based on 34 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Everard.
Hollis
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-is
Rating: 62% based on 29 votes
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
Valencia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ba-LEHN-sya(Latin American Spanish) ba-LEHN-thya(European Spanish) və-LEHN-see-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 30 votes
From the name of cities in Spain and Venezuela, both derived from Latin valentia meaning "strength, vigour".
Sheridan
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SHEHR-i-dən
Rating: 59% based on 34 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The name Sirideán means "searcher" in Gaelic.
Leandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dra(Spanish)
Rating: 59% based on 33 votes
Feminine form of Leander.
Noel
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: NOL, NO-əl
Rating: 59% based on 33 votes
English form of Noël or Noëlle (rarely).
Drew
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DROO
Rating: 58% based on 32 votes
Short form of Andrew.
Sibyl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIB-əl
Rating: 57% based on 27 votes
From Greek Σίβυλλα (Sibylla), meaning "prophetess, sibyl". In Greek and Roman legend the sibyls were female prophets who practiced at different holy sites in the ancient world. In later Christian theology, the sibyls were thought to have divine knowledge and were revered in much the same way as the Old Testament prophets. Because of this, the name came into general use in the Christian world during the Middle Ages. The Normans imported it to England, where it was spelled both Sibyl and Sybil. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps helped by Benjamin Disraeli's novel Sybil (1845).
Momiji
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 紅葉, 黄葉, 椛(Japanese Kanji) もみじ(Japanese Hiragana) モミジ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: MO-MEE-JEE
Rating: 57% based on 15 votes
This name can be used as 紅葉 or 黄葉, referring to the autumn/fall colours and the leaves changing colour. It can also be used as 椛 (kaba, momiji) which is a kokuji character (a character that is made and used in Japan only). 椛 means "birch, maple".

Although used more often on females, this name is also used on boys (albeit rarely). One fictional male bearer of this name is Momiji Sōma (草摩 紅葉) who appeared in the Japanese anime, Fruits Basket.

Juna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, English (Rare), Dutch
Pronounced: YOO-nah(German) JOO-nah(English)
Rating: 57% based on 32 votes
Feminine form of Junius or variant of Juno, June, Junia or Djuna. Also a south Slavic name and thus a feminine form of masculine names like Junij, Junii, Juno, Junian or Junak. The Slavic element "jun/iun" means "young". The name has been used as a given name since 1919.
Kane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: (Japanese Kanji) か子, か禰(Kanji/Hiragana) かね(Japanese Hiragana) カネ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: KAH-NE
Personal remark: Old Japanese name
Rating: 56% based on 18 votes
This name can be used as 兼 (ken, kane.ru, -kane.ru) meaning "concurrently, combine" or か, a phonetic character representing ka, with 子 (shi, su, tsu, ko, -ko, -ne) meaning "sign of the rat (1st sign of the Chinese zodiac)" or 禰 (dei, nai, ne) meaning "ancestral shrine."

Kane was slightly uncommon in the early part of the Edo period (1603-1838), though it became popular in the middle and latter part of that period and in the Meiji period (1868-1912). However, the name's popularity slowly decreased by then and by the Taishō period (1912-1926), the name became uncommon to use.

Kenneth
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Pronounced: KEHN-əth(English)
Rating: 55% based on 37 votes
Anglicized form of both Coinneach and Cináed. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his 1825 novel The Talisman [1]. A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote The Wind in the Willows.
Rosario
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ro-SA-ryo(Spanish) ro-ZA-ryo(Italian)
Rating: 55% based on 30 votes
Means "rosary", and is taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora del Rosario meaning "Our Lady of the Rosary". This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Italian.
Hatsu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 初, 波津(Japanese Kanji) はつ(Japanese Hiragana) ハツ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: HAHTS, HAH-TSUU
Personal remark: Old Japanese name
Rating: 54% based on 17 votes
This name can be used as 初 (sho, ui-, -so.meru, -zo.me, haji.me, haji.mete, hatsu, hatsu-) meaning "beginning, first time" or 波津 with 波 (ha, nami) meaning "billows, Poland, waves" and 津 (shin, tsu) meaning "ferry, harbour, haven, port."

When used as 初, it is, according to Suzuki Sakaye, usually used as the name of the first daughter.

Hatsu was very popular in the Edo period (1603-1868), but by the latter part of the Meiji period (1868-1912) it was dropping down in popularity and by the Taishō period/era (1912-1926), it became uncommon.

Alandria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 54% based on 37 votes
Contracted form of Alexandria.
Elaine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-LAYN(English) ee-LAYN(English)
Rating: 53% based on 32 votes
From an Old French form of Helen. It appears in Arthurian legend; in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation Le Morte d'Arthur Elaine was the daughter of Pelleas, the lover of Lancelot, and the mother of Galahad. It was not commonly used as an English given name until after the appearance of Tennyson's Arthurian epic Idylls of the King (1859).
Morrigan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 53% based on 30 votes
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
Matsuri
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 祭, 茉莉, 万都梨, 真津梨(Japanese Kanji) まつり(Japanese Hiragana) マツリ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: MA-TSOO-RYEE
Rating: 53% based on 29 votes
This name can be used as 祭 (sai, matsu.ru, matsu(.)ri) meaning "festival" or 茉莉, which refers to the Arabian jasmine, made up of 茉 (batsu, ma, matsu) and 莉 (rai, ri, rei).
Examples of Matsuri with 3 kanji include 万都梨 and 真津梨 with 万 (ban, man, yorozu, ma) meaning "ten thousand," 都 (shi, to, miyako, tsu) meaning "capital," 真 (shin, ma-, makoto) meaning "real, true," 津 (shin, tsu) meaning "harbour, port" and 梨 (ri, nashi) meaning "pear."
Mai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovene
Pronounced: MAH:-ee
Rating: 53% based on 24 votes
Variant of Maj.
Wendy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHN-dee
Rating: 52% based on 31 votes
In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name Gwendolen and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed". The name only became common after Barrie's play ran.
Leslie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHZ-lee, LEHS-lee
Rating: 51% based on 30 votes
From a Scottish surname that was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
Adelais
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 50% based on 42 votes
Shortened form of Adalheidis.
Brook
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRUWK
Rating: 50% based on 40 votes
From an English surname that denoted one who lived near a brook.
Bryn
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: BRIN(English)
Rating: 50% based on 36 votes
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. It is now used as a feminine name as well.
Brett
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BREHT
Rating: 49% based on 35 votes
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
Silver
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SIL-vər
Rating: 48% based on 32 votes
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
Laurie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: LAWR-ee(English) LOW-ree(Dutch)
Rating: 48% based on 30 votes
Diminutive of Laura or Laurence 1.
Lindsey
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: LIN-zee(English)
Rating: 47% based on 26 votes
Variant of Lindsay.
Iori
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 庵, 一織, 伊織, 衣織, 依織, 唯織, 惟織, 衣緒里, 衣央里(Japanese Kanji) いおり(Japanese Hiragana) イオリ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: EE-O-REE
Rating: 47% based on 31 votes
This name can be used as 庵 (an, iori, io) meaning "hermitage, retreat" (masculine) or it can combine 一 (ichi, hito.tsu, i) meaning "one," 伊 (i, kare) meaning "that one," 衣 (i, e, kinu, koromo) meaning "clothes, garment," 依 (i, e, yo.ru) meaning "depend, rely," 唯 (i, yui, tada) meaning "merely, only, simply, solely" or 惟 (i, yui, omo.uni, kore) meaning "consider, think" with 織 (o.ri) meaning "fabric, weave."
Rarer examples of Iori include 衣緒里 and 衣央里 with 緒 (sho, cho, itoguchi, o) meaning "beginning, cord, strap," 央 (ou, o, e, ya) meaning "centre, middle" and 里 (ri, sato) meaning "parent's home, ri (unit of distance - equal to 3.927 km), village."

Regarding 伊織, it belongs as an 'azuma hyakkan' (東百官) name, in which they are like hyakkanna (百官名), a court rank-style name that samurai used to announce oneself and give himself authority, but come from the names of government offices in the Kantō region.

The combinations, apart from the first one and the ones with 3 kanji, are unisex. The first combination is mainly used on males (albeit rarely) and the combinations w/ 3 kanji are used on females (albeit rarely).

Iori (庵 & 伊織) is also used as a surname.

Kazuki
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 一輝, 一樹, 和希, 和樹, etc.(Japanese Kanji) かずき(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KA-ZOO-KYEE
Rating: 47% based on 30 votes
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "one" or (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness", (ki) meaning "hope" or (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of kanji characters.
Bertrand
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: BEHR-TRAHN(French) BUR-trənd(English)
Rating: 46% based on 34 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements beraht meaning "bright" and rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". From an early date it has been confused with Bertram and the two names have merged to some degree. A famous bearer was English philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970).
Sona 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: सोना(Hindi)
Rating: 45% based on 26 votes
Means "gold" in Hindi, derived from Sanskrit सुवर्ण (suvarna) meaning literally "good colour".
Everard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 44% based on 27 votes
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
Élinda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 44% based on 28 votes
French elaborated variant of Élina.
Elian
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Rating: 44% based on 26 votes
Dutch variant of names beginning with Eli, such as Elijah or Elisabeth.
Havilah
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: חֲוִילָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: HAV-i-lə(English)
Rating: 44% based on 28 votes
Probably means "to dance, to circle, to twist" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is both a place name and a masculine personal name.
Arley
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-lee
Rating: 44% based on 36 votes
Variant of Arlie.
Lesley
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LEHZ-lee, LEHS-lee
Rating: 44% based on 25 votes
Variant of Leslie.
Emlyn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 43% based on 30 votes
Probably from the name of an ancient region in Wales, its name meaning "around the valley". It has also been suggested that this name is a Welsh form of Aemilianus (see Emiliano).
Yannick
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Breton, French
Pronounced: YA-NEEK(French)
Rating: 43% based on 28 votes
Diminutive of Yann or Yanna 2.
Roan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian
Rating: 43% based on 26 votes
Variant of Ronne.
Eriko
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 恵理子, 恵里子, 恵利子, 絵里子, 絵理子, 絵利子, 江里子, 江理子, 江利子, 栄理子, 栄利子, 栄里子(Japanese Kanji) えり子(Kanji/Hiragana) えりこ(Japanese Hiragana) エリコ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: E-ṘEE-KO
Rating: 43% based on 30 votes
This name combines 恵 (e, kei, megu.mi, megu.mu) meaning "blessing, favour, grace, kindness", 絵 (e, kai) meaning "drawing, picture, painting, sketch", 江 (kou, e) meaning "bay, inlet" or 栄 (ei, you, e, saka.eru, ha.e, ha.eru, -ba.e) meaning "flourish, glory, honour, prosper" & 理 (ri, kotowari) meaning "justice, logic, reason, truth", 里 (ri, sato) meaning "parent's home, ri (unit of distance - equal to 3.927 km), village" or 利 (ri, ki.ku) meaning "advantage, benefit, profit, gain" with 子 (shi, su, tsu, ko, -ko, ne) meaning "child."

This name can also be used as えり子 with two phonetic characters making up Eri connecting with 子.

Lei 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: LAY
Rating: 43% based on 27 votes
Means "flowers, lei, child" in Hawaiian.
Alycia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ə-LEE-shə, ə-LEE-see-ə
Rating: 43% based on 35 votes
Variant of Alicia.
Ricarda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, German
Pronounced: ree-KAR-dha(Spanish) ree-KAR-da(German)
Rating: 42% based on 27 votes
Spanish and German feminine form of Richard.
Micaiah
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מִיכָיָהוּ, מִיכָיְהוּ, מִיכָיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mie-KAY-ə(English) mi-KIE-ə(English)
Rating: 42% based on 31 votes
Means "who is like Yahweh?" in Hebrew. This name occurs in the Old Testament in a variety of Hebrew spellings, belonging to both males and females. It is the full name of Micah, both the prophet and the man from the Book of Judges. As a feminine name it belongs to the mother of King Abijah (at 2 Chronicles 13:2), though her name is listed as Maacah in other passages.
Iseul
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Korean
Other Scripts: 이슬(Korean Hangul)
Pronounced: EE-SUL
Rating: 42% based on 26 votes
Means "dew" in Korean.
Bernice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: Βερνίκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: bər-NEES(English)
Rating: 42% based on 34 votes
Contracted form of Berenice. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II.
Joni 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-nee
Rating: 41% based on 27 votes
Diminutive of Joan 1.
Hayato
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 隼人, etc.(Japanese Kanji) はやと(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: HA-YA-TO
Rating: 41% based on 28 votes
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" (using a nanori reading) and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
Miller
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 41% based on 29 votes
Transferred use of the surname Miller.
Torryn
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 28 votes
Variant and feminine form of Torin.
Andrée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-DREH
Rating: 40% based on 35 votes
French feminine form of Andrew.
Hideaki
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 英明, etc.(Japanese Kanji) ひであき(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KHEE-DEH-A-KYEE
Rating: 40% based on 28 votes
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, fine" and (aki) meaning "bright", as well as other combinations of kanji.
Linda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: LIN-də(English) LIN-da(German, Dutch, Czech) LEEN-da(Italian) LEEN-DA(French) LEEN-dah(Finnish) LEEN-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 40% based on 25 votes
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful". In the English-speaking world this name experienced a spike in popularity beginning in the 1930s, peaking in the late 1940s, and declining shortly after that. It was the most popular name for girls in the United States from 1947 to 1952.
Sianne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare), Indonesian, Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: sie-AN(English) see-AN(English)
Rating: 40% based on 25 votes
Ryou
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 涼, 遼, 諒, etc.(Japanese Kanji) りょう(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: RYO
Rating: 40% based on 27 votes
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji or or (see Ryō).
Robbie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHB-ee
Rating: 40% based on 25 votes
Diminutive of Robert or Roberta.
Lowell
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LO-əl
Rating: 39% based on 23 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a Norman French nickname, from lou "wolf" and a diminutive suffix. The surname was borne by American poet and satirist James Russell Lowell (1819-1891).
Einar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Icelandic, Swedish, Danish, Estonian
Pronounced: IE-nar(Norwegian) AY-nar(Icelandic, Swedish)
Rating: 39% based on 29 votes
From the Old Norse name Einarr, derived from the elements ein "one, alone" and arr "warrior". This name shares the same roots as einherjar, the word for the slain warriors in Valhalla.
Everild
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical)
Rating: 39% based on 29 votes
Latinized form of Eoforhild. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
Sono
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: (Japanese Kanji) その(Japanese Hiragana) ソノ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: SO-NO
Personal remark: Old Japanese name
Rating: 39% based on 15 votes
This name is used as 園 (en, sono) meaning "farm, garden, park, yard."

It's not known how popular Sono was in the early and middle part of the Edo period (1603-1868), but it was moderately popular in the latter part of that period. By the Meiji period (1868-1912), it dropped down in popularity, becoming uncommon by the end of that period and in the Taishō period (1912-1926).

Reba
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REE-bə
Rating: 39% based on 29 votes
Short form of Rebecca.
Maralyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAR-ə-lin, MAR-lin
Rating: 39% based on 28 votes
Variant of Marilyn.
Darragh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 38% based on 31 votes
Variant of Dara 1 or Anglicized form of Dáire.
Marlyn
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAR-lin, MAHR-lin
Rating: 38% based on 24 votes
Variant of Marilyn (feminine) or Marlin (masculine).
Bora 3
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Korean
Other Scripts: 보라(Korean Hangul)
Pronounced: PO-RA
Rating: 38% based on 35 votes
Means "purple" in Korean.
Kotobuki
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese (Rare)
Other Scripts: 寿(Japanese Kanji) ことぶき(Japanese Hiragana) コトブキ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: KO-TO-BOO-KYEE
Rating: 38% based on 31 votes
From 寿 (kotobuki) meaning "congratulations; longevity," derived, via a sound shift, from a combination of 言 (koto) meaning "word" and continuative/stem form of obsolete verb 祝く (hoku) meaning "to pray for a good outcome" (compare Kotohogi). It originally referred to saying something in prayer for a good outcome, then to saying something favourable in hope for a felicitous or auspicious occasion, shifting to its present meaning.

One bearer of this name is manga artist and actor, Kotobuki Shiriagari (しりあがり 寿) (1958-), born Toshiki Mochidzuki (望月 寿城).

This name is very rarely used and is more commonly used as a surname.

Alickina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 38% based on 35 votes
Feminine form of Alick.
Linza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 38% based on 29 votes
Old Germanic form of Linda.
Stavroula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Σταυρούλα(Greek)
Rating: 38% based on 28 votes
Feminine form of Stavros.
Jaclyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK-lin
Rating: 37% based on 27 votes
Contracted variant of Jacqueline.
Innes
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 37% based on 26 votes
Anglicized form of Aonghus, also used as a feminine name.
Wendell
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WEHN-dəl
Rating: 37% based on 28 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Wendel.
Darrena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-ən-a, DER-ən-a, da-REE-na, də-REE-na, da-RAY-na, də-RAY-na
Rating: 36% based on 31 votes
Feminine form of Darren.
Flannán
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 36% based on 26 votes
Diminutive of Flann.
Garvan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: GAHR-van
Rating: 36% based on 26 votes
Anglicized form of Garbhán.
Torrance
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TAWR-ənts
Rating: 36% based on 26 votes
Variant of Torrence.
Shinobu
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) しのぶ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SHEE-NO-BOO
Rating: 36% based on 27 votes
From Japanese (shinobu) meaning "endurance, patience", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations having the same pronunciation.
Malaurie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Modern)
Pronounced: MA-LO-RHEE
Rating: 35% based on 15 votes
French variant of Mallory.
Branda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRAN-də
Rating: 35% based on 30 votes
Perhaps a variant of Brandy or a feminine form of Brand.
Kenau
Gender: Feminine
Usage: West Frisian, Dutch (Rare)
Rating: 34% based on 14 votes
The first element of this name is derived from Germanic kuni meaning "family, kin, race, kind", which is not to be confused with Germanic kuoni meaning "brave". The second element is derived from either Germanic wîh meaning "holy" or Germanic wîg meaning "warrior."

A famous bearer of this name was Kenau Simonsdochter Hasselaer (1526–1588), a Dutch wood merchant from the city of Haarlem, who became a legendary folk hero for her fearless defense of the city against the Spanish invaders during the siege of Haarlem in 1573.

Joey
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JO-ee
Rating: 33% based on 27 votes
Diminutive of Joseph. It is occasionally used as a feminine diminutive of Josephine or Johanna.
Ryuunosuke
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 竜之介, 龍之介, 隆之介, etc.(Japanese Kanji) りゅうのすけ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: RYOO-NO-SOO-KEH, RYOO-NO-SKEH
Rating: 33% based on 26 votes
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 竜之介 or 龍之介 or 隆之介 (see Ryūnosuke).
Dori
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: דּוֹרִי(Hebrew)
Rating: 33% based on 30 votes
Means "my generation" in Hebrew.
Rocío
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ro-THEE-o(European Spanish) ro-SEE-o(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 32% based on 25 votes
Means "dew" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary María del Rocío meaning "Mary of the Dew".
Laverne
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-VURN
Rating: 32% based on 26 votes
From a surname that was derived from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder". It is sometimes associated with the Roman goddess Laverna or the Latin word vernus "of spring".
Royce
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROIS
Rating: 32% based on 26 votes
From a surname that was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of Rose.
Remei
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: rə-MAY
Rating: 32% based on 22 votes
Means "remedy" in Catalan, a Catalan equivalent of Remedios.
Toranosuke
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 寅之助, 虎之介(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: TO-ṘAH-NO-SKE
Rating: 32% based on 29 votes
From the Japanese kanji 寅 (tora) meaning "Tiger (zodiac sign)" or 虎 (tora) meaning "tiger" combined with 之 (no), a possessive, and 助 (suke) meaning "assistente" or 介 (suke) meaning "concern oneself with; mediate".

Other kanji combinations are possible.

Miu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 美羽, etc.(Japanese Kanji) みう(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: MEE-OO
Rating: 32% based on 27 votes
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (u) meaning "feather". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Stav
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: סתָו, סתיו(Hebrew)
Rating: 32% based on 25 votes
Means "autumn" in Hebrew.
Diễm
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Vietnamese
Pronounced: ZEEM, YEEM
Rating: 31% based on 27 votes
From Sino-Vietnamese 艷 (diễm) meaning "beautiful, gorgeous" or 琰 (diễm) meaning "jewel, gem".
Marino
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 毬乃, 茉莉乃, 茉莉野, 真梨乃, 真梨野, 真里乃, 真理乃, 麻里乃, 麻莉乃, 麻莉野, 万莉乃, 万梨乃, 万理乃, 舞里乃(Japanese Kanji) まりの(Japanese Hiragana) マリノ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: MAH-ṘEE-NO
Personal remark: Japanese name
Rating: 31% based on 27 votes
This name is used as either 毬乃 or one of the 3 kanji combinations shown above. The kanji used are 毬 (kyuu, iga, mari) meaning "ball," 茉莉 (ma(tsu)ri) meaning "jasmine," made up of 茉 (batsu, ma, matsu) and 莉 (rai, ri, rei), 真 (shin, ma, ma-, makoto) meaning "real, truth," 梨 (ri, nashi) meaning "pear tree," 里 (ri, sato) meaning "parent's home, ri (unit of distance - equal to 3.927 km), village," 理 (ri, kotowari) meaning "logic, justice, reason, truth," 麻 (ma, maa, asa) meaning "flax, hemp," 万 (ban, man, yorozu, ma) meaning "ten thousand", 舞 (bu, mai, ma.u, -ma.u) meaning "circle, dance, flit, wheel," 乃 (ai, dai, nai, no, sunawa.chi, nanji, no) meaning "accordingly, from, wherefore" and 野 (sho, ya, no, no-) meaning "field, plain."

This name is unrelated to the masculine name Marino, which has a wholly different origin.

Kennetha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: KEN-ith-ə
Rating: 31% based on 29 votes
Feminine form of Kenneth.
Dederica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Archaic), Spanish (Archaic), English (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: de-de-REE-kah(Italian, Spanish) DE-de-reek-ə(English) DE-de-ree-ka(English) day-də-REE-kah(Dutch) day-DAY-ree-kah(Dutch)
Rating: 31% based on 32 votes
Feminine form of Dederico (Italian and Spanish), English variant of Dedericka and Dutch variant of Diederika.
Aymone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 30% based on 17 votes
Feminine form of Aymon.

A well-known bearer of this name is Anne-Aymone Giscard d'Estaing (b. 1933), the wife of the former French president Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (b. 1926).

Lyndsay
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LIN-zee
Rating: 29% based on 25 votes
Variant of Lindsay.
Bryarly
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ər-lee
Rating: 29% based on 32 votes
Variant of Brierley.
Dederick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 29% based on 30 votes
Older form of Derek.
Wayra
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Quechua
Rating: 28% based on 26 votes
Means "wind" in Quechua.
Kinborough
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 28% based on 27 votes
Middle English form of Cyneburg.
Reyes
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: REH-yehs
Rating: 28% based on 26 votes
Means "kings" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, La Virgen de los Reyes, meaning "The Virgin of the Kings". According to legend, the Virgin Mary appeared to King Ferdinand III of Castile and told him his armies would defeat those of the Moors in Seville.
Bertie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUR-tee
Rating: 28% based on 34 votes
Diminutive of Albert, Herbert and other names containing bert (often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright").
Bow
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BO
Rating: 28% based on 32 votes
A variant of Bo, probably influenced by the word "bow" which is used to shoot with arrows or by the word "bowtie", or a diminutive of Rainbow.
Lonnie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAHN-ee
Rating: 26% based on 25 votes
Short form of Alonzo and other names containing the same sound.
Deryl
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 25% based on 30 votes
Variant of Daryl.
Deniz
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Rating: 25% based on 31 votes
Means "sea" in Turkish.
Joncy
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JON-see, ZHON-see
Rating: 21% based on 26 votes
Seije
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian
Pronounced: SIE-yə
Rating: 20% based on 21 votes
This name is used as a short form of Germanic names that begin with the element sigu meaning "victory."
Sjo
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: SHO:
Rating: 20% based on 22 votes
Shortening of Jozef (male) or Johanna (female).
Sarchel
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAHR-chəl
Rating: 20% based on 25 votes
Tonny
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Central African (?)
Pronounced: Ton-nee(Central African)
Rating: 19% based on 28 votes
Variant of Toni, a short form of Anthony and Antonia. Notable bearers include Angolan-Dutch soccer player Tonny Vilhena, Danish entrepreneur Tonny Sorenson, and the title character of the 1962 Norwegian film 'Tonny'.
Umon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 右門, 宇門(Japanese Kanji) うもん(Japanese Hiragana) ウモン(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: UU-MON
Rating: 18% based on 23 votes
This name combines 右 (u, yuu, migi) meaning "right" or 宇 (u) meaning "eaves, heaven, house, roof" with 門 (mon, kado, to) meaning "gate."

One fictional bearer of this name is Umon Kondō, the Edo period constable and main character in the jidaigeki film series, Umon Torimonochō (右門捕物帖).

In modern times, it's rarely given to boys, if given at all.

Umon is also used as a surname.

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