Charlie1977's Personal Name List

Allsopp
Usage: English
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From the name of the village of Alsop en la Dale in Derbyshire, England. It means "Ælli's valley" in Old English.
Bannerman
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAN-ər-mən
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Variant of Banner.
Blackford
Usage: English
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Derived from the words blæc "black" or blac "pale, shining, white" and ford "river crossing"
Blackmore
Usage: English
Pronounced: b l AE k m aw r
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
BLACKMORE, an English name, has two possible beginnings:

The FIRST: It is an obvious use of a descriptive term that crystallized from a nickname into an acceptable family name. Many such names as BLACKMORE, BLACK, BLAKEMAN, BLACMAN, AND BLACKMAN, testify to the darker tone of some of our forbearers countenances. The term has nothing to do with race or nationalistic characteristics, but possibly began as a nickname for a particular individual as "BLACK a' Moor" or black as a Moor. Stephen le Blac (to distinguish him from Stephen le Blane) is now Blake: the name "Nutbrown" was an early name, existing at least until 1630. Our Browns began in the same way.

The SECOND: Many names had their beginning because a person lived in a location easy to describe and thus distinguished the person from another of the same name living elsewhere. For example, Steven atte BLACKMOOR resided close to the murky and gloomy heath or moor.

Bolton
Usage: English
Pronounced: BOL-tən
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From any of the many places in England called Bolton, derived from Old English bold "house" and tun "enclosure".
Bridges
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRIJ-iz
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Originally denoted a person who lived near a bridge, from Old English brycg.
Cahill
Usage: Irish (Anglicized)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cathail ‘descendant of Cathal’, a personal name meaning ‘powerful in battle’.
Conroy
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: KAWN-roi
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Conaire, which means "descendant of Conaire". Conaire is a nickname meaning "hound keeper".
Corbett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOR-bət
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Transferred use of the surname Corbett.
Dempsey
Usage: Irish
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Díomasaigh meaning "descendant of Díomasach", a given name meaning "proud".
Drummond
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: DRUM-ənd
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
From various Scottish place names that are derived from Gaelic drumainn, a derivative of druim meaning "ridge".
Falcon
Usage: Jewish
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from the German Falke, meaning "falcon."
Faulkner
Usage: English, Scottish
Pronounced: FAWK-nər(English)
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
Occupational name meaning "keeper of falcons", from Middle English and Scots faulcon, from Late Latin falco, of Germanic origin.
Fitzgerald
Usage: Irish
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Means "son of Gerald" in Anglo-Norman French. It was brought to Ireland with William the Conqueror.
Fitzsimmons
Usage: Irish
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "son of Simon 1" in Anglo-Norman French.
Fitzwilliam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Literature
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
From an Irish surname meaning "son of William" in Anglo-Norman French, formed using the prefix fi(t)z "son of" (Latin filius; see Fitz). The FitzWilliam family are recorded in Dublin from about 1210. This was the given name of Mr Darcy, a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).
Hamilton
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAM-il-tən
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". The surname was originally taken from the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists). A famous bearer of the surname was Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), a founding father of the United States who was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr.
Kennard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-ərd
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
From a surname that was derived from the Old English given names Cyneweard or Cyneheard.
Lancaster
Usage: English
Pronounced: LANG-kə-stər, LAN-ka-stər
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From the name of a city in northwestern England derived from Middle English Loncastre, itself from Lon referring to an ancient Roman fort on the River Lune combined with Old English ceaster meaning "city, town".
Lear
Usage: English
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means (i) "person from Leire", Leicestershire ("place on the river Leire", a river-name that may also be the ancestor of Leicestershire); or (ii) "person from Lear", any of several variously spelled places in northern France with a name based on Germanic lār "clearing". British artist and poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) was a bearer of this surname.
Longfellow
Usage: English
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline.
MacLeod
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Variant of McLeod.
Macmillan
Usage: Scottish, English
A Scottish family name. The origin of the name is said to derive from the origin of the Scottish Clan MacMillan. The progenitor of the Clan was said to be Airbertach, Hebridean prince of the old royal house of Moray. Airbertach had a son named Cormac, who was a Bishop, and Cormac's own son Gilchrist or, in Gaelic, Gille Chrisosd, the progenitor of the Clann an Mhaoil, was a religious man like his father; and it was because of this that he wore the tonsure which gave him the nickname Maolan or Gillemaol. As a Columban priest, his head would have been shaved over the front of his head in the style of St. John, rather than at the vertex of head (the dominant style in The Church of Rome). This distinctive tonsure is described in Gaelic as 'Mhaoillan'. The name MacMillan thus literally means, "son of the tonsure".
MacQueen
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Rating: 70% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of MacShuibhne.
Marlowe
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
Maxfield
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Transferred use of the surname Maxfield.
Oakley
Usage: English
Pronounced: OK-lee
Personal remark: Girls name, if used as a first name.
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From a place name meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. It was borne by American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
Poindexter
Usage: English
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
From the Jèrriais surname Poingdestre meaning "right fist".
Robinson
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHB-in-sən(American English) RAWB-in-sən(British English)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "son of Robin".
Seeley
Usage: English
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Variant of Sealy.
Sparks
Usage: English
Pronounced: SPAHRKS
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
From an Old Norse nickname or byname derived from sparkr meaning "sprightly".
Steele
Usage: English
Pronounced: STEEL
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
Occupational name for a steelworker, from Old English stele meaning "steel".
Underwood
Usage: English
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Means "dweller at the edge of the woods", from Old English under and wudu.
Wakefield
Usage: English
Personal remark: Girls name, if used as a first name.
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Originally indicated a person who came from the English city of Wakefield, derived from Old English wacu "wake, vigil" and feld "field".
Weatherford
Usage: English
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Topographic name or a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
Wescott
Usage: English
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Variant of Westcott.
Wilberforce
Usage: English
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Means "person from Wilberfoss", Yorkshire ("Wilburh's ditch"). This is borne by Wilberforce University, a university in Xenia, Ohio, USA, founded in 1856 and named in honour of the British philanthropist and anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce (1759-1833). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mrs Wilberforce, the canny little old lady whose house is commandeered by crooks in the film 'The Ladykillers' (1955).
Windsor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: WIN-zər
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "riverbank with a windlass" in Old English (a windlass is a lifting apparatus). This has been the surname of the royal family of the United Kingdom since 1917.
Xanthopoulos
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθόπουλος(Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Means "son of Xanthos".
Yeager
Usage: English, Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: Yay-ger
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of German Jäger.
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