lezginkas's Personal Name List

ABDULATIP
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino, Maguindanao, Dagestani, Avar, Kumyk, Indonesian (Rare)
Other Scripts: ГӀабдулатӀип(Avar) Абдулатип(Russian)
Pronounced: ub-duw-lu-TYEEP(Russian)
Maguindanao, Dagestani and Indonesian form of ABD AL-LATIF.
ADITYA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Nepali, Indonesian
Other Scripts: आदित्य(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali) ആദിത്യ(Malayalam) ಆದಿತ್ಯ(Kannada) ఆదిత్య(Telugu) ஆதித்த(Tamil)
Means "belonging to ADITI" in Sanskrit. This is a name for the seven (or eight) Hindu gods who are the children of Aditi. It is also another name for the sun god Surya.
ADNAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian, Urdu
Other Scripts: عدنان(Arabic, Urdu)
Pronounced: ‘ad-NAN(Arabic)
Means "settler" in Arabic. According to tradition, Adnan was an ancestor of the Prophet Muhammad and the northern Arabian tribes.
AFAKO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ossetian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Афӕхъо(Ossetian)
Pronounced: u-fu-KO(Russian)
Derived from Persian آفاق (afagh) meaning "horizons, world". Alternately, it may be a form of ATHANASIUS via Russian Афанасий (Afanasiy).
AFRAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أفراح(Arabic)
Means "joys, mirths, celebrations" in Arabic, the plural of فَرَح (faraḥ) meaning "happiness, joy".
AFRIZAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: a-FREE-zal
Derived from Arabic أفضل ('afdhal) meaning "best, highest, most outstanding".
AISYAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: IE-shah
Indonesian form of AISHA.
AIZHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Айжан(Kazakh) ايجان(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: ie-ZHAHN
Means "moon soul" from Kazakh ай (ay) meaning "moon" and жан (zhan) meaning "soul".
AIZHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Айжана(Kazakh, Kyrgyz) ايجانا(Kazakh Arabic)
Variant of AIZHAN.
ALIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Uyghur
Other Scripts: عليم(Arabic) ئالىم(Uyghur)
Pronounced: ‘a-LEEM(Arabic)
Means "learned, expert, scholar" in Arabic.
ALSU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tatar
Other Scripts: Алсу(Tatar)
Pronounced: al-SOO(Tatar) ul-SOO(Russian)
Means "scarlet water" or "rose-colored water" from Tatar ал (al) meaning "scarlet, pink" and су (su) meaning "water".
AMIHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino, Tagalog
Means "north wind, winter storm" in Tagalog.
AMMAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عمّار(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘am-MAR
Means "long-lived", from Arabic عَمَرَ ('amara) meaning "to live long".
AMRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عمرو(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘AMR(Arabic) ‘AHM-reh(Egyptian Arabic)
Alternate transcription of AMR.
ANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Ана(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) ანა(Georgian)
Pronounced: A-na(Spanish, Romanian) U-nu(Portuguese) AH-NAH(Georgian)
Form of ANNA used in various languages.
ANAR (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Анар(Kazakh)
Pronounced: ah-NAHR
Variant of ANARA.
ANAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أنس(Arabic)
Pronounced: A-nas
Means "friendliness" in Arabic. This was the name of one of the Prophet Muhammad's companions.
ANIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أنيس(Arabic)
Pronounced: a-NEES
Means "friendly, friend" in Arabic.
ANTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Russian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Slovene, Slovak, Macedonian, Croatian, Romanian, Estonian, Finnish, English
Other Scripts: Антон(Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AN-ton(German) un-TON(Russian) AHN-tawn(Dutch) ahn-TON(Ukrainian) an-TON(Slovene) AHN-ton(Finnish) AN-tahn(English)
Form of Antonius (see ANTHONY) used in various languages.
ANZOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian, Chechen
Other Scripts: ანზორ(Georgian) Анзор(Chechen)
Possibly derived from the Georgian noble title აზნაური (aznauri), ultimately from Middle Persian aznawar meaning "noble".
ARI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦄꦫꦶ(Javanese)
Pronounced: A-ree(Javanese, Indonesian)
Personal note: Indonesian name
Means "younger sibling" in Javanese.
ARIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: آرین(Persian)
Pronounced: aw-ree-YAN
Personal note: Persian name
Variant of ARYA (1).
ARIYA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Thai, Indonesian
Other Scripts: อริยา, อริยะ(Thai)
Pronounced: a-ree-YA(Thai) a-REE-ya(Indonesian)
Personal note: masculine
Thai and Indonesian form of ARYA (1). It is more commonly feminine in Thailand while is it more often used as a masculine name in Indonesia.
ARWA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أروى(Arabic)
Pronounced: AR-wa
Possibly means "mountain goats" in Arabic. This name was borne by some relatives of the Prophet Muhammad. It was also the name of a 12th-century queen of Yemen.
ATIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: عطية(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘a-TEE-yah(Arabic) a-TEE-ah(Indonesian) a-TEE-yah(Indonesian)
Arabic alternate transcription of ATIYA as well as the Indonesian and Malay form.
AYA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 彩, 綾, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-YA
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design", or other kanji characters with the same pronunciation.
AYNUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani, Uyghur
Other Scripts: ئاينۇر(Uyghur)
Means "moon light" in Turkish, Azerbaijani and Uyghur, ultimately from Turkic ay meaning "moon" and Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light".
AYU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Javanese, Balinese
Other Scripts: ꦲꦪꦸ(Javanese) ᬳᬬᬸ᭟(Balinese)
Pronounced: A-yoo(Indonesian, Javanese, Balinese)
Means "beautiful, pretty" in Javanese and Balinese.
AZAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Indian, Hindi, Bengali, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Kurdish
Other Scripts: آزاد(Persian) आज़ाद(Hindi) আজাদ(Bengali) ئازاد(Kurdish Sorani)
Pronounced: aw-ZAWD(Persian)
Means "free" in Persian. This word has derivatives in several other languages, such as Hindi and Turkish.
AZIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Circassian
Other Scripts: Азидэ(Eastern Circassian)
Means "lioness" from Arabic أَسَد (ʾasad) meaning "lion".
BALTABEK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Балтабек(Kazakh) بالتابەك(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: bahl-tah-BYEHK
From Kazakh балта (balta) meaning "axe, hatchet" combined with the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master".
BALZHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Балжан(Kazakh) بالجان(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: bahl-ZHAHN
Means "sweet soul" or "honey soul" from Kazakh бал (bal) meaning "honey" and жан (zhan) meaning "soul".
BASHLAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chechen (Rare)
Other Scripts: Башлам(Chechen)
From BASHLAM, the Chechen name for Mount Kazbek.
BASSAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: بسّام(Arabic)
Pronounced: bas-SAM
Means "smiling" in Arabic, from the root بَسَمَ (basama) meaning "to smile".
BASUKI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦧꦱꦸꦏꦶ(Javanese)
Pronounced: ba-SOO-kee(Indonesian)
Means "healthy, flourishing" in Javanese.
BEKZAT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Бекзат(Kazakh, Kyrgyz) بەكزات(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: byehk-ZAHT(Kazakh)
Personal note: masculine
Derived from the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master" combined with Persian زاده (zadeh) meaning "offspring". It is a unisex name in Kazakhstan while it is solely masculine in Kyrgyzstan.
BENCHAKANLAYANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Thai (Rare)
Other Scripts: เบญจกัลยาณี(Thai)
Pronounced: behn-cha-kan-la-ya-NEE
Means "woman of fivefold beauty" in Thai, from เบญจ (bencha) meaning "five, fivefold" and กัลยาณี (kanlayani) meaning "beautiful girl, belle". In Buddhism this term refers to a woman with five favourable attributes: beautiful hair, beautiful teeth, beautiful flesh, beautiful skin and beauty at any age.
BESLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chechen, Ingush, Circassian, Abkhaz, Karachay-Balkar
Other Scripts: Беслан(Chechen, Ingush, Abkhaz, Karachay-Balkar) Беслъэн(Eastern Circassian) Беслъан(Western Circassian)
Pronounced: byi-SLAN(Russian)
From the Turkish military title beg meaning "chieftain, master" combined with Turkic arslan meaning "lion".
BILAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: بلال(Arabic, Urdu)
Pronounced: bee-LAL(Arabic)
Means "wetting, moistening" in Arabic. This was the name of a companion of the Prophet Muhammad.
CANDRA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: CHAN-dra
Means "moon" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra).
DAGMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: dag-MA-ra
Polish form of DAGMAR.
DAMIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DA-MYEHN
French form of DAMIAN.
DANA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAY-nə
Personal note: feminine
From a surname that originally belonged to a person who was Danish. It was originally given in honour of American lawyer Richard Henry Dana (1815-1882), the author of Two Years Before the Mast.
DARMA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: DAR-ma
Means "good deed" or "duty" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit धर्म (dharma).
DASHINIMA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Buryat
Other Scripts: Дашинима(Buryat Cyrillic)
Combination of DASHI and NIMA.
DASTAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian Mythology, Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: داستان(Persian, Kazakh Arabic) Дастан(Kazakh, Kyrgyz)
Pronounced: daws-TAWN(Persian) dahs-TAHN(Kazakh)
Means "story, legend" in Persian. This is another name for Zal, a character in the Shahnameh epic.
DAWA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tibetan, Bhutanese
Other Scripts: ཟླཝ(Tibetan)
Personal note: feminine
Means "moon, month" in Tibetan.
DAYANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Даяна(Kazakh) دايانا(Kazakh Arabic)
Personal note: Kazakh name
Derived either from Arabic ديانة (diyana) meaning "religion, faith" or Turkish dayan meaning "hold on, endure".
DERYA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "sea, ocean" in Turkish, ultimately from Persian.
DUŠANKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Slovene, Croatian
Other Scripts: Душанка(Serbian)
Feminine form of DUŠAN.
EFFENDI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: ايفيندي(Malay Jawi)
Pronounced: eh-FEHN-dee(Indonesian)
From the Ottoman Turkish title افندي (efendi) meaning "lord, master, sir", ultimately from Greek αφέντης (aféntis).
ELIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Dutch, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ηλίας(Greek) Ἠλίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-LEE-ush(European Portuguese) eh-LEE-us(Brazilian Portuguese) eh-LEE-as(German) EH-lee-ahs(Finnish) i-LIE-əs(English) ee-LIE-əs(English)
Form of ELIJAH used in several languages. This is also the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ENDRIT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
From Albanian dritë meaning "light".
ÉTIENNE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-TYEHN(European French) EH-TSYEHN(Quebec French)
French form of STEPHEN.
FADUMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Somali
Somali form of FATIMAH.
FAISAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, Bengali, Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: فيصل(Arabic) فیصل(Urdu) ফয়সাল(Bengali)
Pronounced: FIE-sal(Arabic)
Alternate transcription of Arabic فيصل (see FAYSAL), as well as the usual Urdu, Bengali, Malay and Indonesian form.
FAZU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Avar (Rare)
Possibly a form of FAIZA. A known bearer was Fazu Alieva (1932-2016), a Soviet poet of Dagestani Avar origin.
FIRMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Personal note: Indonesian name
Means "decree, commandment" in Indonesian, ultimately from Persian فرمان (farman).
GUILLAUME
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: GEE-YOM
French form of WILLIAM.
HAJAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: هاجر(Arabic)
Pronounced: HA-jar
Arabic form of HAGAR.
HAJNALKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: HIE-nawl-kaw
Means "morning glory (flower)" in Hungarian.
HAKAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "emperor, ruler" in Turkish.
HALİL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Turkish form of KHALIL.
HALIMAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: حليمة(Arabic) حاليمه(Malay Jawi)
Pronounced: ha-LEE-mah(Arabic)
Arabic alternate transcription of HALIMA as well as the Malay and Indonesian form. A notable bearer is Halimah binti Yacob (1954-), the current president of Singapore.
HAMZA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian
Other Scripts: حمزة(Arabic)
Pronounced: HAM-zah(Arabic)
Possibly derived from Arabic hamuza meaning "strong, steadfast". This was the name of the uncle of the Prophet Muhammad who was killed in battle.
HANZŌ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 半蔵, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: HAWN-ZO
From Japanese (han) meaning "half" and () meaning "to hide". This name was borne by the noted samurai Hattori Hanzou (1542-1596). The name can also be formed from other kanji combinations.
HASAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Indonesian
Other Scripts: حسن(Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Shahmukhi) হাসান(Bengali)
Pronounced: HA-san(Arabic)
Means "handsome" in Arabic, from the root حَسُنَ (hasuna) meaning "to be beautiful, to be good". Hasan was the son of Ali and the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad. He was poisoned by one of his wives and is regarded as a martyr by Shia Muslims. This was also the name of two kings of Morocco. It is sometimes transcribed as Hassan, though this is a distinct name in Arabic.
HASHIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, Malay
Other Scripts: هاشم(Arabic) ہاشم(Urdu)
Pronounced: HA-sheem(Arabic)
Means "crusher, breaker" in Arabic. This was the nickname of a great-grandfather of the Prophet Muhammad. He acquired this nickname because of his practice of crumbling bread and giving it to pilgrims.
HIBAQ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Somali
Variant transcription of HIBAAQ.
HILAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish
Other Scripts: هلال(Arabic)
Pronounced: hee-LAL(Arabic)
Personal note: feminine
Means "crescent moon" in Arabic, also referring to the new moon on the Islamic calendar. As a given name it is typically masculine in Arabic and feminine in Turkish.
HISHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: هشام(Arabic)
Pronounced: hee-SHAM
Means "generous" in Arabic, ultimately from hashama "to crush". The meaning derives from the traditional Arab act of crushing bread into crumbs in order to share it. This was the name of an 8th-century caliph of the Umayyad dynasty in Spain.
HLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Burmese
Other Scripts: လှ(Burmese)
Pronounced: LA
Personal note: feminine
Means "pretty, favourable" in Burmese.
HONGWEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 洪文, 宏纹, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: KHUWNG-WUN
From Chinese 洪 (hóng) meaning "flood, deluge" or 宏 (hóng) meaning "wide, spacious, great, vast" combined with 文 (wén) meaning "literature, culture, writing" or 纹 (wén) "line, stripe, streak". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
HOUSHANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian Mythology, Persian
Other Scripts: هوشنگ(Persian)
Pronounced: hoo-SHANGG(Persian)
From the Avestan name Haoshyangha possibly meaning "good choice" or "wise choice", from Proto-Iranian hu meaning "good, well" or Middle Persian ōš meaning "intelligence, wisdom" and a second uncertain element šyah perhaps meaning "selecting, deciding". This is the name of a character in the Persian epic the Shahnameh.
ILHAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Uyghur
Other Scripts: إلهام(Arabic) ئىلھام(Uyghur)
Pronounced: eel-HAM(Arabic)
Personal note: masculine
Means "inspiration" in Arabic.
ILJAZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
Albanian form of ILYAS.
INTAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Pronounced: IN-tan(Indonesian)
Means "diamond" in Malay and Indonesian.
IRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Spanish (Latin American)
ISKANDAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: إسكندر(Arabic)
Pronounced: ees-KAN-dar(Arabic)
Arabic, Indonesian and Malay form of ALEXANDER.
JAMSHED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Tajik, Persian Mythology
Other Scripts: جمشید(Persian) Ҷамшед(Tajik)
Alternate transcription of Persian جمشید (see JAMSHID), as well as the regular Tajik form.
JUNAIDAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: جنيده(Malay Jawi)
Pronounced: joo-NIE-dah(Indonesian)
Feminine form of JUNAYD.
JUWARIYAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: joo-wa-REE-yah
Indonesian form of JUWAYRIYYAH.
KAMARIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: قمرية(Malay Jawi)
Derived from Arabic قمري (qamariyy) meaning "lunar, moon-like", from قمر (qamar) meaning "moon".
KANAT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Қанат(Kazakh) قانات(Kazakh Arabic) Канат(Kyrgyz)
Pronounced: kah-NAHT
From Kazakh қанат (qanat) or Kyrgyz канат (kanat) meaning "wing".
KANYKEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Каныкей(Kyrgyz)
Means "wife of (a) khan" in Kyrgyz. In the 'Epic of Manas', Kanykei is the wife of the hero MANAS.
KAYA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Pronounced: ka-YA
Means "rock, cliff" in Turkish.
KHAIRINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: خيرينا(Malay Jawi)
Derived from Arabic خير (khayr) meaning "goodness, good".
KHAIRUNNISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: خير النساء(Arabic) خيرالنساء(Malay Jawi)
Pronounced: khie-roon-nee-SA(Arabic)
Means "goodness of women", from Arabic خير (khair) meaning "goodness" combined with نساء (nisa') meaning "women". This is an epithet of Khadija.
KHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Urdu, Pashto
Other Scripts: خان(Urdu, Pashto)
Pronounced: KHAHN(Urdu)
From a title meaning "king, ruler". Its origin is probably Mongolian, though the word has been transmitted into many other languages.
KIÊN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Vietnamese
Pronounced: KEEN, KEENG
From Sino-Vietnamese 堅 (kiên) meaning "hard, firm".
KUSUMA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: koo-SOO-mah
Derived from Sanskrit कुसुम (kusuma) meaning "flower".
KWESI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Western African, Akan
Variant of KWASI.
LIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Georgian, Greek, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: ლია(Georgian) Λεία(Greek)
Pronounced: LEE-a(Italian) LEE-ə(Portuguese, Greek) LEE-AH(Georgian)
Italian, Portuguese, Georgian and Greek form of LEAH.
LIEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Modern)
Other Scripts: ליאל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: lee-EL, lee-YEL
Personal note: feminine
Means "my God" or "I have (a) God" from Hebrew לי (li) meaning "me, mine" and אל ('el) meaning "God".
MAGOMED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Avar (Russified), Chechen (Russified)
Other Scripts: Магомед(Russian)
Pronounced: mə-gu-MYEHT(Russian)
Russian form of MUHAMMAD, used particularly in the Caucasus.
MÄHRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkmen
Other Scripts: Мәхри(Turkmen Cyrillic)
Pronounced: mah-RI
Derived from Persian ماه (mâh) meaning "moon, month".
MALAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino, Tagalog
Other Scripts: ᜋᜎᜌ(Baybayin)
Pronounced: mu-LA-ya(Tagalog)
Means "free, independent" in Tagalog.
MALKHAZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: მალხაზ(Georgian)
Possibly means "beautiful, elegant, youthful" in Georgian.
MANAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: منار(Arabic)
Pronounced: ma-NAR
Means "beacon, guiding light" in Arabic.
MARAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Azerbaijani, Armenian
Other Scripts: Մարալ(Armenian)
Pronounced: mah-RAHL(Armenian)
Means "deer" in Azerbaijani and Armenian, referring to the Caspian Red Deer, derived from Persian مرال (maral).
MARAT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tatar
Other Scripts: Марат(Tatar)
Tatar form of MURAD.
MARWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian
Other Scripts: مروان(Arabic)
Pronounced: MAR-wan(Arabic)
From Arabic مَرْو (marw) either meaning "flint" or referring to a type of fragrant plant (see MARWA).
MAXIME
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAK-SEEM
French form of MAXIMUS.
MAYA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: माया(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi)
Means "illusion" in Sanskrit. In Buddhist tradition this is the name of the mother of Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha). This is also another name of the Hindu goddess Durga.
METİN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "strong" in Turkish.
MIRSAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bosnian
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from Arabic meaning "watchtower" or Persian meaning "ambush".
MIRZA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Arabic, Bosnian
Other Scripts: میرزا(Persian) ميرزا(Arabic)
Pronounced: MEER-za(Arabic)
Means "prince" from Persian میرزا (mirza), earlier امیرزاده (amirzadeh), which is ultimately from Arabic أمير (amir) meaning "commander" combined with Persian زاده (zadeh) meaning "offspring".
MORDECAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: מָרְדֳּכַי, מָרְדְּכַי(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MAWR-də-kie(English)
Means "servant of MARDUK" in Persian. In the Old Testament Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther. He thwarted a plot to kill the Persian king, though he made an enemy of the king's chief advisor Haman.
MUIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: موين(Malay Jawi)
Pronounced: MOO-een(Indonesian)
Derived from Arabic معين (mu'in) meaning "supporter, patron, advocator".
MUSALAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic (Rare), Indonesian (Rare)
Other Scripts: مسلم(Arabic)
Arabic alternate transcription of MUSALLAM as well as the Indonesian form.
NADEZHDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Надежда(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: nu-DYEZH-də(Russian)
Means "hope" in Slavic.
NASRIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Bengali
Other Scripts: نسرین(Persian) নাসরীন(Bengali)
Means "wild rose" in Persian.
NAZANIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: نازنین(Persian)
Pronounced: naw-za-NEEN
Means "sweetheart, darling" in Persian.
NESTOR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Russian
Other Scripts: Νέστωρ(Ancient Greek) Нестор(Russian)
Pronounced: NEHS-TAWR(Classical Greek) NEHS-tər(English) NYEHS-tər(Russian)
Means "returner, homecomer" in Greek, from νέομαι (neomai) meaning "to return". In Homer's Iliad this was the name of the king of Pylos, famous for his great wisdom and longevity, who acted as a counselor to the Greek allies.
NIMAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian
Other Scripts: نعمة(Arabic)
Pronounced: NEE‘-mah(Arabic) NEE-mah(Indonesian)
Arabic alternate transcription of NIMA (1) as well as the Indonesian form.
NOOR (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: نور(Arabic, Urdu)
Pronounced: NOOR(Arabic)
Personal note: feminine
Alternate transcription of Arabic/Urdu نور (see NUR).
NUR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Uyghur, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: نور(Arabic, Urdu) نۇر(Uyghur)
Pronounced: NOOR(Arabic, Turkish) NUWR(Malay)
Personal note: feminine
Means "light" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition النور (al-Nur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
NURI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نوري(Arabic)
Pronounced: NOO-ree
Means "my light" in Arabic.
NURIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NOO-rya
Spanish form of NÚRIA.
NYIMA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Tibetan
Other Scripts: ཉི་མ(Tibetan)
Means "sun, day" in Tibetan.
OMID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: امید(Persian)
Pronounced: o-MEED
Personal note: masculine
Means "hope" in Persian.
OREN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֹרֶן(Hebrew)
Means "pine tree" in Hebrew.
PARWATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Indonesian
Other Scripts: पार्वती(Hindi)
Pronounced: par-WA-tee(Indonesian)
Hindi alternate transcription of PARVATI as well as the Indonesian form.
PEMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tibetan, Bhutanese
Other Scripts: པད་མ(Tibetan)
Personal note: feminine
Tibetan form of PADMA.
PILAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pee-LAR
Means "pillar" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Pilar, meaning "Mary of the Pillar". According to legend, when Saint James the Greater was in Saragossa in Spain, the Virgin Mary appeared on a pillar.
PRIYONO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦥꦿꦶꦪꦺꦴꦤꦺꦴ(Javanese)
Pronounced: pree-YO-no(Indonesian)
Derived from Javanese priya meaning "man, boy", ultimately from Sanskrit प्रिय (priya) meaning "beloved".
QINGFANG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 清芳, 晴芳, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: CHEENG-FAHNG
Personal note: feminine
From Chinese 清 (qīng) meaning "clear, pure, clean" or 晴 (qíng) meaning "clear weather" combined with 芳 (fāng) meaning "fragrant, virtuous, beautiful". Other character combinations can form this name as well.
RAWIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Thai
Other Scripts: รวินทร์, รวินท์(Thai)
Pronounced: ra-WEEN
Personal note: masculine
From Thai รวิ (rawi) meaning "sun" and อินทร์ (in) referring to the Hindu god INDRA.
REZA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: رضا(Persian)
Pronounced: reh-ZAW
Persian form of RIDHA.
RHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Ῥέα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: REH-A(Classical Greek) REE-ə(English)
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to ῥέω (rheo) meaning "to flow" or ἔρα (era) meaning "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RINCHEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tibetan, Bhutanese
Other Scripts: རིན་ཆེན(Tibetan, Dzongkha)
Personal note: masculine
Means "treasure, jewel, gem" in Tibetan.
ROHIT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Odia, Gujarati, Kannada, Telugu, Nepali
Other Scripts: रोहित(Hindi, Marathi, Nepali) রোহিত(Bengali) ରୋହିତ(Odia) રોહિત(Gujarati) ರೋಹಿತ್(Kannada) రోహిత్(Telugu)
Derived from Sanskrit रोहित (rohita) meaning "red".
ROSEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Росен(Bulgarian)
Derived from Bulgarian росен (rosen) meaning "dittany (a type of flower)". This name is borne by Rosen Plevneliev (1964-), the fourth president of Bulgaria.
RUSALKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slavic Mythology, Theatre, German (Rare)
A water nymph in Slavic Mythology. Also the name of an opera written by the Czech writer Antonín Dvorák.
RUSLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Turkmen, Azerbaijani, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar, Circassian, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: Руслан(Russian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar) Руслъан(Western Circassian, Eastern Circassian)
Pronounced: ruws-LAN(Russian)
Form of YERUSLAN used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem Ruslan and Ludmila (1820), which was loosely based on Russian and Tatar folktales of Yeruslan Lazarevich.
RUYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رؤية(Arabic)
Pronounced: ROO-yah
Means "vision, sight" in Arabic.
SADIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu, Bengali
Other Scripts: سعدیہ(Urdu) সাদিয়া(Bengali)
Urdu and Bengali form of SA'DIA.
SADIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: سعدية(Arabic)
Pronounced: SA‘-dee-yah(Arabic) sa-DEE-yah(Indonesian)
Arabic alternate transcription of SA'DIA as well as the Indonesian and Malay form.
SAMAR (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: سمر(Arabic)
Pronounced: SA-mar
Means "evening conversation" in Arabic, from the root سَمَرَ (samara) meaning "to talk in the evening".
SAMIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian, Persian, Bengali, Urdu
Other Scripts: ثمین(Persian, Urdu) সামিন(Bengali)
Pronounced: sa-MEEN(Persian)
Personal note: masculine
Derived from Arabic ثمين (thamin) meaning "valuable, precious". It is a unisex name in Iran, Bangladesh and Pakistan while it is solely masculine in Indonesia.
SAMIRA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: سميرة(Arabic) سمیرا(Persian)
Pronounced: sa-MEE-rah(Arabic)
Feminine form of SAMIR (1).
SANTI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: SAN-tee
Short form of SANTIAGO.
SANTIAGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: san-TYA-gho(Spanish) sun-tee-A-goo(European Portuguese) sun-chee-A-goo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Means "Saint James", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Yago, an old Spanish form of JAMES, the patron saint of Spain. This is the name of the capital city of Chile, as well as several other cities in the Spanish-speaking world.
SAVA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Сава(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Serbian and Bulgarian form of SABAS.
SAYURI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 小百合, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SA-YOO-REE
From Japanese (sa) meaning "small" and 百合 (yuri) meaning "lily". This name can also be composed of other kanji combinations.
SEMİHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Feminine form of SEMİH.
SHAHBAZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: شہباز(Urdu)
Pronounced: shehh-BAZ
Means "king's falcon" or "royal falcon" from Persian شاه (shah) meaning "king" and باز (baz) meaning "hawk, falcon".
SHAM'A
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: شمعة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SHAM-‘ah
Means "lamp" or "candle" in Arabic.
SHAMIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Kazakh, Avar, Chechen, Tatar, Azerbaijani
Other Scripts: شاميل(Arabic) Шәміл(Kazakh) Шамил(Avar, Tatar) Шамиль(Chechen)
Pronounced: sha-MEEL(Arabic)
From Arabic شاميل (shamil) meaning "comprehensive, universal".
SHAMKHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chechen
Other Scripts: Шамхан(Chechen)
Pronounced: shum-KHAN(Russian)
Either from Arabic شمس (shams) meaning "sun" or شمال (shamal) meaning "north" combined with the Turkic title khan meaning "leader, ruler".
SHIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SHEEN
From Japanese (shin) meaning "real, genuine" or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
SHOLPAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Шолпан(Kazakh) شولپان(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: shol-PAHN
Means "Venus (the planet)" in Kazakh.
SIMON (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Симон(Macedonian) სიმონ(Georgian) Σίμων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-mən(English) SEE-MAWN(French) SEE-mawn(Danish, Dutch) ZEE-mawn(German) SHEE-mon(Hungarian)
From Σίμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) meaning "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεών, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).

In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).

Because of the apostle, this name has been common in the Christian world. In England it was popular during the Middle Ages, though it became more rare after the Protestant Reformation.

SITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Other Scripts: सीता(Sanskrit, Hindi, Nepali)
Means "furrow" in Sanskrit. Sita is the name of the Hindu goddess of the harvest in the Rigveda. This is also the name of the wife of Rama (and an avatar of Lakshmi) in the Hindu epic the Ramayana. In this story Sita is rescued by her husband from the demon king Ravana.
SITARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: ستارہ(Urdu)
Means "star" in Urdu, ultimately from Persian.
SOSLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ossetian
Other Scripts: Сослан(Ossetian)
Ossetian form of SOSRUKO.
SPENCER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPEHN-sər
From a surname that meant "dispenser of provisions", derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry". A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
SUFYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Indonesian, Urdu
Other Scripts: سفيان(Arabic) سفیان(Urdu)
Pronounced: SOOF-yan(Indonesian)
Meaning uncertain. It could be derived from Arabic صوف (suf) meaning "wool", صفا (safa) meaning "pure, clean" or صعف (sa'f) meaning "slim, thin". Sufyan al-Thawri was an 8th-century Islamic scholar.
SULIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chechen
Other Scripts: Сулим(Chechen)
Pronounced: suw-LYEEM(Russian)
Chechen form of SULAYMAN.
SULJO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bosnian
Bosnian diminutive of SÜLEYMAN.
SUMITRA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Bengali, Hindi, Odia, Marathi, Assamese, Punjabi, Kannada, Thai, Indonesian
Other Scripts: সুমিত্রা(Bengali) सुमित्रा(Hindi, Marathi) ସୁମିତ୍ରା(Odia) সুমিত্ৰা(Assamese) ਸੁਮਿਤਰਾ(Gurmukhi) ಸುಮಿತ್ರ(Kannada) สุมิตรา(Thai)
Pronounced: soo-mee-TRA(Thai)
Means "good friend" from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with मित्र (mitra) meaning "friend". It is used as a feminine in India and Thailand while it is masculine in Indonesia. In the Hindu epic Ramayana she is the mother of Lakshmana and Shatrughna and the stepmother of the hero Rama.
SVETLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Светлана(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: svyit-LA-nə(Russian)
Derived from Slavic svet meaning "light, world". It was popularized by the poem Svetlana (1813) by the Russian poet Vasily Zhukovsky. It is sometimes used as a translation of Photine.
TAIMURAZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ossetian
Other Scripts: Таймураз(Ossetian)
Pronounced: tie-muw-RAS(Russian)
Alternate transcription of TAYMURAZ.
TAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַל(Hebrew)
Personal note: feminine
Derived from Hebrew טַל (tal) meaning "dew".
TASSADIT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kabyle
Other Scripts: ⵜⴰⵙⴰⴷⵉⵜ(Kabyle Tifinagh)
Pronounced: TA-SA-DEET(French)
From Arabic سعد (sa'd) meaning "fortune, good luck" combined with the Tamazight feminine prefix ⵜⴰ (ta) and suffix ⵜ (t).
TEMÜÜJIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Mongolian
Other Scripts: Тэмүүжин(Mongolian Cyrillic)
Alternate transcription of TEMUJIN.
TIHOMIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Тихомир(Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Derived from the Slavic elements tikhu "quiet" and miru "peace, world".
TIMOFEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Тимофей(Russian)
Pronounced: tyi-mu-FYAY
Alternate transcription of Russian Тимофей (see TIMOFEY).
TIMUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Russian, History
Other Scripts: Тимур(Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Russian) Төмөр(Mongolian Cyrillic)
Pronounced: tyi-MOOR(Russian) ti-MUWR(English)
From the Turkic and Mongol name Temür meaning "iron". This was the name of several Mongol, Turkic and Yuan leaders. A notable bearer was Timur, also known as Tamerlane (from Persian تیمور لنگ (Timur e Lang) meaning "Timur the lame"), a 14th-century Turkic leader who conquered large areas of Western Asia.
TOBIAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, German, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Τωβίας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: to-BEE-as(German) tuw-BEE-ahs(Swedish) tə-BIE-əs(English)
Greek form of TOBIAH. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.
VAGIF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Azerbaijani, Dagestani, Rutul
Other Scripts: Вагиф(Russian)
Pronounced: vu-GYEEF(Russian)
Azerbaijani alternate transcription of VAQIF as well as the usual form used in Dagestan.
VINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
From Sanskrit वीणा (Vina) meaning "lute".
WARDIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: war-DEE-ah
Derived from Arabic ورد (ward) meaning "rose".
WIRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Pronounced: WEE-ro(Indonesian)
Javanese form of WIRA.
YAIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew, Spanish (Latin American)
Other Scripts: יָאִיר(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of JAIR, as well as a Spanish variant.
YANGCHEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tibetan, Bhutanese
Other Scripts: དབྱངས་ཅན(Tibetan, Dzongkha)
From Tibetan དབྱངས་ཅན (dbyangs can) meaning singer" or "vowel, song". This is the Tibetan name for the Hindu goddess Saraswati.
YASIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Other Scripts: ياسين(Arabic) یاسین(Persian, Urdu)
Pronounced: ya-SEEN(Arabic)
From the Arabic letters ي (called ya) and س (called sin). These letters begin the 36th chapter of the Quran (surah Ya Sin).
YATNO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦪꦠ꧀ꦤ(Javanese)
Pronounced: YAT-no(Indonesian)
From Javanese yatna meaning "to be careful, to take care, to be alert", ultimately from Sanskrit यत्न (yatna) meaning "zeal, energy, enthusiasm".
YAYA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian, Western African
Pronounced: YA-ya(Indonesian) YA-YA(French)
Indonesian form of Yahya (see JOHN), also used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
YURI (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Юрий(Russian) Юрій(Ukrainian) Юрый(Belarusian)
Pronounced: YOO-ryee(Russian)
Alternate transcription of Russian Юрий, Ukrainian Юрій or Belarusian Юрый (see YURIY).
YURI (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 百合, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: YOO-REE
From Japanese 百合 (yuri) meaning "lily". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can also form this name.
ZAHARI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Malay
Other Scripts: زاهري(Malay Jawi)
Personal note: Malay name
Derived from Arabic زهر (zahara) meaning "to shine".
ZAHID
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: زاهد(Arabic) زاہد(Urdu)
Pronounced: ZA-heed(Arabic)
Means "pious, devout" in Arabic.
ZAINAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: زينة(Arabic)
Pronounced: ZIE-nah(Arabic)
Arabic alternate transcription of ZAYNA as well as the Malay and Indonesian form.
ZAREEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: زرین(Urdu)
Variant of ZARINA.
ZELIMKHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chechen
Other Scripts: Зелимхан(Chechen)
Combination of the name SALIM and the Turkic title khan meaning "ruler, leader".
ZEMFIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tatar, Bashkir, Literature
Other Scripts: Земфира(Tatar, Bashkir)
Meaning unknown, possibly of Romani origin. This name was (first?) used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem The Gypsies (1827).
ZHIWEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 志伟, 智伟, 之玮, 志偉, 志韋, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: CHUZH-WAY
From Chinese 志 (zhì) meaning "will, purpose, ambition", 智 (zhì) meaning "wisdom, intellect", or 之 (zhī), a possessive marker, combined with 伟 or 偉 (wěi) meaning "great, robust, extraordinary", 玮 (wěi) meaning "precious, rare, valuable", or 韋 (wéi) meaning "soft leather, tanned leather". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
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