Charlie1977's Personal Name List

Adam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: Адам(Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian) Αδάμ, Άνταμ(Greek) אָדָם(Hebrew) آدم(Arabic) ადამ(Georgian) Ἀδάμ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AD-əm(English) A-DAHN(French) A-dam(German, Polish, Czech, Arabic) A-dahm(Dutch) AH-dam(Swedish) u-DAM(Russian) ah-DAHM(Ukrainian) ə-DHAM(Catalan)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".

According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) meaning "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until they ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. As a result they were expelled from Eden to the lands to the east, where they gave birth the second generation, including Cain, Abel and Seth.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

Aiden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Variant of Aidan.
Alfred
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Pronounced: AL-frəd(English) AL-FREHD(French) AL-freht(German, Polish) AHL-frət(Dutch)
Rating: 44% based on 16 votes
Means "elf counsel", derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman Conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.

Famous bearers include the British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892), the Swedish inventor and Nobel Prize founder Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), and the British-American film director Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980).

Alistair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: AL-i-stər(English)
Rating: 75% based on 18 votes
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Allen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: AL-ən(English)
Rating: 49% based on 15 votes
Variant of Alan. A famous bearer of this name was Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997), an American beat poet. Another is the American film director and actor Woody Allen (1935-), who took the stage name Allen from his real first name.
Alonzo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Rating: 31% based on 15 votes
Variant of Alonso in use in America.
Aloysius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-o-ISH-əs
Rating: 41% based on 14 votes
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of Louis. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
Andor 2
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: AWN-dor
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of András.
Andrei
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian, Old Church Slavic
Other Scripts: Андрей(Russian, Bulgarian) Андрэй(Belarusian) Андреи(Church Slavic)
Pronounced: un-DRYAY(Russian)
Rating: 41% based on 13 votes
Romanian form of Andrew, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Андрей or Belarusian Андрэй (see Andrey).
Angus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish, English
Pronounced: ANG-gəs
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Aonghus.
Anthony
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-thə-nee(American English) AN-tə-nee(British English)
Rating: 59% based on 7 votes
English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy Antony and Cleopatra (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

Anton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Russian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Slovene, Slovak, Macedonian, Croatian, Romanian, Estonian, Finnish, English
Other Scripts: Антон(Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: AN-ton(German) un-TON(Russian) AHN-tawn(Dutch) ahn-TON(Ukrainian) an-TON(Belarusian, Slovene) AHN-ton(Finnish) AN-tahn(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Form of Antonius (see Anthony) used in various languages.
Archibald
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: AHR-chi-bawld
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element ἀρχός (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages.
Archie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: AHR-chee
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Archibald. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941.
Arthur
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: AHR-thər(English) AR-TUYR(French) AR-tuwr(German) AHR-tuyr(Dutch)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius.

Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been based on a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (perhaps briefly in the 7th-century poem Y Gododdin and more definitively and extensively in the 9th-century History of the Britons by Nennius [1]). However, his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth [2]. His tales were later taken up and expanded by French and English writers.

The name came into general use in England in the Middle Ages due to the prevalence of Arthurian romances, and it enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 19th century. Famous bearers include German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), mystery author and Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), and science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008).

Astor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-tər
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
From a surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk".
Aubrey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AWB-ree
Rating: 31% based on 16 votes
Norman French form of the Germanic name Alberich. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song Aubrey along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
August
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English
Pronounced: OW-guwst(German) OW-goost(Polish) OW-guyst(Swedish) AW-gəst(English)
Rating: 69% based on 16 votes
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of Augustus. This was the name of three Polish kings.

As an English name it can also derive from the month of August, which was named for the Roman emperor Augustus.

Bailey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
Rating: 39% based on 13 votes
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
Baldomero
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: bal-do-MEH-ro
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and mari "famous".
Baldwin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: BAWLD-win(English)
Rating: 46% based on 12 votes
Means "bold friend", derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and win "friend". In the Middle Ages this was a popular name in Flanders and among the Normans, who brought it to Britain. It was borne by one of the leaders of the First Crusade, an 11th-century nobleman from Flanders. After the crusaders conquered Jerusalem, he was crowned as the king of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
Barclay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)
Pronounced: BAHR-klee(English)
Rating: 41% based on 13 votes
From a Scottish surname that was likely derived from the English place name Berkeley, meaning "birch wood" in Old English.
Barrett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAR-it, BEHR-it
Rating: 45% based on 14 votes
From a surname probably meaning "strife" in Middle English, originally given to a quarrelsome person.
Basil 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAZ-əl
Rating: 56% based on 7 votes
From the Greek name Βασίλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλεύς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
Basim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: باسم(Arabic)
Pronounced: BA-seem
Rating: 48% based on 13 votes
Means "smiling" in Arabic, from the root بَسَمَ (basama) meaning "to smile".
Baxter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAK-stər
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
From an occupational surname that meant "(female) baker" in Old English.
Beau
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch (Modern)
Pronounced: BO(English)
Personal remark: Given name or nn of 'Beau-' names.
Rating: 42% based on 13 votes
Means "beautiful" in French. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind (1936) this is the name of Ashley and Melanie's son.

Although this is a grammatically masculine adjective in French, it is given to girls as well as boys in Britain and the Netherlands. In America it is more exclusively masculine. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.

Beaumont
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BO-mahnt
Rating: 63% based on 4 votes
From a French surname meaning "beautiful mountain".
Benedict
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHN-ə-dikt
Rating: 65% based on 6 votes
From the Late Latin name Benedictus, which meant "blessed". Saint Benedict was an Italian monk who founded the Benedictines in the 6th century. After his time the name was common among Christians, being used by 16 popes. In England it did not come into use until the 12th century, at which point it became very popular. This name was also borne by the American general Benedict Arnold (1741-1801), who defected to Britain during the American Revolution.
Bennett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHN-it
Rating: 68% based on 15 votes
Medieval form of Benedict. This was the more common spelling in England until the 18th century. Modern use of the name is probably also influenced by the common surname Bennett, itself a derivative of the medieval name.
Benson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BEHN-sən
Rating: 43% based on 15 votes
From a surname that originally meant "son of Benedict".
Blaze
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BLAYZ
Rating: 41% based on 13 votes
Modern variant of Blaise influenced by the English word blaze.
Bradley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAD-lee
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
From a surname that originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
Brady
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: BRAY-dee(English)
Rating: 39% based on 14 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of Brádach".
Brennan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREHN-ən(English)
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
Brent
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRENT
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
Brian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, Ancient Irish
Pronounced: BRIE-ən(English) BRYEE-ən(Irish)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". It was borne by the semi-legendary Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. The name was common in Ireland before his time, and even more so afterwards. It came into use in England in the Middle Ages, introduced by Breton settlers. It subsequently became rare, but was revived in the 20th century.
Briscoe
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIS-ko
Rating: 40% based on 6 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "birch wood" in Old Norse.
Bryant
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIE-ənt
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Brian.
Bryce
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIES
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Variant of Brice.
Bryson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIE-sən
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Brice".
Buster
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BUS-tər
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Originally a nickname denoting a person who broke things, from the word bust, a dialectal variant of burst. A famous bearer was the silent movie star Buster Keaton (1895-1966).
Byron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BIE-rən
Rating: 46% based on 13 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "place of the cow sheds" in Old English. This was the surname of the romantic poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), the writer of Don Juan and many other works.
Cal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL
Personal remark: Nickname for any 'Cal-' names.
Rating: 41% based on 11 votes
Short form of Calvin and other names beginning with Cal.
Callahan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAL-ə-han
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
From a surname, the Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Ceallacháin, which means "descendant of Ceallachán".
Caspian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən(English)
Rating: 62% based on 13 votes
Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his Chronicles of Narnia series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.
Cayetano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kie-eh-TA-no
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
Spanish form of Caietanus (see Gaetano).
Cedric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHD-rik
Rating: 57% based on 13 votes
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel Ivanhoe (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name Caratacos. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel Little Lord Fauntleroy (1886).
Chadwick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: CHAD-wik
Rating: 40% based on 13 votes
From a surname that was derived from the name of towns in England, meaning "settlement belonging to Chad" in Old English.
Chesley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: CHEHS-lee
Rating: 26% based on 11 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "camp meadow" in Old English.
Chestnut
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the English word "chestnut" referring to "a tree or shrub of the genus Castanea; the nut or wood of said tree; and a dark, reddish-brown color". From the Middle English chasteine, from the Old French chastaigne, from the Latin castanea, from the Ancient Greek καστάνεια (kastaneia) 'chestnut'.
Clarence
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAR-əns, KLEHR-əns
Rating: 54% based on 12 votes
From the Latin title Clarensis, which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.
Clay
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAY
Rating: 29% based on 11 votes
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of Clayton.
Clayton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLAY-tən
Rating: 27% based on 11 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from various English place names, all meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
Clifford
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIF-ərd
Rating: 30% based on 11 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
Clifton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIF-tən
Rating: 30% based on 11 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
Clint
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLINT
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Short form of Clinton. A notable bearer is American actor Clint Eastwood (1930-), who became famous early in his career for his western movies.
Clinton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIN-tən
Rating: 36% based on 11 votes
From a surname that was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname is former American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
Clive
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIEV
Rating: 37% based on 12 votes
From a surname meaning "cliff" in Old English, originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
Clyde
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLIED
Rating: 30% based on 12 votes
From the name of the River Clyde in Scotland, from Cumbric Clud, which is of uncertain origin. It became a common given name in America in the middle of the 19th century, perhaps in honour of Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863) who was given the title Baron Clyde in 1858 [1].
Colby
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL-bee
Rating: 43% based on 13 votes
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
Cole
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOL
Rating: 61% based on 13 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the Old English byname Cola.
Colt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOLT
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From the English word for a young male horse or from the surname of the same origin. It may be given in honour of the American industrialist Samuel Colt (1814-1862) or the firearms company that bears his name.
Colton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KOL-tən
Rating: 34% based on 12 votes
From an English surname that was originally from a place name meaning "Cola's town".
Connor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAHN-ər(English)
Rating: 78% based on 16 votes
Variant of Conor.
Corbin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-bin
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-) [1].
Corwin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAWR-win
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From an English surname, derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.
Cosmo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, English
Pronounced: KAHZ-mo(English)
Rating: 47% based on 11 votes
Italian variant of Cosimo. It was introduced to Britain in the 18th century by the second Scottish Duke of Gordon, who named his son and successor after his friend Cosimo III de' Medici.
Crawford
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRAW-fərd
Rating: 34% based on 11 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
Creighton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRAY-tən
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name, originally from Gaelic crioch "border" combined with Old English tun "town".
Curtis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KUR-tis
Rating: 37% based on 11 votes
From an English surname that originally meant "courteous" in Old French.
Cyrus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κῦρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SIE-rəs(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From Κῦρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κύριος (kyrios) meaning "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
Daichi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 大地, 大智, etc.(Japanese Kanji) だいち(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: DA-EE-CHEE
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with (chi) meaning "earth, land" or (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Dalibor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Далибор(Serbian, Church Slavic)
Pronounced: DA-li-bor(Czech) DA-lee-bawr(Slovak)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and borti meaning "to fight".
Damian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, Romanian, Dutch (Modern)
Pronounced: DAY-mee-ən(English) DAN-myan(Polish)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From the Greek name Δαμιανός (Damianos), which was derived from Greek δαμάζω (damazo) meaning "to tame". Saint Damian was martyred with his twin brother Cosmas in Syria early in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in Christian Europe. Another saint by this name was Peter Damian, an 11th-century cardinal and theologian from Italy.
Damiano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: da-MYA-no
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Italian form of Damian.
Damir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Дамир(Serbian)
Pronounced: DA-meer(Croatian, Serbian)
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Possibly derived from the Slavic elements dan "given" and miru "peace, world". Otherwise, it might be of Turkic origin.
Daniel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Finnish, Estonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל(Hebrew) Даниел(Bulgarian, Macedonian) Դանիէլ(Armenian) დანიელ(Georgian) Δανιήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAN-yəl(English) dah-nee-EHL(Hebrew) DA-NYEHL(French) DA-nyehl(German) DAH-ni-yəl(Norwegian) DA-nyəl(Danish) DA-nyehl(Polish) DA-ni-yehl(Czech) DA-nee-ehl(Slovak) da-NYEHL(Spanish) du-nee-EHL(European Portuguese) du-nee-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) də-nee-EHL(Catalan) da-nee-EHL(Romanian)
Rating: 61% based on 16 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

Dante
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: DAN-teh
Rating: 51% based on 11 votes
Medieval short form of Durante. The most notable bearer of this name was Dante Alighieri, the 13th-century Italian poet who wrote the Divine Comedy.
Darin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-ən
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Variant of Darren. This was the adopted surname of the singer Bobby Darin (1936-1973), who was born Robert Cassotto and chose his stage name from a street sign.
Darius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Lithuanian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: də-RIE-əs(English) DAR-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
Roman form of Δαρεῖος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dārayavahush meaning "possessing goodness", composed of the elements dâraya "to possess" and vahu "good". Three ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who expanded the Achaemenid Empire to its greatest extent. His forces invaded Greece but were defeated in the Battle of Marathon.

It has never been very common as a given name in the English-speaking world, though it rose in popularity after the middle of the 20th century. In Lithuania it may be given in honour of the Lithuanian-American aviator Steponas Darius (1896-1933), who died attempting to fly nonstop from New York to Lithuania. His surname was an Americanized form of the original Darašius.

Daryl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAR-il
Rating: 38% based on 11 votes
Variant of Darrell.
David
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Welsh, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) də-BEET(Catalan) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
Rating: 68% based on 16 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

Dawson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAW-sən
Rating: 34% based on 11 votes
From a surname meaning "son of David". This name was popularized in the late 1990s by the television drama Dawson's Creek.
Deacon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DEE-kən
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Either from the occupational surname Deacon or directly from the vocabulary word deacon, which refers to a cleric in the Christian church (ultimately from Greek διάκονος (diakonos) meaning "servant").
Dean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEEN
Rating: 64% based on 11 votes
From a surname, see Dean 1 and Dean 2. The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
Derek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHR-ik
Rating: 42% based on 11 votes
From the older English name Dederick, which was in origin a Low German form of Theodoric. It was imported to England from the Low Countries in the 15th century.
Derrick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHR-ik
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Variant of Derek.
Devon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHV-ən
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Variant of Devin. It may also be partly inspired by the name of the county of Devon in England, which got its name from the Dumnonii, a Celtic tribe.
Dexter
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHK-stər
Rating: 36% based on 11 votes
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".
Dimitri
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, French
Other Scripts: Димитрий(Russian)
Pronounced: dyi-MYEE-tryee(Russian) DEE-MEE-TREE(French)
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
Variant of Dmitriy, using the Church Slavic spelling.
Dixon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DIK-sən
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
From an English surname meaning "Dick 1's son".
Domhnall
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, Irish
Pronounced: DO-nahl
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Gaelic form of Donald.
Dominic
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAHM-i-nik
Rating: 63% based on 13 votes
From the Late Latin name Dominicus meaning "of the Lord". This name was traditionally given to a child born on Sunday. Several saints have borne this name, including the 13th-century founder of the Dominican order of friars. It was in this saint's honour that the name was first used in England, starting around the 13th century. It is primarily used by Catholics.
Donovan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: DAHN-ə-vən(English)
Rating: 47% based on 13 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of Donndubhán".
Doyle
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 31% based on 11 votes
From an Irish surname that was derived from Ó Dubhghaill meaning "descendant of Dubhghall" (see Dougal). Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
Dragan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Драган(Serbian, Macedonian, Bulgarian)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
Drake
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DRAYK
Rating: 52% based on 13 votes
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δράκων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
Dražen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Дражен(Serbian)
Rating: 35% based on 10 votes
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
Driscoll
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Irish
Pronounced: DRIS-kəl(English)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From an Irish surname that was an Anglicized form of Ó Eidirsceóil meaning "descendant of the messenger".
Dušan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Slovak, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Душан(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DOO-shan(Slovak, Czech)
Rating: 46% based on 7 votes
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".
Eamon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EH-mən
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Variant of Éamonn.
Easton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: EES-tən
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.
Edison
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHD-i-sən
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that meant either "son of Eda 2" or "son of Adam". A famous bearer of the surname was the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).
Edmund
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, Polish
Pronounced: EHD-mənd(English) EHT-muwnt(German) EHD-moont(Polish)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "rich protection", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman Conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.

Famous bearers of the name include the English poet Edmund Spenser (1552-1599), the German-Czech philosopher Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) and New Zealand mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), the first person to climb Mount Everest.

Edward
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish
Pronounced: EHD-wərd(English) EHD-vart(Polish)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman Conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.

This is one of the few Old English names to be used throughout Europe (in various spellings). A famous bearer was the British composer Edward Elgar (1857-1934). It was also used by author Charlotte Brontë for the character Edward Rochester, the main love interest of the title character in her novel Jane Eyre (1847).

Edwin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHD-win(English) EHT-vin(Dutch)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "rich friend", from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman Conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
Egbert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: EHG-bərt(English) EKH-bərt(Dutch)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
Elijah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: אֱלִיָּהוּ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-LIE-jə(English) i-LIE-zhə(English)
Rating: 76% based on 14 votes
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is Yahweh", derived from the elements אֵל ('el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.

Because Elijah was a popular figure in medieval tales, and because his name was borne by a few early saints (who are usually known by the Latin form Elias), the name came into general use during the Middle Ages. In medieval England it was usually spelled Elis. It died out there by the 16th century, but it was revived by the Puritans in the form Elijah after the Protestant Reformation.

Elio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EH-lyo
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian form of Aelius or Helios.
Elm
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan, English
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Catalan form of Elmo, as well as a short form of Elmer. The name may also be taken directly from the English word elm, a type of tree.
Emerson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-ər-sən
Rating: 60% based on 14 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of Emery". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
Emmett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHM-it
Rating: 66% based on 13 votes
From an English surname that was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name Emma.
Endeavour
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
English word meaning, "to try (to do something," or, "an effort to do or attain something." The name of an inspector featured in a series of detective novels by Colin Dexter as well as two British television shows, Inspector Morse and Endeavour.
Eoin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: O-in
Rating: 58% based on 10 votes
Gaelic form of John.
Eric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, German, Spanish
Pronounced: EHR-ik(English) EH-rik(Swedish, German) EH-reek(Spanish)
Rating: 54% based on 13 votes
Means "ever ruler", from the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler, mighty". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.

This common Norse name was first brought to England by Danish settlers during the Anglo-Saxon period. It was not popular in England in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, in part due to the children's novel Eric, or Little by Little (1858) by Frederic William Farrar.

Ethan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: אֵיתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: EE-thən(English) EH-TAN(French)
Rating: 60% based on 13 votes
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.

After the Protestant Reformation it was occasionally used as a given name in the English-speaking world, and it became somewhat common in America due to the fame of the revolutionary Ethan Allen (1738-1789). It only became popular towards the end of the 20th century. It is the name of the main character in Edith Wharton's novel Ethan Frome (1911), about a man in love with his wife's cousin.

Evan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English
Pronounced: EHV-ən(English)
Rating: 58% based on 12 votes
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of John.
Ezra
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֶזְרָא(Hebrew)
Pronounced: EHZ-rə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 12 votes
Means "help" in Hebrew. Ezra is a prophet of the Old Testament and the author of the Book of Ezra. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. The American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972) was a famous bearer.
Fabian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Polish, Romanian, English
Pronounced: FA-byan(German, Polish) FA-bee-ahn(Dutch) FAY-bee-ən(English)
Rating: 51% based on 11 votes
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from Fabius. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.
Farley
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FAHR-lee
Rating: 39% based on 10 votes
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "fern clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of this name was Canadian author Farley Mowat (1921-2014).
Fearghal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 48% based on 10 votes
Means "man of valour", derived from the Irish elements fear "man" and gal "valour". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Ireland.
Felix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Latin)
Rating: 72% based on 14 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

Ferdinand
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Dutch, English, Slovak, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: FEHR-dee-nant(German) FEHR-DEE-NAHN(French) FEHR-dee-nahnt(Dutch) FUR-də-nand(English) FEHR-dee-nand(Slovak) FEHR-di-nant(Czech)
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
Finbar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: FIN-bar
Rating: 57% based on 10 votes
Variant of Fionnbharr.
Finn 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: FIN(English)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Older Irish form of Fionn. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Finnegan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: FIN-ə-gən(English)
Rating: 66% based on 13 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of Fionn. This was the name of a character in James Joyce's novel Finnegans Wake (1939), the title of which was based on a 19th-century Irish ballad called Finnegan's Wake.
Fitz
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FITS
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Short form of various given names that are derived from surnames beginning with Norman French fitz meaning "son of" (for example Fitzroy).
Fitzroy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FITS-roi
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of the king" in Old French, originally given to illegitimate sons of monarchs.
Fletcher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLECH-ər
Rating: 45% based on 12 votes
From a surname meaning "maker of arrows" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French flechier.
Flint
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLINT
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the English vocabulary word, from Old English flint.
Florian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Romanian, Polish
Pronounced: FLO-ryan(German) FLAW-RYAHN(French) FLAW-ryan(Polish)
Rating: 66% based on 12 votes
From the Roman cognomen Florianus, a derivative of Florus. This was the name of a short-lived Roman emperor of the 3rd century. It was also borne by Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
Flynn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FLIN
Rating: 60% based on 8 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of Flann".
Fox
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FAHKS
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
Francis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: FRAN-sis(English) FRAHN-SEES(French)
Rating: 66% based on 13 votes
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus meaning "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name became widespread in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. However, it was not regularly used in Britain until the 16th century. Famous bearers include Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552), a missionary to East Asia, the philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon (1561-1626), and the explorer and admiral Sir Francis Drake (1540-1595).

In the English-speaking world this name is occasionally used for girls, as a variant of the homophone Frances.

Fred
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Pronounced: FREHD(English, French, Portuguese) FREHT(Dutch, German)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Short form of Frederick and other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
Fūjin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese Mythology
Other Scripts: 風神(Japanese Kanji) ふうじん(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: FOO-ZHEEN(Japanese)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
From Japanese () meaning "wind" and (jin) meaning "god, spirit". This is the name of the Japanese wind god, who carries the wind in a bag over his shoulders.
Gabriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: გაბრიელ(Georgian) גַּבְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Γαβριήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) ga-BRYEHL(Spanish) ga-bree-EHL(European Portuguese, Romanian) ga-bree-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) GA-bree-ehl(German, Slovak, Latin) GAH-bri-ehl(Swedish) GAHB-ree-ehl(Finnish) gə-bree-EHL(Catalan) GAY-bree-əl(English) GAB-ryehl(Polish) GA-bri-yehl(Czech)
Rating: 68% based on 11 votes
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

Gaël
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GA-EHL(French)
Rating: 58% based on 11 votes
Form of Gael using French orthography.
Gaetano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ga-eh-TA-no
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Italian form of the Latin name Caietanus, which meant "from Caieta". Caieta (now called Gaeta) was a town in ancient Italy, its name deriving either from Kaiadas, the name a Greek location where prisoners were executed, or else from Caieta, the name of the nurse of Aeneas. Saint Gaetano was a 16th-century Italian priest who founded the Theatines.
Gareth
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GAR-əth(English)
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
Meaning uncertain. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends Le Morte d'Arthur, in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
Gavin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GAV-in(English)
Rating: 34% based on 13 votes
Medieval form of Gawain. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
George
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: JAWRJ(English) JYOR-jeh(Romanian)
Rating: 51% based on 13 votes
From the Greek name Γεώργιος (Georgios), which was derived from the Greek word γεωργός (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γῆ (ge) meaning "earth" and ἔργον (ergon) meaning "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.

Initially Saint George was primarily revered by Eastern Christians, but returning crusaders brought stories of him to Western Europe and he became the patron of England, Portugal, Catalonia and Aragon. The name was rarely used in England until the German-born George I came to the British throne in the 18th century. Five subsequent British kings have borne the name.

Other famous bearers include two kings of Greece, the composer George Frideric Handel (1685-1759), the first president of the United States, George Washington (1732-1797), and the Pacific explorer George Vancouver (1757-1798). This was also the pen name of authors George Eliot (1819-1880) and George Orwell (1903-1950), real names Mary Anne Evans and Eric Arthur Blair respectively.

Gideon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English, Hebrew
Other Scripts: גִּדְעוֹן(Hebrew)
Pronounced: GID-ee-ən(English)
Rating: 57% based on 13 votes
Means "feller, hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
Gilbert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: GIL-bərt(English) ZHEEL-BEHR(French) KHIL-bərt(Dutch) GIL-behrt(German)
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century English saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
Graham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: GRAY-əm(English) GRAM(English)
Rating: 61% based on 13 votes
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham [1]. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.
Grant
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: GRANT(English)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
From an English and Scottish surname that was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
Gresham
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: GRESH-əm
Rating: 37% based on 11 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "grazing homestead" in Old English.
Grey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
Variant of Gray.
Greyson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: GRAY-sən
Rating: 50% based on 13 votes
Variant of Grayson.
Griffith
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GRIF-ith
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Gruffudd.
Hammond
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HAM-ənd
Rating: 31% based on 12 votes
From an English surname that was derived from either the Germanic given name Haimund, which meant "home protection", or else the Old Norse given name Hámundr, which meant "high protection".
Harmon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-mən
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Herman.
Harris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAR-is, HEHR-is
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
From a surname that was derived from the given name Harry.
Harvey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAHR-vee
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
Heath
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HEETH
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series The Big Valley [1].
Hobart
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HO-bart
Personal remark: nn Hobie.
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Apparently derived from the given name Hubert. Also a transferred use of the surname Hobart.
Horatio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: hə-RAY-shee-o, hə-RAY-sho
Rating: 47% based on 11 votes
Variant of Horatius. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.
Humphrey
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HUM-free
Rating: 39% based on 11 votes
Means "peaceful warrior" from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and frid "peace". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hunfrith, and it was regularly used through the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the American actor Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957), who starred in The Maltese Falcon and Casablanca.
Huw
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: HYOO
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Welsh form of Hugh.
Ian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Scottish form of John.
Igor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Slovak, Czech, Italian, Portuguese
Other Scripts: Игорь(Russian) Игор(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: EE-gər(Russian) EE-gawr(Polish, Slovak) EE-gor(Croatian, Serbian, Italian) I-gor(Czech)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Russian form of Yngvarr (see Ingvar). The Varangians brought it to Russia in the 10th century. It was borne by two grand princes of Kiev. Famous bearers include Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), a Russian composer whose most famous work is The Rite of Spring, and Igor Sikorsky (1889-1972), the Russian-American designer of the first successful helicopter.
Jack
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Rating: 62% based on 14 votes
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of John [1]. There could be some early influence from the unrelated French name Jacques [2]. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

Jacob
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יַעֲקֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-kəb(English) YA-kawp(Dutch) YAH-kawp(Swedish, Norwegian) YAH-kob(Danish)
Rating: 69% based on 14 votes
From the Latin Iacob, which was from the Greek Ἰακώβ (Iakob), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".

The English names Jacob and James derive from the same source, with James coming from Latin Iacomus, a later variant of the Latin New Testament form Iacobus. Unlike English, many languages do not have separate spellings for the two names.

In England, Jacob was mainly regarded as a Jewish name during the Middle Ages, though the variant James was used among Christians. Jacob came into general use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation. In America, although already moderately common, it steadily grew in popularity from the early 1970s to the end of the 1990s, becoming the top ranked name from 1999 to 2012.

A famous bearer was Jacob Grimm (1785-1863), the German linguist and writer who was, with his brother Wilhelm, the author of Grimm's Fairy Tales.

Jameson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYM-ə-sən
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
From an English surname meaning "son of James".
Jared
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יָרֶד, יֶרֶד(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAR-əd(English)
Rating: 62% based on 10 votes
From the Hebrew name יָרֶד (Yared) or יֶרֶד (Yered) meaning "descent". This is the name of a close descendant of Adam in the Old Testament. It has been used as an English name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popularized in the 1960s by the character Jarrod Barkley on the television series The Big Valley [1].
Jarrod
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAR-əd
Rating: 48% based on 10 votes
Variant of Jared.
Jason
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
Other Scripts: Ἰάσων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: JAY-sən(English) ZHA-ZAWN(French)
Rating: 52% based on 11 votes
From the Greek name Ἰάσων (Iason) meaning "healer", derived from Greek ἰάομαι (iaomai) meaning "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father Aeson as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.

This name also appears in the New Testament, belonging to man who sheltered Paul and Silas. In his case, it may represent a Hellenized form of a Hebrew name. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation.

Jasper
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: JAS-pər(English) YAHS-pər(Dutch)
Rating: 91% based on 8 votes
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
Javier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kha-BYEHR
Rating: 72% based on 5 votes
Spanish form of Xavier.
Jeremy
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JEHR-ə-mee(English) JEHR-mee(English)
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
English form of Jeremiah, originally a medieval vernacular form. This is the spelling used in some English versions of the New Testament.
Jesse
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Dutch, Finnish, Biblical
Other Scripts: יִשַׁי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHS-ee(English) YEH-sə(Dutch) YEHS-seh(Finnish)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the Hebrew name יִשַׁי (Yishai), which possibly means "gift". In the Old Testament Jesse is the father of King David. It began to be used as an English given name after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Jesse James (1847-1882), an American outlaw who held up banks and stagecoaches. He was eventually shot by a fellow gang member for a reward. Another famous bearer was the American athlete Jesse Owens (1913-1980), whose real name was James Cleveland (or J. C.) Owens.
Jett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JEHT
Rating: 28% based on 11 votes
From the English word jet, which denotes either a jet aircraft or an intense black colour (the words derive from different sources).
Jian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 建, 健, etc.(Chinese)
Pronounced: CHYEHN
Rating: 32% based on 10 votes
From Chinese (jiàn) meaning "build, establish", (jiàn) meaning "strong, healthy", or other characters that are pronounced in a similar fashion.
Joachim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: YO-a-khim(German) yo-A-khim(German) ZHAW-A-KEEM(French) yaw-A-kheem(Polish) JO-ə-kim(English)
Rating: 47% based on 10 votes
Contracted form of Jehoiachin or Jehoiakim. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
Joaquín
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kho-a-KEEN, khwa-KEEN
Rating: 52% based on 10 votes
Spanish form of Joachim.
Joel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Finnish, Estonian, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-əl(English) JOL(English) kho-EHL(Spanish) zhoo-EHL(Portuguese) YO-ehl(Swedish, Finnish)
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹאֵל (Yo'el) meaning "Yahweh is God", from the elements יוֹ (yo) and אֵל ('el), both referring to the Hebrew God. Joel is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Joel, which describes a plague of locusts. In England, it was first used as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation.
John
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Biblical
Pronounced: JAHN(American English) JAWN(British English, Dutch) YAWN(Swedish, Norwegian)
Rating: 70% based on 13 votes
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ἰωάννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "Yahweh is gracious", from the roots יוֹ (yo) referring to the Hebrew God and חָנַן (chanan) meaning "to be gracious". The Hebrew form occurs in the Old Testament (spelled Johanan or Jehohanan in the English version), but this name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first is John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who is considered the forerunner of Jesus. He baptized Jesus and was later executed by Herod Antipas. The second is the apostle John, who is traditionally regarded as the author of the fourth gospel and Revelation. With the apostles Peter and James (his brother), he was part of the inner circle of Jesus.

This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular, typically being the most common male name from the 13th to the 20th century (but sometimes outpaced by William). During the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys. In the United States it was the most common name for boys until 1923.

The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

The forms Ian (Scottish), Sean (Irish) and Evan (Welsh) have also been frequently used in the English-speaking world, as has the medieval diminutive Jack.

Jolyon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Medieval form of Julian. The author John Galsworthy used it for a character in his Forsyte Saga novels (published between 1906 and 1922).
Jonah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JO-nə(English)
Rating: 62% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name יוֹנָה (Yonah) meaning "dove". This was the name of a prophet swallowed by a fish, as told in the Old Testament Book of Jonah. Jonah was commanded by God to preach in Nineveh, but instead fled by boat. After being caught in a storm, the other sailors threw Jonah overboard, at which point he was swallowed. He emerged from the fish alive and repentant three days later.

Jonah's story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the Hellenized form Jonas was occasionally used in England. The form Jonah did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation.

Jonathan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən(American English) JAWN-ə-thən(British English) ZHAW-NA-TAHN(French) YO-na-tan(German)
Rating: 64% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "Yahweh has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.

As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote Gulliver's Travels and other works.

Jordon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAWR-dən
Rating: 23% based on 11 votes
Variant of Jordan.
Joshua
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAHSH-oo-ə(English)
Rating: 51% based on 12 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Yehoshu'a) meaning "Yahweh is salvation", from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and יָשַׁע (yasha') meaning "to save". As told in the Old Testament, Joshua was a companion of Moses. He went up Mount Sinai with Moses when he received the Ten Commandments from God, and later he was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites and he led the conquest of Canaan. His original name was Hoshea.

The name Jesus comes from a Greek translation of the Aramaic short form יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a), which was the real name of Jesus. As an English name, Joshua has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.

Josiah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: יֹאשִׁיָהוּ(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: jo-SIE-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 13 votes
From the Hebrew name יֹאשִׁיָהוּ (Yoshiyahu) meaning "Yahweh supports". In the Old Testament this is the name of a king of Judah famous for his religious reforms. He was killed fighting the Egyptians at Megiddo in the 7th century BC. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
Julian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
Rating: 69% based on 13 votes
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from Julius. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
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