Bleuette's Personal Name List

Ada 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Polish, Hungarian, Finnish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: AY-də(English) A-dha(Spanish) A-da(Polish) AW-daw(Hungarian) AH-dah(Finnish)
Originally a short form of Germanic names such as Adelaide or Adelina that begin with the element adal meaning "noble". This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
Adamina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ad-ə-MEEN-ə
Feminine form of Adam.
Adamine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), French (Rare), Scottish (Rare), German (Rare)
Variant of Adamina.
Ainash
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Айнаш(Kazakh) ايناش(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: ie-NAHSH
Derived from Kazakh айна (ayna) meaning "mirror", of Persian origin.
Aino
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish, Estonian, Finnish Mythology
Pronounced: IE-no(Finnish)
Means "the only one" in Finnish. In the Finnish epic the Kalevala this is the name of a girl who drowns herself when she finds out she must marry the old man Väinämöinen.
Aisling
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ASH-lyən
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish. This name was created in the 20th century.
Akakios
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ακάκιος(Greek) Ἀκάκιος(Ancient Greek)
From a Greek word meaning "innocent, not evil", derived from (a), a negative prefix, combined with κάκη (kake) meaning "evil". This was the name of three early saints, two of whom were martyred.
Alasdair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish Gaelic [1]
Scottish Gaelic form of Alexander.
Alastair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: AL-i-stər(English)
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Algernon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-jər-nən
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendant of William de Percy). This name was borne by a character (a mouse) in the short story Flowers for Algernon (1958) and novel of the same title (1966) by the American author Daniel Keyes.
Allegra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-LEH-gra(Italian) ə-LEHG-rə(English)
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron (1817-1822).
Alondra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: a-LON-dra
Derived from Spanish alondra meaning "lark".
Altynshash
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Алтыншаш(Kazakh) التىنشاش(Kazakh Arabic)
Means "golden hair" from Kazakh алтын (altyn) meaning "gold" combined with шаш (shash) meaning "hair".
Anay-ool
Usage: Tuvan
Other Scripts: Анай-оол(Tuvan)
Derived from Tuvan анай (anay) meaning "goat, kid" combined with оол (ool) meaning "son, boy".
Aphrah
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, English (Puritan)
Pronounced: AH-frah(English)
From the biblical place Aphrah in the Book of Micah, meaning "dust." This name was used by Puritans, but has since become rare.
Arcangelo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ar-KAN-jeh-lo
Means "archangel" in Italian.
Archibald
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: AHR-chi-bawld
Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element ἀρχός (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages (sometimes used to Anglicize the Gaelic name Gilleasbuig, for unknown reasons).
Aria 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Means "song, melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century, its rise in popularity accelerating after the 2010 premier of the television drama Pretty Little Liars, featuring a character by this name. It is not traditionally used in Italy.
Arsène
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AR-SEHN
French form of Arsenios.
Arsenio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ar-SEH-nyo
Spanish and Italian form of Arsenios.
Ashok
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Kannada, Tamil, Telugu, Nepali
Other Scripts: अशोक(Hindi, Marathi, Nepali) অশোক(Bengali) અશોક(Gujarati) ಅಶೋಕ್(Kannada) அசோக்(Tamil) అశోక్(Telugu)
Modern form of Ashoka.
Ashoka
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Sanskrit
Other Scripts: अशोक(Sanskrit)
Means "without sorrow" in Sanskrit. This name was borne by Ashoka the Great, a 3rd-century BC emperor of India.
Asra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أسرى(Arabic)
Pronounced: AS-ra
Means "travel at night" in Arabic. It is related to Isra.
Atticus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀττικός(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀττικός (Attikos) meaning "from Attica", referring to the region surrounding Athens in Greece. This name was borne by a few notable Greeks from the Roman period (or Romans of Greek background). The author Harper Lee used the name in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) for an Alabama lawyer who defends a black man accused of raping a white woman.
Aura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Finnish
Pronounced: AWR-ə(English) OW-ra(Spanish) OW-rah(Finnish)
From the word aura (derived from Latin, ultimately from Greek αὔρα meaning "breeze") for a distinctive atmosphere or illumination.
Aytaç
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Derived from Turkish ay meaning "moon" and taç meaning "crown" (of Persian origin).
Azrael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Variant of Azriel. This was the name of an angel in Jewish and Islamic tradition who separated the soul from the body upon death. He is sometimes referred to as the Angel of Death.
Azzurra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ad-DZOOR-ra
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
Balganym
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Балғаным(Kazakh) بالعانىم(Kazakh Arabic)
Derived from Kazakh бал (bal) meaning "honey" and ханым (khanym) meaning "lady, madame".
Bard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
A significant supporting character in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien, Bard the Bowman (abbreviated to Bard) of Esgaroth was a skilled archer and the heir of Girion, the last king of old Dale. He was described as "grim faced" and while a guardsman of Esgaroth he was often predicting floods and poisoned fish. He rallied the guards to defend the town when the Dragon came. Bard was able to slay the dragon Smaug with the Black Arrow after a tip from the old thrush (who had overheard Bilbo Baggins' description of Smaug) had revealed an unarmoured spot on the dragon's underside. Bard claimed a fourteenth of the treasure amassed by the dragon, which he subsequently shared with the Master of Esgaroth to rebuild the town, but the Master stole the money and ran off into the wild where he died. After its rebuilding, Bard was the first king of restored Dale, followed by his son Bain, grandson Brand, and great-grandson Bard II.
Bayram
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Pronounced: bie-RAM
Means "festival" in Turkish.
Beausoleil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Cajun)
Joseph Broussard 1702-1765; also known as beausoleil. Leader of Acadian people of Nova Scotia.
Benjamine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: BEHN-ZHA-MEEN
French feminine form of Benjamin.
Benvenuto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: behn-veh-NOO-to
Means "welcome" in Italian. A famous bearer was the Italian Renaissance sculptor and writer Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1571).
Bernadine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUR-nə-deen
Feminine form of Bernard.
Bilal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish, Urdu
Other Scripts: بلال(Arabic, Urdu)
Pronounced: bee-LAL(Arabic)
Means "wetting, moistening" in Arabic. This was the name of a companion of the Prophet Muhammad.
Birch
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BURCH
From the English word for the birch tree. Famous bearers include Birch Evans Bayh III, senator from Indiana, who assumed office in 1999. Birch Evans Bayh II was a senator from Indiana 1963-1981.
Blackbird
Usage: English
Variation of Blackbeard.
Bonaccorso
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
From a medieval Italian name derived from bono "good" and accorso "haste, rush, help".
Bonaparte
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare), French (Rare)
Variant and French form of Buonaparte.
Bonaventura
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: baw-na-vehn-TOO-ra(Italian)
Means "good fortune" in Italian. Saint Bonaventura was a 13th-century Franciscan monk who is considered a Doctor of the Church.
Bonaventure
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical)
Pronounced: bahn-ə-VEHN-chər(English) BAW-NA-VAHN-TUYR(French)
Variant of Bonaventura.
Botagoz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Ботагөз(Kazakh) بوتاگوز(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: bo-tah-GUUZ
From Kazakh бота (bota) meaning "camel calf, colt" and көз (koz) meaning "eye". The name was traditionally given to girls who were believed to possess the "evil eye" due to the appearance of their eyes at birth.
Brindabella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous Australian
Pronounced: brin-duh-BEL-uh
Locational name, from the Brindabella mountain range on the border of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. Usually said to be from a local language, meaning "two hopping mice" - hopping mice are native Australian mice. Another theory is that it is from brindy brindy, meaning "water running over rocks", with a European -bella added to suggest "beautiful".
Brogán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
From the Old Irish name Broccán, derived from bróc "shoe, sandal, greave" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
Bulut
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "cloud" in Turkish.
Buonaparte
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Derived from Italian elements bona (or buona) "good" and parte "solution".
Cairbre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAHR-bra
Means "charioteer" in Irish. This was the name of two semi-legendary high kings of Ireland.
Caprice
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kə-PREES
From the English word meaning "impulse", ultimately (via French) from Italian capriccio.
Capucine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KA-PUY-SEEN
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
Cedar
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEE-dər
From the English word for the coniferous tree, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek κέδρος (kedros).
Cherubina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Italian, Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of Cherubino.
Chrysalis
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Filipino (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-ə-lis(English)
From the word referring to the pupa of a butterfly or moth or the cocoon where the pupa is enclosed inside, derived via Latin from Ancient Greek χρυσαλλίς (khrusallís), from χρυσός (khrusós) meaning "gold."

A My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic villain bears this name.

Cian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: KYEE-ən(Irish)
Means "ancient, enduring" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of the father of Lugh Lámfada. It was also borne by the mythical ancestor of the Ciannachta and by a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
Cipactli
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "crocodile, alligator, caiman, monster" in Nahuatl [1]. This is the name of the first day in the tonalpohualli, the Aztec 260-day calendar.
Clarity
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLAR-i-tee
Simply means "clarity, lucidity" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clarus "clear".
Clémentine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KLEH-MAHN-TEEN
French feminine form of Clement. This is also the name of a variety of orange (fruit).
Cloelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Cloelius. In Roman legend Cloelia was a maiden who was given to an Etruscan invader as a hostage. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety.
Clotaire
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare), French (African)
Pronounced: KLAW-TEHR(French)
French form of Chlothar. This was used for a character in the French children's comics 'Le Petit Nicolas' (first published in 1959).
Colby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL-bee
From an English surname, originally from various place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town". As a given name, its popularity spiked in the United States and Canada in 2001 when Colby Donaldson (1974-) appeared on the reality television show Survivor.
Colombano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Columbanus.
Colombe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-LAWNB
French feminine form of Columba.
Colombina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Italian feminine diminutive of Columba. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
Columbine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KAWL-əm-bien
From the name of a variety of flower. It is also an English form of Colombina, the pantomime character.
Comfort
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (African)
Pronounced: KUM-fərt
From the English word comfort, ultimately from Latin confortare "to strengthen greatly", a derivative of fortis "strong". It was used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. It is now most common in parts of English-influenced Africa.
Corbin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-bin
From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-) [1].
Corentine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton (Gallicized), French
Feminine form of Corentin.
Corona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: ko-RO-na(Italian, Spanish)
Means "crown" in Latin, as well as Italian and Spanish. This was the name of a 2nd-century saint who was martyred with her companion Victor.
Corvi
Usage: Italian
Nickname derived from Italian corvo meaning "crow".
Cotton
Usage: English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten). Examples include Coton (Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Staffordshire), Cottam (East Yorkshire, Lancashire, Nottinghamshire), and Cotham (Nottinghamshire).
French: from a diminutive of Old French cot(t)e ‘coat (of mail)’ (see Cott).
Čoyğan-ool
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tuvan
Means "pine cone boy" in Tuvan.
Cumhur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "public, people" in Turkish.
Custodio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: koos-TO-dhyo
Means "guardian" in Spanish, from Latin custodia "protection, safekeeping".
Cygnus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Cygnus is a northern constellation lying on the plane of the Milky Way, deriving its name from the Latinized Greek word for swan.
Damascus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Other Scripts: דרמשק, דמשק(Hebrew) ܕܪܡܣܘܩ(Syriac)
The name of Damascus first appeared in the geographical list of Thutmose III as T-m-ś-q in the 15th century BC. The etymology of the ancient name "T-m-ś-q" is uncertain, but it is suspected to be pre-Semitic. It is attested as Dimašqa in Akkadian, T-ms-ḳw in Egyptian, Dammaśq (דמשק) in Old Aramaic and Dammeśeq (דמשק) in Biblical Hebrew. The Akkadian spelling is found in the Amarna letters, from the 14th century BC. Later Aramaic spellings of the name often include an intrusive resh (letter r), perhaps influenced by the root dr, meaning "dwelling". Thus, the Qumranic Darmeśeq (דרמשק), and Darmsûq (ܕܪܡܣܘܩ) in Syriac. The English and Latin name of the city is "Damascus" which was imported from Greek: Δαμασκός, which originated in Aramaic: ‎ דרמשק; "a well-watered place". In Arabic, the city is called Dimashqu sh-Shām (دمشق الشام), although this is often shortened to either Dimashq or ash-Shām by the citizens of Damascus, of Syria and other Arab neighbors and Turkey (as Şam). Ash-Shām is an Arabic term for "Levant" and for "Syria"; the latter, and particularly the historical region of Syria, is called Bilādu sh-Shām (بلاد الشام / "land of the Levant").
Daphne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Δάφνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-PNEH(Classical Greek) DAF-nee(English) DAHF-nə(Dutch)
Means "laurel" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a nymph turned into a laurel tree by her father in order that she might escape the pursuit of Apollo. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the end of the 19th century.
Daphnée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: DAF-NEH
French variant form of Daphne.
Darayavahush
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Persian
Old Persian form of Darius.
Darius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: də-RIE-əs(English) DAR-ee-əs(English)
Roman form of Δαρεῖος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush meaning "possessing goodness", composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.

It has never been very common as a given name in the English-speaking world, though it rose in popularity after the middle of the 20th century. In the United States it is frequently an African-American name. In Lithuania it may be given in honour of the Lithuanian-American aviator Steponas Darius (1896-1933), who died attempting to fly nonstop from New York to Lithuania. His surname was an Americanized form of the original Darašius.

Davida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Feminine form of David.
December
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: dis-EM-bər, DEE-səm-bər
Derived from the Latin word decem, meaning "ten". December is the twelfth month on the Gregorian calendar. This name is used regularly in America, mostly on females.
Defrim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
Derived from Albanian dëfrim "entertainment; fun".
Deja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: DAY-zhə(English)
Means "already" from the French phrase déjà vu meaning "already seen". It received a popularity boost in 1995 when a character named Deja appeared in the movie Higher Learning.
Deograzia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: de-o-GRAHT-syah
Means "grace of God" or "gratitude, thanks to God", from Latin Deus "God" and gratia "grace".
Desen
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "pattern" in Turkish.
Desiderius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Derived from Latin desiderium meaning "longing, desire". It was the name of several early saints. It was also borne in the 8th century by the last king of the Lombard Kingdom.
Désiré
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: DEH-ZEE-REH
Masculine form of Désirée.
Désirée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, German
Pronounced: DEH-ZEE-REH(French)
French form of Desiderata. In part it is directly from the French word meaning "desired, wished".
Diarmaid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: DYEE-ər-ə-məd(Irish)
Meaning unknown, though it has been suggested that it means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.
Dimas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: DEE-mas(Spanish)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Dismas.
Dolorette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare), French (Quebec, Rare)
Combination of Dolores with the suffix -ette.
Donatello
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: do-na-TEHL-lo
Diminutive of Donato. The Renaissance sculptor Donato di Niccolo di Bette Bardi was better known as Donatello.
Dubois
Usage: French
Pronounced: DUY-BWA
Means "from the forest", from French bois "forest".
Dulce
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: DOOL-theh(European Spanish) DOOL-seh(Latin American Spanish)
Means "sweet" or "candy" in Spanish.
Dulcibella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
From Latin dulcis "sweet" and bella "beautiful". The usual medieval spelling of this name was Dowsabel, and the Latinized form Dulcibella was revived in the 18th century.
Dymphy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: DIM-fee
Dutch diminutive of Dymphna and Dymphina.
Edern
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance, Medieval Breton, Breton
Derived from Old Welsh edyrn "immense; heavy; prodigious, wonderful, marvellous", in the past this name has been (falsely) considered a derivation from Latin aeternus "eternal".
This was the name of the father of the legendary 5th-century war leader Cunedda. It was also the name of a Breton saint, frequently depicted riding a stag.
Eleuterio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: eh-lew-TEH-ryo(Spanish)
Spanish and Italian form of Eleutherius.
Emerald
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHM-ə-rəld
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the traditional birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμάραγδος (smaragdos).
Emmanuelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-MA-NWEHL
French feminine form of Emmanuel.
Enid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: EH-nid(Welsh) EE-nid(English)
Probably derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul, spirit, life". In Arthurian tales she first appears in the 12th-century French poem Erec and Enide by Chrétien de Troyes, where she is the wife of Erec. In later adaptations she is typically the wife of Geraint. The name became more commonly used after the publication of Alfred Tennyson's Arthurian poem Enid in 1859, and it was fairly popular in Britain in the first half of the 20th century.
Énna
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Irish
Possibly from Old Irish én meaning "bird". This was the name of several Irish kings and heroes. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint who built the monastery of Killeany on Aran.
Enoli
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cherokee
Means "black fox" in Cherokee.
Esmeralda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
Estella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ehs-TEHL-ə
Latinate form of Estelle. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
Estelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ehs-TEHL(English) EHS-TEHL(French)
From an Old French name meaning "star", ultimately derived from Latin stella. It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
Estera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Slovak, Romanian, Lithuanian
Pronounced: eh-STEH-ra(Polish)
Polish, Slovak, Romanian and Lithuanian form of Esther.
Estrella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-TREH-ya
Spanish form of Stella 1, coinciding with the Spanish word meaning "star".
Eteri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ეთერი(Georgian)
Pronounced: EH-TEH-REE
Form of Eter with the nominative suffix, used when the name is written stand-alone.
Étiennette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
French feminine form of Stephen.
Evangeline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Means "good news" from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἄγγελμα (angelma) meaning "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his 1847 epic poem Evangeline [1][2]. It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
Ever
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EHV-ər
Simply from the English word ever, derived from Old English æfre.
Evidence
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EV-i-dəns
This name comes from a word which can mean "a fact/observation presented in support of an assertion" or "an appearance from which inferences may be drawn." The word is derived from Old French evidence, which originates from Late Latin evidentia meaning "proof" (for Classical Latin, "distinction, vivid presentation, clearness,") stemming from Latin evidens meaning "obvious, apparent."
Fable
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAY-bel
Derived from the word for a succinct story, in prose or verse, that features animals, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature which are given human qualities, and that illustrates a moral lesson.
The word "fable" comes from the Latin fabula (a "story"), itself derived from fari ("to speak") with the -ula suffix that signifies "little".
Fairlight
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Literature
A transferred use of the surname Fairlight used as far back as the 1800's in England and the States.
Fanthorpe
Usage: English
Fan means "From France" and Thorpe is a Middle English word meaning "Small Village, Hamlet"
Faris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Bosnian
Other Scripts: فارس(Arabic)
Pronounced: FA-rees(Arabic)
Means "horseman, knight" in Arabic.
Fawnie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romani
Derived from the Romani word fawnie "ring; finger ring".
Fayette
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: fah-YET(English)
Short form of Lafayette, or else from a surname ultimately derived from Old French faie "beech", which originally denoted a person who lived in or by a beech wood, or who was from any of various places in France named with the word.
Felina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Feminine form of Felinus.
Feline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: feh-LEE-nə
Dutch feminine form of Felinus.
Fereshteh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: فرشته(Persian)
Means "angel" in Persian.
Ffion
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: FEE-awn, FI-awn
Means "foxglove" in Welsh (species Digitalis purpurea). This is a recently created Welsh name.
Fiachra
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: FEE-akh-ra(Irish)
From Old Irish Fiachrae, possibly from fiach "raven" or fích "battle" combined with "king". This was the name of several legendary figures, including one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners: a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France, usually called Saint Fiacre.
Fiamma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: FYAM-ma
Means "flame" in Italian.
Fiammetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Diminutive of Fiamma.
Finch
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Literature
Pronounced: FINCH(English)
Transferred use of the surname Finch.
Fioralba
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Combination of Italian fiore "flower" and alba "dawn".
Firmin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Medieval English
Pronounced: FEER-MEHN(French)
From the Late Latin name Firminus meaning "firm". This was the name of several early saints, notably the 3rd-century bishop Saint Firmin (or Fermin) of Amiens who is especially venerated in Navarre, Spain.
Flaithrí
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Irish
Means "king of princes" from Old Irish flaith "ruler, sovereign, prince" and "king".
Florence
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: FLAWR-əns(English) FLAW-RAHNS(French)
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.

The name can also be given in reference to the city in Italy, as in the case of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). She was a nurse in British hospitals during the Crimean War and is usually considered the founder of modern nursing.

Florry
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLAWR-ee
Diminutive of Florence or Flora.
Flossie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLAHS-ee
Diminutive of Florence.
Folkvi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Old Swedish
Old Swedish form of Folkví.
Forest
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FAWR-ist
Variant of Forrest, or else directly from the English word forest.
Freeman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FREE-mən
From an English surname meaning "free man". It originally denoted a person who was not a serf.
Friday
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (African)
Pronounced: FRIE-day
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English frigedæg meaning "Frig's day". Daniel Defoe used it for a character in his novel Robinson Crusoe (1719). As a given name, it is most often found in parts of Africa, such as Nigeria and Zambia.
Gage
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GAYJ
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book Pet Sematary (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
Galaxy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: GAL-əks-ee(American English)
From the English word galaxy, "a collection of star systems", ultimately from from Ancient Greek γαλαξίας (galaxías, "Milky Way"), from γάλα (gála, "milk").
Galileo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Italian
Pronounced: gah-lih-LAY-oh
Derived from the medieval Latin word Galilaeus, by way of Greek Galilaios, meaning "Galilean; from Galilee." Galilee is from the Hebrew root galal "roll", perhaps referring to the waves on the sea.

Galileo Galilei (born, February 15,1564) was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who is famous for his scientific innovations and discoveries during the Renaissance period. Galileo is often considered to be "the Father of Modern Science".

Gallus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "rooster" in Latin. It could also refer to a person from Gaul (Latin Gallia). This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland.
Gamaliel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: גַּמְלִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: gə-MAY-lee-əl(English)
Means "my reward is God" in Hebrew. In Acts in the New Testament he is a teacher of Saint Paul.
Garland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAHR-lənd
From a surname meaning "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. The surname originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
Garnet 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAHR-nət
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
Gelsomina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jehl-so-MEE-na
Italian form of Jasmine.
Gentian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
From the name of the flowering plant called the gentian, the roots of which are used to create a tonic. It is derived from the name of the Illyrian king Gentius, who supposedly discovered its medicinal properties.
Gérard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: ZHEH-RAR
French form of Gerard.
Gib
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GIB
Medieval diminutive of Gilbert.
Giuvanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sicilian
Sicilian form of Giovanna.
Gizem
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "mystery" in Turkish.
Glauco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: GLOW-ko(Italian, Spanish)
Italian, Portuguese and Spanish form of Glaucus.
Godfrey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GAHD-free
From the Germanic name Godafrid, which meant "peace of god" from the Germanic elements god "god" and frid "peace". The Normans brought this name to England, where it became common during the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was Godfrey of Bouillon, an 11th-century leader of the First Crusade and the first ruler of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem.
Goldie 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GOL-dee
From a nickname for a person with blond hair, from the English word gold.
Goliath
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: גָּלְיָת(Ancient Hebrew) Γολιάθ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: gə-LIE-əth(English)
From Hebrew גָּלְיָת (Golyat), possibly derived from גָּלָה (galah) meaning "uncover, reveal". This is the name of the giant Philistine who is slain by David in the Old Testament.
Gormlaith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Old Irish [1]
Derived from Old Irish gorm "blue" or "illustrious" and flaith "ruler, sovereign, princess". This was the name of several medieval Irish royals, including the wife of the 11th-century king Brian Boru.
Grímr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norse, Norse Mythology
Means "masked person" or "shape-changer" in Old Norse (derived from gríma "mask, helmet"). This was a byname of the god Odin, perhaps given to boys in an attempt to secure the protection of the god.
Grímúlfur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
From the Old Norse elements grim "mask, helmet" and ulfr "wolf".
Grímur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic, Faroese
Icelandic and Faroese form of Grímr.
Guadalupe
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ghwa-dha-LOO-peh
From a Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, meaning "Our Lady of Guadalupe". Guadalupe is a Spanish place name, the site of a famous convent, derived from Arabic وادي (wadi) meaning "valley, river" possibly combined with Latin lupus meaning "wolf". In the 16th century Our Lady of Guadalupe supposedly appeared in a vision to a native Mexican man, and she is now regarded as a patron saint of the Americas.
Gwenaëlle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GWEH-NA-EHL(French)
Feminine form of Gwenaël.
Halloween
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare)
From the English word Hallowe'en, originally used in 1745 as a contraction of All Hallows Eve.
Hamo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Norman form of Haimo. The Normans brought this name to Britain.
Hans-Günther
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Combination of Hans and Günther.
Hans-Peter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Combination of Hans and Peter.
Harland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-lənd
From a surname that was a variant of Harlan.
Haze
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HAYZ
Variant of Hayes, sometimes used as a short form of Hazel.
Heaven
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: HEHV-ən
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
Hector
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Other Scripts: Ἕκτωρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-tər(English) EHK-TAWR(French)
Latinized form of Greek Ἕκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ἕκτωρ (hektor) meaning "holding fast", ultimately from ἔχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends where it belongs to King Arthur's foster father.

Hector has occasionally been used as a given name since the Middle Ages, probably because of the noble character of the classical hero. It has been historically common in Scotland, where it was used as an Anglicized form of Eachann.

Hero 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἡρώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HIR-o(English)
Derived from Greek ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero". In Greek legend she was the lover of Leander, who would swim across the Hellespont each night to meet her. He was killed on one such occasion when he got caught in a storm while in the water, and when Hero saw his dead body she drowned herself. This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play Much Ado About Nothing (1599).
Herod
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ἡρῴδης, Ἡρώδης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHR-əd(English)
From the Greek name Ἡρῴδης (Herodes), which probably means "song of the hero" from ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero, warrior" combined with ᾠδή (ode) meaning "song, ode". This was the name of several rulers of Judea during the period when it was part of the Roman Empire. This includes two who appear in the New Testament: Herod the Great, the king who ordered the slaughter of the children, and his son Herod Antipas, who had John the Baptist beheaded.
Heroides
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Ἡρώιδης(Ancient Greek)
Ancient Greek form of Herod.
Hestiyar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Kurdish
Derived from Kurdish hestyar meaning "sentimental".
Hina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu, Punjabi, Indian (Muslim)
Other Scripts: حنا(Urdu, Shahmukhi) हिना(Hindi)
Derived from the Arabic حناء (ḥinnāʾ), which refers to a dye taken from the Lawsonia inermis plant (called "henna" in English). In South Asian and Middle Eastern culture, it was traditionally used for body art and dying.
Holiday
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: HAHL-i-day
Transferred use of the surname Holiday.
Hollis
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHL-is
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
Honora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Variant of Honoria. It was brought to England and Ireland by the Normans.
Horacio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: o-RA-thyo(European Spanish) o-RA-syo(Latin American Spanish)
Personal remark: is also a Esperanto name
Spanish form of Horatius.
Horsa
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
From the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse". According to medieval chronicles, Horsa and his brother Hengist were the leaders of the first Saxon settlers to arrive in Britain. Horsa died in battle with the Britons.
Hoshiko
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 星子, etc.(Japanese Kanji) ほしこ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: HO-SHEE-KO, HO-SHKO
From Japanese (hoshi) meaning "star" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Hotaru
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: (Japanese Kanji) ほたる(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: HO-TA-ROO
From Japanese (hotaru) meaning "firefly".
Hrafngrímur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
"Raven Mask" from the Old Norse elements hrafn "Raven" and grim "mask, helmet"
Huguette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: UY-GEHT
Feminine form of Hugues.
Humayra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: حميراء(Arabic)
Pronounced: hoo-mie-RA
Means "red" in Arabic. This was a name given by the Prophet Muhammad to his wife Aisha.
Ibrahima
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Western African
Form of Ibrahim used in parts of western Africa.
Ignatius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ig-NAY-shəs(English)
From the Roman family name Egnatius, meaning unknown, of Etruscan origin. The spelling was later altered to resemble Latin ignis "fire". This was the name of several saints, including the third bishop of Antioch who was thrown to wild beasts by Emperor Trajan, and by Saint Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556), founder of the Jesuits, whose real birth name was in fact Íñigo.
Innocent
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical), English (African)
Pronounced: IN-ə-sənt(English)
From the Late Latin name Innocentius, which was derived from innocens "innocent". This was the name of several early saints. It was also borne by 13 popes including Innocent III, a politically powerful ruler and organizer of the Fourth Crusade.

As an English-language name in the modern era, it is most common in Africa.

Israfil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Other Scripts: إسرافيل(Arabic)
Meaning unknown. In Islamic tradition this is the name of the angel who will blow the trumpet that signals the coming of Judgement Day. He is sometimes equated with the angels Raphael or Uriel from Judeo-Christian tradition.
Ivy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IE-vee
From the English word for the climbing plant that has small yellow flowers. It is ultimately derived from Old English ifig.
Jacobina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: yah-ko-BEE-nah
Feminine form of Jacob.
Jacobine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian (Archaic), Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: yah-ko-BEE-nə(Dutch)
Norwegian and Dutch feminine form of Jacob.
Jagoda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Polish
Other Scripts: Јагода(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ya-GAW-da(Polish)
Means "strawberry" in South Slavic, and "berry" in Polish. Also in Poland, this can be a diminutive of Jadwiga.
Jamyang
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Tibetan, Bhutanese
Other Scripts: འཇམ་དབྱངས(Tibetan)
Means "gentle song" in Tibetan, from འཇམ ('jam) meaning "gentle, soft" and དབྱངས (dbyangs) meaning "song, voice".
Jasmin 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bosnian
Bosnian masculine form of Jasmine.
Jasmine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: JAZ-min(English) ZHAS-MEEN(French)
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers that is used for making perfumes. It is derived via Arabic from Persian یاسمین (yasamin), which is also a Persian name. In the United States this name steadily grew in popularity from the 1970s, especially among African Americans [1]. It reached a peak in the early 1990s shortly after the release of the animated Disney movie Aladdin (1992), which featured a princess by this name.
Jawahir
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: جواهر(Arabic)
Pronounced: ja-WA-heer
Means "jewels" in Arabic, ultimately from Persian گوهر (gohar) meaning "jewel, essence".
Johannes
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Pronounced: yo-HA-nəs(German) yo-HAH-nəs(Dutch) yo-HAN-əs(Danish) YO-hahn-nehs(Finnish)
Latin form of Greek Ioannes (see John). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
Journey
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JUR-nee
From the English word, derived via Old French from Latin diurnus "of the day".
Jupiter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: JOO-pi-tər(English)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyew-pater, composed of the elements Dyews (see Zeus) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
Juvela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: yoo-VEH-la
From Esperanto juvelo meaning "jewel".
Kálmán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: KAL-man
Probably of Turkic origin, meaning "remainder". This was the name of a 12th-century king of Hungary. It was also borne in the 13th-century by the first king of Galicia-Volhynia, who was also a member of the Hungarian Árpád royal family. This name has been frequently confused with Koloman.
Kandaĵa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: kan-DA-zha
Means "made of candy" in Esperanto, a derivative of kando meaning "candy, rock sugar".
Kara-kis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tuvan, Khakas
Means "black girl" in Tuvan and Khakas.
Keitha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Feminine form of Keith.
Kestrel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KEHS-trəl
From the name of the bird of prey, ultimately derived from Old French crecelle "rattle", which refers to the sound of its cry.
Keturah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְטוּרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ki-TOOR-ə(English) ki-TYOOR-ə(English)
Means "incense" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is Abraham's wife after Sarah dies.
Kewê
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kurdish
Derived from Kurdish kew meaning "partridge".
Killara
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indigenous Australian (Rare), Darug
Means "permanent, always there" in Darug.

It's the name of a suburb on the Upper North Shore of Sydney, Australia.

Kinneret
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: כִּנֶּרֶת(Hebrew)
From the name of a large lake in northern Israel, usually called the Sea of Galilee in English. Its name is derived from Hebrew כִּנּוֹר (kinnor) meaning "harp" because of its shape.
Kizil-ool
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Siberian, Khakas
Means "red boy" in Khakas.
Kleid
Usage: Jewish
Occupational name for a tailor, from Old High German kleid meaning "garment, clothing".
Kohinoor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From Koh-i-noor, the name of a famous gemstone, meaning "mountain of light" in Persian.
Kokoro
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) こころ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KO-KO-RO
From Japanese (kokoro) meaning "heart, mind, soul" or other kanji and kanji combinations having the same pronunciation. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Kolgrímur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic, Faroese
"Black Mask" from the Old Norse elements kolr "coal, black, dark" and grim "mask, helmet"
Koraljka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
From Croatian koralj meaning "coral", ultimately from Latin corallium.
Koralo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ko-RA-lo
Means "coral" in Esperanto, ultimately from Latin corallium.
Korbinian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: kawr-BEE-nyan
Derived from Latin corvus meaning "raven". This was the name of an 8th-century Frankish saint who was sent by Pope Gregory II to evangelize in Bavaria. His real name may have been Hraban (see Raban).
Kreka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Meaning unknown, possibly of Turkic or Germanic origin. This name was borne by the most powerful of Attila's wives.
Kreshnik
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
From Albanian kreshnik "knight".
Kuğu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "swan" in Turkish.
Kulpynai
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh (Rare)
Other Scripts: Құлпынай(Kazakh)
Means "strawberry" in Kazakh.
Kuškaš-ool
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tuvan
Means "bird boy" in Tuvan.
Lachlan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LAKH-lən(Scottish) LAK-lən(English)
Anglicized form of Lachlann, the Scottish Gaelic form of Lochlainn. In the English-speaking world, this name was especially popular in Australia towards the end of the 20th century.
Lachtna
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Lachtnae meaning "milk-coloured", from lacht "milk" (borrowed from Latin). This was the name of a great-grandfather of the Irish king Brian Boru.
Lake
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAYK
From the English word lake, for the inland body of water. It is ultimately derived from Latin lacus.
Lamya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: لمياء(Arabic)
Pronounced: lam-YA
Means "having beautiful dark lips" in Arabic.
Lavender
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAV-ən-dər
From the English word for the aromatic flower or the pale purple colour.
Layla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى(Arabic)
Pronounced: LIE-la(Arabic) LAY-lə(English)
Means "night" in Arabic. Layla was the love interest of the poet Qays (called Majnun) in an old Arab tale, notably retold by the 12th-century Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi in his poem Layla and Majnun. This story was a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song Layla by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
Leelo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Estonian
Means "folk song" in Estonian.
Legend
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: LEHJ-ənd
From the English word, referring to a story about the past (or by extension, a heroic character in such a story), ultimately from Latin legere "to read".
Léopoldine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LEH-AW-PAWL-DEEN
French feminine form of Leopold.
Líadan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Pronounced: LEE-din
Possibly from Old Irish líath meaning "grey". According to an Irish tale this was the name of a poet who became a nun, but then missed her lover Cuirithir so much that she died of grief. The name was also borne by a 5th-century saint, the mother of Saint Ciarán the Elder.
Liselotte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
Pronounced: LEE-zeh-law-tə(German)
Combination of Lise and Charlotte.
List
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
From Old Norse list meaning "art", "craft"; "skill", "adroitness", "dexterity".
Listalín
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Modern, Rare)
Combination of the Old Norse name elements list "skill; dexterity; art; craft" and lín "flax; linen; linen garment".
Livilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman diminutive of Livia. It was a family nickname for the elder sister of the Roman emperor Claudius, Livia Julia (c.13 BC-31 AD), apparently called Livilla "little Livia" in order to distinguish her from her grandmother and namesake, Livia (wife of Augustus).
Llinos
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SHEE-naws, SHI-naws
Means "linnet, finch" in Welsh. The linnet (species Linaria cannabina) is a small European bird in the finch family.
Lockie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWK-ee
Diminutive of Lachlan.
Lolita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: lo-LEE-ta
Diminutive of Lola. This is the name of a 1955 novel by Vladimir Nabokov.
Lonán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: LUW-nan(Irish)
Means "little blackbird", derived from Old Irish lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by several early saints.
Luc
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Welsh
Pronounced: LUYK(French)
French and Welsh form of Lucas (see Luke).
Luca 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Pronounced: LOO-ka
Italian and Romanian form of Lucas (see Luke). This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
Lucas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: LOO-kəs(English) LUY-kahs(Dutch) LUY-KA(French) LOO-kush(European Portuguese) LOO-kus(Brazilian Portuguese) LOO-kas(Spanish, Swedish, Latin)
Latin form of Greek Λουκᾶς (see Luke), as well as the form used in several other languages.

This name became very popular in the second half of the 20th century. It reached the top ten names for boys in France (by 1997), Belgium (1998), Denmark (2003), Canada (2008), the Netherlands (2009), New Zealand (2009), Australia (2010), Scotland (2013), Spain (2015) and the United States (2018).

Lujayn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: لجين(Arabic)
Pronounced: loo-JIEN
Means "silver" in Arabic.
Lunette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Archaic)
Means "little moon" in Medieval French. It is derived from French lune "moon" combined with a diminutive suffix. So, in other words, one could say that this name is the diminutive form of Lune.
Lupita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: loo-PEE-ta
Diminutive of Guadalupe.
Luqman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Malay, Urdu, Indonesian
Other Scripts: لقمان(Arabic, Malay Jawi, Urdu)
Pronounced: look-MAN(Arabic)
From the name of the 31st chapter (surah) of the Qur'an, named after a figure who is mentioned several times in Islamic scripture. The meaning of his name is not known; it has been suggested to mean "wise" (possibly in reference to his status as a wise man and sage), though it may actually have Sanskrit roots with a similar origin to the names Lakshmana or Lakshmi.
Lycus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λύκος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λύκος (Lykos) meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology including a legendary ruler of Thebes.
Lydia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Λυδία(Ancient Greek) Лѷдіа(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: LID-ee-ə(English) LUY-dya(German)
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king Lydos. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
Macbeth
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: mək-BETH(English)
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic given name Mac Beatha meaning "son of life", implying holiness. This was the name of an 11th-century Scottish king. Shakespeare based his play Macbeth loosely on this king's life.
Maeva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian, French
Pronounced: MA-EH-VA(French)
Means "welcome" in Tahitian. It gained popularity in France during the 1980s.
Magdala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian), Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic), Biblical Hebrew, Literature
Pronounced: MAHG-dah-lah(Latin American Spanish) MAG-də-lə(Hispanic American)
From the biblical, historic village on the Sea of Galilee, whose name meant "tower" in Hebrew. It is where Mary Magdalene was from.

It is the name of a central character in the Agatha Christie mystery novel "Peril at End House," which features detective Hercule Poirot.

Makvala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: მაყვალა(Georgian)
Derived from Georgian მაყვალი (maqvali) meaning "blackberry".
Marigold
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MAR-i-gold, MEHR-i-gold
From the name of the flower, which comes from a combination of Mary and the English word gold.
Marine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Armenian, Georgian
Other Scripts: Մարինէ(Armenian) მარინე(Georgian)
Pronounced: MA-REEN(French)
French, Armenian and Georgian form of Marina.
Maristela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish (Rare)
From the title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea" in Latin. It can also be a combination of Maria and Estela.
Marjanah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Literature
Other Scripts: مرجانة(Arabic)
This name comes from 'Marjaan' with a meaning of 'little pearl' or 'red coral. It is notably used within the Arabian Nights as the name of the clever slave of Ali Baba within 'Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves' although it is important to note this name is used outside of the Nights. It is not to be confused as a variant of Marianna.
Marjolaine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-ZHAW-LEHN
Means "marjoram" in French. Marjoram is a minty herb.
Mars
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: MARS(Latin) MAHRZ(English)
Possibly related to Latin mas meaning "male" (genitive maris). In Roman mythology Mars was the god of war, often equated with the Greek god Ares. This is also the name of the fourth planet in the solar system.
Martial
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, History
Pronounced: MAR-SYAL(French) MAHR-shəl(English)
From the Roman cognomen Martialis, which was derived from the name of the Roman god Mars. The name was borne by Marcus Valerius Martialis, now commonly known as Martial, a Roman poet of the 1st century.
Matryoshka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: матрёшка(Russian)
The diminutive of Matrona. This is also the name of the Russian nesting dolls.
Medraut
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Welsh form of Mordred.
Mehetabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מְהֵיטַבְאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: mi-HEHT-ə-behl(English)
From the Hebrew name מְהֵיטַבְאֵל (Meheitav'el) meaning "God makes happy". This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament.
Mélanie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEH-LA-NEE
French form of Melanie.
Melanie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: MEHL-ə-nee(English) MEH-la-nee(German) meh-la-NEE(German)
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μέλαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.

The name was common in France during the Middle Ages, and was it introduced from there to England, though it eventually became rare. Interest in it was revived by the character Melanie Wilkes from the novel Gone with the Wind (1936) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1939).

Melchior
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Pronounced: MEHL-khee-awr(Dutch) MEHL-kee-awr(English)
Possibly from the Hebrew roots מֶלֶכְ (melekh) meaning "king" and אוֹר ('or) meaning "light". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. According to medieval tradition he was a king of Persia.
Meliora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Derived from Latin melior meaning "better".
Meliton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Georgian
Other Scripts: Μελίτων(Ancient Greek) მელიტონ(Georgian)
Derived from Greek μέλι (meli) meaning "honey" (genitive μέλιτος). This was the name of a 2nd-century bishop of Sardis who is regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church.
Mélodie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEH-LAW-DEE
French cognate of Melody.
Mercan
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Turkish
From Turkish mercan meaning "coral".
Mercurio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Italian form of Mercury.
Mercury
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: MURK-yə-ree(English)
From the Latin Mercurius, probably derived from Latin mercari "to trade" or merces "wages". This was the name of the Roman god of trade, merchants, and travellers, later equated with the Greek god Hermes. This is also the name of the first planet in the solar system and a metallic chemical element, both named for the god.
Meriwether
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MEHR-i-wedh-ər
From a surname meaning "happy weather" in Middle English, originally belonging to a cheery person. A notable bearer of the name was Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809), who, with William Clark, explored the west of North America.
Mihangel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Welsh name of the archangel Michael, formed from a contraction of Michael and angel.
Minodora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian form of Menodora.
Mirabelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis meaning "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Modest
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Модест(Russian)
Russian form of Modestus.
Moïsette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Feminine form of Moïse.
Monday
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (African)
Pronounced: MUN-day
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English mona "moon" and dæg "day". This can be given to children born on Monday, especially in Nigeria.
Mordred
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From Welsh Medraut, possibly from Latin moderatus meaning "controlled, moderated". In Arthurian legend Mordred was the illegitimate son (in some versions nephew) of King Arthur. Mordred first appears briefly (as Medraut) in the 10th-century Annales Cambriae [1], but he was not portrayed as a traitor until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth. While Arthur is away he seduces his wife Guinevere and declares himself king. This prompts the battle of Camlann, which leads to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur.
Morganna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-GAN-ə
Variant of Morgana.
Morgiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Form of Marjanah used in some versions of 'Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves', one of the tales of 'The 1001 Nights', where it is the name of a clever slave girl. It was also used by Shinobu Ohtaka for a character in her manga 'Magi: The Labyrinth of Magic' (2009-), based loosely on 'The 1001 Nights'.
Morrígan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Means either "demon queen" or "great queen", derived from Old Irish mor "demon, evil spirit" or mór "great, big" combined with rígain "queen". In Irish mythology Morrígan (called also The Morrígan) was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
Na'im
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نعيم(Arabic)
Pronounced: na-‘EEM
Means "tranquil, happy, at ease" in Arabic.
Na'ima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نعيمة(Arabic)
Pronounced: na-‘EE-mah
Feminine form of Na'im.
Naime
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Turkish feminine form of Na'im.
Napoleon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, English
Pronounced: nə-PO-lee-ən(English)
From the old Italian name Napoleone, used most notably by the French emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was born on Corsica. The etymology is uncertain, but it is possibly derived from the Germanic Nibelungen meaning "sons of mist", a name used in Germanic mythology to refer to the keepers of a hoard of treasure (often identified with the Burgundians). Alternatively, it could be connected to the name of the Italian city of Napoli (Naples).
Natyra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Means "nature" in Albanian.
Neifion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Pronounced: NAY-vyon
Welsh form of Neptune.
Neige
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), French (Belgian, Rare), French (Quebec)
Pronounced: NEZH(French, Belgian French) NIEZH(Quebec French)
Derived from French neige "snow". The name is ultimately derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Notre-Dame des Neiges "Our Lady of the Snows" (compare Nieves).
Nenetl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Nahuatl
Means "doll" in Nahuatl.
Neonila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Неоніла(Ukrainian)
Ukrainian form of Neonilla. A known bearer is Ukrainian actress Neonila "Nila" Kryukova (1943-).
Neonilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (?), Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Νεονιλλα(Greek) Неонилла(Russian)
Personal remark: "Neon" nickname Russians also use the same word
Likely derived from the Greek element νεος (neos) meaning "new". This was the name of a 3rd-century Syrian saint, supposedly martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Decius along with her husband Terence and their seven children.
Nephele
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νεφέλη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEH-PEH-LEH(Classical Greek) NEHF-ə-lee(English)
From Greek νέφος (nephos) meaning "cloud". In Greek legend Nephele was created from a cloud by Zeus, who shaped the cloud to look like Hera in order to trick Ixion, a mortal who desired her. Nephele was the mother of the centaurs by Ixion, and was also the mother of Phrixus and Helle by Athamus.
Neptune
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: NEHP-toon(English) NEHP-tyoon(English)
From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh- "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.
Nevio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: NEH-vyo
Italian form of the Roman family name Naevius, which was derived from Latin naevus "mole (on the body)". A famous bearer was the 3rd-century BC Roman poet Gnaeus Naevius.
Noctis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Derived from Latin noctis "of the night". This is the name of a character in Final Fantasy XIII Versus.
Non
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Possibly derived from Latin nonna meaning "nun". According to tradition, this was the name of the mother of Saint David.
Nóttolfr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norse
Combination of nátt "night" and ulfr "wolf".
Nubia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of the ancient region and kingdom in Africa, south of Egypt. It possibly derives from the Egyptian word nbw meaning "gold".
Nuh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish
Other Scripts: نوح(Arabic)
Pronounced: NOOH(Arabic)
Arabic and Turkish form of Noah 1.
Oak
Usage: English
Topographic surname for someone who lived near an oak tree or in an oak wood, from Middle English oke "oak".
Océane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-SEH-AN
Derived from French océan meaning "ocean".
Odharnait
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Derived from odar "dun-coloured, greyish brown, tan" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
Okeanosi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ოკეანოსი(Georgian)
Georgian form of Okeanos. Also compare the Georgian noun ოკეანე (okeane) meaning "ocean".
Ondina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Italian
Portuguese and Italian form of Undine.
Onni
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: ON-nee
Means "happiness, luck" in Finnish.
Orpheus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὀρφεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: OR-PEWS(Classical Greek) AWR-fee-əs(English)
Perhaps related to Greek ὄρφνη (orphne) meaning "the darkness of night". In Greek mythology Orpheus was a poet and musician who went to the underworld to retrieve his dead wife Eurydice. He succeeded in charming Hades with his lyre, and he was allowed to lead his wife out of the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her until they reached the surface. Unfortunately, just before they arrived his love for her overcame his will and he glanced back at her, causing her to be drawn back to Hades.
Pakuna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Miwok (?)
Allegedly a variant of Pukuna, a Miwok name meaning "deer jumping when running downhill".
Panther
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Πάνθηρ(Ancient Greek)
Ancient Greek name meaning "panther".
Parvaneh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: پروانه(Persian)
Pronounced: par-vaw-NEH
Means "butterfly" in Persian.
Perrine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: PEH-REEN
French feminine form of Perrin, a diminutive of Pierre.
Persephone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
Peter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tər(English) PEH-tu(German) PEH-tər(Dutch, Danish, Slovene) PEH-tehr(Slovak)
Derived from Greek Πέτρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.

Due to the renown of the apostle, this name became common throughout the Christian world (in various spellings). In England the Normans introduced it in the Old French form Piers, which was gradually replaced by the spelling Peter starting in the 15th century [1].

Besides the apostle, other saints by this name include the 11th-century reformer Saint Peter Damian and the 13th-century preacher Saint Peter Martyr. It was also borne by rulers of Aragon, Portugal, and Russia, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great (1672-1725), who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War. Famous fictional bearers include Peter Rabbit from Beatrix Potter's children's books, and Peter Pan, the boy who refused to grow up in J. M. Barrie's 1904 play.

Peynirci
Usage: Turkish
Pronounced: pay-NEER-jee
From Turkish peynir meaning "cheese".
Phalaris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Φάλαρις(Ancient Greek)
Probably derived from Greek φάλαρον (phalaron), which was the name for a metal disc or boss that was worn as a military ornament on the breast. Phalaris was the name of a tyrant of Acragas (now Agrigento) in Sicily, who lived in the 6th century BC.
Philippa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), German
Pronounced: FI-li-pə(English)
Latinate feminine form of Philip. As an English name, it is chiefly British.
Philippine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FEE-LEE-PEEN
Elaborated feminine form of Philippe.
Phillip
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FIL-ip
Variant of Philip, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.
Phlox
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Taken from the name of the flower, whose name is derived from Greek phlox "flame". As a given name, it has been in occasional use in the English-speaking world from the late 19th century onwards.
Phyllis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Φυλλίς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FIL-is(English)
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
Pine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German short form of Philippine.
Pipaluk
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Means "sweet little thing who belongs to me" in Greenlandic [1].
Piper
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: PIE-pər
From an English surname that was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series Charmed, which debuted in 1998 [1].
Pocahontas
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Powhatan (Anglicized)
Means "little playful one" in Powhatan, an Algonquian language. This was the nickname of a 17th-century Powhatan woman, a daughter of the powerful chief Wahunsenacawh. She married the white colonist John Rolfe and travelled with him to England, but died of illness before returning.
Poppy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: PAHP-ee
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
Porcia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Porcius.
Prosper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: PRAWS-PEHR(French) PRAHS-pər(English)
From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.
Prospero
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: PRAW-speh-ro
Italian form of Prosper. This was the name of the shipwrecked magician in The Tempest (1611) by Shakespeare.
Quadratus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Derived from Latin quadratus meaning "square." This name has been borne by several saints, such as Quadratus the Apologist of Athens.
Quieta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian (Rare), Romanian (Rare), English (Rare), German (Swiss, Rare), Caribbean (Rare)
Derived from Latin quietus, -a, -um "quiet". This was the name of a saint.
Ramadan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رَمَضان(Arabic)
Pronounced: ra-ma-DAN
From the name of the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. It is derived from Arabic رمض (ramad) meaning "parchedness, scorchedness". Muslims traditionally fast during this month.
Ratti
Usage: Italian
From Italian ratto meaning "rat", originally denoting a sly individual.
Ravenna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: rə-VEHN-ə
Either an elaboration of Raven, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.
Regan
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Literature, English
Pronounced: REE-gən(English)
Meaning unknown. In the chronicles of Geoffrey of Monmouth it is the name of a treacherous daughter of King Leir. Shakespeare adapted the story for his tragedy King Lear (1606). In the modern era it has appeared in the horror movie The Exorcist (1973) belonging to a girl possessed by the devil. This name can also be used as a variant of Reagan.
Renard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: RU-NAR
French form of Reynard. Because of the medieval character Reynard the Fox, renard became a French word meaning "fox".
Reverie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: REHV-ə-ree
From the English word meaning "daydream, fanciful musing", derived from Old French resverie, itself from resver meaning "to dream, to rave".
Rhys
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: REES
From Old Welsh Ris, probably meaning "ardour, enthusiasm". Several Welsh rulers have borne this name, including the 12th-century Rhys ap Gruffydd who fought against the invading Normans.
Richardine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: rich-ər-DEEN
Feminine form of Richard.
Rim
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ريم(Arabic)
Pronounced: REEM
Means "white antelope" in Arabic.
Ringo
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Japanese
Pronounced: REE-ngo(English) Ring-oh(English, Japanese) rin-go(English) RIN-go(English) ring-o(English) REE-NGO(Japanese) RIN-GO(Japanese) RING-O(Japanese)
Transferred use of the surname Ringo. A famous bearer of this name was Beatles drummer Richard Starkey (1940), who was nicknamed Ringo due to the many rings he would wear. He ultimately adopted this nickname into a stagename, Ringo Starr, with Starr being an abbreviated form of his surname.

Last but not least, this name can also be Japanese for "apple" or "peace be with you".

Rirette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: RI-RET
Probably derived from the French word rire "laughter".

It can also be seen as a nickname of Henriette.

The name was borne as a pseudonym by the French individual anarchist Rirette Maîterejean.

Robinette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French, French (Rare), English (American, Rare)
Medieval French diminutive of Robine (as -ette is a French feminine diminutive suffix). In other words: you could say that this name is the feminine form of Robinet. This given name is extremely rare in France nowadays, as there are only a handful of bearers in the country today. It doesn't fare much better as a matronymic surname either, what with only 8 bearers of the Robinette surname having been born in France between 1966 and 1990.

As a given name, Robinette is nowadays more used in English-speaking countries (primarily the United States), where its use is often inspired by the surname Robinette (as surnames are often used as given names in the English-speaking world), which is more prevalent there than in France.

Roin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: როინ(Georgian)
Derived from the Middle Persian adjective rōyēn meaning "brazen", which is ultimately derived from the Middle Persian noun rōy meaning "brass, copper".

Also compare the name Royintan from the Shahnameh, which might possibly have been the inspiration behind the use of Roin as a given name in Georgia.

Known bearers of this name include the Georgian historian Roin Metreveli (b. 1939) and the Georgian soccer player Roin Kvaskhvadze (b. 1989).

Rónán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: RO-nahn(Irish)
Means "little seal", derived from Old Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several early Irish saints, including a pilgrim to Brittany who founded the hermitage at Locronan in the 6th century.
Roshanak
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Ancient Persian
Other Scripts: روشنک(Persian)
Original Persian form of Roxana.
Rowan
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ruadhán. As an English name, it can also be derived from the surname Rowan, itself derived from the Irish given name. It could also be given in reference to the rowan tree, a word of Old Norse origin (coincidentally sharing the same Indo-European root meaning "red" with the Irish name).
Rubina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Italian (Rare)
Derived from Portuguese rubi or Italian rubino meaning "ruby", ultimately from Latin ruber "red".
Rudolphine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), Dutch (Surinamese, Rare)
Feminine form of Rudolph.
Rune
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: ROO-nə(Norwegian) ROO-neh(Danish, Swedish)
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
Saladin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Pronounced: SAL-ə-din(English)
Anglicized form of Salah ad-Din.
Saltanat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Салтанат(Kazakh)
Possibly means "festival" in Kazakh.
Saoirse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic. It was first used as a given name in the 20th century.
Saturday
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), African American
From the English word for the day of the week, ultimately deriving from Latin meaning "Saturn's day."

This is also an African American name (as with all the other weekdays). Naming children after the day they were born is common in some African cultures, notably Akan. Early slaves in America continued the day-naming practice with the English equivalents.

Saturn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: SAT-ərn(English)
From the Latin Saturnus, which is of unknown meaning. In Roman mythology he was the father of Jupiter, Juno and others, and was also the god of agriculture. This is also the name of the ringed sixth planet in the solar system.
Sauda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Meaning uncertain, possibly a variant of Sawda.
Schnuckenack
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Pronounced: shnuwk-ə-nak
From Romani schuker nak "beautiful nose".

The name is borne by the musician Schnuckenack Reinhardt, a cousin of Django Reinhardt.

Şehrazad
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish (Rare)
Turkish form of Shahrazad.
September
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sehp-TEHM-bər
From the name of the ninth month (though it means "seventh month" in Latin, since it was originally the seventh month of the Roman year), which is sometimes used as a given name for someone born in September.
Seraphina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: sehr-ə-FEEN-ə(English) zeh-ra-FEE-na(German)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim, which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each.

This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

Séraphine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-RA-FEEN
French form of Seraphina.
Shahrazad
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian (Rare), Arabic
Other Scripts: شهرزاد(Persian, Arabic)
Pronounced: shah-ra-ZAD(Arabic)
Means "free city" from the Persian elements شهر (shahr) meaning "city" and آزاد (azad) meaning "free". This is the name of the fictional storyteller in The 1001 Nights. She tells a story to her husband the king every night for 1001 nights in order to delay her execution.
Shakur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: شكور(Arabic)
Pronounced: sha-KOOR
Means "thankful" in Arabic, from the root شَكَرَ (shakara) meaning "to thank". In Islamic tradition الشكور (al-Shakur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
Sham'a
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: شمعة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SHAM-‘ah
Means "lamp" or "candle" in Arabic.
Shandar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: شاندار(Urdu)
Means "fabulous" in Urdu.
Sheba
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שְׁבָא(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SHEE-bə(English)
Means "oath" in Hebrew. This is the name of several characters in the Old Testament. Also in the Bible, this is a place name, referring to a region in Ethiopia. The queen of Sheba visited Solomon after hearing of his wisdom.
Sheraga
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Other Scripts: שְׁרַגָא(Hebrew)
Means "light, candle" in Aramaic.
Shihab
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: شهاب(Arabic)
Pronounced: shee-HAB
Means "shooting star, meteor" in Arabic.
Shikoba
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Choctaw
Means "feather" in Choctaw.
Shkurte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
From Albanian shkurte meaning "kind of shirt".
Shorena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian, Literature
Other Scripts: შორენა(Georgian)
Pronounced: SHOR-EN-AH(Georgian)
Variant of Borena. It came about due to people confusing or misreading the letters bani (b) and shini (sh) of the medieval Georgian scripts Asomtavruli and Nuskhuri, which are very similar to each other. In other words: this name is basically a corruption of Borena.

Due to close similarity with the Georgian words შორს (shors) meaning "far away, far" and შორეული (shoreuli) meaning "far", people often mistakenly believe that Shorena is derived from these words (or otherwise related to them) and means something along the lines of "distant, remote" (as in, hard to reach).

Lastly, it should be noted that there are sources that claim that the name is derived from Parthian sura meaning "strong, powerful".

In Georgian literature, Shorena is the name of a character from the historical novel The Right Hand of the Grand Master (1939) written by Konstantine Gamsakhurdia (1893-1975).

Shqipe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
From Albanian shqip meaning "Albanian". Additionally, the word shqipe means "eagle" in modern Albanian, a variant of older shkabë. These interrelated words are often the subject of competing claims that the one is derived from the other. The ultimate origin of shqip "Albanian" is uncertain, but it may be from shqipoj meaning "to say clearly".
Shula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: شعلة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SHOO‘-lah
Means "flame" in Arabic.
Siavash
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Persian Mythology
Other Scripts: سیاوش(Persian)
Means "possessing black stallions" in Avestan. This is the name of a prince in the 10th-century Persian epic the Shahnameh.
Siegfried
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: ZEEK-freet(German)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the Nibelungenlied. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. He is a parallel to the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera The Ring of the Nibelung (1876).
Sieglinde
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: zeek-LIN-də(German)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied.
Sinopa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Siksika
Means, "kit fox."
Sissinnguaq
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Greenlandic
Means "squirrel" in Greenlandic [1].
Skúla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Modern, Rare)
Feminine form of Skúli.
Smaranda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: Smah-rahn-dah
Derived from Romanian smarand meaning "emerald". It is a cognate of Smaragda, Esmeralda and Emerald.
Snowden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SNO-dən
Transferred use of the surname Snowden.
Songül
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
From Turkish son meaning "last, final" and gül meaning "rose".
Spomenka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
From Croatian spomenak meaning "forget-me-not flower".
Spring
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPRING
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English springan "to leap, to burst forth".
Spurling
Usage: English
From Middle English sparewe "sparrow" and the diminutive suffix -ling.
Stelara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: steh-LA-ra
From Esperanto stelaro meaning "constellation", ultimately from Latin stella "star".
Stella 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Dutch, German
Pronounced: STEHL-ə(English)
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
Sterling
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STUR-ling
From a Scots surname that was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent". In this case, the word derives from sterling silver, which was so named because of the emblem that some Norman coins bore, from Old English meaning "little star".
Şule
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "flame" in Turkish.
Sultana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, Bengali
Other Scripts: سلطانة(Arabic) سلطانہ(Urdu) সুলতানা(Bengali)
Pronounced: sool-TA-nah(Arabic)
Feminine form of Sultan.
Sunday
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (African)
Pronounced: SUN-day
From the name of the day of the week, which ultimately derives from Old English sunnandæg, which was composed of the elements sunne "sun" and dæg "day". This name is most common in Nigeria and other parts of Africa.
Suzu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) すず(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SOO-ZOO
From Japanese (suzu) meaning "bell" or other kanji having the same pronunciation.
Svitlana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Світлана(Ukrainian)
Ukrainian form of Svetlana.
Sweet
Usage: English
Pronounced: SWEET
From a nickname meaning "sweet, pleasant", from Old English swete.
Tadhg
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: TIEG(Irish)
From Old Irish Tadg meaning "poet" [1]. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Connacht, as well as several other kings and chieftains of medieval Ireland. According to Irish mythology it was the name of the grandfather of Fionn mac Cumhaill.
Talitha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Pronounced: TAL-i-thə(English) tə-LEE-thə(English)
Means "little girl" in Aramaic. The name is taken from the phrase talitha cumi meaning "little girl arise" spoken by Jesus in order to restore a young girl to life (see Mark 5:41).
Tawus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Kurdish
Pronounced: Ta:vus(Arabic)
Means "peacock".
Télesphore
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Archaic)
French form of the Greek name Τελεσφόρος (Telesphoros) meaning "bringing fulfillment" or "bearing fruit" [1]. Saint Telesphorus was a 2nd-century pope and martyr.
Temperance
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHM-prəns, TEHM-pər-əns
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It experienced a modest revival in the United States during the run of the television series Bones (2005-2017), in which the main character bears this name.
Terence
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHR-əns
From the Roman family name Terentius, which is of unknown meaning. Famous bearers include Publius Terentius Afer, a Roman playwright, and Marcus Terentius Varro, a Roman scholar. It was also borne by several early saints. The name was used in Ireland as an Anglicized form of Toirdhealbhach, but it was not found as an English name until the late 19th century. It attained only a moderate level of popularity in the 20th century, though it has been common as an African-American name especially since the 1970s.
Thankful
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: THANGK-fəl
From the English word thankful. This was one of the many virtue names used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Thomasina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: tahm-ə-SEE-nə
Medieval feminine form of Thomas.
Thrussell
Usage: English
From Old English þrostle meaning "song thrush", referring to a cheerful person.
Thulile
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Zulu
Means "quiet, peaceful" in Zulu.
Thurayya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ثريّا, ثريّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: thoo-RIE-ya, thoo-RIE-yah
Means "the Pleiades" in Arabic. The Pleiades are a group of stars in the constellation Taurus.
Tiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: tee-AHR-ə
From the English word for a semicircle crown, ultimately of Greek origin.
Tiger
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TIE-gər
From the name of the large striped cat, derived (via Old French and Latin) from Greek τίγρις (tigris), ultimately of Iranian origin. A famous bearer is American golfer Tiger Woods (1975-).
Tilly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TIL-ee
Diminutive of Matilda.
Tlilpotonqui
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Nahuatl
Means "feathered in black" in Nahuatl.
Tolkyn
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Толқын(Kazakh) تولقىن(Kazakh Arabic)
Pronounced: tol-KUN
Means "wave" in Kazakh.
Torako
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: トラコ(Japanese Katakana) とら子(Kanji/Hiragana) トラ子(Kanji/Katakana) 虎子, 登羅子, 寅子, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: TO-ṘA-KO
From Japanese 虎 (tora) meaning "tiger" combined with 子 (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Tuesday
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Afro-American (Slavery-era)
Pronounced: TOOZ-day(English)
From the name of the day of the week, which derives from Old English tiwesdæg, itself composed of Tiw (genitive Tiwes) and dæg meaning "day". This was used as an African American name during the slave period, as were all the other weekdays; naming children after the weekday on which they were born is common in some African cultures, notably Akan, and early slaves in America continued this practice with the English translations. This is also borne by the American actress Tuesday Weld (1943-), birth name Susan Ker Weld.
Tui
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Maori
Pronounced: Too-ee
Tui is the Maori name for the bird (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae), which are easily identified for their small tuft of white feathers at the neck.

In my experience Tui is solely a feminine name, although it could be equally masculine.

Tuya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Tuya was the wife of Pharaoh Seti I of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt (1292-1189). She was mother of Tia, Ramesses II, Nebchasetnebet, and perhaps Henutmire.

Ramesses II himself chose this name for one of his daughters.

Twila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TWIE-lə
Meaning unknown. Perhaps based on the English word twilight, or maybe from a Cajun pronunciation of French étoile "star" [1]. It came into use as an American given name in the late 19th century.
Tybalt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Medieval form of Theobald. This is the name of a cousin of Juliet killed by Romeo in Shakespeare's drama Romeo and Juliet (1596).
Tzufit
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: צוּפִית(Hebrew)
Means "hummingbird" in Hebrew.
Uaithne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Irish [1]
Possibly from Old Irish úaine meaning "green". Alternatively, it may come from the name of the Irish tribe the Uaithni [2].
Umeko
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 梅子, etc.(Japanese Kanji) うめこ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: OO-MEH-KO
From Japanese (ume) meaning "apricot, plum" (referring to the species Prunus mume) and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Ùna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish Gaelic
Pronounced: OO-nə
Scottish Gaelic form of Úna.
Universina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Feminine form of Universo.
Universo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Variant of Universino.
Upton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: UP-tən
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "upper town" in Old English. A famous bearer of this name was the American novelist Upton Sinclair (1878-1968).
Uranus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Οὐρανός(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-RAY-nəs(English) YOOR-ə-nəs(English)
From Greek Οὐρανός (Ouranos), the name of the husband of Gaia and the father of the Titans in Greek mythology. His name is derived from οὐρανός (ouranos) meaning "the heavens". This is also the name of the seventh planet in the solar system.
Uzma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عظمى(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘OODH-ma
Means "supreme, greatest" in Arabic.
Üzüm
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Means "grapes" in Turkish.
Vaduny
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian (Rare), Slavic Mythology
Possibly means "to see; to know", if derived from the Proto-Slavic věděti, from the Proto-Indo-European wóyd 'to know', from weyd 'to see, to know'. The name itself appears to be a variation of the Russian word vedun'ia "witch, sorceress", the feminine form of vedun 'sorcerer'.
Väinämöinen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish Mythology
Pronounced: VIE-na-mui-nehn(Finnish)
Derived from Finnish väinä meaning "wide and slow-flowing river". In Finnish mythology Väinämöinen was a wise old magician, the son of the primal goddess Ilmatar. He is the hero of the Finnish epic the Kalevala.
Valentine 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VAL-in-tien
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus, which was itself a derivative of the cognomen Valens meaning "strong, vigorous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.
Valentine 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VA-LAHN-TEEN
French feminine form of Valentinus (see Valentine 1).
Valérian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
French form of Valerianus (see Valerian).
Valerian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Georgian, Romanian, History
Other Scripts: Валериан(Russian) ვალერიან(Georgian)
Pronounced: və-LIR-ee-ən(English)
From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name Valerius. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor (Publius Licinius Valerianus) who was captured by the Persians. Several saints have also borne this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.
Venus
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: WEH-noos(Latin) VEE-nəs(English)
Means "love, sexual desire" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of love and sex. Her character was assimilated with that of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. As the mother of Aeneas she was considered an ancestor of the Roman people. The second planet from the sun is named after her.
Vercingetorix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Gaulish
Pronounced: wehr-king-GEH-taw-riks(Latin) vər-sin-JEHT-ə-riks(English)
Means "king over warriors" from Gaulish wer "on, over" combined with kingeto "marching men, warriors" and rix "king". This name was borne by a 1st-century BC chieftain of the Gaulish tribe the Arverni. He led the resistance against Julius Caesar's attempts to conquer Gaul, but he was eventually defeated, brought to Rome, and executed.
Veronica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Romanian, Late Roman
Pronounced: və-RAHN-i-kə(American English) və-RAWN-i-kə(British English)
Latin alteration of Berenice, the spelling influenced by the ecclesiastical Latin phrase vera icon meaning "true image". This was the name of a legendary saint who wiped Jesus' face with a towel and then found his image imprinted upon it. Due to popular stories about her, the name was occasionally used in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. It was borne by the 17th-century Italian saint and mystic Veronica Giuliani. As an English name, it was not common until the 19th century, when it was imported from France and Scotland.
Véronique
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEH-RAW-NEEK
French form of Veronica.
Violante
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Italian
Pronounced: vee-o-LAN-teh(Italian)
Latin form of Yolanda.
Vitória
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Pronounced: vee-TAW-ryu
Portuguese form of Victoria.
Wednesday
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: WENZ-day(English)
From the name of the day of the week, which was derived from Old English wodnesdæg meaning "Woden's day". On the Addams Family television series (1964-1966) this was the name of the teenaged daughter, based on an earlier unnamed character in Charles Addams' cartoons. Her name was inspired by the popular nursery rhyme line Wednesday's child is full of woe.
Wickaninnish
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Nuu-chah-nulth (Anglicized)
Pronounced: wik-ə-NIN-ish(English)
Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in Nuu-chah-nulth. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.
Widogast
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and gast "stranger, guest".
Wilbur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WIL-bər
From an English surname that was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane. Wright was named after the Methodist minister Wilbur Fisk (1792-1839).
Wilder
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
From an English surname meaning "wild, untamed, uncontrolled", from Old English wilde.
Wing
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Canadian)
Winter
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
Wisteria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIS-tee- ree-a
Derived from the name of the flower, which in turn was named after the American anatomist Caspar Wistar. His last name allegedly derives from German Westländer "westerner".
Wulfsige
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1][2]
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and sige "victory".
Yvonne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: EE-VAWN(French) i-VAHN(English) ee-VAWN(German) ee-VAW-nə(Dutch)
French feminine form of Yvon. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
Zamziya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh (Rare)
Other Scripts: Замзия(Kazakh) زامزىييا(Kazakh Arabic)
Derived from Arabic شَمْسِيّ (šamsiyy) meaning "solar".
Zbigniew
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ZBYEEG-nyehf
Derived from the Slavic elements zbyti "to dispel" and gnyevu "anger".
Zinat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Bengali
Other Scripts: زینت(Persian) জিনাত(Bengali)
Means "ornament" in Persian (of Arabic origin).
Zipporah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə(English) ZIP-ə-rə(English)
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
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