Furcifer's Personal Name List

Abaddon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֲבַדּוֹן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ə-BAD-ən(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "ruin, destruction" in Hebrew. In Revelation in the New Testament this is another name of the angel of the abyss.
Abraxas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology, Gnosticism, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: ΑΒΡΑΞΑΣ(Greek)
Pronounced: ə-BRAK-səs(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From a word thought to have originated with the Gnostics or the Egyptians, found on many amulets during the last years of the Roman Empire. Abraxas was used by the Basilideans, a Gnostic sect of the 2nd century, to refer to the Supreme Being or god whom they worshipped; they believed it to be a name of power because it contained the seven Greek letters which, computed numerically, equal the number 365 (the number of days in the year). However, older mythologists placed Abraxas among the Egyptian gods, while some demonologists cite him as a demon with the head of a king and serpents forming his feet. He has been represented on amulets with a whip in his hand. The mystic word abracadabra is supposedly derived from his name (itself perhaps derived from Aramaic avra kedabra "what was said, occurred" or "I will create as I speak"). Many stones and gems were cut with his capricious symbolic markings, such as a human body having a fowl's or lion's head, and snakes as limbs, which were worn by the Basilideans as amulets. Gnostic symbols were later adopted by many societies devoted to magic and alchemy, therefore it is likely that most "abraxas-stones" made in the Middle Ages that contained kabbalistic symbols were talismans.

According to some sources this was an alternative name of one of the four immortal horses of the Greek sun god Helios. It was used by author J. K. Rowling in her 'Harry Potter' series of books for a minor character, the grandfather of Draco Malfoy.

Achlys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αχλυς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AY-klis, AK-lis, ak-LOOS
Means "death-mist, mist-over-eyes" in Greek. In Greek mythology Achlys was the personification of misery and sadness as well as daemon of the "death-mist", i.e., the clouding over of the eyes preceding death. She was portrayed on the shield of Heracles as a pale, emaciated wraith of a woman, covered in tears, blood and dust.
Angerona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: an-geh-RO-na(Latin) an-jə-RO-nə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Possibly from Latin angor "strangulation, torment" or angustus "narrow, constricted". Angerona was the Roman goddess of the winter solstice, death, and silence.
Antiphonus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀντίφονόν(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Greek Ἀντίφονόν (Antiphonon), derived from Greek ἀντίφονος (antiphonos) meaning "in return for slaughter" or "in revenge for blood", from ἀντί (anti) "in return for; for the sake of, for" and φόνος (phonos) "murder, slaughter; blood shed in murder, gore". In Greek legend Antiphonus was one of the sons of the Trojan king Priam.
Apate
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Απάτη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Directly taken from Greek aπάτη, meaning "scam, cheat". Apate was the personification of deceit in Greek Mythology. She was the daughter of Nyx, the personification of night.
Atropos
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἄτροπος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "inevitable, inflexible" in Greek, derived from the negative prefix (a) combined with τρόπος (tropos) meaning "direction, manner, fashion". Atropos was one of the three Fates or Μοῖραι (Moirai) in Greek mythology. When her sister Lachesis decided that a person's life was at an end, Atropos would choose the manner of death and cut the person's life thread.
Azrael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Variant of Azriel. This was the name of an angel in Jewish and Islamic tradition who separated the soul from the body upon death. He is sometimes referred to as the Angel of Death.
Belladonna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Medieval Italian
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
From Italian bella "beautiful, fair" and donna "lady". This is the name of an extremely poisonous plant (Atropa belladonna; also bears the popular name of deadly nightshade). The author J. R. R. Tolkien used it as a hobbit name in 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954), where it belongs to the mother of Bilbo Baggins.
Charon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χάρων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KEHR-ən(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "fierce brightness" in Greek. In Greek mythology Charon was the operator of the ferry that brought the newly dead over the River Acheron into Hades.
Chernobog
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slavic Mythology
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Means "the black god" from Slavic cherno "black" and bogu "god". Chernobog was the Slavic god of darkness, evil and grief.
Crimson
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIM-sən, KRIM-sin
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Derived from English crimson, the name for a strong, bright, deep purplish-red color. The English word is ultimately derived from Arabic qirmiz. It is originally the color of the dye produced from a scale insect, Kermes vermilio, but the name is now also used as a generic term for those slightly bluish-red colors that are between red and rose.

As a given name, Crimson has been in use since the late 1800s.

Cronus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κρόνος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KRO-nəs(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Κρόνος (Kronos), possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ker- meaning "to cut". Cronus was the Titan who fathered the Greek gods. As his wife Rhea gave birth to the gods, Cronus swallowed them fearing the prophecy that he would be overthrown by one of his children. However Rhea hid Zeus, her last child, who eventually forced his father to disgorge his siblings. Cronus and the rest of the Titans were then defeated by the gods and exiled.
Crow
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRO
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the name of the large black bird.
Demon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Δήμων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Ancient Greek name derived from δῆμος (demos) meaning "the people".
Desdemona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: dehz-də-MO-nə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek δυσδαίμων (dysdaimon) meaning "ill-fated". This was the name of the murdered wife of Othello in Shakespeare's play Othello (1603).
Enyo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἐνυώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: i-NIE-o(English)
Meaning unknown. She was a bloodthirsty Greek war goddess and a companion of Ares.
Erebus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἔρεβος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-ə-bəs(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Ἔρεβος (Erebos), which means "nether darkness". Erebus was the personification of the primordial darkness in Greek mythology.
Eris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἔρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-is(English)
Rating: 73% based on 3 votes
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
Hades
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἅιδης, ᾍδης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HAY-deez(English)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From Greek Ἅιδης (Haides), derived from ἀϊδής (aides) meaning "unseen". In Greek mythology Hades was the dark god of the underworld, a place that was also called Hades. His brother was Zeus and his wife was Persephone.
Hecate
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑκάτη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-ə-tee(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Greek Ἑκάτη (Hekate), possibly derived from ἑκάς (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
Kara 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ottoman Turkish
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "black, dark" in Turkish. This was sometimes used as a byname by Ottoman officials, figuratively meaning "courageous".
Klotho
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Κλωθώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KLAW-TAW(Classical Greek)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Means "spinner" in Greek. In Greek mythology Klotho was one of the three Fates or Μοῖραι (Moirai). She was responsible for spinning the thread of life.
Layla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English
Other Scripts: ليلى(Arabic)
Pronounced: LIE-la(Arabic) LAY-lə(English)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Means "night" in Arabic. Layla was the love interest of the poet Qays (called Majnun) in an old Arab tale, notably retold by the 12th-century Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi in his poem Layla and Majnun. This story was a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song Layla by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
Libitina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. Libitina was the Roman goddess of funerals, corpses and death.
Lilith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
Loviatar
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish Mythology
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. In Finnish mythology Loviatar, also known as Louhi, was a goddess of death and plague.
Lucifer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LOO-si-fər(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Means "bringing light", derived from Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bring". In Latin this name originally referred to the morning star, Venus, but later became associated with the chief angel who rebelled against God's rule in heaven (see Isaiah 14:12). In later literature, such as the Divine Comedy (1321) by Dante and Paradise Lost (1667) by John Milton, Lucifer became associated with Satan himself.
Luna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Italian, Spanish) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Lycan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: LIE-kən
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Derived from the ability of man to turn into a wolf (lycanthropy which comes from the Greek words lycos ("wolf") and anthropos ("human being"). It means "wolf". Made famous by the Underworld films.
-------------------------------------
From the Underworld films. Means werebeast.
Medea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Georgian
Other Scripts: Μήδεια(Ancient Greek) მედეა(Georgian)
Pronounced: mə-DEE-ə(English) MEH-DEH-AH(Georgian)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From Greek Μήδεια (Medeia), derived from μήδεα (medea) meaning "plans, counsel, cunning". In Greek mythology Medea was a sorceress from Colchis (modern Georgia) who helped Jason gain the Golden Fleece. They were married, but eventually Jason left her for another woman. For revenge Medea slew Jason's new lover and also had her own children by Jason killed.
Morana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slavic Mythology, Croatian
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From a Slavic root meaning "death, plague" [1]. In Slavic mythology this was the name of the goddess of winter and death.
Morticia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: mawr-TISH-ə(Popular Culture) mawr-TEE-see-ah(Dutch)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Probably based on the American English word mortician meaning "undertaker, funeral director", which is ultimately derived from Latin mortis meaning "death". This pseudo-Latin name was created by cartoonist Charles Addams (1912-1988) for a recurring character in the cartoons that he drew for the magazine The New Yorker. His cartoons became so popular that a television series was based on them, which debuted in 1964 under the name "The Addams Family". When the series was still in development, Addams was asked to provide names for each of his characters (as the characters had never been actually named in the cartoons until then) and Morticia is the name that he came up with for the mother of the family.

There are bearers of this name in real life, meaning that their parents must have been inspired by the character Morticia Addams in one way or the other. As a result, this name no longer purely exists in popular culture. However, the numbers of real-life bearers are very small. For example, in the Netherlands, there was a total of 13 bearers in the entire country in the year 2014, of which less than 5 had the name as a first name that they answer to in daily life.

Nyx
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νύξ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NUYKS(Classical Greek) NIKS(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Means "night" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the night, the daughter of Khaos and the wife of Erebos.
Onyx
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: on-iks
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Onyx comes through Latin (of the same spelling), from the Greek ὄνυξ, meaning "claw" or "fingernail". Onyx with flesh-colored and white bands can sometimes resemble a fingernail. The English word "nail" is cognate with the Greek word.
Otieno
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Eastern African, Luo
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Means "born at night" in Luo.
Persephone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
Raven
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAY-vən
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
Rose
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
Saber
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant transcription of Sabir.
Sable
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-bəl
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
Shade
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From the English word shade or transferred use of the surname Shade, which may be a topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary (from the Old English scead "boundary") or a nickname for a thin man, (from the Middle English schade, "shadow", "wraith") or an Americanized spelling of the German and Dutch surname Schade.
Shadow
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SHAD-o
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Transferred use of the surname Shadow.
Thanatos
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Θάνατος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TA-NA-TOS(Classical Greek) THAN-ə-tahs(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "death" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek god of death who resided with Hades in the underworld.
Zelophehad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: צְלָפְחָד(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Possibly means either "first born" or "shadow from terror" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Zelophehad is a man who dies while the Israelites are wandering in the wilderness, leaving five daughters as heirs.
behindthename.com   ·   Copyright © 1996-2022